Conferences

Conferences

Future Conference information:

ACBS World Conference 22
Buenos Aires, Argentina
23-28 July, 2024
(pre-conference workshops 23-24 July)

ACBS World Conference 23
New Orleans, Louisiana, USA
July 17-20, 2025
(pre-conference workshops July 15-16)


Past Conference information:

ACBS World Conference 21
Nicosia, Cyprus
24-28 July, 2023
(pre-conference workshops 24-25 July)

ACBS World Conference 20
San Francisco, California, USA
June 14-19, 2022
(pre-conference workshops June 14 & 15)

ACBS VIRTUAL World Conference 19
Central European Summer Timezone (GMT/UTS +2) (replaces Poznań, Poland event)
24-27 June, 2021
(pre-conference workshops 12 & 13 June)

ACBS World Conference 18 ONLINE
Central Daylight Time (replaces New Orleans, Louisiana event)
July 16-19, 2020

ACBS World Conference 17
Dublin, Ireland
25-30 June, 2019
(pre-conference workshops 25 & 26 June)

ACBS World Conference 16
Montréal, Québec, Canada
July 24-29, 2018
(pre-conference workshops July 24 & 25)

ACBS World Conference 15
Seville, Spain
June 20-25, 2017
(pre-conference workshops June 20 & 21)

ACBS World Conference 14
Seattle, Washington, USA
June 14-19, 2016
(pre-conference workshops June 14 & 15)

ACBS World Conference 13
Berlin, Germany
July 14-19, 2015
(pre-conference workshops July 14 & 15)

ACBS World Conference 12
Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA
June 17-22, 2014
(pre-conference workshops June 17 & 18)

ACBS World Conference 11
Sydney, Australia (University of New South Wales)
July 8-12, 2013
(pre-conference workshops July 8-9)

ACBS World Conference X
Washington, DC metro area
July 22-25, 2012
(pre-conference workshops July 21-22)

ACBS World Conference IX
Parma, Italy
July 13-15, 2011
(pre-conference workshops July 11-12)

ACBS Annual World Conference VIII
(We've phased out the ACT SI, and simplified the title and numbering beginning with WC VIII.)
University of Nevada
Reno, Nevada
June 21-24, 2010
(pre-conference workshops June 19-20)

ACBS World Conference III
The Third World Conference on ACT, RFT, and Contextual Behavioral Science
University of Twente
Enschede, The Netherlands
July 1-3, 2009
(pre-conference workshops June 29-30)

ACT Summer Institute IV
Illinois Institute of Technology
Chicago, Illinois
May 28-30, 2008
(pre-conference workshops May 26 & 27th)

ACT Summer Institute III
University of Houston - Clear Lake
Houston, Texas
July 16-20, 2007

World Conference II
The Second World Conference on ACT, RFT, and Contextual Behavioral Science
University of London
London, U.K.
July 24-28, 2006

ACT Summer Institute II
LaSalle University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
July 18-22, 2005

ACT Summer Institute I
University of Nevada, Reno
Reno, Nevada
July 12-16, 2004

First World Conference on ACT, RFT & The New Behavioral Psychology
(organized by Psykologpartners Wadstrom & Wisung AB)
Linkoping, Sweden
August 13-17, 2003

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2021 Virtual World Conference

2021 Virtual World Conference

This event has concluded. Please find information regarding the 2022 ACBS World Conference here.

Program

You can expect the following and more at our multi-track 3.5 day event:

Schedule

This year the conference will be held in UTC/GMT +2 time zone.

Approximately 8:00am-7:00pm, in Berlin/Rome/Johannesburg/Warsaw/Paris/Madrid
Please go here to see your timezone in comparison to the live conference time zone.
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Program

Program

Plan your conference days with this brief daily schedule:

View the detailed program, including abstracts:

Disponible en español (aprender más)

Disponivel em português (aprenda mais aqui): 


Session Times: 

Educational sessions:
8:00 a.m. - 6:45 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time), 24-26 June
12:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time), 27 June
 
Networking Sessions (24-26 June):
9:05 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. UTC/GMT +2
1:20 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2
6:50 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. UTC/GMT +2
 
Follies (26 July): 
7:00 p.m. - ... UTC/GMT +2
 
 

Haven't registered for the conference yet? Find out more about rates and registration here.


Please learn more about our fantastic 2021 Program Committee here.

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Program Committee

Program Committee

Program Committee Chairs

Rhonda Merwin, Ph.D.

Rhonda Merwin is an Associate Professor at Duke University Medical Center and the Founder and Director of ACT at Duke (a clinical, research and training program in ACT). She is a Peer-Reviewed ACT Trainer and lead author of ACT for Anorexia Nervosa (available through Guilford Press). She serves on the ACBS Publications Committee. Dr. Merwin completed her PhD at the University of Mississippi under the mentorship of Kelly Wilson, and has been on faculty at Duke for 11 years. Dr. Merwin teaches in the Department of Psychiatry, supervises an ACT practicum, conducts several workshops on ACT every year, and consults locally and nationally. She is also highly active in research. Her current research is funded by the National Institute for Diabetes, and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) (among other sources), and takes a CBS approach to understanding and treating maladaptive eating and weight control among individuals with type 1 diabetes.

Maria Karekla, Ph.D.

Maria is a licensed clinical psychologist, Assistant Professor, chairing the Clinical Psychology Doctorate program and the “ACThealthy” laboratory at the University of Cyprus. She completed her doctorate from the University at Albany, SUNY and her residency at the University of Mississippi Medical Center. Her research focuses on health promotion and the investigation of individual difference factors as they relate to the development and maintenance of behavioural difficulties. She examines the treatment of these difficulties utilizing CBS interventions and innovative delivery methods (e.g., digitalized interventions, virtual reality). Her research received awards from: European Council and Pompidou’s group, ABCT, and Society of Behavioral Medicine; and grants from national and EU funds. She is chairing the Cyprus Bioethics Committee, is a member of the Psychologist Licensing Board, and the European Federation of Psychology Associations’ Psychology and Health and e-health task forces. In the past few years she has served as a secretary-treasurer of ACBS.

If you have questions about your submission(s), please contact Rhonda and Maria.

Welcome to the ACBS Virtual World Conference 2021! As program co-chairs, we are thrilled to have you here and honored to have the opportunity to serve the ACBS community.

This year has challenged all of us. And it has strengthened our commitment to caring for ourselves and each other and using contextual behavioral science to improve the human condition. While we will miss seeing everyone in person, a virtual conference provides greater opportunity for participation from our friends across the globe, and for that we are deeply grateful.

The strength of our organization is in both our diverse perspectives and our shared values. In designing the program, we worked to balance research and clinical practice and to reflect the international nature of our organization with excellent speakers from around the world. We also aimed for content that built upon ACBS’s Strategic Centering Science Pillar, the ACBS Task Force Report on the Strategies and Tactics of Contextual Behavioral Science, and our desire to create a more just and sustainable world.

However imperfect, we hope that you can see these influences in the program, and that the presentations and discussions inspire you and inspire new initiatives, advancements and collaborations in research, supervision, training, clinical practice and public good.
We can move the needle toward a science more adequate to the human condition with more voices in the conversation. So please let your voice be heard and lift the voices of those around you in words and actions.

Warmest regards,
Rhonda M. Merwin and Maria Karekla

 

Committee Members:

Niloofar Afari
Priscilla Almada
John Armando
Patricia Bach
Suzanne Bates
Christopher Berghoff
Ellen Bluett
Matthew Boone
Jessica Borushok
Luisa Canon
Connie Chong
Joanna Dudek
Nuno Ferreira
Claudette Foley
Brandon Gaudiano
Sandra Georgescu
David Gillanders
Andrew Gloster
Jennifer Gregg
Louise Hayes
Nic Hooper
Margaret Hughes
Todd Kashdan
Karen Kate Kellum
Valerie Kiel
Raimo Lappalainen
Andreas Larsson
Lou Lasprugato
Jenna LeJeune
Michael Levin
Stuart Libman
Jim Lucas
Louise McHugh
Siri Ming
DJ Moran
Eric Morris
Kate Morrissey Stahl
Ashley Moskovich
Manuela O´Connell
Fabián Olaz
Margot Osorio
Ray Owen
Nikolai Pavlov
Nanni Presti
Hank Robb
Patti Robinson

Francisco J. Ruiz
Emily Sandoz
Stavroula Sanida
Benjamin Schoendorff
Thomas Sease
Eugen Secara
Laura Silberstein-Tirch
R. Sonia Singh
Wanda Smith
Debbie Sorensen
Joanne Steinwachs
Jill Stoddard
Thomas Szabo
Christeine Terry
Niklas Törneke
Sanna Turakka
Sheri Turrell
Vasilis Vasiliou
Brooks Witter
Joann Wright
Sean Wright

 

 

ACBS staff

WC2021 Virtual Posters

WC2021 Virtual Posters

Please note: You must be logged in as an ACBS member in order to view the content below.

WC2021 Virtual Posters

Community

WC2021 Virtual Posters

WC2021 Virtual Posters

Image denotes ACBS Junior Investigator Poster Award Recipients

Friday, 25 June 2021, 9:05 a.m. - 9:45 a.m. CEST - Poster Session 1

Friday, 25 June 2021, 1:20 p.m. - 2:00 p.m. CEST - Poster Session 2

Friday, 25 June 2021, 6:50 p.m. - 7:30 p.m. CEST - Poster Session 3

Poster Session 1

A case study of evaluation and training of RFS for atypical developing children using PCA Japanese version and MMSTs based on PEAK
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Relational Frame Theory, Children, PEAK, PCA

Kana Shimoyama, C.Psychol., Startline CO.,LTD.
Hiroko Kagawa, Startline CO.,LTD.
Ken Iwamura, Startline CO.,LTD.
Fumiki Haneda, Startline CO.,LTD.

We have used ACT-based approaches to support employees with disabilities and deal with their communication problems caused by misunderstandings in the workplace. In some cases, it was thought that the cause of the problems was the lack of relational frame skills, which are the basis of ACT, in the workers. Therefore, it will be helpful to use systematic relational frame skill training and evaluation methods in the workspaces. The PEAK Relational Training System is a well-sophisticated system for training the cognitive and linguistic abilities of children with disabilities, including autism. Besides, the PCA (PEAK Comprehensive Assessment) is a comprehensive assessment tool for language skills, including relational frame skills. Our purpose is to develop the improved Japanese version of PCA and PEAK and then research the effectiveness of these tools in children as a first step of applying for workplaces.
We improved the original PCA for Japanese-version. We also developed hundreds of types of the improved Japanese-version PEAK tasks using our software, Multipurpose Matching to Sample Training tasks (MMSTs), which can be implemented on touch screens. We intervened atypical developing children using our systems.
We will examine the effects of our training system on the children in their relational frame skills, intellectual ability, and daily life skills.
We will introduce the details of our training and evaluation system based on PEAK and discuss the changes in the relational frame skills and daily life behavior of the children.

A pioneering study: Applying Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) for junior high school students in Japan
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Training, ACT, junior high school students

Kotaro Shindo, Waseda University
Honoka Muramatsu, Waseda University
Kazuya Inoue, Ph.D., Waseda university
Tomu Ohtsuki, Ph.D., Waseda University

This present study aim an effectiveness of psychological intervention that called Acceptance and Commitment Training(ACT)for junior high school students in Japan. Japanese Ministry of education suggests bringing up “strength to live through one’s life” that Preventative Training with psychological basis is demanded on the school. In preceding study, ACT for 15 to 16 years(9th grade)student attempted and got findings. Though, Effectiveness of ACT for 12 to 13years (7th grade) students are little known.Then we conducted psychological education program that mainly constituted by 4 of 6 core-process of ACT(values, acceptance, commitment, mindfulness.
116 students, 62 male and 54 female (M age =12.75, SD = 0.435) data were applied for analysis. Two-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to compare within and between subject differences for the dependent measures, with period (post intervention, pre intervention) as within subject measure, and group type (intervention, wait-list) as between subject measure. Outcome was measured by AFQ, Stress Response scale for Junior High School Students, RSES-J and VOYAGE.Consequently, there were main effect of period over“bad mood” “depression” as lower item of Stress Response scale for Junior High School Students, but any major effect and interaction couldn’t get on other outcomes.
Consequently, there were main effect of period over“bad mood” “depression” as lower item of Stress Response scale for Junior High School Students, but any major effect and interaction couldn’t get on other outcomes. This study raise necessity to improve and to optimize the program.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Climacteric Symptoms: A Multiple Baseline Evaluation
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Menopause, Climacteric

Kazuki Hashiguchi, Doshisha University
Takashi Muto, Doshisha University

Background: Climacteric symptoms experienced by women around menopause significantly decrease health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and their management includes biological (e.g. hormone replacement therapy) and psychological approaches (e.g. cognitive-behavioural therapy). Aims: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy in improving HRQoL and reducing the severity of climacteric symptoms in a concurrent multiple-baseline across-participants design.
Method: Six middle-aged women with moderate-to-severe climacteric symptoms participated in the study. Participants completed 3- to 6-week baselines without showing improvement trends in the severity of climacteric symptoms. Afterwards, they received four 90-min weekly sessions, wherein participants learned to accept unavoidable events such as climacteric symptoms and focus on actions directed towards valued goals. The primary outcome was HRQoL. The secondary outcomes were the severity of climacteric, depressive, and anxiety symptoms. The processes comprising ACT, such as experiential avoidance, were also measured.
Results: ACT improved certain subscales of HRQoL and reduced the severity of climacteric symptoms. Improvements were also observed in questionnaires measuring ACT processes.
Conclusions: ACT intervention could improve HRQoL and alleviate climacteric symptoms. Further randomized studies are thus warranted.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Procrastination in University Students
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Procrastination, Behavioral indicator

Moeko Imori, Graduate School of Psychology, Doshisha University
Yushi Tsunekawa, Graduate School of Humanities and Social Sciences, Nagoya City University
Masataka Ito, Organization for Research Initiatives and Development, Doshisha University/Faculty of Psychology, Doshisha University
Aiko Oya, Faculty of Psychology, Doshisha University

This study aims to examine the effects of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) on procrastination in university students and analyze the psychological and behavioral measures of procrastination.
We assigned 22 participants to an experimental group that received a 60-minute ACT program, and 25 participants to a control group that did not receive the ACT program. We assessed the task achievement rate for 7 days for the behavioral indicator and the procrastination rate for the psychological indicator. We also administered Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) to assess the effect of ACT. All measures were assessed before and after the program.
Analysis of changes in the four indices showed that the experimental group reported an improvement in both the task achievement rate and the procrastination rate over the 7-day period, but did not report any significant difference in the scores of FFMQ and-AAQ-II. Therefore, ACT-based programs are effective for improving the psychological and behavioral aspects of procrastination, but it is necessary to examine the effects of each intervention program.

Acceptance and Resilience Among Working Adults in Malaysia
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Resilience, Acceptance, Work place

Ceri Lan, B.S., Mindfulness Training/HELP University

Working adults make or break a country’s economic prosperity. Malaysia, as a thriving nation has a shared increasing growth in worker’s mental challenges and resilience become a crucial interest. Resilience is the ability to adapt, and bounce back despite adversity. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) believes adversity is in the cognitive activity, not the situation itself. ACT aims to expand the psychological flexibility (PF). PF is the capacity of the individual’s ability to adapt, so they can pursue their value driven goals despite the limiting cognitive content. The ultimate goal is to make room for these unwanted cognitive contents, without any form of avoidance. Non avoidance is acceptance. Acceptance refers to both behavioral willingness to not get in the way of the cognitive content as the individual continue with their value-based choices, while adapting in open, receptive, flexible and non-judgmental posture with respect to moment to moment experience.
The present study examines acceptance as a means for psychological flexibility and its relation to resilience in the workplace, primarily focusing on a research question “Is there a relationship between acceptance and resilience among working adults in Malaysia?” As the mental rigidity opens up to more flexibility, we hypothesis that the individuals who exhibit relatively higher levels of acceptance will also exhibit higher levels of resilience. Acceptance may have a positive relationship with resilience, specifically to Malaysian working adults. Acceptance may have a positive relationship with resilience, specifically to Malaysian working adults.

An exploratory study of the effects of ACT on stuttering symptoms and psychological problems in adults who stutter
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Stuttering, Mindfulness

Risa Matsuoka, Doshisha University
Takashi Muto, Doshisha University

The purpose of this study was to explore the effects of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy on stuttering symptoms and psychological problems in adults who stutter. Recently, the effects of ACT on stuttering have been examined, but there are few intervention studies in Japan. Therefore, we examined whether or not ACT is effective for people who stutter in Japan.
In this experiment, we used a multiple baseline design and followed the changes of five adult participants(sub1-sub5). The participants took part in six intervention programs. Participants completed the OASES-A (about stuttering symptoms), AAQ-Ⅱ, VQ, and FFMQ surveys each time they participated in the program. These results were analyzed qualitatively(drawing a diagram) and quantitatively using Tau-U method.
There were no statistically significant differences between baseline and intervention periods in AAQ-Ⅱ and VQ. Sub1 and sub2 showed a statistically significant difference in general perspectives about stuttering(Sub1;Tau=-1.00, p<.05 Sub2;Tau=-0.79, p<.05) and Non-judging(Sub1;Tau=0.88, p<.05 Sub2;Tau=0.83, p<.05) . Sub3 showed that a statistically significant difference in affective, behavioral and cognitive reactions to stuttering (Tau=-0.96, p<.05) and Acting with Awareness (Tau=0.88, p<.05) . There was no statistically significant difference in Sub4. Sub5 showed no statistically significant difference in OASES-A, but there was a difference in Observing (Tau=0.72, p<.05) and Non-reactivity (Tau=0.78, p<.05).
The results of this study showed that some changes in OASES-A and FFMQ were observed within the participants. However, not all of the participants showed changes. Therefore, it is necessary to the examine content of the intervention program and then experiment again.

Defusion Exercise On Mental Illness Stigma: A behavioral measure using seating arrangement
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Educational settings, Stigma, Mental illness

Natsumi Tsuda, M.A., Doshisha University
Takashi Muto, Ph.D., Doshisha University

The purpose of this study was to measure the effects of defusion intervention on stigma by using a behavioral measure of seating arrangement. One of the aims of ACT for Stigma is not to remove negative thoughts, but to reduce their influence on behavior. Therefore, in this study, the word repeatition was used to exam the effects on behavior in contact situations.
Twenty-seven undergraduate students participated (control: 14, defusion: 13; age average(SD)=19.74 (0.90)). The intervention consisted of a 2 (control, defusion) x 2 (Pre, Post) design. The defusion group was given a word repetition, while the control group was asked to read a text on Japanese culture. The main outcome was the difference in distance within the seating arrangements between Pre- and Post-intervention, which was explained as “having a conversation with a person with mental illness.” In addition, the VAS(discomfort, believability) and Stigma inventory were taken.
The analysis revealed following the intervention was a significant tendency of members in the intervention group to move their chairs closer to each other (t(25)=1.95, p=.06, d=0.75). For discomfort, there was a significant trend in interaction(F(1, 25)=3.47, p=.07, η2=0.12), the results of multiple comparisons showed no significant difference. In terms of believability and stigma inventory, there was no effect of intervention.
The results suggest that the defusion intervention may cause changes in behavior. The fact that no change was observed in the questionnaire suggests that the defusion intervention may have influenced behavior without changing thought such as the stigma inventory, as it was intended.

Development of the Japanese version of AIM and practice of AIM for pre-employed adults
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines, ACT, AIM

Yuko Kikuchi, CBS Human Suppot Laboratory, Startline CO.,LTD.
Gen Ogura, Licensed Psychologist, CBS Human Support Laboratory, Startline CO.,LTD.
Fumiki Haneda, Licensed Psychologist, Vocational Counselor, CBS Human Support Laboratory, Startline CO.,LTD.

In recent years, various ACT programs have been developed, not only for individual therapy, but also for group therapy. AIM (Accept, Identify, Move) is developed by Dr. Mark R. Dixon for school-aged children has been successful in the U.S.. AIM is a comprehensive ACT program for use in classrooms and other group settings. It is designed to integrate elements of mindfulness practices, ACT, and ABA. AIM emphasizes a functional approach to behavior and consists of programs such as ACT exercises and a point system called reinforcer stores that can be used in groups to shape positive behaviors that lead to psychological flexibility. In addition, workbooks are provided for the exercises so that children can engage in them in an experiential and fun way. AIM is intended to have intervention effects on improving psychological flexibility and generating and maintaining behaviors in children, but there are few studies in adults.
To implement AIM for Japanese people (especially pre-employed adults), we developed the Japanese version of AIM, based on an understanding of the essence of exercise, by brushing up the content to make it easier for Japanese to engage in the program. Using it developed above, we tested a part of the ACT exercises for pre-employment adults. In this presentation, we will examine that Japanese version of AIM has intervention effects on improving psychological flexibility in adults. We will introduce the details of our training system based on AIM and discuss the changes of psychological flexibility and daily life behavior in the adults.

Does God Protect the Naïve?: Spiritual Health Locus of Control Beliefs and Mental Health during COVID-19
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Coping

Aaron Cherniak, M.A., Stockholm University
Steven Pirutinsky, Touro College
David Rosmarin, Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital

COVID-19 has caused mass death and economic devastation. Health crises and responses to them are intertwined with scientific and religious beliefs, sociocultural identity, and societal engagement, which has far-reaching implications for disseminating health information, enlisting cooperation with health directives, and coping with the pandemic and its consequences.
A sample of 1,374 American Jews, who had experienced disproportionately elevated rates of COVID-19, rated their levels of concern, exposure, and impact, as well as adherence to health guidelines, risk for severe symptoms, and mental health. We compared these reports with respondents’ scientific beliefs and religious factors including spiritual health locus of control, trust in various leaders (doctors, scientists, religious leaders, God), identity, and cognitive-affective elements of religiosity.
Preliminary results indicate that faith may moderate the impact of COVID-19-related stress on mental and physical health. Analyses of trust, adherence, and beliefs are still being conducted. Especially in uncertain times, individuals’ beliefs influence how they may seek, accept, and act on information. These processes influence the experience of COVID-19-related stressors, coping responses, as well as attitudes and commitment to health directives. In describing social, behavioral, and emotional responses to COVID-19, our study may contribute to effective science communication and psychoeducation, especially regarding religious/scientific beliefs and coping. Tension between religion and science has increased during COVID-19, but our study shows that religion may facilitate coping responses during the pandemic and also improve culturally competent science communication to encourage health behaviors and foster positive societal engagement (World Health Organization, 2020).

Evaluation of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Program for Managers: A preliminary pre-post test
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Organizational behavior management, Workplace, Mindfulness, Perspective taking, Hierarchical Bayesian model, Clinical trial registration

Anna Tozawa, C.Psychol., ADVANTAGE Risk Management Co., Ltd.
Masao Tsuchiya, ADVANTAGE Risk Management Co., Ltd.
Takuto Doi, ADVANTAGE Risk Management Co., Ltd.
Yuki Kiura, ADVANTAGE Risk Management Co., Ltd.

This study aimed to examine the effect of a program for managers based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. A group program consisting of a total of three 90-minute sessions was implemented with the participation of 63 managers. The purpose of this study was to examine whether the program would increase the work performance (WP) of organizational units (hypothesis 1) and decrease the psychological inflexibility of individual managers (hypothesis 2).
Taking a Bayesian approach, organizational unit WP was evaluated before and after as the primary outcome, and individual managers’ psychological inflexibility was indicated parenthetically as a form of process outcome.
The results of the pre/post comparison showed no improvement regarding the WP of 18 organizations (d=-0.26 [95% confidence interval -0.92, 0.40]). On the other hand, a decrease in psychological inflexibility was observed 25 managers who were evaluated (d=-0.27 [-0.5, -0.03]).
The primary outcome, WP of organizational units, was lower after the program than before the program, which did not support the hypothesis 1. On the other hand, the process outcome, psychological inflexibility of individual managers, showed a tendency to decrease after the intervention, supporting the hypothesis 2. In addition, the secondary outcomes, stressors and stress reactions of the organizational unit, WP and psychological distress of individual managers showed a negative trend after the intervention. On the other hand, the support around organizational units, well-being and leadership of individual managers' showed a positive trend after the intervention.

Experience on CHF self-management among patients with CHF and their caregivers: preliminary observations and potential clinical applications
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Chronic illness management

Xuelin Zhang, the hong kong polytechnic university
Yim Wah Mak, Ph.D., RN, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Chronic heart failure (CHF) is an age-dependent, chronic progressive disease with poor prognosis and multiple readmission, which generates an unavoidable situation of increasing dependence of patients on their family caregivers.
The first author was attached to nurses at a cardiac ward of the tertiary hospital in Hubei province, Mainland, China for a clinical update during November 23-29, 2020. She met four patient-caregiver dyads of patients who readmitted to the hospital due to CHF. This paper narratively summarized the author’s clinical observation log regarding the experience of self-management.
The struggles among patients and caregivers usually arise from unpredictable disease trajectory, the side-effects of medications, complex self-care regimen and interdependent relationship between patient and his / her caregiver. The patients normally disturbed by the feeling of being punished, fear, helplessness, hopelessness, anxiety, or depression, unwanted thoughts of being loser, useless or burdensome, along with unpleasant body sensation including fatigue, swelling, frequency and urgency of urination. Meanwhile, their caregivers distressed with self-blame, fear, guilty and being out of control. Furthermore, patients were worried if recommended CHF self-care behaviors will be compromised when staying at home. Besides, patients and caregivers tend to suppress their feelings and thoughts, and overreact to the distresses, thus stay away from original intention of loving each other.
Given adoption of ACT could facilitate individual’s acceptance of inner experiences and reconnect to meaningful life directions actively, a patient-caregiver based ACT, may help to promote patients’ CHF self-care and decrease caregivers’ perceived burden, then simultaneously improved their quality of life.

Impact to work engagement on AI-based interventions to psychological flexibility
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Performance-enhancing interventions, ACT, Work engagement, AI, Psychological flexibility

Honoka Muramatsu, Waseda University
Nao Ozawa, waseda university
Kotaro Shindo, waseda university
Saori Chikami, emol inc.
Daiki Takegawa, emol inc.
Tomu Ohtsuki, waseda university

In recent years, mental health problems among workers have become one of the most important issues in Japan (Hiro, 2016). Work engagement is gaining attention as an indicator to support workers' mental health and is effective for stress management in the workplace; ACT has also been shown to improve mental health in the workplace (Bond et al., 2008). Therefore, this study examines the effects of an exercise to increase psychological flexibility using an AI chat tool.
Participants in the experiment: 20 university students (10 in the intervention group: 10 in the control group) Participants were recruited from the general public. The intervention group received psycho-education and exercises via AI chat for one week. The control group was given certain tasks every day. Questionnaires were measured at midpoint and after the intervention.
A two-factor analysis of variance was conducted for each measure. a main effect of the number of experiments was found for the AAQ-II. In the intervention group, the difference between the first and third experiments and the difference between the second and third experiments were significant. Since the interaction effect was significant, a simple main effect test was conducted and a main effect of the number of experiments was found in the intervention group.
The results of this study did not confirm the impact of psychological flexibility on work engagement. However, it was confirmed that AI chat can increase psychological flexibility and has a significant effect on stress reduction, which is expected to lead to a new psychotherapy.

Perception of Psychological Flexibility Treatment of the Parents of Young People with Chronic Pain
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Chronic Pain

Sook Huey Lee, M.A., UCSI University
Jia Hang Lim, UCSI University
Ji Kwan Lee, Naluri
Yen Teng Tan, Ph.D., UCSI University

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a form of psychological treatment targeting Psychological Flexibility (PF) which have been found to be effective for young chronic pain patients. To develop a treatment protocol that fits well into the Malaysian context, this survey study aims to explore parents' perception towards the intervention for themselves and their children with chronic pain.
A total of 48 Malaysian parents who are having children in pain condition were recruited through purposive sampling. The online questionnaire consisted of brief descriptions about ACT for chronic pain and asked parents to rate their preferences of treatment modes, perception on the effectiveness of the program, and their motivation and barriers to join the proposed program.
Descriptive analysis showed that parents preferred face to face (79.2%) compared to online method (20.8%); individual session (52.1%) compare to group session (47.9%) and continuous (72.9%) compared to intermediate (25%) session. In addition, 56.3% of participants believed the treatment would be effective, and 81.3% reported they are motivated to attend the program with the intention to help their child (31.3%). With regard to the barriers, 18.8% reported the reason of not having heard about the treatment and 16.7% reported being unsure about the effectiveness of the program.
The current sample suggests that parents of children with chronic pain conditions are open to Acceptance and Commitment based intervention targeting psychological flexibility. As such, a treatment protocol tailored to the Malaysian population should be developed and tested.

Relationship between value and self-care behavior in type 2 diabetes patients
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Value, Type 2 diabetes, self-care behavior

Aiko Oya, Ph.D., Doshisha University, Faculty of Psychology
Hisashi Makino, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Mayu Tochiya, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Tamiko Tamanaha, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Yoko Ohata, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Ryo Koezuka, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Miki Matsuo, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Kyoko Kohmo, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Noriko Fujii, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Harue Kaneko, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Naoki Manpuku, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Kiminori Hosoda, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism
Takashi Muto, Doshisha University, Faculty of Psychology

This study examined the relationship between values and self-care behaviors in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 124 patients with type 2 diabetes responded to questionnaires. First, based on the Values Clarification Questionnaire, the domains that Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes value were investigated. Second, we examined the degree of committed action, avoidance of type 2 diabetes, self-care behaviors, and treatment distress to see if they differed by each value domain's score.
The results showed that 40% of the participants placed value on health and 37% on family relationships. Additionally, those who placed more value on family relationships were committed to their value compared to those who valued personal growth. Furthermore, those who placed more value on family relationships followed a specific diet compared to those who valued intimate relationships. These results suggest that family relationships could motivate self-care behaviors in Japanese patients with type 2 diabetes.

The "PROSOCIAL" Approach - A Practical Development for Organizational Activities in Japan
Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination, PROSOCIAL

Fumiki Haneda, Licensed Psychologist, Vocational Counseler, CBS Human Support Laboratory, Startline CO.,LTD.
Gen Ogura, Startline CO.,LTD.CBS Human Suppot Laboratory

Startline Co. Ltd. provides consulting and operates satellite offices and indoor farms for employment support for people with disabilities. Currently, 200 companies are using the our service, and about 1,300 people with disabilities are working there every day. Startline’s CBS Human Support Research Institute has been conducting research on RFT and ACT. As one such initiative, we are researching and preparing for the practical development of the PROSOCIAL approach. For Japanese companies, employment of people with disabilities has two aspects: compliance with laws and regulations, and the realization of ideals such as the concept of diversity. In any case, companies need to accept and build a different way of thinking from the conventional way of corporate management, but many companies are struggling in the early stages of their efforts. Therefore, we are aiming to apply our services through PROSOCIAL, one of the practices of CBS.
Our institute started to learn about the theory and practice of PROSOCIAL by participating in the Workshop of the 17th ACBS World Conference. Immediately after the publication of the book "PROSOCIAL", we started to translate it into Japanese, and with the permission of Dr. Atkins, we are now making arrangements for the publication of the Japanese version of "PROSOCIAL". And now, as a step toward such efforts, we are planning to conduct in-house trials of the PROSOCIAL approach and to conduct PROSOCIAL facilitator training organized by Dr. Atkins. In this presentation, I will report on the status of some of the PROSOCIAL approaches that we are implementing.

The Effect of a Defusion Technique with the Negative and Positive Self-Statements: Using FAST to Explore the Defusion Process in Terms of RFT and the DAARRE Model
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Other, DAARRE, FAST

Maho Konda, Ristumeikan University
Shinji Tani, Ritsumeikan University

The study investigated the effect of a defusion technique on the believability of negative and positive self-statements, and its detailed process was explored in terms of RFT and the DAARRE model by using Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST) and several questionnaires.
23 participants were randomly assigned to either Defusion (DF) or Non-Defusion (NDF) condition. In Experiment Day 1, participants reported negative and positive self-statements. Only DF participants completed a defusion exercise "I am having a thought..." and practice it until the data collection in Experiment Day 2 while NDF participants did not. In Experiment Day 2, FAST and a questionnaire for rating self-statement believability were administrated.
The believability of both negative and positive self-statements in DF condition was significantly lower than in NDF. Also, there were positive correlation between the believability of negative and positive self-statements in NDF condition but not in DF condition. Yet, no significant difference in FAST's index was found between the conditions. At the individual level, the tendency in FAST for DF condition was only 50% consistent with the prediction made by RFT and the DAARRE model, nonetheless, the effect for NDF condition was 70 % consistent with the prediction.
The finding suggested that the defusion technique could reduce the believability of both negative and positive self-statements and allow one to observe the self-statements as statements although the defusion process were remained unclear. In addition, the finding suggest that the DAARRE model may potentially useful to investigating the defusion process, especially at the individual level.

The Impact of ACT Intervention on the Goal Setting and Quality of Life of Home Rehabilitation Patients
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Home rehabilitation, Acceptance & commitment therapy (ACT), QOL, Goal setting

Kyoko Nakaue, Ritsumeikan University
Shinji Tani, Ritsumeikan University
Naoki Nakashika, Ritsumeikan University

Nowadays, home rehabilitation for the elderly in Japan lacks an approach to improving motivation and quality of life (QOL). A factor behind this is the difficulty of setting goals due to a specific psychological condition of the elderly and their resistance to rehabilitation. In this study, we conducted a psychological intervention using acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for a home rehabilitation patient and examined changes in QOL and goal setting.
The case is a man in his 70s with chronic low back pain since his diagnosis of polymyositis 20 years ago. He refused to exercise and his rehabilitation failed. The intervention included 12 sessions, provided twice a week in the participant’s home, and 1 booster session. Changes in QOL were evaluated by SF-12, and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ) and the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire (CFQ) were used as process assessments.
Results showed that QOL improved following improvement in psychological flexibility, and rehabilitation content and goal setting were modified. The Reliable Change Index (RCI) was higher than 1.96 for both the CFQ and the AAQ. Moreover, in the SF-12, RCI was higher than 1.96 in items other than Mental Health and Physical Function.
Examination of the function and effect of "sleep" observed avoidance behavior in the context of daily life and rehabilitation, and strengthening "Shogi" as an alternative behavior. Then he was still in pain, but he noticed that he was approaching the value of "active". Furthermore, commencing rehabilitation with “walking” as a value-based action reduced his refusal to exercise.

The Review of the Use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Supporting People With Disabilities
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: People with disabilities, Group therapy

Yuanjun Tao, Ritsumeikan University

The use of ACT-informed interventions for people with disabilities offers another alternative to solely behavioral approaches but it remains relatively understudied and in need of further exploration. This study reviewed the use of ACT in supporting people with disabilities in current 30 years.
The current systematic review, which searched three databases, PsychInfo, Spycharticles, Google Scholoar, aimed to collate all ACT interventions that included therapeutic components in the treatment of various people with both mentally and physically disabilities. Currently including 5 Inclusion Criteria and 3 exclusion criteria. Each study was reviewed using the Quality Assessment Tool for Studies with Diverse Deigns (QATSDD).
20 individual studies covering a broad spectrum of presenting problems were included, comprising of 855 participants. Overall 10 studies demonstrated the effectiveness of the program, 4 of these using quasi-experimental research designs and 6 studies through pre-experimental research designs. A large proportion of studies were within-group designs with a smaller number using randomized controlled trials. A large proportion of studies were within-group designs with a smaller number using randomized controlled trials. QATSDD was used as quality ratings. Ten studies fell in the high(over 74%) or good range (50%-74%) of methodological range. Ten studies were rated as poor (under 50%).
The current review highlights the potential utility of ACT in Supporting People With Disabilities. Although with many limitations, ACT is a trans-diagnostic intervention that can help with the parenting of children with a range of psychological and physical difficulties.

The role of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Palliative Patients Quality of Life
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Palliative Care

Christopher Martin, BPsych(Hons); MPsych(Clin), Sunshine Coast Hospital and Health Service, Qld, Australia
Kenneth Pakenham, Ph.D., University of Queensland, Australia
Fiona Maccallum, Ph.D., University of Queensland, Australia

Palliative care aims to improve quality of life (QoL) across physical, spiritual, and psychosocial life domains. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy’s (ACT) model of Psychological Flexibility (PF) has demonstrated improvements in QoL across multiple health conditions but is yet to be explored in palliative care. The aim of this research was to understand the relationships between PF and four palliative outcomes: QoL, psychological morbidity, physical pain, death attitudes. It was hypothesized that higher psychological flexibility would be associated with increased QoL, improved death attitudes, and decreased psychological morbidity and physical pain.
A short-term longitudinal survey design was utilized with 81 patients from a Specialist Palliative Care Service. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing PF and the four palliative outcomes at two time points, one-month apart. A 33% attrition rate resulted in 54 patients completing the Time 2 questionnaire.
There were no significant changes between Time 1 and 2 in PF or palliative outcomes. At both Time 1 and 2 higher PF was significantly associated with: increased QoL (Total, Psychological, and Existential), decreased psychological morbidity (Total and Anxiety), decreases on two death attitude dimensions (Fear of death, and Death avoidance), and increases in one death attitudes dimension (Acceptance-neutral).
Findings are consistent with broader ACT literature showing greater PF is associated with increased QoL and lower psychological morbidity; and provide new evidence of associations with improved death attitudes. The provision of an ACT intervention is indicated to improve PF and palliative outcomes which otherwise remained stable in the short-term. A trial is underway.

Understanding what makes us human as the context for functional living and effective therapy
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Process-based models

Penny Brabin, B.Sc., M.Ed., Ph.D., FAPS, Registered Psychologist - Clinical; Education and Developmental

From a practice-based theory a process model is presented describing: 1. how our unique human capacity for bi-directional learning provides us with an ability to comprehend our world – beginning with the context of our experience, the derived view of self from our experience of living which is the core of all mental health problems, 2. the evolution of another capacity to embrace the adaptive non-rated concept of Self-as-context associated with the values, that as humans, we can bring to our experience of living to prevent or manage mental health problems.
A 90-item questionnaire reflecting beliefs, emotion and behavior was developed discriminating the low and high esteemed view of self from the non-rated view of Self and posted on Survey Monkey. From 100 questionnaires returned for the pilot study a Factor Analysis was completed and a 4-factor solution was chosen loading 89 of the 90 items above a .30 loading on one or more factors. A low self-esteem factor, loaded in the same direction as the two high self-esteem factors. In contrast these factors loaded in the opposite direction to the non-rated Self factor, supporting the process model described. Application of the model is described: 1. in education by promoting a shift in language from the predominant self-esteeming focus, still prevalent, to that supporting the non-rated Self-as-context, 2. in therapy by adding mindful techniques to engage the non-rated Self-as-context to promote a conceptual shift away from the emotion and behavior problems of the esteemed self.

Poster Session 2

A preventive eHealth ACT module for positive aging: feasibility results
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Positive aging

Jennifer Reijnders, Ph.D., Open University
Tim Batink, Ph.D., Open University
Marianne Simons, Ph.D., Open University
Sanne Peeters, Ph.D., Open Universiteit
Mayke Janssens, Ph.D., Open Universiteit
Johan Lataster, Ph.D., Open Universiteit
Nele Jacobs, Open Universiteit

Positive aging involves maintaining an adequate level of wellbeing in older age, when inevitable changes and challenges are met. Psychological flexibility can help dealing with these challenges and consequently help preserve wellbeing. An eHealth ACT-module was developed to foster both flexibility and wellbeing in the general population. As part of a longitudinal effectiveness study, this current study investigates the feasibility of the eHealth ACT-module.
The eHealth ACT-module is a stand-alone module of 8 weekly sessions, each containing a short introduction of a specific ACT-skill, followed by several exercises to practice the new skills. For the current study adults aged 40 and over from the general population were given access to the module and were asked to answer questions afterwards regarding acceptability and usability.
276 participants (75.7% female), varying in age from 40-75 (Mean=54.7, SD=9.4) and mostly higher educated (75.8%) completed the feasibility questionnaire. 93.5% of the participants reported completing between 50-100% of the module. The mean evaluation of the module of these participants was 7.5 (SD=.97) and participants spent on average 3.7 hours (SD=6.2) per week on the module and practicing the skills they learned in daily life. Regarding the content of the module, most participants indicated the video’s (76%), exercises (81%) and metaphors (81%) as useful and 82% stated that they now have a good understanding of the principles of ACT.
Additional results on active participation (time spent online, number of completed sessions), self-evaluation and aspects mostly appreciated and points for improvements will be presented at the congress.

A qualitative inquiry of the potential benefits of psychedelic use for mental health professionals
Primary Topic: Professional Development
Subtopic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Psychedelic Science

Ioana Ivan, BSc, Babeș-Bolyai University, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences
Eugen-Călin Secară, Babeș-Bolyai University, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences

Before psychedelic substances were classified as illicit, mental health professionals’ use of psychedelic substances was an acknowledged practice in mental health institutions (Winkler and Csemy, 2014; Winkler et al., 2016). Nowadays, psychedelics are still used by this group for self-exploration. In spite of this, only a handful of studies have investigated the way in which psychedelic experiences undergone in a context that facilitates introspection impact the day-to-day practice of mental health professionals. The aim of this study is to fill this knowledge gap.
Semi-structured interviews were conducted online with 13 mental health professionals. Thematic analysis was used to identify central themes (Braun and Clarke, 2013).
The results show an increase in perceived empathy toward the client’s suffering; reduced judgement of clients and; enhanced present moment awareness in session; increased tolerance of clients' maladaptive coping strategies; increased acceptance of clients' ambivalence and non-compliance; increased trust in the efficiency of empirically tested techniques due to having successfully applied them during the experience; increased self-compassion for struggles related to practicing psychotherapy; enhanced trust in clients' ability to thrive in spite of psychosocial stress. The qualitative part of the study represents only the first step in elaborating and testing a psychedelic assisted protocol for enhancing the ability of psychotherapists to foster genuine therapeutic alliance and therefore to stand a better chance to improve the lives of their clients or patients. This would be a major step in opening a new avenue of applicability for psychedelic assisted-psychotherapy.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for insomnia: a systematic review
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Sleep, Insomnia, ACT, Systematic Review, PRISMA

Léo Guarnieri, Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo
Ila Linares, Ph.D., Universidade de São Paulo da Faculdade de Medicina
Renatha Rafihi-Ferreira, Ph.D., Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade de São Paulo

Cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) is the golden treatment, but some don’t respond to this intervention. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) presents itself as an useful intervention, for which, instead of focusing on controlling the symptoms, ACT focuses on accepting the feelings and thoughts associated, through value-based actions. This systematic review evaluated the effectiveness of interventions using ACT for insomnia as primary outcome.
Following PRISMA protocol, PubMed, PsyInfo and Scopus databases were searched. Key words were: (“acceptance and commitment therapy”) AND (“insomnia” OR “sleep problems''). Papers using ACT for insomnia in English were included. Theoretical studies and treatments with insomnia as secondary outcome were excluded.
105 articles were identified, 11 were included: 6 randomized and 5 non-randomized trials. 7 articles combined behavioral components with ACT and 4 used only ACT. Regarding sleep-related results, decrease of the insomnia severity, sleep latency and number of wakes and increase in the subjective sleep quality, total time of sleep and sleep efficiency were found. Results also showed decrease of experiential avoidance, thought suppression, dysfunctional beliefs, use of hypnotics and levels of anxiety, depression and chronic pain and increase in psychological flexibility, acceptance to sleep and quality of life. Only 1 study compared ACT plus behavioral components with CBT-I, no significant difference between groups were found.
Despite the promising results, studies with more subjects, quantitative measures, randomized designs and comparison groups mainly with CBT-I are needed. It is also important to distinguish between the role of the ACT and the behavioral components in the outcomes.

ACT and Broad Form of Enhanced Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT-Eb) in Clients with Eating Disorders and Clinical Perfectionism: a Pilot Study
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, perfectionism, eating disorders, psychological flexibility, ACT, CBT-Eb

Rosa Bruna Dall’Agnola, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria Integrata, Verona, Italy
Chiara Bonetto, Università degli Studi di Verona, Italy
Mirella Ruggeri, Università degli Studi di Verona, Italy
Cristiana Patrizi, Scuole di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC–SPC, Italy
Valeria Semeraro, Scuole di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC–SPC, Italy
Elena Cirimbilla, Scuole di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC–SPC, Italy
Caterina Villirillo, Scuole di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC–SPC, Italy
Emily Boifava, Scuola di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC, Verona, Italy
Martina Nicolis, Scuola di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC, Verona, Italy
Emanuele Rossi, Scuole di Specializzazione in Psicoterapia Cognitiva APC–SPC, Italy

The literature highlights a direct correlation between perfectionism and symptoms related to eating disorders (Bardone-Cone, 2007) and the role that perfectionism can play in maintaining these symptoms (Egan et al., 2011).
The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of ACT combined with CBT-Eb on a sample of clients (aged 15 to 18 years) with eating disorders and clinical perfectionism. The present poster will present the study protocol and the research project.
Taking into account that ACT is configured as a particularly suitable model of intervention for adolescents - since it offers a transdiagnostic approach to psychopathology focused on psychological flexibility processes and provides appropriate intervention strategies also related to prevention - we expect that the application of the CBT-Eb and ACT protocols can significantly attenuate the severity of eating disorder compared to CBT-Eb alone, primarily in clients who showed high levels of clinical perfectionism.
Our starting hypothesis is that we will be able to observe: significant reduction of scores in Clinical Perfectionism subscale (MPS-F and EDI-3); significant improvement with respect to the ability to observe internal experiences, behave with awareness and accept internal experiences without judgment (CAMM-10); reductions in experiential avoidance and cognitive fusion (AFQ-Y8); enhanced awareness of personal values and a growing engagement in committed actions driven by them.

ACT And Prosocial for Positive Change
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT And Prosocial

Jamie Nyaa, Commit and Act Foundation in Sierra Leone

Commit and Act Foundation was established in Sierra Leone in 2010 and officially opened in 2013 shortly before the outbreak of the Ebola Viral Disease (EVD), to provide ongoing psychosocial support from local counselors in the area. CAF-SL is the leading organization in Bo district that offers training and development programmes for service providers, including legal and medical practitioners, educators, counselors, law enforcement agents, and community-based counselors. In September 2019 Commit and Act foundation open its second office in Makeni the Northern part of Sierra Leone to provide Support services for women and girls that have experienced Sexual Gender Based Violence and babies born as a result of Sexual Gender Based Violence.

Major challenges in the country • Sexual Gender Based Violence • Teenage pregnancy • Increase in girls dropping out from school • Poverty • Poor Water and sanitation facilities • Corruption
What has been done by Commit and Act Foundation? • Protection of girls that have been sexually abused • Provision of dignity kits to clients while at the shelter • Proper documentation of clients • Provision of three meals while at the shelter • Individual and group counselling session • Provision of medical support to clients • Legal education and communication • ACT and Prosocial training for girls • Family tracing and reunification • Livelihood and educational support • Community sensitization and awareness raising on Sexual gender Based violence

ACT in Assisted Living: A Literature Review Supporting a Potential Intervention to Improve Mental Health in Older Adults
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Mental Health

Emily Jewell, B.A., MSW, University of Prince Edward Island
Jessica Strong, Ph.D., University of Prince Edward Island

Mental health symptomology among older adults varies by living environment. Because mindfulness is beneficial in older populations, mindfulness-based interventions may represent a promising avenue for improving mental health in residential settings. Group-based mindfulness interventions may be especially appropriate in residential settings and this treatment format is typically found to be as effective as individual therapy.
A literature review was conducted to ascertain differences in depression and anxiety symptomology among older adults in community and residential settings. Literature related to group-based interventions and mindfulness-based therapies with older adults was also reviewed to determine the effectiveness and use of these interventions.
Rates of depression and anxiety in older adults rise with increased intensity of care. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) have been well studied in older populations and appear to be both feasible and effective. Literature on Dialectical Behaviour Therapy (DBT) is much scarcer. Literature on the use of ACT with older adults is less well-researched than with MBSR or MBCT but more developed than with DBT.
MBSR, MBCT, and ACT have an evidence-base to support their use with older adults. ACT may be particularly well-suited to work with older adults due to its transdiagnostic nature, emphasis on values-based living, and lack of medicalized language (Petkus & Wetherall, 2013). However, no studies of group-based ACT to address depression and anxiety symptoms among ALF residents could be located. A proposed project would fill that gap in hopes of identifying group-based ACT as an effective intervention for implementation in ALFs.

ACT in the workplace: a survey of the use of ACT by BACB clinicians in the field of applied behavior analysis
Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: BCBA, BCaBA, RBT

Lisa Jacovsky, M.S., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Laura Kruse, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, also known as ACT, utilizes techniques to promote mindfulness and psychological flexibility. Working on psychological flexibility can help people with anxiety induced stress encouraging them to be more mindful of their thoughts and how it effects their emotions. The techniques promoted in ACT are gaining popularity with those who work in high stress fields.
To understand how well-known ACT is, who is providing training to those utilizing ACT in their clinical practice, and whether the techniques have proven useful for the individual a survey was created for professionals who work 1:1 in various settings with children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder.
The results of the survey provide support to the ever-growing research on ACT and its possible use in the field of ABA. The use of ACT can provide psychological flexibility when working in a high stress field. In addition, many BCBA's are seeking out training on ACT to utilize it in their practice. There are few BCBa's that are training other certificants in the use of ACT.

ACT interventions for parents of children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder: A systematic review
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Parents

Hannah Dardis, B.A., M.Sc., University College Dublin
Lisa Murphy, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Parents of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience higher levels of parenting stress than other parents. Having a child with ASD is also associated with difficulties in terms of parental mental health, marital relationships, and overall family wellbeing, indicating a need for efficacious interventions. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a therapeutic approach which has received promising empirical support for use with this population.
To identify relevant studies, searches were conducted using the following electronic databases: PubMed, Embase, Scopus, PsychInfo and PsychArticles. The methodology was informed by the PRISMA 2009 guidelines and registered with PROSPERO (CRD42020131947).
Ten papers were included in this narrative review, representing nine unique studies (n=199). Most of the included studies found a significant improvement in the outcomes measured. The quality of the studies included was variable, with small sample sizes a common feature.
The evidence for ACT-based interventions is not yet well established, though there are some encouraging findings which provide tentative evidence for the viability of ACT with this population. Further investigation using more rigorous methodological designs is needed.

An ACT perspective on adolescent social anxiety disorder
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Adolescence, Social anxiety disorder

Paula Vagos, Universidade Portucalense Infante D. Henrique
Diana Figueiredo, Universidade de Coimbra
Daniel Rijo, Universidade de Coimbra
Luiza Nobre Lima, Universidade de Coimbra
Maria do Céu Salvador, Universidade de Coimbra

Adolescence is a life stage particularly prone to feelings of social anxiety that persists throughout adulthood, associating with severe functional impairment. An ACT perspective may be useful to understanding social anxiety disorder in adolescence. Efforts to avoid, control, or modify inner experiences and an inability to modulate behavior consistently with valued goals are proposed to predict psychological inflexibility (PI) which, as is the case with other psychopathological symptoms, should impact on social anxiety.
Forty adolescents (Mage = 16.13, SD = .76) recruited within school settings with a primary diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (SAD) assessed through MINI-KID completed a set of self-report measures assessing social anxiety, acceptance, committed action, and psychological inflexibility. Data analysis relied on a mediation model linking acceptance and committed action to social anxiety via PI; the moderating role of gender was investigated.
A total mediation linking acceptance and committed action to social anxiety through PI was found explaining 61.8% of the variance of social anxiety. This model was equally applicable to boys and girls, though boys had significantly lower levels of acceptance, which could reflect how boys and girls are thought to deal with internal experiences from a young age.
Acceptance and committed action were confirmed to be central processes to PI and all these processes have a key role in social anxiety in adolescent boys and girls. Overall, this work implies that ACT could be applied as a comprehensive model to understand and intervene in adolescents with SAD.

Associated factors of playing video games as experiential avoidance in adolescence

Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Adolescents

Luiza Brandão, M.S., Universidade de São Paulo
Zila Sanchez, Ph.D., Universidade Federal de São Paulo
Márcia Melo, Ph.D., Universidade de São Paulo

Problematic video game playing in adolescents is associated with an array of mental health and behavioral problems. Little effort has been made to understand the comorbidities. Understanding functions to video game playing that are associated with poorer outcomes may help better understand the problem. Escapism, that may be understood as experiential avoidance (EA), is one function commonly associated to mental health and behavior problems. The aim of the present study is to access whether sociodemographic factors, drug use, bullying victimization and perpetration and mental health symptoms are associated with playing video games to forget or alleviate problems among Brazilian eighth grade students.
This study was a cross-sectional survey nested in a cluster randomized controlled trial. The study sample included 3,939 eighth grade students who answered to an anonymous self-report questionnaire. Weighted logistic regressions were used to investigate the associated factors.
The results show that 57% (CI=55.85; 58.15) of the adolescents played as a form of EA. Playing to forget about problems is associated with being male, using tobacco, bullying victimization and perpetration, healthy levels of prosocial behavior and emotional symptoms. Playing video games as a form of EA has shown to be a relevant aspect to be investigated among this public, as it is related to impairing conditions in adolescence.

Bienestar eudaimónico y mindfulness en el trabajo: revisión sistemática
Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Isaac Carmona Rincón, M.S., Universidad Jaime I de Castellón / Ítaca, Psicología y Lenguaje
Azucena García Palacios, Universidad Jaime I de Castellón
Santiago Segovia Vázquez, Elea, Instituto Psicoeducativo Integral

Antecedentes: La mayor parte de los estudios que han analizado los efectos de mindfulness sobre el bienestar lo han hecho desde una perspectiva hedónica, sin que se haya explorado suficientemente la perspectiva eudaimónica, íntimamente relacionada con la flexibilidad psicológica. El objetivo de este estudio fue analizar los efectos de las intervenciones basadas en mindfulness (IBMs) sobre variables relacionadas con el bienestar eudaimónico en contextos laborales. Para ello, seguimos las instrucciones del método Cochrane (Higgins y Green, 2012) e incluimos únicamente ensayos controlados aleatorizados.
Método: Se efectuó una búsqueda de publicaciones relevantes en las bases de datos PsycInfo, Pubmed y ProQuest, acotando desde enero de 2009 a diciembre de 2019. Los términos de búsqueda incluyeron aquellas variables relacionadas con el modelo de Bienestar Eudaimónico (Ryff, 2017) (p. ej. resilience, maturity, wisdom, autonomy, will to meaning, self-compassion, etc.).
Resultados: Un total de 9006 estudios fueron revisados, de los que 16 fueron incluidos finalmente. Se identificaron un total de 9 variables psicológicas relacionadas con la eudaimonia. Los estudios diferían en el tipo de IBM, duración de la intervención, tiempo de práctica personal y variables eudamónicas evaluadas.
Discusión: En general, las IBMs son eficaces, con tamaños de efecto medios, para mejorar variables vinculadas a la autoaceptación, las relaciones positivas y el crecimiento personal. No obstante, los resultados han de considerarse con cautela, debiendo realizarse estudios tanto de replicación como de mayor calidad (i.e. con muestras más amplias y equivalente proporción entre sexos, controles activos, seguimientos a medio y largo plazo, etc.).

Burnout and Intimacy in a Sample of Health-care Workers: The Mediational Role of Psychological Flexibility
Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Professional Development, Burnout

Maria Del Carmen Ortiz-Fune, Psychiatry and Mental Health Service of the University Assistance Complex of Salamanca
Maria Arias, Ph.D., University of Seville
Rafael Martínez-Cervantes, Ph.D., University of Seville

The predominant model of Burnout comprises three dimensions: Emotional Exhaustion (EE), Depersonalization (D) and lack of Personal Accomplishment (PA). Recent approaches from Contextual Behavioral Sciences (CBS) considered the role that variables such as Psychological Flexibility and Intimacy can play in understanding Burnout. This study explored the role of Intimacy, as described in the Awareness, Courage and Responsiveness (ACR) behavioral model, and the mediating role of Psychological Flexibility in Burnout.
A non-probabilistic intentional sample of 120 health workers (77.5% women) from Spain’s National Health System was recruited. Participants completed an online survey with validated measures for Burnout, Intimacy, and Psychological Flexibility. To examine the relationships between these variables, mediation analyzes and multiple linear regression were performed.
Courage was the only ACR variable that predicted the three dimensions of Burnout, although Others-Awareness (a skill related with Awareness) also showed a role in PA. The role of Psychological Flexibility as a mediator was only found when analyzing PA, increasing the contributions of Courage and Others- Awareness.
These results contribute to understand the role of CBS related variables to explain burnout. At least two of the intimacy dimensions predict Burnout, mediated by Psychological Flexibility in the case of lack of personal accomplishment. These results contribute to understand the role of contextual behavioral variables in Burnout.

Can self-compassion mitigate the impact of COVID-19 on mental health? A multinational study across 21 countries
Primary Topic: Compassion
Subtopic: COVID-19 pandemic

Marcela Matos, Ph.D., University of Coimbra, Portugal
Kirsten McEwan, University of Derby, United Kingdom
Martin Kanovský, Comenius University, Slovakia
Júlia Halamová, Comenius University, Slovakia
Stanley Steindl, University of Queensland, Australia
Nuno Ferreira, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Mariana Linharelhos, University of Coimbra, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), Portugal
Daniel Rijo, University of Coimbra, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), Portugal
Kenichi Asano, Mejiro University, Japan
Sónia Gregório, University of Coimbra, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), Portugal; Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain
Margarita Márquez, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain
Sara Vilas, Universidad Europea de Madrid, Spain
Gonzalo Brito-Pons, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile
Paola Lucena-Santos, University of Coimbra, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), Portugal
Margareth da Silva Oliveira, Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul, Evaluation and Treatment in Cognitive and Behavioral Psychotherapies - Research Group (GAAPCC), Brazil
Erika Leonardo de Souza, Conectta: Mindfulness & Compassion, Brazil
Lorena Llobenes, Motivación Compasiva, Argentina
Natali Gumiy, Motivación Compasiva, Argentina
Maria Ileana Costa, Motivación Compasiva, Argentina
Noor Habib, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH&RC), Saudi Arabia
Reham Hakem, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH&RC), Saudi Arabia
Hussain Khrad, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH&RC), Saudi Arabia
Ahmad Alzahrani, King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH&RC), Saudi Arabia
Simone Cheli, University of Florence, Italy
Nicola Petrocchi, John Cabot University, Italy
Elli Tholouli, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Philia Issari, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece
Gregoris Simos, University of Macedonia, Greece
Vibeke Lunding-Gregersen, Mindwork Psycological Center, Denmark
Ask Elklit, University of Southern Denmark
Russell Kolts, Eastern Washington University, USA
Allison C Kelly, University of Waterloo, Canada
Catherine Bortolon, Grenoble Alpes University, France; Centre Hospitalier Alpes Isère, France
Pascal Delamillieure, CHU de Caen, France; University of Normandy, France
Marine Paucsik, Grenoble Alpes University, France
Julia E. Wahl, The Mind Institute Poland; SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland
Mariusz Zieba, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland
Mateusz Zatorski, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Poland
Tomasz Komendziński, Nicolaus Copernicus University, Poland
Shuge Zhang, University of Derby, United Kingdom
Jaskaran Basran, University of Derby, United Kingdom
Antonios Kagialis, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
James Kirby, University of Queensland, Australia
Paul Gilbert, University of Derby, United Kingdom

The world is facing an unprecedented crisis due to the COVID-19 pandemic, with detrimental effects on psychosocial wellbeing. Thus, examining factors that may buffer the detrimental impacts of the pandemic on mental health is critical. Mounting research has documented the numerous benefits of compassion has for mental health, emotion regulation and social relationships. The current study explores the moderator effect of self-compassion against the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety and stress across 21 countries worldwide.
A sample of 4057 adult participants from the general community population was collected across 21 countries from Europe, Middle East, North America, South America, Asia and Oceania. Participants completed self-report measures of perceived threat of COVID-19, self-compassion and mental health indicators (depression, anxiety, stress).
Perceived threat of COVID-19 predicted higher scores in depression, anxiety and stress, and self-compassion predicted lower scores in these mental health indicators. Self-compassion moderated the impact of perceived threat of COVID-19 on depression, anxiety and stress. These effects were consistent across all countries.
The findings suggest that being able to be compassionate towards oneself in the face of suffering can mitigate the harmful impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health, and offer evidence supporting the universality of this buffering effect of self-compassion. Public health policy-makers and providers should consider the implementation of compassion-based interventions and communication strategies to promote resilience and address mental health problems during and in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Commit And Act Foundation Using ACT To Strengthen Community Structures In The Fight Of COVID-19
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Using ACT To Strengthen Community Structures

Edmond Brandon, B.S., Commit and Act Foundation in Sierra Leone

Sierra Leone has experienced substantial economic growth in recent years, although the ruinous effects of the civil war continue to be felt. The country is beautiful but with multiple problems such as violence against women, poverty, corruption, lack of water and sanitary facilities, increase in maternal and morbidity rate, and many more. Government and other NGOs are doing their best to overcome some of the challenge faced by the country. Commit and Act has played integral role by using ACT to train all categories of individual, groups in the prevention of COVID-19 transmission.
What was done by Commit and Act Foundation? • Provision of support services for girls that have experienced sexual Gender based violence • ACT training for community members to help them break the Chain of Covid-19 transmission.(using the Matrix) • Provision Covid -19 prevention materials to community members • Strengthen chiefdom level bye laws and monitoring of law and action plans developed • Counselling services for individuals and couples
What needs to be done by Commit and Act Foundation? • Continue to provide support services for girls that have experienced sexual gender Based violence • Provision of counselling services for those in need. • Monitor activities of trained groups • Continue with ACT trainings for children and couples at chiefdom and community levels • Advocate with government and other partners for the provision of quality drinking water for community members • Support girls to achieve quality education • Source funding opportunity for the continuity of its projects

Comparative Efficacy of ACT and CBT for Chronic Insomnia: A pilot randomized controlled trial
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Insomnia

Renatha El Rafihi-Ferreira, Ph.D., Instituto de Psiquiatria, Universidade de São Paulo
Charles Morin, Ph.D., Laval University
Andrea Toscanini, M.D., Ph.D., Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo
Rosa Hasan, M.D., Hospital das Clínicas, Universidade de São Paulo
Franscisco Lotufo Neto, Ph.D., Universidade de São Paulo

Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Insomnia (CBT-I) is recognized as the therapy of choice for insomnia, with several studies reporting and supporting its effectiveness. With a divergent approach to the cognitive strategy present in CBT-I, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) represents a paradigm shift in the management of insomnia since it focuses on the participants from a macro perspective, aiming to increase their psychological flexibility, not concentrating exclusively on symptom control. Objective: To evaluate a protocol for acceptance and commitment therapy for insomnia (ACT-I) in adults compared to cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I).
Participants were 37 adults (74.3% women; M = 43.7 years, SD = 10.7) with chronic insomnia. They were randomized to 6 weekly, group sessions consisting of ACT-I (n=19) or CBT-I (n=18). The evaluation occurred in three moments - pre-treatment, post-treatment and six-month follow-up, through the instrument Insomnia Severity Index (ISI).
CBT-I was associated with a higher proportion of treatment responders immediately after the intervention, the improvements in insomnia associated with CBT were faster but not as sustained and the improvements associated with ACT was slower and sustained. The proportion of treatment responders and insomnia remission were higher in the CBT (64.7% and 58.8%) relative to ACT-I (50% and 22.2%) groups at post treatment, while 6 months later ACT-I made further gains (55.6% and 33.3% respectively) and CBT-I had loss (58.8% and 41.2%). Conclusions: Both CBT and ACT therapies are effective, with a more rapid effect for CBT and a delayed action for ACT treatment. These different trajectories of changes provide possibilities into the process of behavior change via cognitive versus contextual approach.
Both CBT and ACT based therapies are effective, with a more rapid effect for CBT and a delayed action for ACT based treatments. These different trajectories of changes provide possibilities into the process of behavior change via cognitive versus contextual approach.

Contextual-behavioral model of self predicts borderline personality disorder symptoms

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Relational Frame Theory, Borderline Personality Disorder, BPD, Mindfulness, Self as Context, Self as Process, Self as Content

Jan Topczewski, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Paweł Ostaszewski, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Dysregulation of self is argued to be at the core of borderline personality disorder (BPD). It is linked to symptoms such as identity disturbance and chronic feelings of emptiness. Mainstream models of self dysregulation often lack either strong theoretical foundations or ecological validity, hence it is difficult to address this problem in clinical research and psychotherapy. From a contextual-behavioral perspective, there are three behavioral repertoires with important implications for a healthy self: self-as-content, self-as-process, and self-as-context. The aim of this study was to investigate if, and how well the specific elements of the contextual-behavioral model of self predict BPD symptoms.
348 participants completed a demographic questionnaire and self-report measures of self-as-content flexibility (three subscales from SCS-SF), self-as-process (MAAS), self-as-context (SEQ), and BPD symptoms (BPD checklist). To answer the research questions, multiple regression analysis was performed. In addition, to check for potential moderating effects of demographic variables, moderation analysis was applied.
Multiple regression analysis revealed that the contextual-behavioral model of self is predictive of borderline personality disorder symptoms, with self-as-process being the strongest predictor. A series of moderation analyses revealed that self-as-process has a stronger impact on BPD symptoms in younger participants than in older participants, and that self-as-content flexibility predicts BPD symptoms only in females.
This study is the first to suggest that all three behavioral repertoires related to self may be relevant targets in interventions for people with BPD. Potential clinical implications and further research directions are discussed.

Coping with the COVID-19 Pandemic and Quality of Life in the Context of Psychological (In)Flexibility Processes: A Test of Two Multiple-Mediation Models
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: COVID-19 Pandemic

Eric Tifft, M.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Max Roberts, M.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Shannon Underwood, B.S., University at Albany, SUNY
John Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with numerous disruptions to daily life, unique stressors, increased mental health concerns, and decreased quality of life (QoL; Gallagher et al., 2020; White & Van Der Boor, 2020). The extent to which individuals are able to respond flexibly to pandemic-related stressors may, in turn, account for relations between coping and QoL. The present study aimed to elucidate such relations.
Undergraduates (N = 531) completed measures of psychological (in)flexibility, QoL, and how well they were coping with pandemic-related stress and anxiety. In two models, ACT inflexibility and flexibility processes were evaluated as mediators of relations between coping and QoL.
Individuals who reported more effective coping with pandemic-related stress and anxiety had greater QoL (c = 8.40, SE = 1.08, t(592) = 7.77, p < .001), and this relation was partially mediated by contact with values (abest = 1.26, 95% CI [.33, 2.34]) and committed action (abest = 1.41, 95% CI [.42, 2.62]). In the second model, lack of present moment awareness (abest = 1.16, 95% CI [.37, 2.07]) and weak committed action (abest = 2.58, 95% CI [1.00, 4.28]) partially mediated relations between coping and QoL.
Findings suggest that the impact of coping on QoL during the pandemic is accounted for, in part, by unique psychological inflexibility and flexibility processes. Implications of these findings will be discussed in terms of role of psychological flexibility when discussing the utility of coping strategies for navigating significant stressors and life challenges.

Couple schemas, cognitive fusion, and interactions in the relationship
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Couples

Lidia Baran, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Joanna Dudek, Ph.D., SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Avigail Lev, Bay Area CBT Center
Jadwiga Jagódka, University of Silesia in Katowice
Magdalena Krasińska, University of Silesia in Katowice
Marta Potuczko, University of Silesia in Katowice
Agata Serwaczak, University of Silesia in Katowice
Kamil Zając, University of Silesia in Katowice

Several studies show that early maladaptive schemas are related to couple satisfaction (Dumitrescu & Rusu, 2012) and may predict divorce (Yousefi et al., 2009). Maladaptive schemas are activated in the adult romantic relationship, and they may lead to avoidance of schema pain through schema coping behaviors (McKay, Lev & Skeen, 2012). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy may prove its potential effectiveness to help partners become aware of the existing interpersonal schemas and defuse from them to engage in more workable couple interactions (Lev & McKay, 2017).
The ongoing project aims to analyze relations between relationship schemas, fusion, and interactions in romantic relationships. The survey is conducted online among people over 18 and in a romantic relationship. Couples participating in the study complete the Couples Schema Questionnaire, the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire, and the Interactions in Relationship Scale (based on The Functional Idiographic Assessment Template-Questionnaire).
We will present preliminary results obtained from 139 couples concerning: a) associations between relationship schemas (abandonment/instability, mistrust/abuse, emotional deprivation, defectiveness/shame, social isolation/alienation, dependence, failure, entitlement/grandiosity, self-sacrifice/subjugation, and unrelenting standards) and interactions in the relationship (assertion of needs, bidirectional communication, conflict, disclosure and interpersonal closeness, emotional experience, and expression), b) cognitive fusion as a moderator of the relation between relationship schemas and interaction in the relationship. The study results will allow us to better understand associations between schemas and behaviors in romantic relationships and respond to relationship problems during counseling or therapy.

Efectos psicológicos del Programa Mindfulness-based Mental Balance
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Isaac Carmona Rincón, M.S., Universidad Jaime I de Castellón / Ítaca, Psicología y Lenguaje
Azucena García Palacios, Universidad Jaime I de Castellón
Santiago Segovia Vázquez, Elea, Instituto Psicoeducativo Integral, Spain

Antecedentes: El presente trabajo se centra en el análisis preliminar de los beneficios psicológicos del Nivel 1 del Mindfulness-Based Mental Balance (MBMB), una intervención basada en mindfulness, de tres años de duración por nivel. El nivel 1 está orientado a reducir los pensamientos intrusivos y alcanzar el estado mindful de consciencia (yo-contexto, en términos de ACT). Nuestra hipótesis fue que se producirían aumentos en las puntuaciones de mindfulness y satisfacción vital, así como en variables del Modelo de los Cinco Grandes de la Personalidad: «apertura», «extraversión», «amabilidad» y «responsabilidad». Igualmente, la puntuación de «neuroticismo» se vería reducida positivamente, como también la fusión cognitiva, el estrés percibido y la ansiedad (estado y rasgo).
Método: Se evaluó la intervención siguiendo un diseño controlado de línea base múltiple entre sujetos, con la participación de nueve personas (población no clínica). El entrenamiento se ajustó a la estructura estandarizada y manualizada del MBMB (Segovia, 2017), con una duración de 41 semanas. Los datos fueron obtenidos en la fase pre-tratamiento y post-tratamiento.
Resultados: los resultados apoyan la eficacia del Nivel 1 de MBMB para producir mejoras en gran parte de las variables dependientes, obteniendo resultados estadísticamente significativos en mindfulness, fusión cognitiva, neuroticismo, extraversión, responsabilidad, ansiedad estado, estrés percibido y satisfacción con la vida. En general, los tamaños de efecto encontrados fueron medianos.
Discusión: Tomando con cautela los resultados, el Nivel 1 de MBMB podría ser un entrenamiento prometedor para mejorar el bienestar y el desarrollo personal, es decir, aumentar la flexibilidad psicológica.

Effect of an ACT Protocol Focused on the Most Problematic Self-Beliefs or the “Big Ones”: Improving Psychological Inflexibility in Adolescents
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Performance-enhancing interventions, Adolescents, Psychological Flexibility, Big Ones, Relational Frame Theory, ACT

Katia Barrutia, M.Sc., Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology(MICPSY)
Bárbara Gil-luciano Gil-Luciano, Ph.D., Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology(MICPSY)
Beatriz Sebastian, M.Sc., Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology(MICPSY)

Although there has been an increase in studies regarding the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl & Wilson, 1999, 2014; Wilson & Luciano, 2001) with young clinical population, studies in school settings are rare. In addition, recent research shows the importance of addressing the Big Ones (most problematic self-beliefs, or self-concepts) (Gil-Luciano et al., 2019; Ruiz et al., 2016, 2018; Luciano, 2017), in that they unleash an inflexible class of behaviors that produce multiple limitations. To our knowledge, no prior studies have addressed psychological inflexibility with teenagers this way. The aim of this pioneer study was to develop an ACT-based protocol focused on the Big Ones and assess its impact on academic performance.
A single case design with a sample of 16 adolescents with poor academic performance, 50% male, aged 14-17 years old. Firstly, participants filled in several questionnaires and a functional assessment was performed. Secondly, the protocol was tailored to each participant. Finally, all measures were taken again. The ACT-based protocol consisted on a multiple exemplar training on discriminating private events as they emerged in several academic tasks, learning to frame them in hierarchy with the deictic I, so that flexible reactions could take place.
Results show clinically relevant improvements in psychological flexibility. Results are discussed in terms of psychological flexibility improvement from the impact of directly addressing the Big Ones.

Electronically Mediated Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Chronic Illnesses: A Systematic Research Synthesis

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Chronic Illness

Amelia Welch, MSMFT, Florida State University
Tom Su, Florida State University

Electronically mediated ACT approaches have been associated with high completion and high adherence to protocol (Brown et al., 2016). ACT has been identified as an effective and cost-effective treatment (Kerns et al., 2011) for chronic pain in a variety of clinical settings and patient samples (McCracken et al., 2007). The purpose of this study is to systematically review existing research linking electronically mediated ACT interventions and chronic illnesses.
A literature search was conducted using the keywords acceptance and commitment therapy, online, internet, web, telephone, smartphone, arthritis, asthma, cancer, COPD, diabetes, chronic, and pain. 9 studies remained after incorporating the inclusion criteria to confirm that each article covered an (a) intervention study (b) addressing an electronically mediated, ACT-based approach as treatment for (c) a sample of participants who are living with a chronic illness, (d) published between 2006 and 2020 in a (e) peer-reviewed (f) English-language journal.
The results revealed key patterns between studies, including types of chronic illness studied, gender demographics, attrition rates, location, and measurement tools. The average attrition was 2.3% for samples that are 95-100% female, as compared to a rate of 16.7% for more representative samples. Six studies reported significant decreases in patient-reported pain, seven reported improvements in patient functioning measures, and 8 studies reported significant psychological improvements.
Clinicians may consider this review as they incorporate electronically mediated approaches. The nine studies, individually and when compared, provide support for the use of ACT-based therapy for chronic conditions, electronically mediated ACT approaches, and collaborative care.

eLIFEwithIBD - Living with Intention, Fullness and Engagement with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: Presenting an ICT-delivery format of a novel contextual behavioural intervention for IBD
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: IBD, Mindfulness, Compassion, Acceptance

Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., University of Coimbra, CINEICC
Joana Pereira, Ph.D., University of Coimbra, CINEICC
Sérgio Carvalho, University of Coimbra, CINEICC
Ana Galhardo, Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
Paola Lucena-Santos, University of Coimbra
Nuno Ferreira, Ph.D., University of Nicosia
Francisco Portela, Department of Gastroenterology, Coimbra University Hospital
Bárbara Rocha, M.D., Ph.D., Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra
Inês Trindade, Ph.D., University of Coimbra

Living with Intention, Fullness and Engagement with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) is an ICT-delivery format (eLIFEwithIBD) of an acceptance, mindfulness, and compassion-based intervention adapted to people with IBD that aims to add to the traditional medical approach of IBD treatment. This intervention’s pertinence emerges from the lack of acceptance and compassion-based psychological interventions for IBD. Moreover, digital technologies offer promising means of delivering behaviour change approaches at low cost and on a wide scale. The present work aims to present an ICT-delivered contextual behavioural intervention for IBD to improve mental health and quality of life in people with IBD.
This toolkit comprises eight self-guided online sessions, each delivered weekly. eLIFEwithIBD addresses IBD education, and acceptance, mindfulness, cognitive defusion, compassion, values clarification, and committed action modules, adapted for the IBD context. These contents are offered through text, video, audio and experiential exercises. All sessions follow a similar structure: overview of the core competency/concept, metaphors and/or exercises to support participants learn the targeted ability/concept and its application, an invitation to complete between-session exercise(s), and a brief session summary. Between-session exercises encompass mindfulness and compassion practices.
It is expected that the eLIFEwithIBD intervention will produce improvements in perceived physical and mental health, and the quality of life of people with IBD. If effective, this intervention will allow a larger proportion of people with IBD to access a self-help tool. The ICT-based delivery format’s flexibility can be appealing for this population and may remove barriers usually encountered in face-to-face interventions.

Enhancing University Students’ Well-Being with Psychological Flexibility and Organized Study Skills Training
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Performance-enhancing interventions, Higher education

Kristiina Räihä, M.Sc. (Health Sci.), University of Helsinki
Nina Katajavuori, Ph.D., University of Helsinki
Henna Asikainen, Ph.D., University of Helsinki

As there are increasing, and long-effecting problems with higher education students’ well-being, the development of effective study-integrated well-being enhancing interventions is important. There is preliminary evidence of various positive results of ACT-based interventions targeted to students, but a lack of knowledge of the effects of combining psychological flexibility and study skills training. This study aimed to determine the effects of an online intervention course on university students’ psychological flexibility, stress, study-related burnout risk, and organized study skills.
74 university students participated in an eight-week online ACT and study skills training combining intervention that was conducted with an experimental control setting. Changes in students’ well-being were measured by questionnaires and heart rate variability (Firstbeat) at the beginning and the end of the intervention.
The data were analyzed with Pearson's correlation coefficient, repeated-measures t-test, and repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA). The results showed that students’ psychological flexibility and organized study skills increased as stress and study-related burnout risk decreased. The results of the heart rate variability measurements will be discussed at the conference.
The effects of the intervention suggest that well-being of university students can be supported by an online course combining ACT practices and study skills training. More research is needed on the individual-level changes and the long-term effects of the intervention on well-being and study-related burnout.

Establishment and maintenance of equivalence classes and transfer of function in depressed and nondepressed individuals
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Depression,Transfer of function, IRAP

Heloisa Ribeiro Zapparoli, Federal University of São carlos
Mariéle Diniz Cortez, Federal University of São Carlos

The present study assessed the formation and maintenance of equivalence classes as well as the transfer of function among stimuli of different valences and abstract stimuli in depressed and nondepressed individuals.
Sixty-four participants were administered the Beck Depression Inventory II, and distributed into groups. Two experimental groups (depressed and nondepressed) underwent matching-to-sample procedure to establish three four-member classes, containing faces expressing emotions (e.g., sadness, happiness and neutrality) and abstract stimuli. The transfer of function among stimuli were assessed by means of a semantic differential and an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). Thirty days later those participants were resubmitted to equivalence tests, to the semantic differential device and to the IRAP. Two control groups (depressed and nondepressed) only evaluated experimental stimuli using the semantic differential (they weren’t exposed to other procedures).
Data collection is still in progress and statistical analysis has not yet been done. By now, twenty-six of 41 participants in the experimental groups demonstrated class formation, 11 depressed and 15 nondepressed. Participants from both experimental groups similarly evaluated the abstract stimuli from the happy, sad and neutral classes as positive, negative and neutral, respectively, demonstrating the transfer of function among stimuli. IRAP data suggest that depressed participants responded faster on Sad-Negative/True and Happy-Positive/True trials while nondepressed participants responded faster only on Happy-Positive/True trials. The mean D-IRAP scores for other trial types for both groups doesn’t seem to present differences compared to zero. Follow-up data collection is still in progress and must be finished and analyzed soon for further discussion.

Evaluating the novel Mask Delay Discounting Task: Concurrent validation with monetary delay discounting and association with self-reported mask use
Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Delay Discounting

Matthew Dwyer, M.S., Rowan University
Connor Burrows, M.A., Rowan University
Schyler Newman, B.S., Rowan University
Bethany Raiff, Ph.D., Rowan University

Underutilization of face masks has continued to be a problem within the United States. Several factors may explain why individuals do not wear a mask, however, impulsive choice (defined by how much individuals discount delayed vs. immediate outcomes) has not been evaluated. Therefore, the development of a delay discounting measure could prove to be useful in investigating the role of impulsive choice on mask-wearing behavior.
We developed a novel instrument called the Mask Delay Discounting Task (MDDT). Participants (n=300) were asked to imagine a scenario where they are entering a grocery store and measures how long the person is willing to wait to obtain a mask before choosing to enter without one. The goal was to examine the relationship between performance on the MDDT (i.e. the decision to wear a mask across a range of time delays) and a monetary delay discounting task. Performance on both measures was correlated with self-reported mask use in seven contexts using a logistic generalized linear model.
Analysis of performance on the MDDT compared to a monetary delay discounting task. found the odds ratio for the low discounting group differed from the high discounting group. Odds-ratios and the inflection point of the logistic curve differed between these groups in predicting mask-wearing across six of seven contexts.
These results demonstrate the potential for impulsive choice defined by delay discounting as a possible influence on mask-wearing. The MDDT may be a useful tool to facilitate more research in this area to inform policy and intervention development.

Fusion and self-compassion as moderators of self-stigma in parents of children with autism spectrum disorder
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Parenting

Anna Pyszkowska, MA, University of Silesia in Katowice, Poland
Krzysztof Rożnawski, University of Silesia in Katowice
Zuzanna Farny, University of Silesia in Katowice
Ada Stasiak, University of Silesia in Katowice
Weronika Szubert, University of Silesia in Katowice

Research shows that stigma occurs in the lives of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) as well as their parents. Parents experience stigma, the internalization of which can lead to the occurrence of self-stigma. It can lead to a cognitive fusion with negative thoughts – especially those about oneself. Previous studies show that self-compassion reduces feelings of suffering, shame and self-stigma. The aim of this study was to test the relationship between self-stigma and cognitive fusion among parents of children with ASD. The moderating role of self-compassion as a protective factor was also verified.
The following questionnaires were used: Perceived Public Stigma Scale, Perceived Courtesy Stigma Scale, Self-Compassion Scale Short-Form, Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale. The study included parents of children with ASD (Nf233, including 218 women).
Results showed that there is a positive correlation between fusion and both affiliate (r = .31, p < .001) and public stigma (r = .33, p < .001). Fusion and self-compassion were significant predictors of affiliate stigma. Self-compassion moderated the relationship between fusion and depression (β = -.11, p < .05) and a relationship between fusion and stress (β = -.11, p < .05).
Cognitive fusion with negative beliefs about oneself can contribute to self-stigma. Defusion-oriented actions may allow one to distance oneself from negative thoughts and eliminate their consequences. Self-compassion manifests itself in a compassionate and accepting attitude towards oneself hence actions taken to strengthen it could contribute to reduce suffering experienced by parents of children with ASD.

How do Acceptance and Commitment Therapy interventions work for informal caregivers? A Systematic Review
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Family caregivers

Golnaz Atefi, M.Sc., Maastricht University
Sara L. Bartels, Maastricht University
Rosalie J.M. Van Knippenberg, Maastricht University
Michael Levin, Utah State University, Department of Psychology
Tessa O.C. Kilkens, Lionarons ggz Heerlen
Frans R.J. Verhey, Maastricht University
Marjolein E. De Vugt, Maastricht University

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) as a transdiagnostic and evidence-based approach has shown promise in improving mental health and overall wellbeing. One promising area that has been growing is ACT for informal, family caregivers outside the context of parenting.
This systematic review following the PRISMA protocol, examined the feasibility, acceptability and efficacy of ACT for family caregivers of adult patients. Potentially relevant publications were identified through a systematic search of 5 databases (n = 1668).
A total of 11 articles (10 individual studies) were finally selected and reviewed. The quality of studies was also assessed. Generally, ACT appeared to be feasible and acceptable for caregivers. Intervention efficacy varied and effects on negative psychological symptoms were more often assessed (7/10 studies).
Various types of study designs, interventions, and informal caregiving contexts highlighted the applicability of ACT in caregiving and areas for future research. Future studies should be conducted to measure the positive psychological outcomes of ACT such as quality of life, and for various family caregiver populations with chronic conditions.

Improvement in nonjudgment during the first week of treatment as a predictor of treatment outcome
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Performance-enhancing interventions, Nonjudgment

Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Benjamin Shepherd, M.Ed., Nova Southeastern University & Institute for Life Renovation, LLC

Nonjudgment has been indicated in the literature as an important variable related to outcomes. Increases in nonjudgment during the first week of treatment were examined as a predictor of significant increases in quality of life.
Participants (n=48) consisted of individuals presenting with multiple comorbidities who were receiving treatment from an intensive, individualized outpatient program completed the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and the Quality Of Life Inventory (QOLI; Mean age=31.08, SD=12.09; Caucasian=77%; Female=62%). Paired sample t-tests were conducted to explore changes in mindfulness from pre-treatment to the first week of treatment and significant differences were found in only the nonjudgment factor. Those participants were divided into two groups and a linear regression was conducted on both groups to determine whether changes in FFMQ scores during the first week of treatment predicted changes in QOLI scores.
Non-judgment was the only facet of mindfulness that significantly differed from pre-treatment to the first day of treatment, t(47) = -.520, Mean = -2.36, SD = 6.36, p < .014. For the group with improved non-judgment, quality of life was significantly higher at the first month of treatment compared to pre-treatment, t(31) = -4.18, Mean = -7.66, p < .001, d = -.739. Furthermore, changes in nonjudgmental mindfulness significantly predicted changes in QOL for the group with improved non-judgment, b = 1.26, p = .008 (p < .01), R² = .215. Longitudinal findings suggest non-judgment is a unique dimension of mindfulness and that if increased early in treatment, could lead to better treatment outcomes.

Measuring self-authenticity in lesbian, gay, and bisexual people: a novel measure of authentic living
Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Other, Lesbian, gay, and bisexual psychological wellbeing, Authentic living/valued living

Tim Cartwright, University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, B.Sc., Ph.D., University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Gemma Evans, University of Chester

Self-authenticity is an important psychological construct, given that knowing and being oneself is considered as necessary to achieve greater happiness and wellbeing in life. However, being one’s self may be difficult for specific groups, for example, sexual minorities, due to potential stigma and discrimination which could be experienced. We wanted to understand the relationships between being one’s self and sexuality-related constructs such as outness, discrimination, and internalised homonegativity, as well as consider if self-authenticity could be increased through the psychological flexibility model of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.
As such, we developed the novel Self-Authenticity Measure to improve on existing measures of authenticity. Exploratory factor analysis (n = 1,152) suggested two-factors: knowing and being oneself (internal self-authenticity) and being oneself around others (external self-authenticity). The measure demonstrated good to excellent internal consistency (α = .83 to .86), test-retest reliability (r = .87 and .89), convergent (r = -.69 and .84), concurrent (r = -.61 and .74), incremental, and construct validity (CFI = .92, TLI = .91, SRMR = .05, RMSEA = .07). We found weak to moderate correlations with discrimination, internalised homonegativity, and outness (r = -.22 to -.54) and moderate to strong correlations between self-authenticity and psychological flexibility constructs (r = .63 to .83).
Our findings suggest we have developed a valid and reliable measure of self-authenticity and that self-authenticity may in some way regulate sexuality-based constructs. Furthermore, psychological flexibility may be helpful in increasing self-authenticity in sexual minorities.

Mindfulness-based Mental Balance Teacher Training: Beneficios psicológico
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Isaac Carmona Rincón, M.S., Universidad Jaime I de Castellón / Ítaca, Psicología y Lenguaje
Azucena García Palacios, Universidad Jaime I de Castellón
Santiago Segovia Vázquez, Elea, Instituto Psicoeducativo Integral

Antecedentes: en este estudio evaluamos los efectos del primer año de entrenamiento de instructores del programa Mindfulness-based Mental Balance (MBMB). Se trata de una formación de 41 semanas de duración, con prácticas destinadas al desarrollo de la serenidad y la ecuanimidad, a través de la meditación de concentración. Posteriormente, se lleva el estado mindful de consciencia a la vida diaria y se entrena la autorregulación emocional e intencional (compasión y autocompasión).
Método: se empleó un diseño controlado de línea base múltiple, donde participaron 12 sujetos no clínicos. El entrenamiento se ajustó a la formación oficial del programa MBMB (Segovia, 2017). Los datos fueron obtenidos en la fase pre y postratamiento.
Resultados: la comparación de medias con la prueba t de Wilcoxon evidenció beneficios significativos en las puntuaciones de mindfulness, autocompasión, defusión cognitiva, ansiedad (estado) y estrés percibido. Los tamaños de efecto oscilaron entre medianos y grandes, aunque la potencia estadística no resultó suficiente para inferir generalizaciones (salvo en la variable mindfulness).
Discusión: el entrenamiento sistemático propuesto por el MBMB resultó eficaz para aumentar la flexibilidad psicológica, dando lugar a una mejora del bienestar personal en sujetos no clínicos. Estos hallazgos son similares a los encontrados anteriormente (Carmona-Rincón et al. 2021), No obstante, es necesario realizar otros estudios de replicación, además de ensayos controlados aleatorizados. Cabe mencionar, por otro lado, que el estudio coincidió con la crisis del SARS-CoV-2, dando lugar a fluctuaciones en la adherencia al tratamiento que podrían haber reducido sus potenciales efectos.

My Aspirations for CBS in South Africa
Primary Topic: Spreading CBS
Subtopic: Contextual Behavioral Science in South Africa

Nevern Subermoney, M.A., HPCSA

I was introduced to the world of CBS only last year, but since then I have digested multiple books, articles, and completed various training courses. All of this was because of the power I saw in this approach to link science to human suffering. It was amazing to me that hardly anyone in my country knew about this approach, and so I feel very committed to spreading this knowledge in my corner of the world and using these techniques to help the people around me.

Negative self-referential thoughts of university students in a Irish context: A thematic analysis
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Educational settings, Negative self-referential thoughts

Joseph Lavelle, M.Sc., University College Dublin
Neil Dunne, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

The Contextual Behavior Science (CBS) literature has given particular focus to negative self-referential thoughts with research within this sphere giving particular focus to processes and brief-interventions that target such thoughts (see Duff, Larsson, & McHugh, 2016; Larsson, Hooper, Osborne, Bennet, & McHugh, 2016; Masuda, Hayes, Sackett, & Twohig, 2004; Masuda, Feinstein, Wendell, & Sheehan, 2010). Said studies routinely ask participants to select and state a negative self-relevant thought that they experience but give focus to evaluations of these thoughts and rarely, if ever, treat the rich qualitative data generated as the unit of analysis. Therefore, the present study intends to remedy this by subjecting this data to qualitative methods of investigation.
Participants were 87 students in an Irish university context with a mean age of 21.93 years (SD=4.75). 63 participants identified as female, 22 identified as male, and two identified as non-binary or gender fluid. Participants reported negative self-referential thoughts via The Target Thought Questionnaire (Larsson, Hooper, Osborne, Bennett, & McHugh, 2015). The chosen method of qualitative analysis was thematic analysis which was conducted per Braun and Clark (2006).
This analysis divulged four themes: dissatisfaction with body and appearance, issues around self-worth; perception of being undeserving of friendship and love; and feelings of failure. These findings may inform future interventions ranging from brief interventions that target negative self-referential thoughts to self-directed interventions such as bibliotherapy or e-mental health.

Online Acceptance and Commitment Therapy For A Burnout Physician During Covid-19 pandemic: A Case Report
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Burnout

Mohamed Abdelalem Aziz, M.D., Omar Shahin mental hospital

The physicians working in Isolation hospitals all over the world especially in the developing countries was under a great work Stress during Covid-19 pandemic. Hereby, we are introducing a case of Physician suffering from Burnout symptoms during his presence in the isolation hospital.
• Male patient, 27 years old, From Egypt • A physician in Isolation hospital for Covid-19 cases • Positive history of OCD and depression 7 years ago • Positive family history of anxiety disorders • Complaint: moderate anxiety, agitated, thoughts of helplessness and hopelessness, feeling physically exhausted, decrease concentration for two weeks. • Medication: Prozac 40 mg daily for one week. • First time to have psychotherapy sessions.
We did six session (two sessions per week) every session about one hour and thirty minutes. During the six session, the patient was trained for the core processes of ACT. After two weeks, the patient showed a great improvement during the follow-up session. I talked to my Psychiatry colleague in the Isolation hospital and he gave a good feedback about the patient work and communication with the patients and his colleagues.
The obstacles we faced were 1) The internet bad connection which sometimes affects the quality of the sessions, 2) Lack of ACT protocol for dealing with burn out syndrome cases, 3) Patient resistance regarding psychotherapy due to the fear of Stigma. For conclusion, ACT showed a promising result for dealing with burnout syndrome cases using teletherapy.

Parent-implemented naturalistic language intervention: Systematic literature review of parent’s teaching methods
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, children with intellectual disabilities, language delay or impairment, parent training

Lívia Balog, Universidade Federal de São Carlos
Luiz Ricardo Ribeiro, Universidade Federal de São Carlos
Ana Luísa Libardi, Universidade Federal de São Carlos
Camila Domeniconi, Universidade Federal de São Carlos

This review aimed to identify the current state-of-art in the parent’s teaching methods of parent-implemented naturalistic language interventions applied with children who show either one of the following traits: intellectual disabilities, language delay or communication impairments.
Full-text research published from 2011 to 2020 in journals in the fields of Psychology and Social Science were searched in three databases (Scopus, Web of Science and PsycINFO). The articles were filtered to meet the following criteria a) studies describing an intervention directed at parents, b) involving language teaching stimulation strategies to be used in the family's routine, c) with the participation of children who have intellectual disabilities, language delay or communication impairment. 19 articles were selected and categorized according to a) characteristics of participating children,b) type of intervention performed with parents and c) duration of intervention.
Ten studies had as participants children with language delay or communication impairment, followed by five studies with children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder and four studies worked with intellectual disabled children. It was observed that most studies included three-year-old children and most interventions lasted more than two months (12). A large part (12) of the selected methods carried out the teaching individually for the parents, some studies used both group and individually teaching (4) and a few only groups (2). Further information about the studies and the strategies used were described.
The different ways of teaching naturalistic language strategies to parents found within the research are discussed, including the increasing use of technology to assist the intervention.

Population screening of gambling behavior: Identifying key characteristics of at-risk players
Primary Topic: Population screening
Subtopic: Other, Gambling

Klavdia Neophytou, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Georgia Panayiotou, University of Cyprus

The increase of gambling availability and the inclusion of Gambling disorder as an addiction in DSM-5 highlight the importance of brief screening measures aiming to identify at-risk gamblers.
The current study using a brief telephone survey assessed demographic characteristics and gambling behaviors in 2118 adults. Questions were developed based on DSM-5 criteria for Gambling Disorder, and common assessment tools.
A percentage of 6% was identified as at-risk gamblers. Male gender, low monthly income, high frequency of gambling behavior, large amounts of money spent and gambling to escape from everyday problems or for amusement, specifically for men, were found to be characteristics that can help in the early identification of at-risk gamblers. Gambling for financial gain and as a way to socialize, birth date (age range), and employment status were not significant predictors of gambling severity.
This study shows that the above characteristics can be assessed easily through phone screening of large populations, aiding in prevention practices to reduce the problematic use of gambling activities.

Primeros pasos en un centro educativo terapéutico especializado en trastornos del espectro autista en modelos contextuales
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Centro terapéutico, TEA, Jóvenes

Javier Brenlla, licenciado

Primeros pasos en un centro educativo terapéutico especializado en trastornos del espectro autista en modelos contextuales. Cetip es un centro educativo terapéutico que se dedica al trabajo con jóvenes y niños dentro del espectro autista, se encuentra ubicado en Buenos Aires, Argentina. Diariamente concurren 20 jóvenes y 19 profesionales de diferentes disciplinas, fonoaudiologas, psicólogos, terapistas ocupacionales y medica especialista en neurodesarrollo, de lunes a viernes de 9 a 16 hs. Las investigaciones han demostrado una gran eficacia de la terapia cognitivo conductual (TCC) en personas dentro del espectro autista , se observó que nuestro mayor trabajo hacía foco en las diferentes terapias con el niño o el joven y se perdia de vista su contexto interpersonal. Con respecto a los los profesionales se comenzó a trabajar sobre la flexibilidad, vulnerabilidad, valores, su auto cuidado y su mirada compasiva, en el aquí de su trabajo diario con los jóvenes. Se comenzaron a realizar los primeros pasos en los modelos contextuales, en la institución, que consistieron en: Reuniones con el equipo terapéutico para desarrollar cuales eran los objetivos y el porque del cambio a las terapias contextuales . Se invitaron a profesionales expertos para realizar diferentes charlas sobre ACT. Se les brindaron materiales de lectura sobre ACT , análisis funcional , conducta verbal y diferentes materiales de tercera ola. Se comenzaron a trabajar sobre diferentes conceptos e intervenciones sobre la familia Se brindaron sesiones de mindfulness en donde se pudieron indagar procesos internos de los profesionales (flex. psicológica , valores, auto cuidado, amabilidad). El poder ver desde el trabajo con pacientes dentro del espectro autista con la combinación de ACT con otras perspectivas psicológicas de tercera generación nos puede brindar realizar intervenciones funcional, contextual y amorosa con el paciente y su contexto.

Promoting ACT in a group intervention for parents of children with developmental disabilities
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parents of children with developmental disabilities

Emina Osmanovic Basic, Psychological counseling ABC

When it comes to children and adults with disabilities, support for parents and other family members is very rarely mentioned. Parents are mentioned only in the context of their important role in the child’s early intervention. Due to the lack of understanding of parents' need for support, we send the message that parents should always be strong. If parents have not adapted to the child's difficulty and have not achieved a balanced image of the child, they will have difficulty in recognizing the signs sent by the child and in providing a safe base. After the initial shock, parents deal with painful truth through a grieving process. With each new developmental stage in which the child cannot achieve developmental goals, they can go through a new process of grief. Parents are able to adapt to varying degrees to the new circumstances related to developmental difficulties. If parents suppress this process of grieving, it can lead to difficulties in adaptation to the child's disability. ACT with its philosophy of non-judgmental, non-pathological, and compassionate approach can greatly help in the process of grief and successful adaptation. The plan is to do future research on the effects of ACT therapy in group interventions for parents of children with disabilities.

Protective factors predicting quality of life in family carers of people with dementia: the role of psychological flexibility
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Dementia family caregivers

Milena Contreras, M.Sc., CPsychol, University of East Anglia
Eneida Mioshi, Ph.D., University of East Anglia
Naoko Kishita, Ph.D., University of East Anglia

The current study aimed to investigate the impact of protective factors (i.e., knowledge about dementia, psychological flexibility, self-compassion and hours of support from other family members) on the quality of life (QoL) of dementia family carers.
A multiple regression analysis was conducted with QoL as a dependent variable. All protective factors were entered into the model simultaneously as independent variables. Ninety-one family carers with a mean age of 69.5 years old were assessed. Participants were primarily female family members looking after a person with severe Alzheimer's disease. The model's R2 was 24%. The results demonstrated that psychological flexibility was the only significant independent variable predicting QoL (β = -0.46, p=0.00, 95% CI: -0.71 to -0.20). These results indicated that higher psychological inflexibility was associated with worse QoL.
These findings suggested that improving carer’s psychological flexibility may be particularly important in promoting QoL among family carers of people with dementia. Psychological interventions aimed at improving psychological flexibility such as ACT may have a strong potential as an effective intervention for improving the QoL of this population.

Psychological flexibility as a causal protective factor against predictors of suicide
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Suicide

Rosina Pendrous, MRes, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Kevin Hochard, University of Chester
Nicholas Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide. Current theories provide a relatively comprehensive overview of the statistical predictors of suicidality but have not yet produced highly effective interventions. Facilitating psychological flexibility may be useful in building resilience to suicidal thoughts, but few longitudinal studies exist which have established the theoretical basis for psychological flexibility as a safe, causal protective factor in this context. Indeed, to establish causality, one must demonstrate that variation in psychological flexibility precedes variations in suicidality temporally by way of longitudinal or experimental studies.
Our data result from a large, three-wave longitudinal study (N1 = 1395; N2 = 512; N3 = 352) of the general population, recruited using social media.
Longitudinal latent model analyses to test for temporal precedence were planned; however, our auxiliary assumption tests — that these variables would change over time — were unsupported. The three factors of the CompACT remained stable over time thus making longitudinal latent modelling of the impact of psychological flexibility on suicidality inappropriate. Instead, we ran regression models exploring whether earlier psychological flexibility predicted later suicide predictors and behaviours, finding mixed support for psychological flexibility.
Overall, we present an argument that before we can establish a strong theoretical basis for the causal role of psychological flexibility in suicidality, we need to correct for measurement issues, consider time invariance, and explore the boundaries in which we observe naturally occurring change in psychological flexibility – the key process of change in ACT – using different methodologies (e.g., ecological momentary assessment).

Psychological Flexibility Exercises and Metaphors: A Review of ACT English Language Books
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Psychological Flexibility, Metaphors, Exercises, Worksheets, Books

Emanuele Rossi, Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy
Francesco Mancini, Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy; Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy

The purpose of the present study is to offer a general overview of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy psychological flexibility processes on ACT books (1999-2018) with the aim of outlining a comprehensible and user-friendly profile of the use of metaphors, exercises, and worksheets within them.
In order to realize the profile, books were divided into two main groups: (1) ACT Books for professionals and (2) ACT Books for clients. We have created easy-to-read summary tables which provide a basic overview of acceptance, defusion, present moment, self-as-context, values, and committed action metaphors, exercises and worksheets.
This review was carried out with the purpose of providing an universally accessible, clear and intuitive cataloging tool of practical and experiential resources for ACT learners and practitioners. The summary tables briefly describe the way every metaphor, exercise or worksheet is presented and a reference to external resources as well.
This poster is aimed to summarize and evaluate the results of previous works presented at ACBS World Conference 17 and ACBS World Conference 18 related to a pilot project which involved all the processes of psychological flexibility.

Psychological Inflexibility and its Relation to Performance Anxiety, Flow, & Perfectionism in University Musicians
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Educational settings, Music Performance Anxiety, Flow, Musicians

Joanna Roman, M.A., ACT with Music, London, UK
David Juncos, Psy.D., Hornstein, Platt & Associates, Counseling & Wellness Centers, Philadelphia PA; Voice Workshop, East Bergholt, UK
Margaret Osborne, Ph.D., University of Melbourne
Dana Zenobi, D.M.A., Butler University

Thus far, no studies have examined the relationship between psychological inflexibility and variables of interest with university musicians, like music performance anxiety (MPA), flow, and perfectionism. Several ACT for MPA studies have observed improvements in psychological flexibility and MPA as part of treatment (Juncos et al., 2017; Clarke, Osborne, & Baranoff, 2020), yet no analyses of the relationship between those variables were conducted. A recent study examined the role of psychological inflexibility in predicting MPA, but with a sample of community musicians (Singh & Dudek, 2020). Given the theorized role that psychological inflexibility plays in the development/maintenance of anxiety disorders (Eifert & Forsyth, 2005) and clinical perfectionism (Ong et al., 2019), it was hypothesized that psychological inflexibility would be significantly related to MPA, flow, and perfectionism for university musicians from two samples.
Two samples of university musicians (N = 127) participated in this research as part of a larger study assessing a new measure of psychological flexibility for musicians (Juncos et al., 2021). Students were music majors from an American university & an Australian conservatory, respectively. Students completed measures of psychological inflexibility, MPA, perfectionism, & flow. Demographic variables from both samples were also collected.
Multiple regression analyses were conducted to determine the relationship between psychological inflexibility and MPA, perfectionism, and flow within performance and practice, within both samples of students, while controlling for demographic variables. A discussion of how well psychological inflexibility relates to MPA, perfectionism, and flow, and how the demographic variables accounted for the results, will be included.

Psychological inflexibility predicts symptoms of stress, depression and anxiety in international students
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Educational settings, Symptoms predictors

Francesca Brandolin, M.A., University of Jyväskylä
Päivi Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä
Ana Gallego, University of Jyväskylä
Simone Gorinelli, University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä

This study aimed to investigate psychological inflexibility and distress of international students at a Finnish university. This cross-sectional research examined the common symptomatology of stress, depression, and anxiety while moving abroad to study.
The participants (n = 63) completed online questionnaires assessing their stress, depression, anxiety, psychological inflexibility, mindfulness skills, and engaged living.
Nearly 90% reported moderate to high stress levels. Approximately 40–45% of the students experienced moderate to high anxiety and depression levels. We observed that students with low psychological flexibility skills endured more stress, depression, and anxiety. Further, a regression analysis suggested that different components of mindfulness, engaged living and psychological inflexibility accounted for 20–45% of the variance in stress, depression, and anxiety among international students.
Interestingly, different combinations of these components predicted different symptoms. These findings underline the importance of enhancing psychological flexibility skills to improve international students’ mental health and general study experience.

Psychological quality of life after a marital rupture: The role of attachment and experiential avoidance
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, marital ruptures, attachment, experiential avoidance, psychological quality of life

Joana Silva, Ph.D., Universidade Portucalense
Ana Xavier, Universidade Portucalense (Oporto, Portugal)
Bruna Gonçalves, Universidade Portucalense

Marital rupture often culminates in a diminished perception of psychological quality of life. Attachment anxiety and mistrust as well as experiential avoidance have been linked to poorer psychological and emotional adjustment to adverse life circumstances. Notwithstanding, empirical exploration of the indirect role of experiential avoidance between individuals’ attachment styles and psychological quality of life remains largely unexplored.
This cross-sectional study aims to test the indirect effect of experiential avoidance on the relationship between attachment styles (anxiety and mistrust) and psychological quality of life after a marital rupture. A convenience sample of 122 participants was assessed through an online protocol, comprising the short version of World Health Organization Quality-of-Life Scale, Adult Attachment Scale and Acceptance and Action Questionnaire.
Results showed that experiential avoidance has an indirect effect on the relationship between anxious attachment style and lower psychological quality of life (32% variance explained). The second mediation model accounted for 27% of the variance of psychological quality of life, indicating that experiential avoidance fully mediates the relationship between mistrust in others and lower psychological quality of life. Results show that individuals with an attachment style characterized by anxiety and mistrust report a poorer psychological quality of life, particularly when they present a rigid and inflexible behavioral repertoire. This highlights the importance to promote psychological flexibility, acceptance and emotional awareness in individuals who have experienced a marital rupture, particularly the ones with anxious and mistrusting forms of attachment, considering that this may positively influence their psychological quality of life.

Racial Diversity and Inclusion in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Interventions for Chronic Pain
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Chronic Pain

Amelia Welch, MSMFT, Florida State University
Tom Su, Florida State University

An estimated 20% of the world is currently dealing with chronic pain (Boris-Karpel, 2010). While white, non-Hispanic individuals and Black, non-Hispanic individuals in the U.S. report experiencing pain at comparable rates (Nahin, 2015), current research in chronic pain treatment is overwhelmingly centered around white samples. The purpose of this study is to review the research linking ACT interventions and chronic pain and to assess the racial diversity and inclusivity of these studies.
A literature search was conducted using the keywords acceptance and commitment therapy, ACT, and chronic pain. 13 studies remained after incorporating the inclusion criteria to confirm that each article covered a (a) non-pilot intervention study (b) addressing the use of an ACT approach as treatment for (c) an original sample of participants with chronic pain that was (d) published in an English-language (e) peer-reviewed journal (f) between the years 2010 and 2020.
Of the articles included, one article provided subgroup analyses that included race. No other articles acknowledged racial demographic information outside of listing basic sample demographics and seven did not include any racial demographic information. One of the 13 studies did not support the use of ACT for individuals with chronic pain. This was also the only study that did not report a predominantly white sample.
Clinicians may consider this review as they utilize ACT in culturally diverse settings. Conclusions are limited by incomplete reporting of demographics. A key finding of this synthesis is the need for increased effort to improve the racial diversity of study samples.

Self-harm, shame and borderline features in adolescents: The mediating role of self-compassion
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, borderline features, adolescents, self-compassion, self-harm, shame

Marina Cunha, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
Ana Valente, M.Sc., ISMT
Diogo Carreiras, Ph.D. Student, University of Coimbra- CINEICC
Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
Paula Castilho, Ph.D., University of Coimbra FPCE

Borderline features can be identified in adolescents. Some studies suggest an association between shame and Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) and self-harm. Self-compassion is an “antidote” for a critical, punitive and judgmental attitude towards the self. This study aimed to explore the mediator effect of self-compassion in the relationship between self-harm and borderline features and between shame and borderline features in adolescents.
The sample was composed of 432 adolescents, ageing between 12 and 19 years old, attending elementary and high school. Participants completed self-report questionnaires to assess Borderline features (BPFS-C), Self-harm (ISSIQ-A), Self-Compassion (SCS-A) and External an Internal shame (EISS-A). Data was analyzed on SPSS and PROCESS Macro.
Girls presented higher scores of borderline features, self-harm and shame than boys. Boys showed higher levels of self-compassion. Age and years of schooling were not associated with study variables. Borderline features were negative and moderately associated with self-compassion and positive and moderately correlated with self-harm and shame. The mediation models with self-compassion as a mediator were significant and explained 26% of the variance between self-harm and borderline features and 46% between shame and borderline features.
This study added an important contribution to the mediator role of self-compassion to understand borderline features in adolescents, considering self-harm and shame. Developing a compassionate and kind relationship with oneself might have a unique and positive effect between self-harm, shame and borderline features in adolescents.

Spanish adaptation of the Comprehensive Assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (COMPACT)
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Psychological Flexibility, Measures

Salvador Reyes-Martin, M.Sc., University of Jaén
Mónica Hernández-López, Ph.D., University of Jaén, Spain
Miguel Rodriguez-Valverde, Ph.D., University of Jaén

Psychological flexibility (PF) is the key process and target of intervention in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The most typically employed measures of PF, like the AAQ-II have been criticized in terms of their discriminant validity. In recent times, a number of multidimensional measures have been developed that seek to provide a more comprehensive examination of the different PF processes. There is a very limited number of such measures that have been adapted for use with Spanish-speaking population.
This study presents a Spanish adaptation of the Comprehensive Assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (COMPACT) (Francis et al., 2016), a 23-item instrument with three subscales: openness to experience, behavioral awareness and valued action. The COMPACT has shown good reliability and validity. The 23 items were translated to Spanish and back-translated following current standards for the adaptation of psychometric instruments. The COMPACT was administered online to a sample recruited through snowball sampling, together with the Spanish-validated version of the AAQ-II, as well as measures of anxiety, depression, and stress (DASS-21), general health and wellbeing (SF-12v2), social desirability (MCSD), and satisfaction with life (SWLS).
Data collection is currently ongoing. Analyses will examine the factor structure of the adapted version of the COMPACT, and well as its reliability and convergent and discriminant validity. The results will be discussed in terms of the potential of the COMPACT for the assessment of PF in Spanish-speaking population.

Stressless: A pilot study to promote compassion and gratitude skills among university students
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: College students, Burnout, Compassion, Gratitude

Lara Sofia Palmeira, Universidade Portucalense
Ana Xavier, Universidade Portucalense
Ana Barbosa, Universidade Portucalense
Marisa Moreira, Universidade Portucalense
Vilma Costa, Universidade Portucalense

The academic context is highly competitive and entails numerous challenges for students. A recent Portuguese study revealed that almost fifty percent of college students present significant burnout symptoms, which are consistently related to poor academic and psychological outcomes. Thus, there is a clear need for psychological interventions that promote student’s emotional well-being and reduce stress, self-criticism, and burnout. Developing compassion and gratitude skills may be important to reduce students' stress and burnout levels as these have been associated with well-being and decreased psychopathological symptoms. Brief and low-intensity interventions may be useful for college students, as they are economical, efficient and improve access, involvement, and availability compared to more intensive approaches, and are appropriate for the COVID-19 pandemic context.
This pilot study aims to test the feasibility and efficacy of two brief online interventions (one focused on compassion and another focused on gratitude) in college students in reducing stress, self-criticism, and burnout and increasing compassion and gratitude. Participants will be randomly allocated to one of the two interventions delivered through a website over the course of four weeks.
It is expected that by the end of the intervention participants from both interventions will present increased compassion/ gratitude levels, reduced stress, and burnout symptoms. Finally, results will reveal whether one of the interventions is more effective than the other. The clinical implications of the findings will be discussed.

The European Portuguese version of the Determinants of Meditation Practice Inventory-Revised: Preliminary results
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Other, Assessment, Meditation Barriers

Bárbara Monteiro, M.Sc., University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
Marina Cunha, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE
José Pinto-Gouveia, M.D., Ph.D., University of Coimbra, CINEICC, FPCE

Although there is mounting evidence that meditation has beneficial effects on physical and mental health, several barriers to its regular practice have been recognized. In order to assess the perceived barriers to meditation, the Meditation Practice Inventory has been developed and more recently revised. This is a self-report instrument encompassing 12 items along four dimensions: Low perceived benefit, perceived inadequate knowledge, perceived pragmatic barriers and perceived socio-cultural conflict. The current study aimed to preliminarily investigate the psychometric properties of the European Portuguese version of the DMPI-R.
A general population sample comprising 79 (67 women and 12 men), presenting a mean age of 24.22 (SD = 6.01) years old and a mean of 13.86 (SD = 1.93) years of education, completed online the DMPI-R. A principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted. Reliability was examined through Cronbach alpha.
The DMPI-R PCA showed a four-factor solution, with an eigenvalue of 1.06, explaining 68.26% of the variance. Component loadings varied from .54 to .86, and communalities ranged from .45 to .78. Item-total correlations ranged from .24 to .52. A Cronbach alpha of .77 was found for the total score, and Cronbach alpha values for the four dimensions ranged between .61 and .83.
The European Portuguese version of the DMPI-R showed a similar structure to the one found in its original version. It revealed adequate reliability. These preliminary results seem promising, and further analyses should be conducted, in larger samples, to confirm this factor structure and assess the validity and test-retest reliability.

The Me and Us of Emotions: Preliminary results of a program to promote children’s empathy, compassion and cooperation
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Children, social-emotional skills, school setting, empathy, compassion

Ana Xavier, Universidade Portucalense (Oporto, Portugal)
Paula Vagos, Universidade Portucalense
Lara Palmeira, Universidade Portucalense
Sofia Mendes, SPO, Agrupamento de Escolas Gaia Nascente
Vanessa Rocha, Universidade Portucalense
Sónia Pereira, Universidade Portucalense
Marta Tavares, SPO, Agrupamento de Escolas Valadares
Paulo Menezes, University of Coimbra, ISR
Bruno Patrão, University of Coimbra, ISR
Rui Silva, University of Coimbra, ISR

Given the challenges of the modern world, specifically at schools, and the alarming increase in mental health difficulties in young people, it is crucial to universally foster social and emotional skills in the school context.
This study aims to present the development and preliminary results of a program to promote socioemotional skills for children in the 3rd and 4th grade. This program named “The Me and the Us of Emotions” is integrated in the Gulbenkian Academies of Knowledge 2020 and consists of 10 group sessions included in the school curriculum. The specific objectives are to promote the capacity for emotion recognition; to teach emotional self-regulation strategies focused on reassurance and compassion; and to encourage behaviors of social connection and cooperation. Digital technologies (e.g., interactive games) are complementarily used to promote these skills. An experimental design is used, and the efficacy measures address empathy, emotional skills, and cooperation, and emotional climate at classroom, based on a multi-informant perspective (children, parents, and teachers).
It is expected that the children show improved emotion regulation skills, as well as increased cooperation, empathy, and compassionate actions towards themselves and others reported by themselves, their parents, and teachers. This will contribute to foster children’s psychological well-being and, more broadly, to developing more positive and compassionate environment at schools.

The new era of digital-based research: Lessons learned with recommendations provided
Primary Topic: Digital Innovations
Subtopic: Professional Development, Technology and Digital Innovations

Pinelopi Konstantinou, M.Sc., University of Cyprus
Andria Trigeorgi, University of Cyprus
Chryssis Georgiou, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Interest in using digital methodologies and devices in research has grown immensely in the last years. The use of mobile applications during the daily life of individuals to assess behaviors, thoughts and feelings in real-time, namely ecological momentary assessment (EMA), is widely used as it appears to be a valid and reliable method for overcoming the problems caused by the standard, self-reported questionnaires. Using wearable technologies to measure individuals’ psychophysiological signals, such as heart rate, during daily life are also increasingly used in health and clinical research. Despite the various advantages of digital methodologies, researchers have to face many challenges and problems when conducting digital-based research and when using such methodologies e.g., the choice of a wearable device and missing data in real-time.To date, there have not been any recommendations to researchers and clinicians planning to conduct digital-based research.
This study aims to propose research informed recommendations in using wearable devices and EMA techniques in health and clinical research.
Recommendations are provided including the choice of a good wearable device, battery consumption of wearable devices, how to gain multiple measurements in real-time, and the ways to cope with the huge amount of missing data in real-time. These recommendations serve as a starting point for researchers and clinicians interested to conduct digital-based research with the potential to overcome, in the best way possible, the challenges and problems faced with digital means and provide higher quality of research.

The relationship between ACT processes and psychological functioning in postpartum women
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Perinatal Mental Health

Alexa Bonacquisti, Ph.D., Holy Family University
Kristin McMahon, M.S., Holy Family University
Laura Prader, M.S., Holy Family University
Elizabeth Becks, M.A., Holy Family University

Improving psychological functioning in postpartum women is an important goal, with potential benefits for both mothers and children. Postpartum mood and anxiety disorders may be well-suited to an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) approach; however, increased understanding of the application of ACT during the postpartum period is warranted. The purpose of this study is to examine ACT process variables and psychological functioning in postpartum women. The study also addresses barriers to accessing mental health care in the postpartum period to inform clinical service delivery.
Postpartum women (N = 299) were enrolled in this study via online social media recruitment. They completed an electronic survey assessing their reproductive history, current psychological functioning, and a range of ACT process variables, such as experiential avoidance, mindfulness, and cognitive fusion. They also reported perceived barriers to mental health care during the postpartum period and their preferences regarding delivery of interventions.
Results indicated significant associations between ACT processes of experiential avoidance and cognitive fusion and symptoms of depression, traumatic intrusions, and panic. Descriptive analyses of treatment barriers and preferences indicated that participants experienced substantial barriers during the postpartum period, but that flexibility in treatment delivery could mitigate those barriers.
ACT has shown promise as a novel, innovative intervention for postpartum women experiencing psychological distress. This study furthers the empirical investigation of ACT as an evidence-based treatment for postpartum mood and anxiety disorders and highlights potential opportunities for reducing treatment barriers and improving engagement in mental health care for postpartum women.

The relationship between psychological flexibility and psychological distress in student-athletes in the US during COVID
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Educational settings, Student-athletes, COVID-19 pandemic, Psychological flexibility, Mental health

Christina Galese, Kean University
Daniel Watson, M.S., Kean University
Kendahl Shortway, Psy.D., Kean University

Student-athletes are more susceptible to experiencing psychological difficulties compared to the general college population. Recently, this distress has been further compounded upon due to the unprecedented nature of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic coupled with the effects of the sociopolitical climate within the U.S.; emerging research suggests student-athletes are experiencing distress at rates up to twice higher than historically reported (NCAA, 2021), and college senior-athletes are sensing greater loss compared to their teammates (NCAA, 2020). Previous literature has proposed psychological flexibility to be an important mechanism in effectively coping with transitional and stressful experiences for student-athletes.
Thus, this longitudinal study (May 2020-November 2020) aimed to ascertain the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on psychological well-being of senior spring-sport athletes to better support them during this historical time. Our sample consisted of 95 senior athletes across all NCAA divisions and nine sports from the U.S. who completed online surveys.
Simple linear regression analyses indicated both emotion regulation (F(1, 76) = 70.773, p <.001) and psychological flexibility (F(1, 80) = 64.049, p<.001) significantly predicted psychological distress in May 2020; further, emotion regulation (F(1, 76) = 11.244, p = .001) and psychological flexibility (F(1,81) = 15.102, p<.001) predicted satisfaction with life in May 2020. A significant, positive correlation was found between psychological flexibility at the outset of the pandemic and psychological distress in November 2020 (r = .754, p = .019).
We advocate for those working with student-athletes to implement interventions targeted at increasing psychological flexibility as they navigate this tumultuous time.

The relationship between self-objectification, social comparison, eating disorders and self-concept clarity
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Self-objectification, social comparison, eating disorders and self-clarity

Florina Poenaru, Clinical Psychology Master's Student, Department of Clinical Psychology
Aurora Szentagotai Tătar, Ph.D., Babes Bolyai University/UBB

Self-objectification is a pervasive phenomenon which subsumes a variety of negative consequences, such as eating disorders, depression and sexual disfunction. Despite these negative psychological responses, not much is known about the factors that can affect this relationship. Empirical data shows that social comparison process has a mediator role in the relationship of self-objectification and eating disorders. Self-concept clarity represents a protective factor against social and cultural influences, which is associated with psychological adjustment. Therefore, the main purpose of this study is to investigate the self-concept clarity’s effect of moderated mediation in the relationship between self-objectification, social comparison and eating disorders.
Sample: The participants will be at least 89 females from a Romanian sample. Instruments: INCOM, Iowa-Netherlands Comparison Orientation Scale (Gibbons and Buunk, 1999); Self-Concept Clarity Scale (Campbel et. al., 1996); The Objectified Body Consciousness Scale OBCS (McKinley & Hyde, 1996); Eating Disorder Examination Questionnaire EDE-q (Fairburn & Beglin, 2008); Design: Cross-sectional moderated mediation.
We expect that : (1) social comparison process would be positively related to eating disorder symptomatology; (2) self-objectification would be positively associated with eating disorder symptomatology; (3) social comparison process will predict eating disorder symptomatology; (4) the relationship between self-objectification, eating disorders, mediated by social comparison process, will be moderated by self-concept clarity.
Limitations: Using a cross-sectional design, we could not infer causality; The instruments used in this research were self-report questionnaires. Future research: Longitudinal studies; Take into account other variables that can affect the relationship between self-objectification and eating disorders; Use instruments with increased validity;

The role of dispositional empathy in psychological inflexibility for partners of people with depression
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Depression

Elizabeth O'Brien, B.A., M.Mus., M.A., University College Cork
Raegan Murphy, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., HDip, University College Cork

Research suggests that high levels of empathy in individuals with partners with mental health difficulties such as depression can lead to improved outcomes for their partner while compromising their own mental health. Some studies propose that the affective dimension of empathy (AE) diminishes resilience to the distress of a partner whereas cognitive empathy (CE) can enhance it. Psychological flexibility is suggested to be an important feature of psychological resilience. The current study aimed to investigate the role of CE and AE in psychological inflexibility (PI) for people who live with a partner with depression.
A cross-sectional design was employed in which 148 participants living with a partner with depression and 45 participants for a comparison sample were recruited using online platforms. Participants completed an online survey with measures related to demographics and dispositional empathy (Cognitive Affective and Somatic Empathy Scale) as predictor variables and PI (AAQ-II) as the outcome variable. Scores were compared between the study and comparison samples. Exploratory and hierarchical regression analyses were run to examine associations between variables within the study sample.
The study sample scored significantly higher for PI, and significantly lower for CE and AE than the comparison sample. Analyses within the study sample revealed that whilst CE and AE were inversely associated with PI, only CE predicted the outcome variable.
The findings suggest that interventions for partners of people with depression that enhance psychological flexibility may bolster the cognitive dimension of empathy and improve mental health outcomes for both members of the couple relationship.

The role of psychological flexibility and cognitive fusion in compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout in health-care professionals during the COVID-19 health crisis in Spain
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Psychological Flexibility, Cognitive Fusion, Compassion Satisfaction, Compassion Fatigue, Burnout

Lidia Budziszewska, M.S., European University of Madrid & University of Almería
Paula Odriozola-González, University of Cantabria
Marta Villacieros, Centro de Humanización de la Salud, Centro San Camilo, Madrid

During COVID- 19 crisis health-care professionals all over the world were especially vulnerable to suffer from burnout and compassion fatigue. Spain has been one of the countries that were harder hit by the COVID- 19 crisis therefore health-care professionals were exposed to many particularly stressful situations, increase in workload and health risk during work. Psychological flexibility and cognitive fusion are processes derived from contextual- behavioral approach that are playing an important role in predicting anxiety, depression, stress and burnout. Our aim is to evaluate psychological flexibility (PF),cognitive fusion (CFU) as predictors of compassion satisfaction (CS), compassion fatigue (CF) and burnout (BO) in healthcare professionals during the COVID- 19 health crisis in Spain.
A total of 320 health professionals participated in the survey during the COVID-19 health crisis in Spain. Psychological flexibility was measured by AAQ-II, Cognitive fusion by CFQ, Professional Quality of Life Questionnaire and Self- Compassion by SCS. Socio-demographic and occupational variables were also analyzed.
Psychological flexibility and cognitive fusion predicts compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and burnout in healthcare professionals during COVID- 19 crisis emergency. Psychological flexibility and cognitive fusion predicts both positive and negative outcomes related to compassion in health- care professionals. Implications of these findings in designing of prevention and intervention programs for health-care professionals would be discussed.

Derived relations as a response transfer network for Cocaine Use Disorder: A Pilot Study
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Substance Use Disorder

Kenneth Carpenter, Columbia University Irving Medical Center
Richard Foltin, Columbia University
Margaret Haney, Columbia University
Suzette Evans, Columbia University

Respondent elicitation has offered an important framework for understanding the etiology of several subjective and physiological indicators of Cocaine Use Disorders (CUD). However, treatments based on this process have not promoted prolonged reductions in substance use. The acquisition of respondent-eliciting functions via emergent relations (e.g., equivalence) may be another important avenue by which a range of stimuli can come to increase the probability of cocaine use. Unfortunately, this process is not adequately addressed in many interventions.
Match-to-sample (MTS) procedures were used to teach two four-member equivalence classes to five non-treatment seeking participants who met criteria for CUD. One member of one class was paired with 25mg of smoked cocaine and one member of the other class was paired with 0mg of smoked cocaine. All eight stimuli were then presented alone and under extinction. Changes in physiological responding (HR, BP, and Skin Temperature) from baseline assessed the transfer of these conditioned physiological responses.
Two of the five participants demonstrated the emergence of two four-member equivalence classes and a complete transfer of respondent-eliciting functions across select physiological measures. Three other participants, who did not demonstrate four-member equivalence classes, although evidenced other relations (i.e. three-member equivalence; transitivity), demonstrated a transfer of respondent-eliciting functions in accordance with emergent symmetry but with different physiological measures across participants.
These results documented the transfer of respondent-eliciting functions of smoked cocaine across emergent relations, and highlighted several processes by which drug use–stimulus interactions may influence cocaine use behavior.

Threat appraisals of teachers’ fear appeals and test anxiety: The mediating role of experiential avoidance and mindfulness skills
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines, Test anxiety, Teachers’ fear appeals, Experiential avoidance, Mindfulness, Adolescents

Cláudia Pires, M.Sc., University of Coimbra, CINEICC
David W. Putwain, Ph.D., Liverpool John Moores University, UK
Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., Boston University, USA
Maria do Céu Salvador, Ph.D., University of Coimbra, CINEICC

Fear appeals are persuasive loss-focused messages to promote behavioral change, particularly to avoid an unwanted outcome. Secondary school teachers use this as a form of motivating students by stressing the consequences of examination failure (e.g., not able to engage in further education). Teachers’ fear appeals act as a potential trigger for students to engage in appraisal processes,especially threat-focused ones, which is known to be one of the predictors of test anxiety,a higher prevalent condition in these students. However, little remains explored about the processes that might mediate this relationship. Two of the processes known to play a role in test anxiety manifestation are experiential avoidance and mindfulness skills. Nevertheless, no study has yet explored if they intervened in the link between threat appraisals of teacher’s fear appeals and test anxiety.
A cross-sectional study was carried out with 328 adolescents, aged between 14 and 19, who completed a set of self-report questionnaires. A parallel multiple mediator model was estimated, testing the mediating role of experiential avoidance and mindfulness skills in the relationship between threat appraisals of teachers’ fear appeals and test anxiety.
The model explained 59% of variance in test anxiety. Threat appraisals of teachers’ fear appeals were directly and indirectly associated to test anxiety, through higher experiential avoidance and lower mindfulness skills. These results suggest that experiential avoidance and lack of mindfulness skills play an important role in students’ appraisal of teachers’ fear appeals and test anxiety, pointing out to their inclusion in psychological and educational interventions with students and teachers.

Veterans’ experience and preferences of incorporating valued life goals in addiction treatment
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Substance Use Disorders, Veterans, Valued Life Goals, Recovery

Victoria Ameral, Ph.D., VA Bedford Healthcare System
Steven Shirk, Ph.D., VA Bedford Healthcare System
Benjamin Feldman, VA Bedford Healthcare System
Sophie Schuyler, M.A., VA Bedford Healthcare System
Megan Kelly, VA Bedford Healthcare System

Addiction treatment research is increasingly focused on functional outcomes beyond abstinence. Third wave therapies like Acceptance and Commitment Therapy hold promise in this area, as they are largely centered on improving one’s life functioning and quality of life. However, little is known about whether and when valued life goals are currently included in treatment, or patients’ experiences and preferences regarding this approach.
The current study is a planned secondary analysis of a cross-sectional, online investigation of Veterans’ (n≥50) addiction treatment experiences in the wake of COVID-19. Recruitment will begin in late March2021 and is expected to conclude by late May 2021 (based on recent experience in our group). Analyses will examine a series of questions on (1) the importance of personal recovery goals in addiction treatment (across established, empirically-derived valued life domains); (2) the extent to which past treatment has focused on these areas; (3) preferred timing of such discussions during care; and (4) the earliest these topics have arisen in actual treatment.
Results will include descriptive findings across the four questions and comparisons between preference and experience in the presence and timing of valued life goals in addiction treatment. Depending on the sample distributions, additional analyses will compare these questions as a function of sample characteristics including demographics, primary substance, and treatment experience history. Together, these findings will provide insight into the Veterans’ preferences with respect to incorporating their valued life goals into addiction treatment.

What if training away from threat reduces negative affect under stressor? The role of attentional avoidance
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Social Anxiety

Klavdia Neophytou, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Georgia Panayiotou, University of Cyprus

According to cognitive models, attention to social threat is one of the principles that maintain social anxiety. Individuals with social anxiety are known to show attention biases to threat stimuli, although there is inconsistency in the literature with regards to the type of attentional biases they present. This study aims to examine Attention Bias Modification Treatment (ABMT) effectiveness.
Firstly, this experiment compares attention training away from threat, placebo group and a third group of training towards threat, investigating if extinguishing attentional avoidance can also affect anxiety levels. Secondly, this study assesses social anxiety changes with self-report measures, behaviourally (speech stressor) as well as physiologically. Participants were assessed with regards to AB changes as well. Participants were 82 adults with social phobia who were randomly allocated into 2 training and placebo groups. Both assessment and intervention were done under a stressor.
Results showed non-treatment effectiveness in all measures and all groups except the corrugator supercilii (frown) measure. This measure was decreased during a speech assessment only in training away from threat group. Corrugator supercilii reduction at this specific training was presented only for attentional avoiders. The reduction of negative affect (as indexed by the corrugator) can be considered as a useful result for socially anxious individuals in order for them to regulate negative affect and tolerate a stressful situation.
Future research may need to investigate more this result and the possible mechanism of its effectiveness. In addition, ABMT effectiveness and under which circumstances has positive results needs to be more investigated.

Poster Session 3

“I feel good!” Factors Related to Subjective Ratings of Health in Midlife Women Experiencing Menopausal Symptoms
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Menopause, Acceptance, Mindfulness

Victoria Dickerson, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Caroline Kelley, Psy.D., VA Salt Lake City Health Care System
Jennifer Altman, Ph.D., Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, Ph.D., University of Louisville

Nearly 1.5 million U.S. women experience the menopausal transition each year. Most of these women report moderate symptoms, which have a negative impact on perceived health and quality of life. Recent research indicates that various factors such as subjective symptom severity impacts one’s perception of general health and wellness. The current study sought to identify predictors of health perception in midlife women experiencing menopausal symptoms.
The sample consisted of 225 women ages 39 to 59, most of whom identified as White/Caucasian (87.2%). The sample data was collected from online menopause support groups. Participants completed demographic items and measures of menopause status, self-rated health, and well-being as part of a larger survey study on menopause.
Within this sample, 13% of women fell in the pre-menopause stage, 27% in the perimenopause stage, and 31.4% in the post-menopause stage. Somatic symptom severity (p<0.001), but not psychological or urogenital symptom severity, predicted lower perceived health. Additionally, factors such as willingness acceptance, and mindfulness observance, predicted higher perceived health (All p’s < .05). Individually, menopause acceptance predicted self-rated health F(2,148) = 16.641, p < 0.001, and accounted for 17.3% of the variance. The regression model including all aforementioned variables accounted for 40% of variance, F(10,120) = 7.923, p < 0.001.
In our sample, subjective factors such as acceptance of menopause symptoms and mindfulness predicted the perception of one’s health. Given the documented association of self-rated health with lifestyle-related diseases and mortality, factors affecting self-rated health are worthy of further examination, especially in this understudied population.

A Behavior Analytic Approach to Promote Fact-Checking on Social Media
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Relational Frame Theory, Rule-governed behavior

Carol Williams, LPA BCBA, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

Since at least 2017, Americans have turned to online sources for news and related information. Information propagated as false news has political, social, economic, and health implications which have potential collateral consequences of altering resource allocations, changing the status quo, and polarizing populations against one another based on interpretations of virally produced false information or identification with certain groups disseminating false narratives. To stem the flow of false information, online platforms such as Twitter, could utilize bilateral strategies, including analysis of response effort and individual behavior consequences.
This quasi-behavioral experiment examined variables related to the flexibility of rule-governed behavior specific to sharing information using a single subject reversal design. The research determined a relation between the availability of convenient fact-checking services and the rates of sharing behavior. Additionally, the study examined factors relative to implementation of a consequence, wherein participant’s shared information was rated according to percentage of factually checked information and resulting in a publicized percentage on each participant’s public profile.
The study results were that participants increased sharing of factual information with fact checking resources conveniently available; that sharing of false information was reduced with the introduction of a consequence; and that participants overall made use of a fact checking resource when it was conveniently available.
Knowledge regarding what factors motivate readers to determine the validity of shared information and what may deter the spread of false news may provide strategies to improve social outcomes and reduce the negative impact of false information.

A behavioral analysis of a mindfulness technique called RAIN
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Mindfulness

Maria Vuckovich, Private practice

RAIN is an acronym that stands for 4 steps (recognize, allow, investigate and nurture). There are two extra steps before and after the RAIN) which one can add to complete the practice. The RAIN technique which comes from traditional mindfulness practices, can be used by an ACT clinician to foster all proceses of the hexaflex and in so to create a context for counterconditioning of the aversive stimuli in order to change its function.

A Critical Systematic Review of ACT Interventions for Developmental Service Workers and Teachers to Address Work-Related Challenges
Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Industrial Organization Psychology

Kristina Axenova, B.A., University of Western Ontario
Albert Malkin, M.A., BCBA, University of Western Ontario

The aim of this systematic review is to critically summarize the research on the application of ACT related interventions to work performance, psychological flexibility, and burnout in developmental service workers (DSWs) and teachers; as well as how these aspects pertain to the COVID-19 pandemic.
We searched multiple databases to include peer-reviewed empirical research assessing ACT-related interventions with at least three of the following four criteria: measures of psychological flexibility, burnout-related constructs, intervention targeting development of at least one core ACT process, and work performance in DSWs and teachers.
Results of the systematic review found that a variety of modes and durations of ACT interventions demonstrated effectiveness. However, ACT-interventions involving DSWs and teachers make up a small proportion of the entirety of ACT research.
We found conceptual and methodological issues that require further exploration, specifically related to the constructs of burnout, psychological flexibility, and relevant objective measures.

A Single-Session of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Promote Health-Related Behavior Change: A Single Case Design
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Single Session ACT

Thi Tran, M.A., Westen Michigan University
Scott Gaynor, Western Michigan University

A potentially cost-effective use of ACT is a 60-minute intervention, based on FACT (Barreto, Tran, & Gaynor, 2019). This intervention consists of four components. First, a research therapist begins by implementing a focused clinical interview to yield useful clinical information on the targeted behavior. Second, the research therapist and the client use the information collected to complete the matrix formulation identifying internal and external barriers to making a change in the target behavior, and internal and external facilitators of change. Third, the research therapist introduces ACT exercises to assist the participant when identified barriers arise. Lastly, to help promote motivation for change participants are asked to create a commitment statement based on his or her desired behavior change, including a 24-hour goal, a one-week goal, and a 30-day goal. The project is a multiple baseline between subjects AB research design.
In analysis. Overall, the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a brief intervention is still in its early stages. This study will provide the field with information related to the efficacy of this approach to an important area of mental health. Benefits of the study include providing further support through brief interventions and promoting lifestyle changes. Indirect benefits include general health assessments, participation in ongoing research, and identification of health-related behaviors including tobacco use, alcohol use, marijuana use, exercise, eating habits, and sleep. All of these indirect benefits have the potential to enhance therapeutic and research outcomes.

Acculturative Stress Across Disordered Eating Behaviors: A Meta-Analysis
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral medicine, Eating Disorder

Maria Kalantzis, B.S., Bowling Green State University
(Sam) Chung Xiann Lim, B.S., Bowling Green State University
Aubrey Dauber, M.A., Bowling Green State University
Emma Studer-Perez, Bowling Green State University
Zachary Silverman, Bowling Green State University

The relationship between Acculturative Stress (AS) and Disordered Eating Patterns (DE) remains ambivalent due to the lack of a uniform construct, theoretical framework, and standardized measurements for AS. The present meta-analysis aimed to address the quantitative gap in the literature by examining the correlation between AS and DE reported by past studies.
The r-values were converted to Zr with Fisher’s r-z transformation. To examine the overall relationship, we used a random-effects model which produced more conservative r-values in our analyses (Hunter & Schmit, 2008). Additionally, the random-effects model considers both within-study and between-study variability. Finally, moderation and linear regression analyses were calculated to assess heterogeneity within the data.
The overall weighted effect size of AS and DE was r = .186. Subgroup and moderation analyses were run to investigate the substantial heterogeneity detected between studies (Q = 72.16, I2 = 77.8%). Studies that used the Social, Attitudinal, Familial, and Environmental (SAFE) scale to measure AS differed significantly from those that used other scales (p = 0.002). Studies that used the SAFE versus Non-SAFE scales revealed a significant moderator for the correlation between AS and DE (r = -0.2, p = 0.001) and were responsible for 55% of the variances between studies (R² = 0.55). - AS is significantly associated to DE - SAFE is recommended for measurement of acculturative stress in relation to disordered eating behaviors due to its heightened sensitivity and predictive validity.

An Exploration of the Utility of ACT to Increase Tolerance to Induced Pain
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Induced Pain

Madison Dirickson, Registered Behavior Technician, University of Nevada, Reno
Sara White, University of Nevada, Reno
Kelsey Brendlen, University of Nevada, Reno
Valentina Olarte-Mesa, University of Nevada, Reno

Few studies have addressed ACT when pain is induced. A preliminary finding of current research suggests that ACT increases mental toughness among high-performance athletes. The present study will address gaps in the literature by utilizing college students rather than athletes. Our research aims to determine if acceptance will have an impact on the tolerance to induced pain. We aim to help build a foundation that will inform specific populations of techniques that can increase pain tolerance in aversive situations.
We will measure the duration that participants hold ice against their tongue and soft palate while utilizing the ACT-based technique, acceptance. We will compare baseline and acceptance conditions. In the baseline condition, we will ask participants on a variable time schedule, “are you holding the ice in place?” In the acceptance condition, participants will be asked, “are you willing to continue while experiencing what comes up?”
We anticipate seeing longer durations in the experimental acceptance condition based on previous literature. We also expect data levels across all baseline conditions will stay relatively stable across sessions.
Our study is ongoing, but we note the following limitations, (a) the experiment runs on an accelerated time frame, limiting the number of trials we can run, (b) due to the COVID-19 pandemic, all participants will be run online. Future investigators should better generalize the effects of acceptance on induced pain tolerance to real-world situations. Researchers should maximize these effects when prompting from someone is impossible to optimize this research line for military and hostage situations.

Be Gentle with Yourself: The Impact of Self-Compassion on Fear of Evaluation in Social Anxiety
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Social anxiety disorder

Brooke Short, Murray State University

Self-compassion entails showing oneself kindness instead of judgement, recognizing one’s experiences to be part of a shared human experience instead of isolating oneself, and being mindfully aware of painful thoughts and feelings instead of over-identifying with them (Neff, 2003). The process enjoys considerable conceptual overlap with facets of the psychological flexibility model (e.g., selfing; Hayes et al., 2012). Self-compassion has been explored in a variety of areas, one area being social anxiety; Harwood and Kocovski (2017) found that those higher in social anxiety who completed a self-compassion writing exercise experienced less anticipatory anxiety before a social stressor. The present study aims to replicate and extend these findings. Fear of negative evaluation is recognized as an integral feature of social anxiety disorder (APA, 2013), and fear of positive evaluation has also been linked to social anxiety disorder (Heimberg et al., 2014). Both fear of negative evaluation and fear of positive evaluation have displayed negative correlations with self-compassion (Long & Neff, 2018; Werner et al., 2012).
The present study randomized participants to a self-compassion or control writing exercise to explore the interactive role of self-compassion and fear of evaluation experienced before a social stressor. We hypothesized that self-compassion writing will reduce fear of negative and positive evaluation for those higher in social anxiety. Data collection with undergraduate participants is in progress. Future research directions and implications for the use of self-compassion exercises before socially anxious individuals are exposed to social stressors will be discussed.

Behaving Without a Head: Implications of the Headless Way for Behavior Analysis
Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Consciousness

Jessie Schindler, University of Nevada, Reno
Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., Murray State University

Douglas Harding’s 1974 book The Science of the 1st Person: Its Principles, Practice and Potential presented a re-envisioning of the scientific endeavor and a clue as to what it often overlooks: the subjective experience of first-persons. Through a synthesis of functional contextualism and Harding’s work, this poster builds the case for idiographic research that captures the experience of the individual while maintaining scientific rigor.
The features of Harding’s work and its implications for behavior analysis and science as a whole are discussed. Idiographic research is highlighted as a means for behavior analysts to incorporate Harding's vision of a more complete science into their work. Additionally, analogies between Harding's work and the philosophy of functional contextualism are discussed. Ultimately, this poster suggests the possibility for and benefits of a Headless behavior analysis.

Body Compassion during a Pandemic: The Intersection of Well-Being, Health Anxiety, and Body Compassion
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Well-Being, Health Anxiety, Body Compassion, Covid-19

Catherine Hackl, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Hillary Washington, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Marissa Lewis, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Christian French, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Amy Schaefer, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Abbie Beacham, University of Louisville

In 2019, a novel coronavirus (Covid-19) was detected and led to increased uncertainty, isolation, and distress across the globe. We hypothesized the pandemic would have an adverse impact on individual levels of health anxiety and well-being. Reductions in health anxiety and its impact have been demonstrated via the mechanism of acceptance (Hossmann et al., 2014). Furthermore, evidence has demonstrated acceptance-based constructs specific to the body, such as body compassion, are influential in supporting desirable psychological outcomes. To date, there has been no published research specifically examining the role body compassion may play in health anxiety and well-being.
The present study utilized data provided by a sample of adults from the general population (N = 93) to explore how one’s relationship to the body, measured via the construct of body compassion, may influence health anxiety and well-being. Study participants completed demographic items and measures of Well-Being (PERMA-H), the Health Anxiety Inventory and the Body Compassion Scale as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a Pandemic.
Linear regression was conducted to ascertain salient predictors of Total Well-being accounting for 36% of variance (p <.001). Significant IVs (controlling for Age and COVID risk status) were Body Compassion Subscales – Defusion (β = .371, p=.033), Common Humanity (β=-.278, p=.044) and Acceptance (β=.481, p=.007) but not Health-Related Anxiety (ns).
Subjective Well-being may be influenced by enhancing one’s ability to engage in development of compassion with the body as opposed to efforts to reduce anxiety related to physical health.

Childhood Maltreatment and Borderline Personality Characteristics: The Moderating Role of Psychological Inflexibility
Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Psychological flexibility, Borderline, Childhood maltreatment

Mahsa Mojallal, M.A., University of South Dakota
Raluca Simons, Ph.D., University Of South Dakota
Jeffrey Simons, Ph.D., University Of South Dokota
Surabhi Swaminath, B.S., University of South Dakota

Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been linked to history of childhood maltreatment (Varnaseri et al., 2016). Victims of childhood maltreatment may use avoidance as a coping strategy to mentally escape distressing experiences, when physical escape from hostile environment is not possible (Reddy et al., 2006), which can cultivate psychological inflexibility (PI; Boykin et al., 2018). Studies suggest PI is a strong predictor of BPD symptoms (Iverson et al., 2012), with individuals with borderline symptoms tend to avoid a range of internal experiences even when doing so interferes with perusing value-directed life (Hayes et al., 1996). No study has evaluated distinct relation between types of childhood maltreatment (neglect, sexual abuse, punishment) and borderline characteristics with the moderating role of PI. Present study aimed to clarify the moderating role of PI in the association between types of childhood maltreatment and borderline characteristics.
College students (N = 610; Mage = 19.65; 71% Female, 87% White) at a midwestern university completed online cross-sectional survey. A moderation analysis was conducted in Stata (StataCorp. 2019).
The association between neglect and borderline symptoms was stronger at high levels of PI than at means or low levels (ß = 0.04, SE = 0.01, p < .01 ); However, the associations between sexual abuse (ß = –0.06, SE = 0.02, p < .01 ) and punishment (ß = –0.06, SE = 0.02, p < .0001 ) with borderline symptoms were stronger at mean and low levels of PI than at high levels. Theoretical and clinical implications will be discussed.

Citation Analysis of Empirical and Conceptual Applications of Interbehaviorism in Contemporary Research: 1984-2021
Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Other, Interbehaviorism

Kristina Axenova, B.A., University of Western Ontario
Albert Malkin, M.A., BCBA, University of Western Ontario

J.R Kantor’s Interbehaviorism, introduced in the early 20th century, is a system which is characteristic of a naturalistic foundation to explain all scientific psychology, behavior, and activity. Consensus on the relative utility of Interbehaviorism in contemporary behavior science appears to be mixed (e.g., Dixon & Belisle, 2020; Hayes & Fryling, 2019; Jacobs, 2020; Rehfeldt et al., 2020). The aim of this citation analysis is to contribute a form of objective data to the above-mentioned discourse via an examination of the influence of Interbehaviorism between 1984 and 2021. This window of time entails contemporary research and extends Ruben (1984), who evaluated major trends in Interbehavioral psychology between 1937 and 1983.
Citations were organized according to the following categories: peer-reviewed Empirical (experimental) and Non-Empirical (reviews or conceptual) studies. Our key terms included Interbehavior-related search terms. The analysis was further organized by journal, topic, empirical details, and country of origin. Additional information was recorded on applicable non-peer reviewed work authored through university/graduate institutions. Databases searched included Web of Science, PsycInfo, and Google Scholar.
Our analysis revealed that the majority of published articles were Non-Empirical. These results shed light on the ongoing nature of the influence of Interbehaviorism on contemporary research.

Cognitive Fusion Mediates the Relation of Cognitive Anxiety Sensitivity and Rumination in Undergraduate College Students
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Depression

Jacey Anderberg, University of South Dakota
Lucas Baker, B.S., University of South Dakota
Emily Kalantar, B.A., University of South Dakota
Christopher Berghoff, Ph.D., University of South Dakota

Excessive rumination, defined as intrusive and repetitive self-focused thinking, is associated with cognitive difficulties (e.g., diminished concentration and problem-solving; Watkins & Roberts, 2020) and the onset, severity, and maintenance of depression symptoms (Galecki & Talarowska, 2017). Researchers indicate cognitive anxiety sensitivity (i.e., fear of losing internal control) is positively associated with rumination and suggest this may be due to cognitive vulnerabilities for depression (Brown et al., 2015). However, treatment of rumination in the context of depression has proved difficult and mechanisms responsible for change in cognitive anxiety sensitivity following treatment are not specified (Tull & Gratz, 2008). As such, identification of factors that mediate the cognitive anxiety sensitivity-rumination relation and are amenable to change through psychosocial intervention appears warranted. Cognitive fusion (i.e., behavior guided by cognition rather than environmental contingences) may mediate this relation, in that individuals who experience cognitive anxiety sensitivity may become attached to and influenced by their thoughts, leading to unhelpful rumination.
The present study investigated the influence of cognitive fusion on the cognitive anxiety sensitivity-rumination relation. College students (Nf244; Mage=19.5) completed a cross-sectional survey in exchange for course credit.
Bootstrap-based results indicated cognitive fusion significantly mediated the cognitive anxiety sensitivity-rumination relation, ab=1.14, 95% CI [0.92, 1.42], suggesting cognitive fusion may modify the association of cognitive anxiety sensitivity and ruminative behavior.
Cognitive fusion appears to be a productive target for intervention (Bramwell & Richardson, 2017) and may be especially relevant for individuals who struggle with anxiety sensitivity and rumination. Future directions and clinical implications will be discussed.

Cognitive Fusion Moderates Relations of COVID-19 Stress and Anxiety Symptomology
Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: COVID-19, Anxiety, Cognitive Fusion

Lucas Baker, M.A., University of South Dakota
Emily Kalantar, B.A., University of South Dakota
Rachel Bock, M.A., University of South Dakota
Jennifer Kuo, M.A., University of South Dakota
Christopher Berghoff, Ph.D., University Of South Dakota

COVID-19 has infected over 100 million individuals and contributed to nearly 2.3 million deaths worldwide as of February 2021 (John Hopkins University, 2021). COVID-19 related stress (e.g., contamination or financial concerns; Taylor et al., 2020) appears associated with increased anxiety (Jakovljevic et al., 2020), yet researchers have not identified factors that may modify this relation. Cognitive fusion, or becoming entangled in thoughts such that cognition guides behavior, is positively associated with anxiety in the context of negative life events (Bardeen & Fergus, 2016). Accordingly, cognitive fusion may influence the association between COVID-19 stress and anxiety, though researchers have not investigated such relations. The present study addressed this gap by evaluating cognitive fusion as a moderator of the COVID-19 stress-concurrent anxiety relation.
In so doing, cross-sectional self-report data from 232 midwestern US college students were collected from October-December 2020.
Results indicated cognitive fusion (Gillanders et al., 2014) significantly moderated relations of COVID-19 danger (i.e., worry about catching the virus) and compulsion (i.e., checking social media posts) subscales and anxiety symptoms (Lovibond & Lovibond, 1995; β=.18, p<.001; β=.11, p=.02, respectively). Simple slope analyses revealed stronger relations of COVID-19 stress and anxiety at high (vs. low) levels of cognitive fusion. However, other COVID-19 stress factors including financial concerns, contamination, traumatic stress, and xenophobia were not moderated by cognitive fusion. Results will be discussed in terms of future directions and implications for treatments for individuals who experience anxiety that is associated with specific forms of COVID-19 related stress.

Development and Implementation of Group-based ACT to Enhance Graduate Student Psychological Flexibility
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Rivian Lewin, M.S., University of Memphis
Samuel Acuff, M.S., University of Memphis
Kristoffer Berlin, Ph.D., The University of Memphis
Jeffrey Berman, Ph.D., The University of Memphis
Amy Murrell, Ph.D., University of Memphis

Graduate school is a challenging time for students who face a plethora of demands they have not encountered before. It is not surprising graduate students have higher levels of psychological distress than the general population, and recent reports show that universities may not have psychological services that fit their needs, underscoring the importance of interventions specifically tailored to graduate students.
To address the mental health concerns of graduate students, a group-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) intervention was developed and implemented in a university psychological services center over the course of several semesters (summer 2019-summer 2020). The 8-week intervention covers the processes of psychological flexibility through experiential exercises, group discussions, didactic instruction, and homework activities and review. Graduate students are guided in breaking patterns of avoidance, contacting values that led them to their educational pursuits, and engaging meaningfully in fulfilling aspects of their lives despite the trials and tribulations that come with being a student. Clients (total N = 11; Semester 1 n = 4, Semester 2 n = 2, Semester 3 n = 5) completed measures of treatment acceptability.
Preliminary treatment acceptability evaluations show that the clients perceived the intervention positively and believed they benefited from participating.
The results support the social validity and acceptability of the treatment for this specific population and justify continuing to provide the group as well as conducting future studies assessing treatment efficacy and effectiveness.

Evaluating psychological inflexibility processes for anger in college students
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anger

Hannah Johnson, B.S., Utah State University
Jennifer Krafft, Utah State University
Woolee An, Utah State University
Michael Levin, Utah State University

Preliminary research suggests that Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be a successful treatment for problematic anger (Berkout, et al., 2019). However, research is needed to examine the relationship between anger and specific facets of psychological flexibility. The present study examined correlations between anger and psychological flexibility in order to identify the processes most relevant to mindfulness and acceptance-based treatment of anger.
386 college students completed self-report measures at baseline and 8-week follow-up. This study examined the relationship between the DAR and the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire (CFQ; Gillanders et al., 2014), the Awareness and Acceptance subscales of the Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale (PHLMS; Cardaciotto et al., 2008), and the Progress subcale of the Valuing Questionnaire VQ-Progress; Smout et al., 2014).
The DAR was correlated with PHLMS-Acceptance (r = 0.13, p < .05), the CFQ (r = -0.22, p < .001, and VQ-Progress (r = -0.18, p < .01), but not PHLMS-Awareness (r = -0.08, p > .10. The CFQ approached significance in predicting the DAR at follow-up when controlling for baseline DAR (β = 1.78, p = .08) as did PHLMS-Acceptance (β = -1.69, p = .09).
These results show that specific facets of psychological flexibility including acceptance, cognitive fusion, and values progression are closely related to anger. These results support the utility of ACT as a treatment for problematic anger. In addition, techniques focusing on acceptance and cognitive fusion may be the most useful treatment.

Fatigue and avoidance among individuals with chronic disease: a meta-analysis
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Meta-analysis

Jenna Adamowicz, M.A., University of Iowa
Miriam Velez-Bermudez, M.A., University of Iowa

Fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom experienced by individuals with chronic disease. Avoidance, or the act of evading unwanted experiences, is associated with fatigue across chronic disease samples. This study sought to determine the strength of the association between fatigue and avoidance in individuals with chronic disease.
PubMed, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses databases were searched. Eligible studies measured fatigue and avoidance in chronic disease samples, or samples with a disease that has lasted or is expected to last 1-year or longer or result in the need for continuing medical care or impairment to daily living. Fifty-seven studies were included. Data analysis was conducted in Rstudio. A random-effects model was employed, and a single weighted main effect was computed for fatigue and avoidance. Mixed-effects meta-regression analyses were conducted to examine moderating variables (e.g., sex, age, illness duration, sample, country). Publication bias was examined using several methods.
A small, positive association was found between fatigue and avoidance (r = .21, p <.001). The association was stronger in measures of fatigue- and disease-specific avoidance than general avoidance. Moderation analyses of age, sex, illness duration, sample, and country were all non-significant. There was some indication of publication bias; however, the association between fatigue and avoidance remained significant following trim-and-fill analysis (r = .18, p <.001).
Results indicate individuals with chronic disease and increased fatigue experience increased avoidance as well. This suggest that the use of psychological interventions targeting avoidance might help with the treatment of fatigue among individuals with chronic disease.

Further examination of the factor structure of the Comprehensive assessment of ACT processes
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Assessment of Psychological Flexibility

Ti Hsu, M.S., University of Iowa
Lesa Hoffman, Ph.D., University of Iowa
Emily Kroska, Ph.D., University of Iowa

Psychological flexibility, or the ability to focus on the present moment and to change one’s behavior in the pursuit of values even in the face of difficult situations or emotions, is a main target of intervention in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes et al., 1999). The Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (CompACT; Francis et al., 2016) was developed to address the limitations of previous questionnaires assessing the construct (e.g., The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II; Bond et al., 2011) and provide a more discriminating and comprehensive measure of psychological flexibility (Ong et al., 2020).
The current study aimed to further validate the three-factor structure proposed by previous studies examining the CompACT with a sample of a non-clinical U.S. sample of adults (N = 485). Confirmatory factor analyses were performed in Mplus v. 8.3 (Muthen & Muthen, 1998-2017) using robust maximum likelihood (MLR) estimation.
Preliminary results suggest that the original three-factor model provides inadequate fit for the data (chi-squared (df= 227, Nf 485) =1028.121, p < .001, TLI = .81, CFI = .83, RMSEA = .09 [CI: 0.08, 0.09], SRMR = 0.13), therefore, alternative factor structures will be evaluated. These data are part of a longitudinal study that examined psychological flexibility in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic (Kroska et al., 2020).
As such, if a structure with suitable fit is modeled, longitudinal measurement invariance will be examined. Results have implications for the assessment of psychological flexibility.

Getting Help from My Friends: Aversive Internal Experience and Social Support among LGBTQIA+ Individuals During COVID
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, LGBTQIA+, COVID-19

Marissa Lewis, Spalding University
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University
Catherine Hackl, Spalding University
Hillary Washington, Spalding University
Christian French, Spalding University
Amy Schaefer, Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, University of Louisville

Health-related anxiety and social isolation/loneliness are especially relevant during the COVID-19 pandemic and higher levels may place people at increased risk of medical/psychological conditions and illnesses. Social support and feelings of connection have been shown to mitigate negative effects of isolation and health anxiety. This may be especially important for people in the LGBTQIA+ community.
Our study sample consisted of LGBTQIA+ (Nf20) and non-LGBTQIA+ (Nf73) participants who completed demographic items and measures of Health Anxiety, Social Support and Loneliness as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic and stay-at-home orders were in place.
When compared to those in our sample who identify as heterosexual, LGBTQIA+ participants scored appreciably higher on Health Anxiety [t(75) = -2.07, p = .042] and Loneliness [t(78) = -2.45, p=.015] and lower on Social Support from Family [t(87) = 4.67, p<.001] and a Significant Other [t(87) = 2.09, p=.04]. Social support from friends, however, did not differ between the groups.
Results indicate that periods of isolation, exacerbated by the pandemic and stay-at-home mandates, can be associated with higher levels of aversive internal experience, such as health anxiety, and feelings of loneliness especially among those who feel distant from family. Enhancing values-consistent connections with friends and within support communities may be especially important for further work with LGBTQIA+ individuals.

How does Attachment and Trauma severity impact ACT in those with Psychosis and Trauma histories?
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Trauma, Psychosis

Alicia Spidel, Ph.D., Kwantlen University
Tania Lecomte, Ph.D., Université de Montréal

Background: Although Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be effective for individuals with psychosis and a history of childhood trauma, little is known about predictors of treatment response among such patients. Aims: The current study examined: (1) whether severity of trauma predicted treatment response, and (2) profiles of patients with regard to their responses to treatment.
Method: Fifty participants with psychosis and childhood trauma history were recruited and randomized to take part in either eight sessions of group-based ACT, or to be on a waiting list for the ACT group (i.e. treatment as usual group). The entire sample was used for the first part of the analyses (aim 1), whereas subsequent subsample analyses used only the treatment group (n = 30 for aim 2).
Results: Trauma severity did not moderate the effectiveness of ACT on symptom severity, participants’ ability to regulate their emotional reactions, or treatment compliance with regard to help-seeking. Among those receiving ACT, the results revealed three distinct and clinically relevant change profiles. Avoidant attachment style and number of sessions attended were predictive of belonging to the different clusters or profiles. Patients in the profile representing the least amount of clinical change attended an average of two sessions less than those in the other change profiles.
Conclusion: ACT offered in a group format appears to be a promising treatment for those with psychosis and history of trauma regardless of trauma severity. Given the brevity of the intervention, patients should be encouraged to attend each session for maximum benefit.

Is Dispositional Optimism Associated with Subjective Physical Health Across Demographics?
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Dispositional Optimism

David Giard, B.A., California Northstate University, College of Psychology

Quality of physical health is associated with increased longevity and decreased societal and individual costs. In previous literature, dispositional optimism has been shown to improve physical health, both subjectively and objectively. Differences in demographics have mainly not been studied. Understanding the generalizability of research into dispositional optimism could help develop future interventions designed to cultivate dispositional optimism, resulting in increased quality of life, increased longevity, and decreased individual and societal costs of healthcare.
Data used came from the fourth wave of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (AddHealth). Nf5114. The first variable used is optimism, a secondary variable comprised of 4 questions taken from the LOT-R (Life Orientation Test, Revised). The response variable is subjective general health “In general, how is your health?” Demographic variables include biological sex, race and ethnicity, total household income, and the highest education level.
Optimism is associated with subjective general health (p=<.001, Rsquared of .082). Results indicate that Optimism accounts for 8.2% of the variance in general health. Potential confounds such as biological sex, total household income, and the highest education level were found to have independent relationships with subjective health. Race and ethnicity were found to moderate the relationship between optimism and subjective health in some races.
Dispositional Optimism is associated with subjective measures of health. Demographic differences, including sex, age, household income, and the highest level of education, were independent predictors of subjective health. Race/Ethnicity was a moderator of dispositional optimism on subjective health in races including American Indian and “Other” races.

Is Loneliness Impacted by the Judge and Jury Within?
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Loneliness, Mindfulness, Non-Judgement

Aaron Carter, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding School of Professional Psycho
Christian French, Spalding School of Professional Psycho
Lauren Peterson, Spalding School of Professional Psycho
Amy Schaefer, Spalding School of Professional Psycho
Abbie Beachum, University of Louisville

Loneliness can adversely impact health at rates equivalent to or higher than obesity. The physical ramifications are startling, contributing significantly to mortality. Further, loneliness has a deleterious impact on mental health, leading to outcomes including depression, anxiety or suicide. The effects of COVID-19 have compounded these effects in subsets of the population. Interestingly, some studies have shown that certain mindfulness techniques can mitigate the impacts of loneliness and social isolation. Given the context of COVID-19 we hypothesized that Loneliness would be higher among those with high Anxiety Sensitivity and Health Anxiety and low Mindfulness. We surveyed a population of (n=93) individuals between the ages of (18-64+), primarily between the ages of 25-34 (50.3%), white (88.2%), heterosexual (78.5), and female gendered (77.4%).
Study participants completed demographic items and measures of Health Anxiety, Anxiety Sensitivity, Mindfulness and Loneliness as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic and “stay-at-home” orders were in place.
Backwards linear regression was conducted to ascertain salient predictors of Loneliness. The final model accounted for 29% of variance [F (2, 70) = 14.85p <.001]. Significant IVs were Negative Consequences/Health Anxiety (β = .222, p<.049) and Mindfulness/Nonjudgement of Internal Experience (β= -.412, p<.001).
Contrary to our initial hypotheses, neither Anxiety Sensitivity nor other facets of Mindfulness were significant predictors of Loneliness in our sample. These findings do suggest that increasing focus on present moment awareness with emphasis on nonjudgement may influence aversive perceptions of loneliness during especially challenging times.

Is Nonjudging of Internal Experience a Key to Resilience in LGBTQIA+ Populations in Hard Times?
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, LGBTQIA+, perceived stress, flourishing, mindfulness, resilience, pandemic, COVID-19

Christian French, B.S., Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Ph.D., Spalding University
Lauren Peterson, M.A., Spalding University
Aaron Carter, Spalding University
Amy Schaefer, M.A., Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, Ph.D., University of Louisville

LGBTQIA+ people are largely invisible in existing research and disaster response in the United States (Salerno et al.,2020). Existing work suggests resilience is a protective factor during the pandemic (Zager Kocian et al.,2021), but gender diverse persons have comparatively lower resilience (Hunt et al.,2020). Further, perceived stress has shown to be higher in LGBTQIA+ adults (McElroy et al.,2016). Research on mindfulness in minority populations is sparse (Li et al.,2019) and no known work has studied mindfulness or flourishing in LGBTQAI+ populations during the pandemic.
Participants completed demographic items and measures of Resilience, Perceived Stress, Flourishing positivity ratio, and Mindfulness as part of a larger study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic. Our sample included 93 participants who were predominantly female (n=72,77.4%), heterosexual (n=73,78.5%), white (n=82,88.2%), and young adults between the ages of 25-34 (n=47,50.5%).
Compared to heterosexuals, LGBTQIA+ (n=17,18.3%) participants scored appreciably lower on Resilience and Flourishing positivity ratio and higher on Perceived Stress (all p’s<.05). LGBTQIA+ participants did not differ on any of the facets of mindfulness except scoring much lower on Nonjudging of Internal Experience [t(86) = 2.99,p=.004].
In addition to more negative scores on symptom-based measures, LGBTQIA+ participants were appreciably lower on a facet of mindfulness fundamental to present moment awareness-Nonjudging of Internal Experience, suggesting LGBTQIA+ individuals not only already have a subjectively more unpleasant experience, but they also fight with and judge it more. This finding alone offers a necessity to foster acceptance-based skills among those LGBTQIA+ persons who may be experiencing distress.

Just Keep Moving: Positive Impact of Physical Activity During Pandemic Stress
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Covid-19, Perceived Stress, Physical Activity, Well Being

Yancy Nesbitt, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University
Amy Schaefer, Spalding University
Tori Dickerson, Spalding University
Christian French, Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, University of Louisville

Physical activity as beneficial to well-being and coping with stress has been well established in the literature. At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, levels of well-being and stress were adversely impacted across the globe in response to uncertainty and isolation.
Study participants consisted of 93 adults, aged 18 and above. 77.4% identified as female, and 19.4% identified as male. Study participants completed demographic items and measures of Well Being (PERMA-H), Perceived Stress (PSS), and Physical Activity (Godin Leisure Time Questionnaire) as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic.
Participants indicating levels of weekly participation in physical activity that meet or exceed recommended health guidelines scored appreciably higher on all five components of Well Being t(60) = -3.24, p=.002, and lower on Perceived Stress t(76) = 2.53, p=.014.
Results indicate the potential protective role of regular physical activity in support and maintenance of wellbeing in times of high stress, even in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that groups may not differ on these measures due to the exceptional stress levels in the context of COVID-19. However, this was not the case. These results provide support for committed action in regular physical activity as supportive of well-being in the context of external stressors.

Life Stressors and Coping in College Students: The Role of Experiential Avoidance and Humor
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Trauma, Experiential Avoidance, Humor

Marian Amundsen, B.A., Florida Institute of Technology
Kyla Jones, B.A., Florida Institute of Technology
Krishna Patel, B.S., Florida Institute of Technology
Giuliana Berry, B.A., Florida Institute of Technology
Victoria Follette, Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technolong

The goal of this study is to examine coping styles and trauma symptomology in college students. Specifically, the purpose of the present study is to examine the relationship between humor styles, trauma, and experiential avoidance among college students through the use of self-report questionnaires.
The sample will consist of approximately 120 undergraduate college students. Measures include a brief demographic survey, the Humor Styles Questionnaire, the Trauma Symptom Checklist, the Life Events Questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, and a question regarding COVID-19 stressors.
This study is currently in progress, and therefore results have not yet been determined. We are prepared to examine the relationships between maladaptive and adaptive humor styles with experiential avoidance, traumatic life events, psychological stress, and posttraumatic symptomology. We will also compare the humor styles against each other, to determine if there is a relationship between maladaptive and adaptive humor styles. The role of mediation using experiential avoidance with be examined in regression analysis.
This study will be complete by the time of the presentation, and is an important research project developed to further research this novel area. We hope to gain data on these relationships as it will benefit the field of clinical practice to have further answers on humor as it pertains to the healing process. This is pilot data for a larger study of the use of humor in first responders and medical personnel.

Medical Student Perceptions of an Acceptance and Commitment Training Curriculum
Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Performance-enhancing interventions, Burnout, Acceptance and Commitment Training

Andrew Kim, University of Nevada, Reno School of Medicine
Ngantu Le, University of Nevada, Reno
Maebob Enokenwa, University of Nevada, Reno
Bryan Attridge, University of Nevada, Reno
Alison Szarko, M.A., University of Nevada, Reno
Kian Assemi, M.A., BCBA, University of Nevada, Reno
Nicole Jacobs, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno
Ramona Houmanfar, M.A., Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno

Burnout is often defined as a prolonged state of emotional exhaustion and a reduced sense of personal accomplishment.1 The medical student population experiences significant rates of burnout,2 prompting medical educators to construct wellness programs that employ various methods to improve outcomes (e.g., social support, advising, and curricular modifications).3,4  Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACTraining) has demonstrated early signs of benefit in higher education settings.5,6  However, little research has been done to investigate ACTraining in medical education. While recent research suggests resilience training in medical education offers some benefit,7 the extent to which the current literature has incorporated training rooted in a Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS) approach is unclear. The primary goal of this project was to investigate medical students’ perceptions of an ACTraining curriculum at a Central Western U.S. medical school to better inform curricular changes.
An anonymous survey of open response and multiple choice questions was administered to a small group (n=25) of first and second year medical students at a Central Western U.S. medical school.
Preliminary results indicate student preferences for metaphors and exercises in present moment contact, acceptance, and perspective taking (i.e., self-as-context) over those in defusion, values clarification, and committed action.
It is important to target all six core processes within the ACT model for developing resilient physicians. Our data, however, suggest student preferences for 3 of the 6 skills taught, implying a need for further investigation regarding the selection and implementation of metaphors and exercises to best meet the needs of the medical student population.

Mindfulness and Health Anxiety – not Social Support – Associated with Resilience During COVID-19
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Resilience, Mindfulness, Health Anxiety, Social Support, COVID-19

Lauren Peterson, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University
Christian French, Spalding University
Aaron Carter, Spalding University
Amy Schaefer, Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, University of Louisville

The COVID-19 pandemic placed new and unforeseen stress on individuals, resulting in increased feelings of overwhelm, social isolation, and worry about health of ourselves and/or others. Coping with the effects of this ongoing stressful situation has the potential to cause diminished ability to bounce back or be resilient in the face of adversity (CDC, 2021). Resilience has been suggested to be a protective factor against adverse mental health outcomes after a disaster (Joohee et al., 2017) and has been shown to be influenced by behavioral, environmental, and cognitive processes. Given the context of COVID-19, our study examined factors associated with resilience.
Study participants completed demographic items and measures of Resilience, Health Anxiety, Mindfulness, and Perceived Social Support as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic and “stay-at-home” orders were in place. Our sample included 93 adults who were primarily female (72%), and a majority of participants identified as White (82%). Many (50.5%) of our participants were young adults (Range 25-34 years).
Linear regression was conducted to ascertain salient predictors of Resilience accounting for 53% of variance (p <.001). Significant IVs (controlling for Age) were Health Anxiety (β = -.407, p<.001) and Mindfulness (β=.392, p<.001) but not Social Support (ns).
Although support from others is well documented, the ability to “bounce back” (i.e., be resilient) may be more related to an individual’s private internal experiences. Boosting individuals’ ability to work flexibly with internal experiences may increase resilience regardless of their social support level.

Multiple Dimensions of Social Support Buffer the Relationship Between States of Depression, Anxiety, and Stress and Suicidal Ideation
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Depression

Kellyann Navarre, B.A., The University of Toledo
Kelsey Pritchard, M.A., The University of Toledo
Peter Mezo, Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Suicide is a leading cause of death among college students. College students encounter increased stressors and are prone to anxiety and depression symptoms. However, not everyone with these symptoms experience suicidality, and higher levels may precede or worsen suicidal ideation. Given that previous research has found robust associations between social support and decreased depression, we examined dimensions of perceived social support (family, friends, and significant others) as a buffer between three negative states (depression, anxiety, and stress) and suicidal ideation.
Data were collected from 725 undergraduate students (Mage = 19.63; 67% female). Participants completed the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support, Suicidality subscale of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale–Revised, and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales–21. Moderation analyses were employed to test the strength of the relationship.
Analyses revealed dimensions of perceived social support significantly moderated the relationship between negative states and suicidal ideation, even after controlling for sex. These findings held for depression (b = -.243, 95% CI [-.335, -.151]), anxiety (b = -.265, 95% CI [-.372, -.158]), and stress (b = -.266, 95% CI [-.368, -.165]). Perceptions of higher quality support from friends, family, and significant others buffered the effects of negative states on increased suicidal ideation.
Results point to transdiagnostic implications for community-based suicide prevention in college students. Social support systems foster psychological well-being and are a suicidality protective factor during negative states. Future research should explore further variables of interest (e.g., positive affect) and potential contexts that impair real or perceived social support.

Outcomes as Mediators: A review
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Mediation

Annelise Dankworth, University of Nevada Reno
Funmi Sheddy, University of Nevada Reno
Jessie Schindler, University of Nevada, Reno
Emily Faircloth, B.S., B.A., Capella University
Fredrick Chin, M.S., University of Nevada Reno

Recent calls have been to shift from syndromal approaches in psychology toward a process-based account, linked to evidence-based procedures. As an initial step towards process-based analyses, the present meta-analysis explores the mediating effects of outcomes of interest on other outcomes of importance. This strategy may reveal implications on the ways in which outcomes are functionally linked to one another, while helping practitioners identify the most important target of change, when generalized effects are desired.
Drawn from a larger ongoing study on all successful mediators identified in the psychosocial literature, the present dataset includes 69 outcome-based mediators from a total of 58 studies describing outcomes as mediating other outcomes of interest. Mediational data, including timing of measurements and mediational tests utilized were extracted from the studies.
The majority of studies examined mediators and outcomes at baseline, post-treatment, and at follow-up, rather than concurrently throughout treatment. Depressive symptoms emerged as the most commonly assessed outcome that mediates other outcomes, constituting nearly half of all mediators identified in the present dataset. Several studies examined bi-directional mediational relationships among outcomes and found significant mediation in both directions.
The present findings lend support to the importance of examining processes of change, but it extends that analytic approach to common treatment outcomes. In combination with emerging data on more proximal processes of change, these data suggest ways of prioritizing treatment targets in multi-problem cases. They also highlight a common shortcoming in the field, in that outcomes are generally measured only at discrete timepoints rather than continuously.

Pandemic-related adversity and distress: A longitudinal investigation of psychological flexibility as a mediator
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Psychological Flexibility

Manny Stegall, B.S., University of Iowa
Ti Hsu, M.S., University of Iowa
Alyssa Schneider, M.P.H., University of Iowa
Anne Roche, M.A., University of Iowa
Emily Kroska, Ph.D., University of Iowa

Research has demonstrated a strong positive association between COVID-19-related hardship and distress (Pierce et al., 2020). One potential mediating factor of this relation is psychological flexibility (PF), a modifiable transdiagnostic process (Hernández -López et al., 2021). The current study examined the mediating role of PF in the relation between pandemic adversity (PA) and distress.
Participants were recruited from MTurk in May 2020 (n = 485), with follow-up in June (n = 360) and July (n = 265) 2020. Self-report measures included PA, PF components (CompACT; openness to experience (OE), behavioral awareness (BA), valued action (VA)), and psychological distress (K10).
Parallel mediation analysis was conducted in SPSS using the PROCESS macro. Coefficients are unstandardized. PA predicted distress at two-month follow-up (β = 0.34, SE = .07, 95% CI: [0.22, 0.47], t(259) = 5.34, p < .001). A significant indirect effect of PA on distress operated through increases in OE (β = 0.11, Boot SE = 0.03, CI: [ 0.05, 0.19]) and BA (β = 0.26, Boot SE = 0.06, CI: [0.15, 0.39]), but not VA (β = 0.01, Boot SE = .01, 95% CI: [−.01, .03]). Overall, PF mediated the relation between PA and distress (β = 0.37, Boot SE = 0.06, CI: [0.27, 0.50].
OE and BA mediated the relation between PA and distress, and VA did not. ACT may be an appropriate intervention amidst adversity. Given that COVID-19 has acted as a global stressor, identification of transdiagnostic processes that account for the relation between adversity and distress is important.

Passing Time: Effects of Time Feedback on Runner's Pacing Behavior
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Other, Feedback

Patrick Smith, University of Nevada Reno
Michelle Forman, M.A., University of Nevada Reno
Ashlie Encinias, University of Nevada Reno

Feedback is an important aspect of athletic performance and is rated as impactful by athlete self-report. Additional research into self-report on feedback and on the various feedback types is needed. The purpose of this study was to assess the degree to which varying clock feedback, in the form of split times, influences running effort in trained runners. Secondarily, we looked to identify runners who would benefit from training designed to undermine overly rigid clock responding. In addition, potential demographic indicators and results on a AAQ-II and PFSS survey were analyzed.
Alternating Treatments Design (ATD) with four conditions during a continuous running effort. Feedback in the form of split times (pace) were provided to each runner for every 200m (half lap) of the effort where one of four semi-randomly alternating conditions was applied to the feedback. The dependent variable is each athlete’s split time for each split across the 5000m run.
Research results would provide more detailed, evidence-based analysis of performance outcomes based on feedback types, which would be useful for athletes and their coaches. Results from the AAQ-II and PFSS, and Demographics were also analyzed for trends and/or moderators.
Feedback type and rigid clock responding are important topics for athletic performance. However, little research has been done on analyzing the effects of varying feedback types on athletic performance. This study adds to that body of research and invites future research on performance and feedback.

Personal Technology Use, Social Media, And Daily Affect in Emerging Adults
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Social technology, Well-being, Affect, Emerging adults, Adolescence, Measurement, Screen time, Smartphone, Social media

William Crabtree, Murray State University
Sean Rife, Ph.D., Murray State University

With the widespread adoption of personal social and communication technology, significant controversy exists debating the effects these social technologies. Specifically, there is a strong debate in the scientific literature over the psychological effects of social technologies, smartphones, and social media usage. Some arguments are made that modern technology can help improve psychological well-being, whilst others claim it has destroyed a generation of adolescents and emerging adults. The present project aims to address this debate by exploring the current research from a variety of methodologies about social technology usage effects on psychological well-being, including severe discrepancies in survey-based correlational studies, meta-analyses, longitudinal designs, and random assignment experiments. There is also a systematic problem regarding literature in this area, particularly in the validity of self-report measurement instruments in comparison to actuarial assessments of technology use, including screen time. Specifically, there is evidence discussed for systemic over-reporting of technology use, in turn leading to false positive, statistically significant results that do not replicate when using actual screen time assessments.
This project will address these problems in the research literature by using actuarial assessments of screen time in order to see if positive and negative affective variation can be accounted for by utilizing a daily diary methodology.
Data collection is currently in progress, with 49 daily measurement observations (current Nf26; planned N of at least 100 participants).
Implications for clinical measurement and interventions will be discussed, with an emphasis on implications for contextual behavioral science informed conceptualization of psychological well-being.

Predictors of response to weight loss intervention: An examination of acceptance and mindfulness based variables
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Obesity and weight loss
Jason Lillis, Ph.D., Alpert Brown Medical School; California Northstate University
Lara Cummins, B.A., The Miriam Hospital; Lifespan Health

Individuals lose on average 7% of initial weight in response to standard behavioral weight loss treatments, however variability is high, with some losing 50 or more pounds while others lose nothing, or even gain weight. Little research has been done to assess whether variables typically associated with acceptance and mindfulness interventions are associated with response to weight loss intervention. The present study aimed to assess such associations.

This study is a secondary analysis of data from a large RCT testing two interventions for weight loss maintenance. In this RCT, all participants receive an initial, online, previously validated weight loss intervention and are then randomized to experimental weight loss maintenance conditions. The present study examines data from the initial online weight loss period (3 months) and looks at associations between weight loss and acceptance and mindfulness-based variables: psychological flexibility as measured by the AAQ-II, weight-related experiential avoidance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire for Weight, food acceptance as measured by the Food Acceptance and Action Questionnaire, and openness to experience, behavioral awareness, and valued action as measured by the CompACT.

For each variable, we examined baseline score and 3-month change in relation to pre-to-post treatment weight loss using regression analyses. We found a mixed pattern of results indicating that there may be some role for these variables in response to standard behavioral weight loss intervention. We discuss implications, including pre-screening for additional support and the potential of treatment matching.

Preference for Zoom vs. In-Person Social Situations among those with Social Anxiety Disorder
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Social Anxiety

Mila Popovic, Wilfrid Laurier University
Nancy Kocovski, Ph.D., C.Psych., Wilfrid Laurier University
Jan Fleming, M.D., F.R.C.P.C., The Mindfulness Clinic

Many social situations have shifted to virtual platforms during the pandemic. For those with social anxiety, this shift may be difficult or welcomed. The purpose of the present research was to examine preferences for experiencing social situations virtually versus in-person. It was hypothesized that participants would prefer Zoom for situations without an interaction component (being observed by others, presentations) but prefer in-person for social interactions.
Participants (n = 12 for preliminary analyses) with social anxiety disorder receiving group ACT via Zoom were asked to rate nine social situations regarding their format preferences.
Although some participants preferred an in-person format for some situations, an in-person format was not preferred on average for any situation. For two social interaction situations (e.g., talking with people you don’t know very well), the mean fell at the middle range indicating no preference. For the remaining seven situations, the mean indicated a preference for Zoom. The strongest preference for Zoom was for entering a meeting while others are already present, and consistent with hypotheses, this preference was significantly stronger compared to a social interaction situation, t(11) = 3.96, p = .002. Preferences may have been influenced by social anxiety severity; those with greater social anxiety were more likely to prefer Zoom overall (r = .51, p = .09).
These results support that the degree to which virtual social situations are preferred varies based on the type of social situation. Further research is needed to explore the extent to which these preferences are avoidance driven.

Psychological Flexibility Moderates the Relation of Distress Tolerance and Heavy Drinking Affective Avoidance
Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Substance Use

Jennifer Kuo, M.A., University of South Dakota
Lucas Baker, University of South Dakota
Rachel Bock, University of South Dakota
Morgan Maples, University of South Dakota
Christopher Berghoff, University of South Dakota

Heavy alcohol consumption (i.e., drinking until blackout; consuming five or more drinks within three hours; Sadeh & Baskin-Sommers, 2017) is common among undergraduate students and associated with elevated health and academic problems, sexual assault, and accidental death (SAMHSA, 2019). Distress tolerance (DT) is inversely associated with alcohol related problems and individuals with low DT engage in excessive alcohol use to avoid distressing private experiences (Khan et al., 2018; Wahesh et al., 2020). However, not all individuals low in DT engage in affective avoidance drinking, suggesting other factors may moderate this relation. One candidate moderator is psychological flexibility (PF). For example, the deployment of flexible responses to unwanted affective states may support effective coping behavior, whereas low flexibility may underlie ineffective responses such as problematic drinking. Indeed, low PF and DT are associated with elevated substance-related problems (Levin et al., 2012; Shorey et al., 2017) and PF moderates psychiatric symptom-substance abuse relations (Bordieri et al., 2014). Yet, researchers have not evaluated PF as a moderator of the DT-affective avoidance relation.
This study aimed to clarify these relations in an undergraduate student sample (Nf297; Mage=19.2, SD=1.4) whom completed cross-sectional surveys.
DT was negatively correlated with affective avoidance drinking, r = -.272, p<.001. PF moderated this relation when controlling for age and sex, ΔR2=.018, F(1, 291)=5.99, p=.015. Specifically, high PF was associated with an inverse DT-affective avoidance drinking relation, b=-.022, p=.003, whereas no significant DT-affective avoidance drinking relation existed at moderate and low PF levels. Future directions and clinical implications will be discussed.

Psychological Inflexibility as a Transdiagnostic Process Across DSM-5 Anxiety and Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders: Replication and Extension
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Anxiety

Max Roberts, M.A., University at Albany, State University of New York
Eric Tifft, M.A., University at Albany, State University of New York
Shannon Underwood, B.S., University at Albany, State University of New York
John Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, State University of New York

Psychological inflexibility (PI; Hayes et al., 2012) is a transdiagnostic process thought to account for diagnostic comorbidities across topographically distinct disorders. For example, PI is greater among those with comorbid hoarding and obsessive-compulsive disorder compared with either disorder alone (de la Cruz et al., 2013). PI is also greater among individuals with both depressive and anxiety disorders compared with either alone, even after controlling for distress (Levin et al., 2014). The present study aimed to replicate and extend this work by evaluating PI as a process underlying all DSM-5 anxiety and OC disorders, to specify how PI varies by number of diagnostic comorbidities after controlling for anxiety severity.
Community participants (N = 335; 80.9% female; Mage = 47.14) completed measures of PI (AAQ-II) and anxiety severity (DASS-21) and were asked to self-endorse lifetime anxiety and OC disorder diagnoses. Participants reported no diagnoses (58.2%), 1 diagnosis (24.2%), 2 diagnoses (10.1%), and 3 or more diagnoses (7.5%). PI was evaluated as a function of number of comorbid diagnoses, controlling for anxiety severity.
As anticipated, even after controlling for anxiety severity, PI significantly covaried by number of lifetime diagnoses [F (3,330) = 19.98, p <.001, PartialEtaSq = .15].
More comorbid anxiety and OC disorders is associated with greater PI after controlling for anxious distress. The present study shows how PI is potentiated as a function of greater anxiety-related comorbidities. These findings demonstrate PI is a transdiagnostic process underlying anxiety disorders and support the trend toward transdiagnostic approaches to understanding and treating anxiety problems.

Rebounding from Stress with Psychological Flexibility
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Sanela Kalakovic, B.S., Western Michigan University
Kenia Torres-Olson, M.A., Western Michigan University
Scott Gaynor, Ph.D., Western Michigan University

The goal of the current study was to examine if the overall psychological functioning of adolescents would improve using a novel 14-session Acceptance and Commitment Therapy protocol. The existing evidence supporting the use of ACT for adolescents is promising but limited. Stress management is one domain that is lacking evidence. Stress levels in adolescents have been shown to be higher than the population at large (Allen & Hiebert, 1991). This ACT protocol was adapted for adolescents using popular culture references to introduce skills and a group therapy format to foster social connections. COVID-19 provided a real world example of the utility of ACT for stress-management.
Using a pre-test/post-test design with an embedded repeated measures design, six adolescents (100% Hispanic or Latinx) struggling to manage stress were offered a 14-session Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group therapy protocol. Sessions 3-9 were the ACT intervention sessions and included homework review, skill introduction using popular culture references, orientation to skills, activities, and homework assignments.
Group-level statistically significant effects were found for quality of life and psychological flexibility. At the individual level, clinically significant changes varied depending on the participant. Most participants showed clinically significant changes for quality of life and ACT skills.
Participants were able to respond flexibly to the stresses and challenges that inevitably occur. These data suggest the potential utility of ACT for stress management and for adolescents from diverse backgrounds; however, given the difficulties with the small sample size, lack of control group, and inconsistent baseline, additional research is clearly warranted.

Regulatory Focus Theory and experiential avoidance: Examining relationships between focus strategies, treatment attitudes, and values
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Attitudes toward mental health services

Morgan Brewington, Murray State University
Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., Murray State University

Regulatory focus theory involves contrasting motivations—promotion focus, motivated by achievement of positive experiences; and prevention focus, motivated to avoid negative outcomes (Park, Swift & Penix, 2019). There are strong connections between prevention focus and experiential avoidance, and individuals high in experiential avoidance are less likely to behave in line with personal values, which is linked with psychological distress and negative attitudes toward mental health services (Chawla & Osta, 2007; Masuda et al., 2017; Smout et al., 2014).
The current study analyzes focus strategies in relation to valued living, psychological distress, and attitudes toward seeking mental health services. Additionally, previous experiences with psychotherapy were examined in relation to focus strategies. Prevention focus was expected to be negatively related to attitudes toward mental health services, with psychological distress as a moderator. Promotion focus was hypothesized to be positively related with valued living. Participants were undergraduate students (N = 129). The linear regression model for prevention focus and distress was significant, and distress was the greatest predictor of attitudes toward mental health services, though not a moderator, F (3, 125) = 5.01, p < 0.03, r2 = 0.11.
Prevention focus related to negative attitudes toward mental health services, while promotion strategies correlated with value-aligned living and less psychological distress. Additionally, prevention focus was related with more past experience with psychotherapy (Chawla & Osta, 2007; Masuda et al., 2017). Further research is needed on factors relating to attitudes toward mental health services and how this impacts who needs and will receive treatment.

Relationships Between Discrimination, Self-Compassion, and Anxiety

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Self-Compassion

Rebecca Browne, M.S., Suffolk University
Brooke Duarte, M.S., Suffolk University
Sarah Schwartz, Ph.D., Suffolk University

Research has highlighted the negative impacts of racial discrimination on mental health outcomes among racial minorities in the U.S. (Carter et al. 2017). Positive aspects of self-compassion (e.g., self-kindness) have been shown to buffer against the impact of discrimination on mental health (Lui et al., 2020). However, limited research has examined how the negative aspects of self-compassion (i.e., self-judgment, over-identification, and isolation) may interact with experiences of discrimination. Thus, the present study examines relationships between experiences of discrimination, negative aspects of self-compassion, and symptoms of anxiety.
Participants were 348 college students, 67.3% female, with a mean age of 22.15 (SD = 5.65). Students were from diverse racial and ethnic minority backgrounds (1.4% Native American, 27.9% Asian, 38.8% Black, 27.0% Latinx, 2.6% Middle Eastern/North African, .6% Pacific Islander, 27.2%, 3.7% Multiracial/Multiethnic). Students completed surveys consisting of the General Ethnic Discrimination Scale, the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, and the Brief Symptom Inventory-18.
Multiple regression analyses revealed that discrimination (β = .26, p < .001), self-judgement (β = .28, p < .001), isolation (β = .28, p < .001), and over identification (β = .19, p = .019) were significantly associated with increased symptoms of anxiety. However, only self-judgement (β = .73, p = .023) moderated this effect: the relationship between the experience of discrimination and anxiety symptoms was stronger for individuals who endorsed higher self-judgement.
Findings provide preliminary evidence for the deleterious role of self-judgement in the context of experiences of discrimination among BIPOC. Implications and directions for future research will be discussed.

Relationships Between Discrimination, Valued Living, and Mental Health Outcomes
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Values

Rebecca Browne, M.S., Suffolk University
Alexandria Miller, M.S., Suffolk University
Laura Austin, Suffolk University
Jessica Graham-LoPresti, Ph.D., Suffolk University
Sarah Schwartz, Ph.D., Suffolk University

Experiences of racism are associated with negative mental health outcomes (Carter et al. 2017). Theory and research both suggest that attending to, and making choices based on, one’s values may act as a buffer against the experiences of discrimination and promote positive mental health outcomes (Graham et al., 2015; Wilson & Murrell, 2004). The present study examines relationships between the experience of discrimination over the past year, engagement in valued-living, and symptoms of anxiety and depression.
Participants were 348 college students, 67.3% female, with a mean age of 22.15 (SD = 5.65). Students were from diverse backgrounds (1.4% Native American, 27.9% Asian, 38.8% Black, 27.0% Latinx, 2.6% Middle Eastern/North African, .6% Pacific Islander, 27.2%, 3.7% Multiracial/Multiethnic). Students were surveyed on discrimination (using the General Ethnic Discrimination Scale), values-based living (using the Engaged Living Scale), and symptoms of anxiety and depression (using the Brief Symptom Inventory-18).
Multiple regression analyses revealed that discrimination over the past year was significantly associated with both symptoms of depression (β = .26, p =.005) and anxiety (β = .28, p = .002). When engaged living was added to the model, it became the only significant predictor of depression (β = -.39, p = .015) but was not significantly associated with anxiety (β = -.18, p = .07). Surprisingly, results revealed no significant interaction between the experience of discrimination and engaged living on mental health outcomes.
Results highlight the need for additional research on the role of values-based living in the context of experiences of discrimination.

Runners, Planks, and Perseverance: An Exploration of Verbal Interventions to Improve Task Persistence
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Task Persistence

Jessie Schindler, University of Nevada, Reno
Ashlie Encinias, University of Nevada, Reno

Runners’ verbal behavior plays a key role in their capacity to persist under aversive conditions during competition and training. The current study examined the effects of Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) based verbal interventions on maximum plank holds in runners. 
This study utilized a within-subject, alternating treatments design. Nine sessions were conducted with each of the nine participants through recorded Zoom video calls where participants were asked to hold planks for as long as they could. Conditions consisted of baseline (previously learned verbal behaviors), willingness ("Are you willing to continue while experiencing what shows up?" on a VT 25s schedule), and defusion (sing about discomfort to the tune of a song). After the initial baseline session, subsequent sessions were randomized for condition. No condition was ran more than two times, consecutively.
Both intervention conditions resulted in longer plank holds than in the baseline condition for all but two participants. The willingness condition yielded the longest holds for 66% of participants and the defusion condition yielded the longest holds for 33% of participants.
This study demonstrates that ACT based verbal interventions are effective at increasing runners' task persistence. The willingness condition may have been most effective in that it closely resembles a coaching session with the participant being asked to check in on a VT 25s. Future research where this condition is changed to a covert verbal response could be beneficial in emulating realistic training and race settings where runners would not have a coach present.

School-based mindfulness program associated with teacher reports of decreased emotional, peer, and conduct problems
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Educational settings, Mindfulness

Raegan Cupp, B.A., The University of Toledo
Wesley Bullock, Ph.D., The University of Toledo
Leah Kehler, University of Toledo

Mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) programs have been successfully employed to promote physical, psychological, and behavioral benefits (Salmoirago-Blotcher et al., 2018; Beauchemin et al., 2008),including school-based mindfulness programs for children (Dimick et al., 2016; Saltzman, 2008; Semple et al., 2010; Weare, 2012). The objective of the current study was to evaluate a public school-based mindfulness program using a multi-modal, multi-informant outcome design to evaluate the effectiveness. The current study focuses on teacher reported outcomes for the students.
A waitlist control design with randomization to the mindfulness program or to a waitlist control was used. Half of the classes participated in the fall and the other half in the spring. The mindfulness program curriculum included twice weekly meetings for 30 minutes, for a total of 13 weeks (26 sessions). Teachers completed the Strength and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ); (Goodman, 1997) at pre- and post- participation. The SDQ includes a Total Problems score and five subscales: Conduct, Emotion, Hyperactivity, Peer Relationships, and Prosocial Behaviors.
A repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significant Group X Time interaction for Total Problems F (1,39) = 5.138, p<.05, with teachers also reporting a significant decrease in students’ difficulties with Emotion, Peer Relationships, and Conduct Problems, such that students who participated in the Mindfulness Program were significantly lower in these problem areas compared to those students who were in the waitlist control group. These results provide further support for the benefits of school-based mindfulness in reducing emotional and behavioral problems. Longer-term investigations of these benefits for school-aged children are needed.

Self-Care Strategies and Job Crafting Practices as Predictors of Work-Life Balance, Work Engagement, and Burnout
Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Professional Development, Behavior Analysis

Julie Slowiak, Ph.D., BCBA-D, University of Minnesota Duluth
Amanda DeLongchamp, University of Minnesota Duluth

Applied behavior analysis (ABA) practitioners report high levels of burnout, exhibited as exhaustion and disengagement. Turnover, a stressful and costly experience for individual practitioners and the human service organizations that employ them, is a potential consequence of burnout. Work-life balance and work engagement are associated with lower burnout and lower intention to quit. Research concerning behavioral predictors of work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout—all of which are associated with turnover intentions—among ABA service providers is scant. The purpose of the current study was to explore whether and how the use of self-care strategies and job crafting practices influence perceived levels of work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout among ABA practitioners.
We disseminated a recruitment message via email to relevant professional organizations and listservs and posted it on relevant social media pages and in relevant social media groups. We asked participants to complete a survey containing sociodemographic and job-related items, along with measures to assess self-care strategies, job crafting practices, work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout.
In a sample of 826 ABA practitioners, 72% reported medium-to-high levels of burnout. Hierarchical regression analyses revealed that the use of both self-care strategies and job crafting practices predicted work-life balance, work engagement, and burnout above and beyond gender and years experience.
Findings of this research provide implications for researchers, practitioners, and their employers/supervisor, graduate programs that prepare future ABA practitioners, and the profession at large. Findings can inform the development of effective organization- and individual-level interventions that support sustainable individual, organizational, and client-related outcomes.

Self-help for self-stigma?: Evidence from a randomized trial of ACT and traditional CBT for depression

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Depression, stigma, self-help

Carter Davis, B.F.A., Utah State University
Leila Capel, Utah State University
Jennifer Krafft, Utah State University
Michael Twohig, Utah State University
M. Scott Deberard, Utah State University
Michael Levin, Utah State University

Self-stigma is the experience of persistent negative beliefs directed towards oneself (Barney et al., 2010), and is prevalent among individuals with depression (Vogel et al., 2017). We sought to understand whether a low-intensity depression treatment (online bibliotherapy) impacted levels of depression-related self-stigma, and which therapeutic processes are involved in this pathway.
A sample of 142 undergraduates were recruited for a randomized trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression, delivered in a bibliotherapy format over 10 weeks. In addition to self-stigma, we measured changes in therapeutic processes associated theoretically with ACT and CBT. We used a series of linear regression models to determine whether changes in therapeutic processes early in treatment were predictive of self-stigma outcomes at posttreatment.
Reductions in frequency of automatic thoughts, decreases in cognitive fusion, and increases in behavioral activation were all significantly predictive of self-stigma. Additionally, participants using the ACT book saw greater reductions in self-stigma associated with cognitive fusion than participants reading CBT. The effects of automatic thoughts and behavioral activation on self-stigma were not more associated with one book over the other.
Our findings indicate that a low-intensity and self-guided intervention for depression can effectively reduce self-stigma, with a number of therapeutic processes relevant to this pathway. Changes in cognitive fusion were more predictive of self-stigma for those using the ACT book, suggesting this particular therapeutic process which is central to ACT (Bramwell & Richardson, 2018) may more reliably influence self-stigma when an ACT approach is used.

Self-Rated Fidelity measure for ACT

Primary Topic: Professional Development
Subtopic: Other, Treatment Fidelity

Dustin Cox, PT, DPT, LSVT, CLT, ACBS
Anna Quigg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, ACBS

Measuring implementation fidelity helps evaluate practice integrity and ensures methods developed and tested under research conditions generalize to practice (McHugo et al, 2007; Joa et al, 2020). At this time, one peer-rated fidelity measure for Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) practice exists, however, not all ACT practitioners have access to professional peers who could rate their ACT practice fidelity. The purpose was to address concerns about lack of access to peer-reviewers and to ensure the ability of practitioners to engage in fidelity checks often, a self-rating system, the Self-Rated Fidelity measure for ACT (SRFACT), was developed and piloted.
Participants (Nf49) were recruited from social media and list-servs and completed measures of psychological flexibility, self compassion, and the SRFACT. A nonparametric analysis of the relations between the pilot measure SRFACT and other published assessments was conducted.
The following variables were positively correlated with SRFACT scores: number of years of practice (rT = .337 , p <.009, Time1) (rT = .323 , p <.013, Time2); psychological flexibility (rT = .257, p <.033, Time2); self-compassion (rT = .283, p <.018, Time 2); and ratings at Time1 and Time2 (rT = .373, p <.002).
The SRFACT was positively related to practitioners’ experience, psychological flexibility, and self-compassion, and remained stable over the short period. Further testing is needed to determine the reliability and validity of the SRFACT. The SRFACT may be a helpful tool for self-evaluation of ACT fidelity in practice.

Sleep and Perceived Stress during COVID-19: What’s mindfulness got to do with it?
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Mindfulness, Sleep, Stress, COVID-19

Hillary Washington, Spalding School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Catherine Hackl, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Marissa Lewis, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Amy Schaefer, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Christian French, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Abbie Beacham, University of Louisville

The National Institutes of Health report that an estimated 30% of adults complain of sleep disruption. Specifically, sleep latency – difficulty getting to sleep – has been associated with daytime functioning as well as anxiety, worry, and other psychological symptoms. To date, there has been minimal research considering sleep and facets of mindfulness. Some studies suggest that psychological distress may mediate the relationship between mindfulness and sleep quality. Conversely, mindfulness may also mediate this relationship. Evidence also suggests that mindfulness training may be associated with improvements in sleep quality and onset latency through greater acceptance of pre-sleep emotional arousal and ruminative thought.
Study participants (Nf93) completed demographic items and measures of Sleep Quality, Mindfulness, and Perceived Stress as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic and stay-at-home orders were in effect.
In our sample, nearly 70% of participants reported “Poor” sleep scores. Among those participants, 45% had difficulty with sleep latency at least three nights a week. When “Good” versus “Poor” sleep groups were compared, there were overall differences in both Perceived Stress [t(70) = 4.06, p<.001] and Mindfulness [t(68) = 3.095, p=.003], with “Poor” sleepers scoring significantly lower on Mindfulness facets of Describe, Nonjudgment, and Acting with Awareness (all p’s <.05).
Persons struggling with sleep quality and perceived stress may benefit from mindfulness-based interventions with a focus on nonjudging of experiences (i.e., acceptance) associated with delayed sleep onset. These interventions may be especially useful in contexts with high levels of uncertainty.

Socioeconomic and Sex Differences in Psychological Flexibility
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: MPFI

Forrest Parker, B.S., Southern Illinois University - Carbondale
Morgan Franklin, M.A., Southern Illinois University - Carbondale
Chad Drake, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University - Carbondale

This study is a preliminary investigation into the potential effects of self-reported indicators of demographic variables (i.e., sex and socioeconomic status) on observed psychological flexibility and inflexibility as measured by the Multidimensional Psychological Flexibility Inventory (MPFI; Rolffs et al. 2016).
Levels of psychological flexibility and inflexibility as measured by a multidimensional self-report survey were analyzed for differences across gender/sex and annual income groups among 314 undergraduate students by using two-way between-subjects ANOVA.
Results indicated that sex differences were not statistically significant for either flexibility or inflexibility. An effect of annual income was found for levels of inflexibility, but not flexibility. Those reporting an annual income of $50,001-$75,000 evidenced significantly less inflexibility than those in the lowest income range. Those in the highest income range did not show significantly higher inflexibility levels than other groups.
The results of the current study provide evidence that differences in psychological flexibility and inflexibility among individuals do not differ significantly upon the basis of sex. The results regarding the effect of income may suggest that having a higher income may be associated with less inflexibility up to a certain threshold, whereupon high income may be associated with similar levels of inflexibility to those among lower SES.

Subjective versus Objective Sleep Quality and Wellbeing during COVID-19: Which matters most?
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Sleep Quality, Wellbeing, COVID-19

Victoria Dickerson, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Ph.D., Spalding University
Amy Schaefer, M.A., Spalding University
Yancy Nesbitt, Spalding University
Christian French, Spalding University
Abbie Beacham, Ph.D., University of Louisville

COVID-19 pandemic stress has contributed to poor sleep in the average person. Evidence shows that poor sleep is associated with lower mood and decreased overall wellbeing. Most studies focus on objective sleep as a primary indicator of wellbeing. However, research argues that objective sleep measures may not be synonymous with wellbeing and that variability may be partially mediated by subjective sleep quality. The present study aims to explore the relationship between perceived sleep quality and well-being during COVID-19.
The sample consisted of 93 adults ages 18 to 64. Most participants identified as female (77.4%) and Caucasian (88.2%). In this study, participants completed demographic items and measures of sleep quality and well-being as part of a larger study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a pandemic.
In our sample, nearly 70% had “Poor” objective sleep scores. Objectively “Good” sleepers had higher overall wellbeing scores [t(54) = 2.58, p=.013]. Despite these differences, 49% of “Poor” sleepers actually subjectively rated their sleep as “Good-to-Very Good”. When these sores were compared to those who rated their sleep as “Bad-to-Very Bad”, those who perceived their sleep to be better had higher scores on all Wellbeing components: Positive Emotion, Engagement, Positive Relationships, Accomplishment and Meaning (All p’s < .05).
Results suggest that the perception of sleep quality may be a more robust driver of wellbeing than objective sleep quality, even with the additional stressor of COVID-19. In addition, the experiences of engagement and meaning might be meaningful predictors of both perceived sleep and wellbeing.

Systemic Barriers to Implementing a FACT Intervention in Diverse Youth with Diabetes and their Caregivers during COVID
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, FACT, Type 1 Diabetes, Youth and Families

Rivian Lewin, M.S., University of Memphis
Mary Keenan, M.S., Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student
Jessica Cook, M.S., Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student
Katherine Semenkovich, M.S., Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student
Adora Choquette, Clinical Psychology Doctoral Student
Kristoffer Berlin, Ph.D., Licensed Psychologist
Amy Murrell, Ph.D., University of Memphis
Angelica Eddington, Ph.D.

Increasing quality of life in youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) often requires personalized interventions tailored to individual characteristics (e.g. race, gender, age, family resources). Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) is promising for this population, as FACT follows whole person care (including medical and behavioral health) through brief, targeted clinical interactions guided by client needs. To promote wellness among adolescents with T1D and their caregivers, a group telehealth FACT intervention with parallel adolescent and caregiver groups was developed. Implementation was planned in an outpatient endocrinology clinic. However, engagement in this clinical resource has progressed slowly and feasibility data was collected about reasons for not participating.
Data were collected from referred families including demographics, reasons for not participating, and contact attempts. The clinical research team evaluated the qualitative relations of barriers to treatment expressed by families and engagement with treatment within the context of systems of oppression present in the Black community which comprises ~50% of the clinic within the Mid-South, USA.
Several barriers to treatment were present including slow referral from medical providers, variable work schedules of mothers, preference for individual treatment, and misgivings about therapy and participation in clinical research.
Challenges implementing this intervention underscore the need for person-centered approaches tailored to this population that embody cultural humility and workable modalities for treatment delivery. Significant barriers to accessing care already present in the Black community in the Mid-South required additional focused attention to systems of oppression especially within the context of a worldwide pandemic.

The Trouble with Tasks: Exploring How Technology Can Help Us Create Prosocial Households
Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Organizational behavior management, Cooperation

Neal Falletta-Cowden, M.A., BCBA, University of Nevada, Reno
Funmi Sheddy, University of Nevada, Reno
Jessie Schindler, University of Nevada, Reno

The challenges of shared household living are experienced by a range of populations such as married couples and college roommates. One of these challenges is the distribution of household labor such as cleaning the share living space and maintaining the home. In fact, problems with household labor have been exposed as a rising motive of divorce over the last several decades. Among college roommates, the methods that universities currently use to try to match similar individuals to a room are not very successful in terms of creating highly satisfying roommate relationships. The promise of behavioral science is that we can use our technologies and interventions to better the lives of people in any setting, and shared living spaces are rapidly becoming more common and thus require our attention.
This poster reviews the literature on household task distribution and the how dissatisfaction with this distribution can lead to catastrophic effects on the relationships between married couples, college roommates, and various other forms of housemates.
The results of the literature review show an increasing need for scalable behavioral interventions that can operate at the group level and bring housemate behavior under the control of a shared contingency. Results show how relationships of various kinds suffer when household labor is not distributed equitably.
Technological interventions such as apps have increased in popularity over the last decade in areas such as depression and anxiety, and mobile apps should also be developed using behavioral science to help people at the group level (i.e. shared households).

Thought Shape Fusion in a Residential Eating Disorder Sample
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Other, Eating disorders

Eric Lee, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University
Myles Arendtson, Southern Illinois University
Andy Wall, Southern Illinois University
Jennifer Barney, M.S., Utah State University
Michael Twohig, Ph.D., Utah State University
Tera Lensegrav-Benson, Ph.D., Avalon Hills Eating Disorder Program
Benita Quakenbush-Roberts, Ph.D., Avalon Hills Eating Disorder Program

Thought shape fusion, a variant of thought action fusion, is a specific type of cognitive process that is associated with eating disorders. The Thought Shape Fusion Questionnaire (TSF; Shafran et al., 1999) is an 18-item measure used in these populations. The factor structure of the construct has been somewhat inconsistent depending on the sample and translated language of the measure. Therefore, further examination is needed in clinical samples.
173 patients diagnosed with an eating disorder completed an assessment battery at intake that included the TSF. All patients were admitted to a residential eating disorder facility. The sample included 73 adolescents and 100 adults. Construct validity, internal consistency, and the factor structure of the TSF was examined in both adults and adolescents.
Adolescent TSF mean scores were significantly lower (2.81, SD = 1.04) than adults (3.48, SD = 1.12) on average (t = 3.93(162), p < .001, d = .62). Large significant correlations were found between the TSF and eating disorder severity (r = .70, p < .001) and cognitive fusion (r = .71, p < .001). Further factor analyses will examine the factor structure.
Thought shape fusion appears to be a more significant factor in adults with eating disorders. It is a seemingly relevant construct in both adolescent and adult populations as it is highly associated with eating disorder severity. It is important for the field to establish the factor structure and psychometric properties of measures in clinical populations as they may interpret items differently than non-clinical populations.

Trauma Informed Treatment Within a Jail Setting: Potential Barriers and Advantages to Implementation
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Trauma Informed Care

Victoria Visscher, M.A., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Nancy Bothne, Ph.D., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

This study seeks to identify what obstacles have prevented a beneficial trauma informed treatment program from being implemented. In addition, this study hopes to create a list of factors that are viewed to facilitate trauma program effectiveness. Further, the proposed study will examine how perceptions about institutional factors may act as a deterrent or facilitator against effective trauma treatment. Lastly, this study will explore the negative impacts that working with traumatized individuals can have on correctional staff. Determining how best to include information regarding secondary traumatization in a training dedicated to trauma informed treatment would be beneficial for all. These factors are crucial for program development as they would assist with engaging correctional officers and other staff in employing trauma informed methods for their own benefit. Therefore, this study will attempt to establish what practices of trauma treatment should be integrated into the jail system.
Correctional officers were asked their opinions on a variety of topics related to mental health treatment and trauma informed practices within the jail using a semi-structured interview. These interview responses were then coded to determine themes and commonalities that will be used to inform future program development. At the present moment, the data has not been fully analyzed. At the time of the presentation, findings will be discussed.

Valued living and committed action on weight-related health behaviors: A secondary analysis of an RCT
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Weight-related health behaviors

Marissa Donahue, M.A., Utah State University
Jennifer Krafft, M.S., Utah State University
Seth Seifert, Utah State University
Jason Lillis, Brown Alpert Medical School
Michael Levin, Utah State University

Poor nutrition can result in increased risk for overweight or obesity, heart disease, stroke, Type II diabetes, cancer, and brain function deficits. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) can be an effective approach in promoting weight control strategies through behavioral commitment to values-based behavior. The present study aimed to assess the relationship of valued living and committed action on diet health behaviors among adults with overweight or obesity.
Secondary data analysis was performed of baseline and post-intervention data from 70 adults who participated in a randomized controlled trial comparing a Health Behavior Tracking app (HBT; n=21), HBT plus ACT matrix app (HBT+ACT; n=24), or waitlist condition (n=25) over the course of four weeks. Health behaviors related to weight management were assessed using the Weight Control Strategies Scale (WCSS), eating patterns were assessed using the Three Factor Eating Questionnaire-Revised (TFEQ), and satisfaction with life was assessed using the Satisfaction with Life Scale (SWLS). Process measures included the Values Living Questionnaire (VLQ) and the Committed Action Questionnaire (CAQ). Pearson’s correlations were used to assess baseline relationships across measures. Hierarchical regression analysis assessed predictions over time. Mediation model analyses assessed mechanisms of observed relationships between measures.
Findings will include baseline correlations found between committed action and valued living success and importance on weight control strategies. Baseline committed action predicted weight control strategies at 4 weeks, controlling for intervention condition and baseline weight control. Mediation analysis findings regarding weight control strategies, satisfaction with life and committed action will be presented.

What does it mean to “accept” chronic pain? Effects of acceptance on treatment outcomes in a multimodal pain rehabilitation program
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Chronic Pain

Sharlene Wedin, Psy.D., ABPP, Medical University of South Carolina
Bethany Pester, Medical University of South Carolina
Taylor Crouch, Medical University of South Carolina
Rebecca Kilpatrick, Medical University of South Carolina
Jeffrey Borckardt, Medical University of South Carolina
Kelly Barth, Medical University of South Carolina

Though pain acceptance has been shown to play an integral role in pain treatment outcomes, the function of acceptance is not well understood due to its multidimensional nature with both cognitive and behavioral components. This study examined if 1) acceptance is affected by multimodal pain rehabilitation, and 2) components of acceptance are related to treatment outcomes of distress, pain severity, and pain interference.
A retrospective cohort study was conducted on participants of a 3-week intensive outpatient pain rehabilitation program (Nf83). Patients completed a battery of measures at baseline and discharge measuring pain acceptance (Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire), pain severity and interference (Brief Pain Inventory), and distress (Brief Symptom Inventory).
Patients’ pain acceptance total and subscale scores (pain willingness and activity engagement) increased significantly from baseline to discharge (p<.001). Change in pain acceptance was associated with changes in other treatment outcomes, including distress (BSI; depression: r=-.49, p<.001; anxiety: r=-.27, p=.013), pain interference (BPI; r=-.32, p=.004), and pain severity (BPI; r=-.40, p<.001), such that increases in acceptance were correlated with improvements in these other outcomes. Further examination revealed that strength of the correlations varied by outcome and component of acceptance.
Patients in multimodal pain rehabilitation showed significant increases in cognitive and behavioral components of pain acceptance (pain willingness and activity engagement despite pain). Increases in acceptance were associated with improvements in other important outcomes, such as distress, functioning, and pain severity. Treatments for pain may benefit from targeting certain components of acceptance based on patients’ presentation and needs.

Working out, Working within: The protective factor of exercise for flourishing & mindfulness at the start of a pandemic
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Mindfulness, COVID-19

Amy Schaefer, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Jennifer Altman, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Yancy Nesbitt, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Tori Dickerson, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology
Christian French, Spalding University of Professional Psychology
Abbie Beacham, Spalding University School of Professional Psychology

Links between both exercise and mindfulness with each other and with positive mental health outcomes has been well established in the literature. Evidence suggests a bidirectional relationship between mindfulness and frequency of exercise engagement. The current study further examined these relationships in the context of the onset of a pandemic, specifically investigating the potential protective role of previously established regular exercise engagement in maintaining flourishing and mindfulness during broad and nebulous external stressors.
Study participants completed demographic/health behavior items and measures of Mindfulness and Positive/Negative Affect as part of a larger survey study conducted shortly after COVID-19 was categorized as a Pandemic. The sample consisted of 93 adults aged 18 to 64 who primarily identified as female (77.4%) and Caucasian (88.2%).
Participants answered retrospectively (prior to mandated stay-at-home order) how many days per week they exercised >15 minutes. Groups of Hi, Med, Low exercisers differed overall on mindfulness (F(2,83)= 4.78, p =.011) and Flourishing positivity ratio scores (F(2,87)=3.69, p =.029) with all scores increasing with higher frequency of exercise. Notably, mindfulness facets Nonjudging of Inner Experience and Acting with Awareness and Positive Affect were most salient contributors to overall model findings.
In a more “typical” scenario, these results may be expected. We hypothesized that groups may not differ on these measures due to the COVID-19 related context. Suggesting that well-established exercise and mindfulness habits may be able to withstand the impact of external widespread stressors. These results introduce interesting questions regarding state dependent nature of mindfulness and affect/mood.
ACBS staff

Registration

Registration

Registration has now concluded for 2021, thank you for joining us! Viewing of recorded content ended 27 August.

Conference registration includes access to LIVE AND RECORDED presentations.

  • Registration gives you access to live presentations delivered 24-27 June 2021. You have the ability to interact with the presenter and moderators via a live online chat. You will also be able to participate in our virtual, live networking rooms during the event, interact with poster presenters, and connect with other attendees.

  • In the week following the live event, the recordings will be loaded to the online conference website, and you will have unlimited access to watch any research or training sessions that you missed live, even if you were in another session at the same time. This recorded access is available for all registrants (no matter when they register) beginning a few days after the live event, and ending on 27 August 2021. (Example: Those registering on 1 August would only have 26 days of access.)

  • CE credits are available for the indicated sessions after watching a live session. (CE certificates will be sent within 4 weeks of the end of your recorded access.)

  • CE credits for psychologists are available with the CE fee for the indicated recorded sessions (they will say "Psychologists - Recorded" in green) after watching the session AND the successful completion of a comprehension test (75% score required).


Pre-Conference workshop registration includes LIVE ONLY access to the workshop you select.

  • Registration gives you access to live presentations delivered 12 & 13 June 2021. Each 2-day workshop requires it's own registration. You have the ability to interact with the presenter and moderators via a live online chat.

  • CE credits are available for the indicated sessions after attending a live session. (CE certificates will be sent within 4 weeks of the end of your live access.)


Please Note:
  • Additional fees are required for certificates that track the number of hours you attended ($12) and CE credits ($65). These fees cover all eligible sessions from 12-27 June 2021, and their recordings.
  • All rates in US Dollars.
  • Registration rates apply as you register. Subsequent memberships do not qualify those already registered for a refund of the difference between the member and non-member rates. The same is true for students, or other similar status and discounts, unless a full cancellation and refund are issued, and prevailing rates apply.
  • Affiliate members (or non-members who are not professionals or students) may register at the professional rate. If you are currently receiving mental health care we encourage you to talk to your provider about the utility of this conference for you, prior to registering.
  • To register via Mail or Fax, or pay via PayPal, please use the Printable Version: DOC or PDF
  • Formulario de registro en español disponible aquí: DOC o PDF.
  • All access to recordings ends on 27 August regardless of the date of registration. (Example: Those registering on 1 August would only have 26 days of access.)
  • Faxed (1 (225) 302-8688) or mailed registrations must be received at P.O. Box 655, Jenison, MI, 49429, USA, by 18 June 2021.
  • Student Registration/Membership is available to individuals who are enrolled in a program of study leading to a bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degree, are interns, or are postdoctoral candidates. Postdoctoral candidates qualify for Student Registration for up to 2 years, with proof of status from their employer. After this time, they need to register as a Professional. Note: Those registering for the conference as a student are ineligible to earn any kind of CE credits.
  • ACBS membership is required for access to available slides and handouts after 27 August. They will be available on the ACBS website, if provided/permitted by the presenter.
  • NEED HELP? If you're having trouble registering, please email Abbie at support@contextualscience.org

World Conference Refunds:
Cancellation of World Conference registration must be submitted in writing via email and must be dated on or before 5:00 p.m. Central European Summer Time, on 21 June 2021 to support@contextualscience.org to receive a refund minus a $25 USD registration cancellation processing fee.

We regret that after 21 June, refunds cannot be made, however we will allow a substitute registrant (they can receive a certificate in their name). If you need a refund, please contact us via email. (Note: Shared registrations are not permissible... meaning that you can't attend one day and your colleague the next, etc.) No refunds will be granted for no-shows.

It is the responsibility of the registrant to make sure that they have received information related to virtual conference access. If you are registered and do not receive an email granting you conference access by 21 June 2021, or within 3 hours of registering (after 21 June), please contact staff@contextualscience.org.

Photographs/Video:
ACBS intends to take photographs and video of this event for use in ACBS newsletters and promotional material, in print, electronic and other media, including the ACBS website and social media accounts. By participating in this event, I grant ACBS the right to use any image, photograph, voice or likeness, without limitation, in its promotional materials and publicity efforts without compensation. All media become the property of ACBS . Media may be displayed, distributed or used by ACBS for any purpose.

Attendees of the World Conference or Pre-Conference Workshops are not permitted to audio or video-record sessions without the express written permission of ACBS.

If you have any concerns regarding the media policy, please feel free to contact us.

Waiver of Liability:
As a condition of my participation in this meeting or event, I hereby waive any claim I may have against the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and its officers, directors, employees, or agents, or against the presenters or speakers, for reliance on any information presented and release ACBS from and against any and all liability for damage or injury that may arise from my participation or attendance at the program. I further understand and agree that all property rights in the material presented, including common law copyright, are expressly reserved to the presenter or speaker or to ACBS. I acknowledge that participation in ACBS events and activities brings some risk and I do hereby assume responsibility for my own well-being. If another individual participates in my place per ACBS transfer policy, the new registrant agrees to this disclaimer and waiver by default of transfer.

ACBS staff

En español

En español

Con gran entusiasmo les contamos que la ACBS Virtual World Conference, 24-27 junio, tendrá 2 traducciónes simultánea al español o presentaciones en español en todos los horarios de la Conferencia! Además podrán acceder durante 8 semanas a las presentaciones con traducción al español a través de la plataforma de la conferencia. La interfase de la conferencia será en inglés y a partir de ella podrán acceder al contenido traducido.

Gracias a que este año la conferencia será online otra vez y la asociación trabaja comprometidamente con la inclusion y la diversidad, ofreceremos esta oportunidad histórica para todos los hispanohablantes.

Es un gran paso que esperamos beneficie a muchos. No se la pierdan!

Este año, la conferencia se llevará a cabo en la zona horaria UTC/GMT +2.

Aproximadamente de 08:00 a 19:00 en Berlín / Roma / Johannesburgo / Varsovia / París / Madrid.
Vaya aquí para ver su zona horaria en comparación con la zona horaria de la conferencia en vivo.

Registrarse aquí: https://contextualscience.org/wc2021virtual_registration

O si prefiere, puede pagar por PayPal aquí: https://contextualscience.org/paypal

y da la forma de inscripción aquí:

https://contextualscience.org/files/Formulario de inscripción - WC2021_0.docx

y enviarlo a Emily a ACBS emily@contextualscience.org

Gracias,
Manuela O'Connell
ACBS Conference Strategy Committee - Chair

admin

Em português

Em português

É com grande entusiasmo que informamos que a Conferência ACBS Virtual World, de 24 a 27 de junho, terá 1 tradução simultânea para o português em todos os momentos da Conferência! As apresentações também poderão ser acessadas com tradução para o português, por 8 semanas após o evento, por meio da plataforma da conferência. A interface da conferência será em inglês e a partir daí vocês poderão acessar o conteúdo traduzido.

É um grande passo que esperamos beneficiar a muitos. Não perca!

É um belo cuidado da ACBS Mundial incluir a tradução para o português, revelando seu valor de integração com todos! A ACBS Brasil conta com a participação de toda a comunidade brasileira para estar juntos, aprender, trocar ideias e mostrar ao mundo o que estamos fazendo pela ciência comportamental contextual! - Mara Lins, ACBS Brasil

Este ano, a conferência será realizada no fuso horário UTC/GMT +2.

Aproximadamente das 8h00 às 19h00, em Berlim / Roma / Joanesburgo / Varsóvia / Paris / Madrid.
Acesse aqui para ver seu fuso horário em comparação com o fuso horário da conferência ao vivo.

Registre-se aqui: https://contextualscience.org/wc2021virtual_registration

ou se preferir, você pode pagar por PayPal aqui: https://contextualscience.org/paypal

e enviar este formulário de registro:


https://contextualscience.org/files/Registration Form - WC2021 - portugues.docx

 

e enviar para Emily ou Melissa em ACBS emily@contextualscience.org ou staff@contextualscience.org

admin

CE Credits

CE Credits
Type of Credit Available: 

CE Credit for psychologists for LIVE AND RECORDED sessions (95% of the sessions will be eligible for "CEs for psychologists" for watching recordings; look for "Psychologists - Recorded" tag on session pages for confirmation, as well as the existence of a post-test, which is required for earning CEs for recorded viewing).

To earn credit for watching RECORDED sessions, you must watch the complete session and successfully pass a quiz with a 75% or higher score. You must complete and pass the required post-test quizzes by 3 September, at the latest.

CE certificates will automatically be emailed to you by 30 September, and will include the total of your live AND recorded session credits.

The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science maintains responsibility for this program and its content.

CE credit for BCBAs will be available for select LIVE sessions.
BCBA eligible pre-conference workshops:
Viviendo en contacto con el corazón: El análisis clínico de la conducta y los principios basados en contingencias y conducta relacional (“Living with heart”: Clinical behavior analysis and the principles based on contingencies and relational responding) - Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.
Here, Now, and Between Us: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and the power of the therapeutic relationship - Mary P. Loudon, Ph.D., Sarah Sullivan-Singh, Ph.D., Mavis Tsai, Ph.D., Robert J. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
Empowering psychological interventions by incorporating cutting-edge RFT research - Francisco J. Ruiz, Ph.D., Louise McHugh, Ph.D., Bárbara Gil-Luciano, Ph.D.
 
BCBA eligible conference sessions:
Click here to download. Eligible sessions are indicated in green.

BCBA credits are sponsored by Foxylearning.  Thank you Foxylearning! 

Dutch CE credit will be available for LIVE conference sessions. (Symposia, plenaries, invited lectures, workshops, panels delivered 24-27 June. Networking, Ignites, Movement, and Poster sessions are not eligible.)

Types of credit available: SKB, VVGT, VGCT, FGzPt, NIP

Credit is only available for LIVE attendance at the conference 24-27 June. Your attendance will be tracked and verified through your account.

For those earning VGCT, FGzPt, NIP credit, you will be required to complete an evaluation for each session you attend. The evaluations will all be done online and links will be included at the bottom of each session’s page. These online evaluations must be completed by Monday, 12 July 2021. Additionally, you must attend a minimum of 90% of the conference, or at least 26 hours.

The certificates are free for ACBS members, and € 20 ($25 USD) for non-members.

Thank you to the Belgium & Netherlands (Dutch-speaking) Chapter for working so hard to organize this!

Certificate with Number of Hours Attended

As an alternative to a CE certificate, some credentialing agencies (please check with yours) may accept a certificate with the number of hours attended. The certificate will only include the hours of the sessions you attend LIVE during the conference (any recordings you watch will not be included). The cost for this type of certificate is $12 USD.

Information about the CE Process

CEs or certificates with the number of hours attended are available for a one-time fee for the entire online event.

CE rules require that we only issue credits to those who attend the entire session. Those arriving more than 15 minutes late or leaving before the entire session is completed will not receive CE credits.

Evaluations will be available, but are not required to earn CE credits.

CE credits will be available for the indicated recorded sessions upon completion of watching the session AND the successful completion of a comprehension post-test (75% score required). Certificates will be sent out after the conclusion of your registration period. 


Fees:

A $65 USD fee will be required to earn CEs. This fee is non-refundable (unless you cancel your registration in its entirety before the cancellation deadline). Attendance verification and the successful completion of a comprehension post-test may also be required.

The cost for a certificate indicating only the number of contact hours (not a CE certificate) is $12.

Refunds & Grievance Policies: Participants may direct any questions or complaints to ACBS Executive Director Emily Rodrigues, acbs@contextualscience.org, or through the Contact Us link on this website.

  • CEs are only available for events that qualify as workshops, symposia, invited lecture, panel discussion, or plenary sessions. Poster sessions, IGNITE sessions, sessions shorter than 1 hour, Chapter/SIG/Committee meetings, and some other specialty sessions do NOT qualify for Continuing Education credit.
  • (Note: CE credits are only available for those registered as a professional. You may not earn CE credits with a student registration.) 
ACBS staff

CEs for Psychologists - Post-test links

CEs for Psychologists - Post-test links

For those earning CEs for Psychologists - Recorded

Credit is available for sessions indicated (on the specific session page) for watching RECORDED sessions AND successful completion of post-test quizzes. To earn credit for watching RECORDED sessions, you must watch the complete session and successfully pass a quiz with a 75% or higher score.

You must complete and pass the required post-test quizzes by 3 September, at the latest. CE certificates will automatically be emailed to you by 30 September, and will include the total of your live AND recorded session credits.


01. Changing Behaviour to Solve Environmental Problems

02. Personalising digital health interventions applying N-of-1 methods.

03. Advances/innovations in telehealth: Technology-based ACT interventions for transdiagnostic behavioral health concerns

04. Psychological Flexibility as a malleable health target - from methodical considerations to real-world applications

05. Sexual and romantic connection and victimization: Uncovering predictor and moderator variables.

06. ACT with Parents of Children with Health Conditions

07. Surfing the Urge and Riding the Wave Towards What Matters Most: ACT and Integrative Harm Reduction Psychotherapy

08. Together we can build a digital platform to help the world! - Let's co-create and give it to all, for free!

09. Feel the guilt and do it anyway

10. Encarnando metáforas en ACT: Como la experiencia corporal puede ser un vehículo en la implementación de ACT

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

11. Ego is the enemy of excellence: How to promote the letting go of ego (nonattachment)

12. Current developments in ACT for individuals with Acquired Brain Injury and their carers

13. RFT-Based Analysis of Complex Human Behavior involving temporal, causality, and hierarchical responding

14. ACT in action: Examining cutting edge modalities of delivering ACT to meet higher demand for services

15. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy & Birth Trauma

16. Reorienting CBS: Promoting accessibility, collaboration, diversity, inclusion, & longevity

17. Prosocial Schools: Nurturing Teacher and Student Wellbeing and Cooperation

18. Psychological Flexibility for LGBTQIA+-identified clinicians

19. Supercharge Your ACT with Psychodynamic Psychotherapy: Sharpen Your Clinical Work with Defense-Mechanism Analysis as Functional Assessment

20. ACT for Eating Disorders: 3 Key Interventions to Disrupt Maladaptive Weight Control and Choose Mattering

21. How symbols control behavior: Implications for a contextual conception of culture

22. Applications of ACT to Adolescents and University Students

23. Measuring Psychological Flexibility: Challenges and Opportunities

24. Past, present, and future of CBT: Reflecting on the historical developments of radical behaviorism, RFT, ACT and CBS

25. Lessons we're learning from COVID: How CBS and Prosocial principles help us support healthcare workers post pandemic

26. El entrenamiento en ACT para público hispanohablante: desafíos y guías

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

27. A Call for Compassion: CFT with Adolescents in a Pandemic Era

28. Games and Frames: Improving your ACT with RFT

29. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Social Anxiety: An Evidence-Based In-Person and Virtual Group Approach

30. Saying the wrong thing! Approaching difficult conversations with psychological flexibility

31. ACT in the Context of Anxiety and Serious Disease

32. Advancements in Digital Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Improve Population Health

33. The Role of Adherence to Values in Promoting Desirable Behavior

34. Hopeful Creativity: Flexible High-Performance Interventions Within Dynamic Spaces and Places

35. Self-Conceptualization: Self-Relevant Responding in the Development, Maintenance, and Treatment of Depression

36. Shaping Psychological Flexibility with Real-Time Functional Feedback

37. Learning how to publish Contextual Behavioral Science

38. Self Compassion and Courage: An Introduction to Compassion Focused Therapy for Anxiety

39. Evaluación del funcionamiento conyugal mediante la Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy: La Formulación DEEP

40. Youth and the Transition to Adulthood: The Role of Context, Development, and Process-based Treatment

41. Nonattachment: Letting go, becoming free

42. How to enjoy old age in super-aged society: A CBS Perspective

43. The role of ACT processes in understanding and attenuating nonclinical paranoia

44. ACT Interventions and Processes

45. ACT for Cancer: Processes and Applications with Patients and Oncology Nurses

46. Never Good Enough: Responding to perfectionistic self-criticism as a therapist using flexibility and compassion

47. How to improve the effectiveness of therapeutic relationship in complex conceptualization: A FAP perspective

48. A third wave CBT universal protocol and its application for therapy & a community resilience prevention intervention

49. CFT for Caregivers of young people with mental health difficulties: Introduction to essential skills and activities

50. Rapid Role-Play: Flexibly Integrating the ACT Core Processes into Therapy

51. Rule Busting: Using the RFT account of rule-following to promote flexible, appropriately contextualized responding

52. CBS on a Large Scale: Applications to Higher Education, Sociopolitical Conflict and Healthcare

53. Empirical innovations in psychometric development & validation of self-report measures of psychological flexibility

54. Context Matters: Actionable Behavioral Conceptualizations of Matters of Social Significance

55. Upping our game: Research methods for contextual behavioral science

56. Clinicians' Perspectives on Clinical Behavior Analysis: Concepts & Clinical Implications

57. Awareness Courage and Love Accessing Self Forgiveness To Rewrite Your Pandemic Story

58. ACT made simpler, easier and effective: six steps to psychological flexibility with the ACT Matrix

59. Identificando patrones de flexibilidad e inflexibilidad psicológica en niños

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

60. Linking Values to Other ACT Processes

61. From Rats to Walden II Revisited: Research Reflections on Contemporary Issues in Contextual Behavior Science

62. 100RCTs: Reviewing Up-to-Date Research on ACT

63. The Latest Advancements in RFT and Future Directions

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

64. A CBS perspective on the dialogue between Buddhist traditions and empirically-supported systems of behavior change

65. Psychedelics and Psychological Flexibility: A CBS Account of Processes of Change

66. Supporting Caregivers of those with Memory Loss Through ACT and DBT

67. Improving supervision using FAP-Based on Processes: Strengthening Supervisor-Supervisee relationship

68. ACT for Gastrointestinal Disorders in Youth: Neuroscience Metaphors, Functional Goals, and Measurable Outcomes

69. El dolor en la aceptación: Favorecer la apertura para incrementar la experiencia sentida del consultante

70. The Challenge of Change in Couples: How Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy brings about change and acceptance

71. Understanding the role of contextual behavioral science in obesity and obesity treatments

72. Leveraging ACT and Values to Increase Treatment Adherence in Diverse Healthcare Contexts

73. CBS Research Task Force Report: Recommendations with Commentary

74. Variation with Vignettes: Responding to Clinical Presentations from the Perspectives of ACT, FAP, RFT, and CFT

75. Inspiring Stories: Global Perspectives On Facilitating Climate Action in a Just and Culturally Sensitive Manner

76. Using Exposure to Strengthen Psychological Flexibility

77. ACT Quest: Gamifying Therapy for Treating Anxiety and Trauma

78. Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP): Cultivating the Sacred in Therapy and Beyond

79. Charting a path towards a just and caring future for transgender people: A CBS approach to addressing discrimination

80. Internet interventions in the era of a pandemic

81. The complexities of compassion: What inhibits it and how we can help facilitate it

82. ACT with adolescents: Preliminary outcomes and processes of change across contexts

83. Recent theoretical and empirical advances in understanding and remediating rigid rule-governed behavior.

84. Community-Based Interventions and Cultural Adaptations

85. Shaping Supervision: Developing ACT consistent Supervision Skills

86. Breaking the Binds of Body Image using ACT

87. Top 5 mistakes you don't want to make as an [ACT] therapist

88. Stuff that's Stuck: ACT for Difficult to Engage Teens

89. Making smashing smartphone content from your academic pursuits

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

90. Trauma-Focused ACT: Working With Mind, Body and Emotion

91. Psychological flexibility, mental health and health behavior in the context of COVID: An international perspective

92. Bend, But Don't Break: Psychological Inflexibility and Responses to Trauma, Abuse, and Assault

93. Psychological Flexibility Processes: Evidence and Explorations

94. Harnessing ACT to develop/deliver innovative interventions targeting university students' health & illicit drug use

95. Case Conceptualization and Treatment of a Cancer Case from a CBS Perspective

96. Group Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for psychosis: recovery and connection across cultures

97. Honing your ACT-skills with peers: An experiential introduction to the Portland model of peer consultation

98. Clinical Behavior Analysis for Behavioral Newbies: Intervening on Context, Behavior, and the Psychological Present

99. Dancing with the Elephant: Using the ACT Matrix to Guide Conversations about Race

100. Mindfulness and acceptance based approaches for psychosis: current evidence and future directions

101. Processes of Psychological Flexibility in the Development and Maintenance of Disordered Eating Symptoms

102. Loneliness, Social Interactions and Couples: Empirical Investigations and Interventions

103. Finding Your Home in ACBS

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

104. Increasing Cultural Responsiveness in Work with Latinx Caregivers of those with Anxiety and Autism Spectrum Disorders

105. CBS Interventions for Underserved Populations: When Client Context Selects Novel Treatment Approaches

106. Contextual Behavioral Science and Atlas Hugged: A Meta-conversation

107. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Managing Cravings and Addictive Behaviors

108. MAPping for Now: Understanding Procrastination through an ACT Lens and Using the Mindful Action Plan to Address It

109. Análisis funcional de los patrones problemáticos de rumia y preocupación

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

110. Sociocultural, Diversity, and Equity Issues and ACT/CBS

111. The parent trap: Psychological flexibility, mindfulness, and observable behaviors among parents and caregivers

112. ACT Functional Analysis and Treatment in ABA Settings: Working with Caregivers, Employees, and Athletes

113. Interbehaviorism: Then and Now, All the Way, and In the Room

114. Advancements in the Treatment of Children and Adolescents

115. Process-Based CBT, Open Science and Other Trends

116. Integrating CBS principles into suicide prevention and intervention

117. Magic ACT: Transforming (Emotional) Pain into Purpose with Clinical RFT

118. Truffle hunting: Bringing Values to Life in the Therapy Room

119. Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World

120. Psychological flexibility as a transdiagnostic dimension in adolescents and young people

121. Implementation and dissemination of ACT for youth around the world using DNA-V

122. Evaluating Valuing Measures and Conceptualization in Research, Digital Interventions, & Clinical Conceptualizations

123. ACT Philosophy and Empirical Investigations of the Self

124. On Becoming a Peer Reviewed Trainer: Shared Experiences and Support

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

125. The Flexible Mind: Acceptance and Commitment Approaches to Athletes' Wellbeing and Performance

126. Prosocial for Social Activists

127. ACT and Psychosis: Creating a context for behavior change, together!

128. Improving our Tools: The Fundamentals of Crafting and Optimizing Measures

129. The ACT Therapeutic Relationship: Creating Healthy Alliances and Repairing Ruptures

130.IRAP can capture Japanese’s AARRs in flight: Interpreting from DAARRE model

131. Investigating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Interventions and Processes in Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders

132. ACT and Chronic Health Conditions: Opportunities, Challenges, and Future Directions

133. Validación y comunicación entre pacientes con cáncer y sus cuidadores primarios

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

134. Moving from the Illusion of Equity to Meaningful Action: A Prosocial Approach to Overcoming Barriers

135. ACT for Adolescents: Lessons learned in cyberspace

136. Lo experiencial en la psicoterapia: Los Niveles de Interacción Clínica

Recorded CEs for Psychologists not available for this session.

137. You-Here-Now: Using FAP to Respond More Effectively To Your Challenges as a Therapist

138. Belonging As Our Birthright: Cultivating Belonging from the Inside Out

139. Enhancing College Student Mental Healthcare with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

140. Self-as-context: Theory, evidence, and applications beyond traditional psychotherapy

141. Digital Interventions for Health Behavior Change: Innovations Using Acceptance & Mindfulness-Based Approaches

142. ACT Functional Analysis and Treatment in ABA Settings: Children with ASD and Related Disorders

143. Contextual behavioral analyses of the conceptualization and intervention in worry and rumination

144. Values, Vulnerability, and Consensual Non-Monogamy

145. Philosophy Bakes Bread: Practical Implications of Interbehavioral Perspectives on Applied Work

146. ACT in the Treatment of Trauma: Clinical Panel on Emotional Processing, Recovery, and Growth

147. A Zoom for Two...and Their Minds

148. El trabajo de exposición en la persona del terapeuta: “exponerse para exponer mejor”

ACBS staff

Conference Awards & Scholarships

Conference Awards & Scholarships

All available Conference Awards have been awarded for the 2021 Virtual World Conference.  Read more about those awarded here.

 

 

 

 

 

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Follies

Follies

Follies!

6:50pm – 8:15pm-ish? (GMT +2)
Saturday, 26 June

The Follies is an annual tradition with the intention of not taking ourselves too seriously. This year the focus is on a positive celebration and demonstrating the talent in our membership… think “ACBS’s Got Talent.” Examples include (but are not limited to): positive songs, parodies of songs, poems, skits, and sing-alongs related to our work and the community.

Dr. DJ Moran and Dr. Dayna Lee-Baggley will co-host live but all the submissions have to be submitted via video (no live performances). Videos should be no longer than 4 minutes and need to be sent to DJ by 19:00 (GMT+2) on Friday, 25 June.

The Follies will be hosted on the same Zoom platform as the rest of the conference. The audience will be able to participate through the chat function. It will also be recorded like the other sessions, so remember this one will be around for all eternity.

If you want more information email DJ: dj@drdjmoran.com

admin

Invited Speakers for VIRTUAL WC2021

Invited Speakers for VIRTUAL WC2021

Plenary Speakers

Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D., Columbia University

Anne Marie Albano is a professor of medical psychology, a clinical psychologist and board certified in clinical child and adolescent psychology. She also serves as the Director of the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders.

Dr. Albano will be giving the following presentation: Youth and the Transition to Adulthood: The Role of Context, Development, and Process-based Treatment.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Gerhard Andersson, Ph.D., Linköping University

Professor Gerhard Andersson, Ph.D. is full professor of Clinical Psychology at Linköping University, in the Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, and the Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences.

Dr. Andersson will be giving the following presentation: Internet interventions in the era of a pandemic.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., Australian Catholic University

Joseph Ciarrochi is professor at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University.

Dr. Ciarrochi will be giving the following presentation: Nonattachment: Letting go, becoming free.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D., McLean/Harvard Medical School 

Dr. Coyne is the current President of ACBS, and an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. She is a Research Coordinator on the Coalition of Behavioral Science Climate Change Task Force.

Dr. Coyne will be giving the presentation: Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Jo Lloyd, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
 

Jo Lloyd is a senior lecturer and researcher in psychology and management at Goldsmiths, University of London. 

Dr. Lloyd will be giving the follwing presentation: Charting a path towards a just and caring future for transgender people: A CBS approach to addressing discrimination on interpersonal, institutional, and systemic levels.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Linda Steg, University of Groningen
 

Linda Steg is a professor of environmental psychology at the University of Groningen. She studies factors influencing sustainable behaviour, the effects and acceptability of strategies aimed at promoting sustainable behaviour, and public perceptions of technology and system changes.

Linda will be giving the following presentation: Changing behaviour to solve environmental problems.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Invited Speakers

Joanna Arch, Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder

Dr. Joanna Arch is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder, Member in Cancer Prevention and Control at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, and a licensed clinical psychologist.

Dr. Arch will be giving the following presentation: ACT in the Context of Anxiety and Serious Disease.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Andrew Christensen, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Andrew Christensen is a Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dr. Christensen will be giving the following workshop: The Challenge of Change in Couples: How Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy brings about change and acceptance.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Kenneth Fung, M.D. FRCPC MSc, University of Toronto

Dr. Kenneth Fung is Staff Psychiatrist and Clinical Director of the Asian Initiative in Mental Health Program at the Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network and Associate Professor with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. 

Dr. Fung will be giving the following presentation: Sociocultural, Diversity, and Equity Issues and ACT/CBS.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


James Kirby, Ph.D., The University of Queensland

James is a Senior Lecturer, Clinical Psychologist and Co-Director of the Compassionate Mind Research Group at School of Psychology at The University of Queensland. 

Dr. Kirby will be giving the following presentation: The complexities of compassion: What inhibits it and how we can help facilitate it.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Dominika Kwasnicka, MA, MSc, Ph.D., University of Melbourne

Dominika is a research fellow at the University of Melbourne; she is a behavioural scientist who has diverse interests in health psychology, digital health and research methods focusing on individuals. 

Dr. Kwasnicka will be giving the following presentation: Personalizing digital health interventions applying N-of-1 methods.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Takashi Muto, Ph.D., Doshisha University

Takashi Muto, Ph.D. is a full professor and the Dean of the Department of Psychology at Doshisha University. 

Dr. Muto will be giving the following presentaiton: How to enjoy old age in super-aged society: A perspective of Contextual Behavioral Science. (超高齢化社会で老年期を楽しむ方法:文脈的行動科学からの観点)

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Júlio De Rose, Ph.D., Universidade Federal de São Carlos

Professor of Psychology at Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil, and Research Director of the National Institute for Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition, and Teaching. Associate Editor of The Psychological Record.

Dr. De Rose will be giving the following presentation: How symbols control behavior: Implications for a contextual conception of culture.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Kelly Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University at Mississippi. 

Dr. Wilson will be giving the following workshop: Linking Values to Other ACT Processes.
 

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.

staff_1

Invited Speakers - Bios and Abstracts

Invited Speakers - Bios and Abstracts

Plenary Speakers

Anne Marie Albano, Ph.D., Columbia University

Anne Marie Albano is Professor of Medical Psychology in Psychiatry at Columbia University and Founder of the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders and Clinical Site Director of New York Presbyterian Hospital’s Youth Anxiety Center, and Executive Director of Modern Minds of Charleston, SC. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Mississippi. Dr. Albano is a Fellow of the American Psychological Association, Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT), Founding Fellow of the Academy of Cognitive Therapy, a Beck Institute Scholar, and is Board Certified in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. She is the recipient of the 2015 ABCT Award for Outstanding Contributions by an Individual for Clinical Activities. Dr. Albano is a past President of the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology of the American Psychological Association and also past-president of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT). She is past editor of Cognitive and Behavioral Practice and Associate Editor of the Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology. Dr. Albano was the inaugural editor of the journal “Evidence-Based Practice in Child and Adolescent Mental Health” published by the Society for Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology. She has published more than 200 articles and chapters and is the co-author of several cognitive behavioral treatment manuals and of the Anxiety Disorders Interview Schedule for Children, all published by Oxford University Press. Dr. Albano served as a Principal Investigator of a 6-site, National Institute of Mental Health-sponsored study entitled “Child/Adolescent Anxiety Multimodal Treatment Study” (CAMS) and the Extended Long Term Follow Up of CAMS (CAMELS) and also was a PI for the Treatments for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) and the Substance Use Outcomes following TADS follow up trial (SOFTADS). These trials examined the relative efficacy and long term impact of CBT, medication, combination treatment, and pill placebo in youth. Her book with Leslie Pepper, You and Your Anxious Child: Free Your Child from Fears and Worries and Create a Joyful Family Life, was a 2014 ABCT Self-Help Book Award winner and 2014 Self-Help Book Award winner from the American Society of Journalists and Authors. In 2015, a new ABCT award was established in Dr. Albano’s name by a family to encourage the proliferation of evidence-based treatment, the Anne Marie Albano Early Career Award for Excellence in the Integration of Science and Practice.

Youth and the Transition to Adulthood: The Role of Context, Development, and Process-based Treatment

The developmental transition through early adulthood is a time of uncertainty and anxiety but also of optimism and growth. For youth with anxiety disorders, everyday tasks become insurmountable, resulting in a failure to achieve independent functioning. CBT and medication are effective treatments for anxiety in youth however, long-term remission through the transition to adulthood is not maintained for half of effectively treated youth, rendering risks for future mental health problems and long term dependency. Traditionally, symptom remission is the focus of treatment, with family context being minimally involved in empirical studies as well as in community-based care. In addition, developmental milestones and age-appropriate functioning has not been a primary target of treatment. And, the unique contextual features of the environments and situations experienced by youth calls for specific attention from therapists in delivering ecologically valid exposure and treatment goals that are meaningful and values-based for the youth. This talk will describe a novel model consistent with ACT and a process-oriented approach with an emphasis on novel components addressing development, parental “letting go” by engaging and addressing core beliefs and fears of the parents and their emerging adult child, and engaging youth in ecologically valid treatment.


 

Gerhard Andersson, Ph.D., Linköping University

Professor Gerhard Andersson, Ph.D. is full professor of Clinical Psychology at Linköping University, in the Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, and the Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Professor Andersson received his education at Uppsala University, Department of Psychology, and graduated in 1991 (M.Sc. Clinical Psychology). His first Ph.D. was in Clinical Psychology (1995), and his second Ph.D. was in Medicine, Otorhinolaryngology (2000). He did his post-doc at the Department of Psychology, University College, London (1996-1997), working with patients with dizziness and imbalance. In 2010 he completed a B.A. in Theology. He was guest professor and affiliated researcher at Karolinska Institutet in the Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry between the years 2007-2020.

During his career Andersson has worked part-time with patients, mainly in audiology but for a period also in psychiatry. He has a part-time position as clinical psychologist at the Department of Audiology, Linköping University Hospital, as a member of the Tinnitus team.Dr Andersson is trained as a CBT therapist and has a license and graduate diploma as a psychotherapist (2005). He has also completed teaching and supervision training in cognitive and behavioural psychotherapy (2016). Professor Andersson has published over 710 research papers, 50 chapters and 20 books. His present h-index is 94 (Scopus; Web of science 86). In 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020 Andersson was on the list of highly cited researchers. Also on Googles list on highly cited researchers.

Internet interventions in the era of a pandemic

It is clear that mental health problems have increased as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. The specific problems across countries reflect their response to the pandemic with mental health problems, including the effects of social isolation (physical distancing), loss followed by disrupted grief ceremonies, loss or disruption to vocational, economic or educational opportunities, fear of additional outbreaks of COVID-19 and future post-corona mental health consequences even following vaccination. Recent studies indicate that service demands for psychiatric assessments and interventions have increased, while at the same time in person psychiatric visits for mild to moderate conditions have been advised against while partly being replaced with video-conferencing contacts. Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT) has existed for 20 years and there are now a large number of controlled trials for a range of problems. In this talk I will outline how ICBT can be of help and also present data from two controlled trials on psychological problems associated with the pandemic.


Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., Australian Catholic University

Joseph Ciarrochi is professor at the Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University. He has published over 150 scientific journal articles and many books, including the best-selling Get out of your mind and into your life teens, and the influential book, Thriving Adolescent. His most recent youth book is out this year and is called Your Life Your Way. In the adult area, Joseph has published The Weight Escape, and Mindfulness, Acceptance, and Positive Psychology: The seven foundations of well-being, and Emotional intelligence: A practitioner’s guide. He has been honoured with over four million dollars in research funding. His work has been discussed on T.V., and in magazines, newspaper articles, and radio.

Nonattachment: Letting go, becoming free

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has focused on reducing experiential avoidance, or what clinicians often call “away moves.” I argue ACT has under emphasised experiential attachment, or the downsides of “towards moves.” We define experiential attachment as attempts to cling to positive thoughts, feelings, and other internal experiences, even when doing so creates harm in the long run. One can cling to positive ideas about autonomy (clinging to the idea of “being strong” prompts bullying and job loss”), competence (clinging to the idea of being “a good parent” prompts neglect of self-care), and connectedness (clinging to the idea of “being liked” prompts chasing popularity and neglecting genuine relationships”). Each attachment offers an addictive substitute for genuine autonomy, competence, and connectedness needs.

We present evidence that experiential attachment and avoidance are not opposite sides of the same continuum. For example, the lust for power is not the fear of powerlessness. I hypothesize that experiential avoidance and acceptance need to be targeted by distinctive interventions, and conclude the talk with some concrete examples of how you can use ACT-based self and motivational interventions to undermine harmful attachments. 


Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D., McLean/Harvard Medical School 

Dr. Coyne is the Founder and Senior Clinical Consultant of the McLean OCD Institute for Children and Adolescents at McLean Hospital, and is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School. She is the Founder and Executive Director of the New England Center for OCD and Anxiety (NECOA) and was elected President of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). She is member of the Clinical and Scientific Advisory Board and is on the Faculty of the Behavior Therapy Training Institute (BTTI) of the International OCD Foundation (IOCDF). She is also a licensed psychologist, a peer-reviewed ACT trainer, and author. She has authored multiple articles and chapters on ACT with children and adolescents, and is a co-author of the books Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Clinician’s Guide for Supporting Parents (Elsevier), and The Joy of Parenting (New Harbinger). Her new books, Stuff That’s Loud: A Teen’s Guide to Unspiralling When OCD Gets Noisy (New Harbinger & Little Brown), Stop Avoiding Stuff: 25 Microskills to Face Your Fears and Do It Anyway, were published in 2020.

Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World

At a population size of nearly 8 billion, humans strain the resources of our planet. Our shared climate crisis affects us all – but it affects marginalized communities vulnerable to disparities in income, health, and education most immediately and most deeply. We cannot avert these unfolding catastrophes acting alone, as individuals. We are going to need all of our community’s compassion, wisdom, and innovation. Most of all, we will need the tools conferred by contextual behavioral science (CBS). The technology for behavior change offered by CBS is essential to inform best practices for shifting to a more sustainable and just world. It is time to scale up our science and capitalize on interdisciplinary collaborations such that we can address our behavioral impact on the climate. Where there is division, we can sow nurturance and justice; where there is disconnection with the natural world, we can make committed actions that will leave our home better than we found it for generations to come.


Jo Lloyd, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
 

Dr Jo Lloyd is a senior lecturer and researcher in psychology and management at Goldsmiths, University of London. She is also Head of Department for the Institute of Management Studies (IMS). Jo’s most recent line of research concerns understanding the interpersonal and structural antecedents of wellbeing and quality of life in different social groups. Work has focussed on marginalised minority groups (e.g., transgender and gender nonconforming people, sexual minority individuals) as well as larger social units/entities (e.g., dyads/couples, organisations, neighbourhoods). Jo’s other major line of research involves the application of Contextual Behavioural Science (CBS) theories to the prediction and enhancement of health and behavioural effectiveness. Work has focussed on the impact of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) informed psychological skills interventions across different applied settings and the development of new psychometric instruments to assess CBS processes in workplace, clinical and general life contexts. Jo is a Chartered Psychologist with the British Psychological Society (BPS) and a Registered Occupational Psychologist with the Health and Care Professions Council (HCPC). She is a member of Goldsmiths’ Wellbeing in Context interdisciplinary research stream, and lead researcher on the Quality of Life in Transgender and Gender Nonconforming People in England longitudinal cohort study. Jo regularly presents on her work in both UK and international academic conferences and is a frequent guest speaker at professional events.

Charting a path towards a just and caring future for transgender people: A CBS approach to addressing discrimination on interpersonal, institutional, and systemic levels

Transgender people are one of the most heavily marginalised social groups today, suffering pervasive discrimination on interpersonal, institutional, and systemic levels. This discrimination is a major contributing factor to the lower levels of physical and psychological health, and poorer life outcomes experienced by transgender people, relative to their cisgender counterparts. Contextual Behavioural Science (CBS) offers us concepts, models, and approaches to begin to understand and address this significant social justice issue at the different levels that it exists. At the same time, as we progress through these increasingly complex levels, the requirements and demands of research and practice become more challenging, and the need for professional, analytical, and disciplinary diversity more evident. The CBS community is well-positioned to meet this challenge. In our desire for multiple perspectives, penchant for research-practice synergies, and compassion for self and others, we find our strength of collective action and the possibilities for charting a path towards a just and caring future for transgender people.


Linda Steg, University of Groningen
 

Linda Steg is professor of environmental psychology at the University of Groningen. She studies factors influencing sustainable behaviour, the effects and acceptability of strategies aimed at promoting sustainable behaviour, and public perceptions of technology and system changes. She is member of Member of the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences (KNAW), and lead author of the IPCC special report on 1.5°C and AR6. She participates in various interdisciplinary and international research programmes, and collaborates with practitioners working in industry, governments and NGOs.

Changing behaviour to solve environmental problems

Many environmental problems can be reduced when people would more consistently engage in sustainable behaviour. Many approaches to encourage sustainable behaviour target extrinsic motivation, by offering incentives that change personal costs and benefits of behaviour. Yet, such approaches may not always be as effective as assumed. I will discuss factors and strategies that can foster intrinsic motivation to act pro-environmentally. Intrinsically motivated people behave without being coerced or incentivised, even when pro-environmental behaviour is somewhat costly, as doing so is meaningful and makes them feel good.


Invited Speakers

Joanna Arch, Ph.D., University of Colorado Boulder

Dr. Joanna Arch is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of Colorado Boulder, Member in Cancer Prevention and Control at the University of Colorado Cancer Center, and a licensed clinical psychologist. Her research focuses on developing and evaluating interventions designed to address anxiety disorders as well as to improve well-being among adults with cancer, with a focus on mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions. Her work to date has resulted in research funding from the National Cancer Institute, National Institute of Nursing Research, American Cancer Society, and the Templeton Foundation.

ACT in the Context of Anxiety and Serious Disease

ACT involves a stance of opening up to human experience as it is—“the good, bad, and ugly”—and working skillfully, using behavioral science, to move toward meaning and connection no matter what shows up. An acceptance stance provides a strong foundation for dealing with perceived threats such as those experienced within anxiety disorders as well as the bodily and existential threats posed by diseases such as cancer. This invited talk will focus on the ways we have studied ACT in the context of people facing diverse forms of anxiety and threat, beginning with trials of ACT for anxiety disorders and shifting toward our trials of ACT with adults facing early- and late-stage cancer. Two intersections with this clinical research will be highlighted: First, the successes and challenges of embedding much of this work in community clinics, with interventions developed with and led by community clinicians; and second, the synergy of connecting clinical trials with laboratory-based investigations of relevant processes. I will reflect on what we continue to learn as scientists, as clinicians, and as human beings.


Andrew Christensen, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles

Dr. Andrew Christensen is a Distinguished Research Professor of Psychology at the University of California, Los Angeles, the co-creator of IBCT and co-author of the IBCT manual, Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy: A Therapist's Guide to Creating Acceptance and Change (Norton, 2020). Since 2010 when the United States Department of Veteran’s Affairs adopted IBCT as one of its evidence-based treatments, he has been training VA clinicians in IBCT. Along with Dr. Brian Doss of the University of Miami, he developed the online program for couples, www.OurRelationship.com , which has been shown effective in three nationwide clinical trials.

The Challenge of Change in Couples: How Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy brings about change and acceptance

Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy (BCT) is an evidence-based intervention for couples. In this presentation, the co-developer of IBCT, Dr. Andrew Christensen, will present on IBCT strategies for bringing about change in the emotional tenor of relationships as well as change in specific problematic behaviors. He will show the link between individual approaches to change, which distinguish different stages and processes of change, and IBCT. He will also explain how the IBCT strategies of empathic joining and unified detachment can directly change the emotional tenor of the relationship and indirectly change specific behaviors. In addition, he will show how the IBCT strategies of Direct Change have a direct impact on specific behaviors but an indirect impact on the emotional tenor. Throughout, he will show how these IBCT strategies bring about emotional acceptance.


Kenneth Fung, M.D. FRCPC MSc, University of Toronto

Dr. Kenneth Fung is Staff Psychiatrist and Clinical Director of the Asian Initiative in Mental Health Program at the Toronto Western Hospital, University Health Network and Associate Professor with the Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto. His research, teaching, and clinical interest include both cultural psychiatry and psychotherapy, especially Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), CBT, and mindfulness. He conducts community-based research in stigma, resilience, mental health promotion, trauma, caregivers for children with ASD, and immigrant and refugee mental health. He is psychiatric consultant to the Hong Fook Mental Health Association and Mon Sheong Scarborough Long-Term Care Centre. He is the President of the Society of the Study of Psychiatry and Culture, the immediate past chair of the Transcultural Section of the Canadian Psychiatric Association, and a Board Member of the World Association for Cultural Psychiatry. He is a past Chair and current officer and Historian of the Federation of Chinese American and Chinese Canadian Medical Societies. He is a past Chair of the Ontario Chapter of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). He is a Distinguished Fellow of the Canadian Psychiatric Association, Fellow of the American Psychiatric Association, and Fellow of Association of Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). His awards include the 2015 Social Responsibility Award from the University of Toronto Faculty of Medicine; the 2016 American Psychiatric Association Foundation Award for Advancing Minority Health; the 2017 College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario Council Award; the 2018 Psychotherapy Award for Academic Excellence from University of Toronto; and the 2020 Colin Woolf Award For Sustained Excellence in Teaching; and the Canada 150 Medal.

Sociocultural, Diversity, and Equity Issues and ACT/CBS

Our sociocultural context invisibly influences and shapes our perception, experiences, and meaning making process. This presentation will examine ACT through a cultural lens, including its strengths and limitations. At the clinical level, this will increase our capacity to deliver ACT more effectively to diverse populations. Many of the problems that we face are beyond the scope of individual intervention. We will also explore how ACT can be used to address sociocultural issues for marginalized or vulnerable populations, advance social justice, and promote equity. This includes an example of an online pandemic intervention that builds individual resilience while integrating social justice principles and collective empowerment.


James Kirby, Ph.D., The University of Queensland

James is a Senior Lecturer, Clinical Psychologist and Co-Director of the Compassionate Mind Research Group at School of Psychology at The University of Queensland. James has broad research interests in compassion science. He evaluates compassion focused programs, as well what fears people have towards compassion, as well as behavioural and physiological responses to compassion. James also holds an Visiting Fellowship at the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University. He continues to work as a clinical psychologist helping individuals with self-criticism and shame with Compassion Focused Therapy.
 

The complexities of compassion: What inhibits it and how we can help facilitate it

We all have a sense of what compassion is, how we have experienced it or even show it. But when you dig deeper into what compassion is it can start to become complex. For example, there are many contextual factors that can inhibit a compassionate response in an individual who has generally high trait levels of compassion. But what are those factors and can they be modified? This presentation will define what we mean by compassion, using an evolved model that underpins Compassion Focused Therapy. It will then present emerging research showing the bounds of our compassion in children and adults, and present possibilities to overcome some of these inhibitors. Finally, clinical work on how compassion can help with self-criticism and shame will be presented.


Dominika Kwasnicka, M.A., MSc, Ph.D., The University of Melbourne

Dominika Kwasnicka, PhD, is a Research Fellow in Digital Health at the Nossal Institute for Global Health, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, at the University of Melbourne, funded by the NHMRC Centre for Research Excellence (CRE) in Digital Technology to Transform Chronic Disease Outcomes, Australia. She is also a Senior Research Fellow, Faculty of Psychology, at SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Wroclaw, funded by the Foundation for Polish Science, Poland.

She is a behavioural scientist who has diverse interests in health psychology, digital health and research methods focusing on individuals. She completed her Doctor of Philosophy degree in Health Psychology and Behavioural Medicine and Master of Science in Public Health and Health Services Research at Newcastle University, England. She trained in Scotland and England, then she worked on digital health projects at Curtin University and Central Queensland University, in Australia as well as collaborated broadly with European colleagues in Poland, the Netherlands, Germany, the UK and Finland. She leads Open Digital Health initiative that promotes reusing open digital health solutions across contexts and settings www.opendigitalhealth.org. She is also passionate about science translation and dissemination and is a leader of the Practical Health Psychology blog currently translated to 27 languages.

Personalizing digital health interventions applying N-of-1 methods

Theories of behaviour change and health behaviour change interventions are usually tested in conventional between-participant designs. However, most of these theories and interventions ultimately focus on within-participant change. This mismatch is fundamentally problematic. Appreciation of this is fuelling the growing interest in N-of-1/within-participant methods in behavioural medicine, yet there is currently a shortage of opportunities to learn about within-participant approaches.

The talk will include: (I) presentation of N-of-1 method (design overview, theory and basic principles); (II) introduction to observational N-of-1 studies and their practical application; (III) introduction to N-of-1 RCTs and their practical application; and (IV) general elaboration of key priorities (e.g., application, personalising behavioural interventions, data analysis, limitations of the design) and advantages and disadvantages of using this method.

WHY SHALL I ATTEND? Knowledge of how to employ N-of-1 methods enables researchers to capitalise on the recent technology development to design behavioural studies and interventions which are tailored to each individual. Using unobtrusive data capture such as wearables and smartphone sensors, combined with Ecological Momentary Assessment, allows to develop truly personalised treatments. We are therefore at an opportune time to expand our use of within-person designs to better understand health behaviour and to deliver precision behaviour change interventions. 


Takashi Muto, Ph.D., Doshisha University

Takashi Muto, Ph.D. is a full professor and the Dean of the Department of Psychology at Doshisha University. An author of nearly 20 books and 200 scientific articles, his career has focused on behavior analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). He is the pioneer of Contextual Behavioral Science in Japan and the developer of the Japanese chapter of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (so-called ""ACT Japan"").

Dr. Muto is a fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and the president of the Japanese Association for Behavior Analysis (i.e., the Japanese branch of Association for Behavior Analysis International).
 

How to enjoy old age in super-aged society: A perspective of Contextual Behavioral Science. (超高齢化社会で老年期を楽しむ方法:文脈的行動科学からの観点)

"Aging society is now a global phenomenon. The United Nations’ World Population Prospects (2019) says that the number of persons aged 80 and above is going from 143 million to 426 million by 2050. And Japan has entered a “super-aged” society, with senior citizens aged 65 and above account for 28.7% of its population in 2020. The purpose of this invited address is to present some CBS researches and practices for problems such as ageism and dementia in Japan, “super-aged” society. My talk will have the following contents:
1) how to mitigate behavioral assimilation to age stereotypes, based on Hashimoto et al. (2020).
2) how to reduce the burden of caring for dementia and enhance the quality of life (QOL) in family caregivers, based on Muto (2015, 2016)
3) how to reduce BPSDs through contextual-behavioristic family-based intervention, based on Muto (2018, 2019).

(高齢化社会は,今や世界的な現象となっている。国連の「世界人口展望」(2019年)によると,80歳以上の人口は2050年には1億4,300万人から4億2,600万人になるという。そして,日本は2020年には,65歳以上の高齢者が人口の28.7%を占める「超高齢社会」となっている。この招待講演の目的は、日本の「超高齢社会」におけるエイジズムや認知症などの問題に対するCBSの研究と実践を紹介することにある。
私の講演は,以下のような内容を予定している。
1)年齢に対するステレオタイプによる行動同化をいかに緩和するか(Hashimoto et al., 2020)。
2)認知症の介護負担を軽減し、家族介護者のQOLをいかに高めるか(武藤, 2015, 2016)
3)文脈行動科学的な家族介入によってBPSDをいかに減らすか(武藤, 2018, 2019))"


Júlio De Rose, Ph.D., Universidade Federal de São Carlos

Professor of Psychology at Universidade Federal de São Carlos, Brazil, and Research Director of the National Institute for Science and Technology on Behavior, Cognition, and Teaching. Associate Editor of The Psychological Record.

How symbols control behavior: Implications for a contextual conception of culture

The influential anthropologist Clifford Geertz may come close to being a Contextual Behavioral Anthropologist. Geertz even points out that culture is a context within which behaviors, social events, institutions, can be described. Resorting to Gilbert Ryle, Geertz contains that this description should be "thick", which we might translate as a description that is functional, rather than topographic. In this "contextual" view, culture is conceived as a system of symbolic devices for controlling behavior. A limitation in this highly influential view of culture was the lack of knowledge about the processes of behavioral control by symbols. This led anthropologists influenced by Geertz to resort to Psychoanalysis for an explanation of how symbols might control behavior. With the recent advances of Behavior Analysis and Contextual Behavioral Science, we are in a much better position to explain how symbols do control behavior. This presentation will briefly review Geertz's conception of culture and the RFT approach to symbolic behavior. I will present recent research showing how transformation of functions lead symbols to control behavior. The presentation will end with tentative examples of how networks of symbolic relations control behavior at the social and cultural levels.


Kelly Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., is a Professor Emeritus of Psychology at the University at Mississippi. 


Linking Values to Other ACT Processes

ACT processes are sometimes taught using examples and exercises that highlight the particular process being taught. Having learned discrete exercises for acceptance, defusion, values, commitment, self, and present moment, clinicians sometimes struggle to put the “parts” of the model back together. However, in practice, the intermingling of processes can create synergies that amplify the impact of an intervention. In this workshop, I will offer a technical definition of values and examples of ways that clinicians can use all other ACT processes to enhance values work. Troubles encountered in values work are often related to difficulties with other processes. For example, a rigidly held story about self may inhibit values work, but that does not necessarily mean that we stop the values work. Instead, we can infuse values work with self-work, such as perspective taking. Other times, intentionally setting aside particular processes can facilitate values work. For example, values and committed action interventions are often presented side-by-side. But committed action, or even the possibility of impending committed action, can be frightening enough to stop values exploration. Setting committed action aside quite explicitly can free up values exploration. Examples will be offered that mix ACT processes singly and in combination with values work. The workshop will contain both behavioral analysis of the mechanics of the interventions and experiential elements that demonstrate the impact of integrating processes. Dr. Wilson will do live real-play demonstrations with workshop volunteers.
 

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WC Advertising & Sponsorship Opportunities

WC Advertising & Sponsorship Opportunities

2021 Advertising/ Sponsorship

Are you interested in promotion to those that are attending the ACBS Virtual World Conference this year?

ACBS would love to partner with you in a meaningful way.

Our sponsorship options are designed to maximize your budget and achieve your marketing goals.

Click here to learn more about why sponsorship could be beneficial to you, and the options that are available.

WC MARKETING REACH

June 2020 Online Conference 
1,431 total conference attendees 
268 students

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1,117 total conference attendees
265 students, 852 professionals
 

Questions: Please reach out to Melissa Wesolek, staff@contextualpsycology.org

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Call for Submissions - Closed

Call for Submissions - Closed

2021 Virtual World Conference
Join us online!

 

Jump down to SUBMIT

Conference Theme: 

"Broadening Our Vision: Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World"

This is meant to encourage ACBS to broaden our vision such that we shift our scientific and practical focus from behavior change at an individual level to a population level; that we evaluate best practices to amend disparities and divisions to create prosociality and cooperation; that we widen our perspective from individuals’ psychological well-being to consider how our science might inform public policy; that we embed our behavioral science within efforts to address the climate crisis – to create a more just and nurturing world for all of us. - Dr. Lisa Coyne, ACBS President

Oral submission deadline: 15 February 2021.

Poster submission deadline: 20 March 2021.

(Results of oral submissions will be emailed out in the last week of March or the first week of April 2021. Results of poster submissions will be emailed out in April.)

Chapter/SIG networking meeting deadline: 1 May 2021.

RFT and Behavior Analysis Track:

A track will be organized for submissions of RFT/Behavior Analysis data, as well as conceptual and clinically-relevant submissions to address the needs of those interested in RFT and BA across experience levels.

Aceptamos presentaciones para la conferencia en inglés y español.

If you have any problems submitting, please contact support@contextualscience.org

Tips for Submissions

Questions about the submission website? Check out some FAQs here.

Are you wondering how to increase the chance of acceptance for your submission? Click here for tips.

Unsure about writing Educational Objectives? Click here to learn more about them. 

Are you submitting a poster? Check out the poster guidelines here

ACBS staff

Broadening Our Vision: Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World

Broadening Our Vision: Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World

Coming Together to Light Up the Darkness: Some News About Our 2021 World Conference Theme 

It has been such a difficult year, for all of us, all around the world. For those of you who have lost someone; for those on the front line of the COVID-19 pandemic; for those of you who are worn out from fighting against marginalization and oppression; for those of you who have been displaced or struggling due to fires or floods set in motion by our climate crisis; for those of you who are weary, and stressed, and suffering, may you be safe; may you have health; may you experience kindness; may you know peace.

Each year, we come together as a community at the ACBS World Conference to celebrate our connections to one another, to revel in our scientific advances, to gain skills such that we can help to alleviate suffering. In 2021, our World Conference will be online, and we will connect in the virtual world – despite our distance, despite our struggles, we will find a way to be together. And in our gathering, we will light the way for each other to begin to heal; through our sharing of ideas and rigorous science, we will light the way for us to cultivate kinder, more equitable, more nurturing relationships with ourselves and with one another.

It is time for contextual behavioral science to shine its light in the darkness. Our technology for behavior change is exactly what we need right now to inform best practices for shifting to a more sustainable and just world. It is clear that the strength of a community can be measured by the collective actions of its members. Transforming current ways of living and creating a world in which our planet and its inhabitants are shielded from further harm requires shared strategic planning and community-level commitment. However, we are used to working at the level of the individual and of small groups; we are more comfortable addressing mental health than focusing on shaping a more just and sustainable philosophy – and practice – of living.

It is time to scale up our science and its applications and capitalize on interdisciplinary collaborations with evolutionary science, technology, economics, public health, and policy advocacy such that we can bring our work to bear in the larger world to address issues of discrimination, racism, health disparities, overconsumption of our natural resources, and our behavioral impact on the climate. Where there is division, we can sow nurturance and fairness; where there is lack of regard for our interrelationship with the natural world, we can amplify awareness and evaluate best practices for collective committed actions that will leave our home better than we found it for generations to come.

Thus, the theme for this year’s conference is Broadening Our Vision: Using CBS to Nurture a Just and Sustainable World. This is meant to encourage ACBS to broaden our vision such that we shift our scientific and practical focus from behavior change at an individual level to a population level; that we evaluate best practices to amend disparities and divisions to create prosociality and cooperation; that we widen our perspective from individuals’ psychological well-being to consider how our science might inform public policy; that we embed our behavioral science within efforts to address the climate crisis – to create a more just and nurturing world for all of us. 

- Dr. Lisa Coyne, ACBS President

ACBS staff

Pre-Conference Workshops for VIRTUAL WC2021 - Closed

Pre-Conference Workshops for VIRTUAL WC2021 - Closed

This event has passed.  Please consider joining us for the ACBS Virtual World Conference 24-27 June which includes 50+ workshops, panels, research symposia, and recorded viewing for 2 months!

12 & 13 June 2021

Unforgettable. Inspiring. Cutting-edge. Inviting. ACBS Pre-Conference Workshops are well-known as a source for world-class CBS, evidence-based trainings. Here is the heart of ACBS. Where therapists and researchers of all ages sharpen their skills, and push their limits. Where expert trainers from across the globe converge as a creative force aiming to shape and support all those in attendance. Where life-long friends reconnect, or meet for the first time.

What to Expect

The 2021 Pre-Conference Workshops offer exciting new opportunities that will engage therapists and researchers of any skill level. Highlights include:

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Participate in experiential workshops to learn this empirically supported therapy
Relational Frame Theory (RFT): Apply this powerful and modern perspective on cognition and language to your own practice
Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP): Utilize the power of your therapeutic relationships with FAP
Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT): Engage compassionate emotions within your clients with a processed-based approach
Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT): Learn how to effect psychological flexibility with limited client contact

Combining therapy role-plays, experiential exercises, case presentations, data graphics, focused lectures, and small group discussions, you can expect high-quality training from ACBS Pre-Conference Workshops. Continuing Education credits are available.

Be sure to review the list of workshops to see your full list of options.

When & Where?

These workshops will be held virtually on 12 & 13 June 2021.

There will be morning and afternoon workshops available. 

Morning workshops will be from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time) Saturday and Sunday, 4 hours each day (8 hours total per workshop attended)

Afternoon workshops will be from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time) Saturday and Sunday, 4 hours each day (8 hours total per workshop attended)

Please go here to see your timezone in comparison to the live conference time zone.

Pre-Conference workshop registration includes LIVE ONLY access to the workshop you select. These workshops will not be recorded.

More general registration information can be found here

Additional information about registrations, refunds, etc., can be found here.

 

Learn about the specific workshops here.

ACBS staff

Complete List of Pre-Conference Workshops - VIRTUAL WC2021

Complete List of Pre-Conference Workshops - VIRTUAL WC2021

This event has passed.  Please consider joining us for the ACBS Virtual World Conference 24-27 June which includes 50+ workshops, panels, research symposia, and recorded viewing for 2 months!

 

ACBS VIRTUAL WC2021 Pre-Conference Workshops

12 & 13 June MORNING workshops:

Morning workshops will be from 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 

Darin Cairns, M.A.
(Clinical; Intermediate, Advanced)

David Gillanders, DClinPsy, Sonja V. Batten, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate)

Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., Laura Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Robyn Walser, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Intermediate, Advanced)

12 & 13 June AFTERNOON workshops:

Afternoon workshops will be from 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 

Sean M. Barnes, Ph.D., Lauren M. Borges, Ph.D., Geoffrey Smith, Psy.D., Debbie Sorensen, Ph.D., Nazanin H. Bahraini, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.
(Clínico, Investigación; Nivel intermedio, Nivel avanzado)
(Clinical, Research; Intermediate, Advanced)
*Simultaneous English translation available*

Mary P. Loudon, Ph.D., Sarah Sullivan-Singh, Ph.D., Mavis Tsai, Ph.D., Robert J. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Francisco J. Ruiz, Ph.D., Louise McHugh, Ph.D., Bárbara Gil-Luciano, Ph.D.
(Clinical, Research; Beginner, Intermediate)

Emily K. Sandoz, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Intermediate, Advanced)

Kirk Strosahl, Ph.D., Patricia Robinson, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D., Patricia Zurita Ona, Psy.D.
(Clinical, Research; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

ACBS staff

ACT for Life: Experiential training on a Contextual Behavioral Approach to Suicidal Ideation and Behavior

ACT for Life: Experiential training on a Contextual Behavioral Approach to Suicidal Ideation and Behavior

ACT for Life: Experiential training on a Contextual Behavioral Approach to Suicidal Ideation and Behavior

Workshop Leader: 
Sean M. Barnes, Ph.D.
Lauren M. Borges, Ph.D.
Geoffrey Smith, Psy.D.
Debbie Sorensen, Ph.D.
Nazanin H. Bahraini, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

Competence in suicide prevention is vital to clinical practice. Yet, responding to suicide risk is often a source of tremendous stress and can place therapists at odds with their clients. Respecting a client’s autonomy and maintaining therapeutic rapport can conflict with concerns for safety and practical considerations of clinician liability. Furthermore, standardized suicide risk assessment and management approaches mandated by health care organizations often promote assessment focused on the presence or absence of suicidal ideation and behavior, but fail to identify the function of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS) can be used to successfully navigate these concerns to gain a nuanced and accurate understanding of the factors maintaining a client’s suicidal thoughts and behaviors (Borges et al., 2019). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) provides a powerful and balanced approach to suicide prevention by promoting engagement in life in addition to preventing suicidal behavior (Barnes et al., 2017). Participants in this pre-conference training will learn how CBS, and ACT in particular, can be used to join with clients in acknowledging, understanding, and accepting pain that leads them to desire death, while still choosing an alternative - a vital and values-based life. Case examples, role-plays, experiential exercises, and small group discussions will be used to expand clinicians’ repertoires for working effectively and compassionately with clients who experience suicidal ideation.

The empirical literature supporting the use of ACT with clients at risk of suicide will be reviewed. Participants will then learn about ACT for Life, a treatment protocol developed for clients at high risk of suicide, but also applicable to clients at low to moderate suicide risk. The facilitators of the training developed ACT for Life through a formative evaluation with experts in ACT and suicidology, and a randomized acceptability and feasibility study recently provided empirical support for ACT for Life. The ACT for Life protocol combines CBS functional assessment practices (e.g., chain analysis) and gold standard suicide risk mitigation tools (e.g., safety planning) with guidance on engaging ACT processes to build vital values-based lives clients will choose to live.

Participants will learn about common barriers to working effectively with clients considering suicide, and explore systemic issues they face, as well as their own internal responses and behavior patterns in working with suicide. Methods for responding effectively to common barriers will be discussed, and clinicians will explore how their reactions to suicidal thoughts and behaviors may influence clinical decision making.

Additionally, participants will learn how CBS/ACT-consistent safety plans are created in ACT for Life. This is particularly important given that safety planning (i.e., assisting clients in making a hierarchical list of plans to cope with a suicidal crisis) has become the standard of care in suicide prevention and can be a useful tool for managing suicide risk, while engaging in deeper therapeutic work to address the function of suicidal thinking and behavior. However, safety plans often focus on avoidance or reduction of unwanted thoughts and emotions, and may seem inconsistent with CBS interventions that emphasize acceptance. Additionally, safety plans do not typically include material tailored to the client’s values.

The remainder of the preconference training will involve case examples and role plays to practice conceptualizing suicide from a CBS perspective and using functional analysis to take a process-based approach to suicide risk assessment and risk management. Specifically, participants will use chain analysis to identify unique factors maintaining suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Then participants will build on the information generated from chain analysis to create a conceptualization of a client’s suicide risk and develop a treatment plan to disrupt behavior maintaining suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In addition to identifying opportunities to prevent suicidal ideation and behavior from interfering with functioning, participants will practice identifying values worth living that are connected to the suffering maintaining suicidal ideation and behavior. Treatment planning will include guidance on using emotional pain and related values to inform committed actions that will build a meaningful life. Finally, participants will discuss useful experiential exercises, metaphors, and bold moves to lead clients in turning toward a life worth living. 

About Sean M. Barnes, Ph.D.: 

Sean M. Barnes, Ph.D. is a clinical research psychologist at the Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for Veteran Suicide Prevention and an assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado Denver School or Medicine. As a principal investigator at the Rocky Mountain MIRECC, Sean contributes to the MIRECC's mission to prevent Veteran suicide through research, consulting, assessment, and treatment. Sean has published and presented nationally on a wide range of topics, including contextual behavioral approaches to working with moral injury and suicide risk. Sean is an ACT for Depressed Veterans provider and the principal investigator of the ACT for Life study, testing a brief ACT protocol for maximizing recovery after suicidal crises. Other aspects of Sean's research focus on ACT for Moral Injury, suicide risk assessment, and computerized interventions, but all of his projects share a common goal of alleviating suffering and helping others build vital meaningful lives.

About Lauren M. Borges, Ph.D.:

Dr. Lauren M. Borges is a clinical research psychologist at the Rocky Mountain Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center (MIRECC) for suicide prevention. She holds an academic appointment of assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Dr. Borges’ primary line of research concerns the use of contextual behavioral interventions to help individuals approach emotions like guilt and shame more flexibly. She is a principal investigator on a federally funded study focused on investigating the acceptability and feasibility of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Moral Injury (ACT-MI) and a co-investigator on an intervention applying ACT to cultivate flexible responding to suicidal ideation and behavior. She is also interested in using functional analysis (in particular the chain analysis skill from Dialectical Behavior Therapy) to help individuals identify and intervene on their suicidal behavior more efficiently and effectively. Beyond her focus on interventional research, Dr. Borges is developing and validating novel approaches to measuring facets of responding to guilt and shame.

About Geoffrey Smith, Psy.D.:

Dr. Geoff Smith has been a clinical psychologist and administrator working with adults with acute and chronic mental illness since 2001. His experience spans from Community Mental Health Center program administration and development to Veterans Affairs Medical Center psychiatric unit administration, clinical services and senior leadership.
He is currently the Section Chief of Inpatient and Specialty Mental Health Programs for the Denver Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Past projects include developing Veteran programs for Peer Support Specialists providing health coaching on an inpatient psychiatric unit, developing Psychiatric step-down services, and using evidence based psychotherapy for suicide prevention. He is the psychological Incident Commander for the VA Critical Incident Response Team and Workplace Violence Prevention Programs. He provides numerous seminars and presentations across various MH staff disciplines and is a faculty instructor for the Psychiatry Department at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center.

About Debbie Sorensen, Ph.D.:

Debbie Sorensen, Ph.D. is a psychologist in private practice in Denver, Colorado, and a part-time Clinical Research Psychologist at the Rocky Mountain VA MIRECC for Suicide Prevention. She has a Ph.D. in Psychology from Harvard University and a bachelor’s degree in Psychology and Anthropology from the University of Colorado, Boulder. She is a co-creator and co-host of the popular psychology podcast Psychologists Off the Clock, and co-author of the book ACT Daily Journal: Get Unstuck and Live Fully with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

About Nazanin H. Bahraini, Ph.D.:

Dr. Bahraini is a Clinical Research Psychologist and Director of Education at the Rocky Mountain MIRECC for suicide prevention. In addition, she is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry and Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation at the University of Colorado School of Medicine. Her research focuses on understanding factors that promote functional improvement and recovery among Veterans with chronic physical and mental health conditions. Along these lines, she is interested in how the principles and core processes underlying Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) relate to suicide, and how this knowledge can inform ACT based interventions to improve functioning and decrease suicide risk in indicated populations (i.e., Veterans hospitalized for suicide risk).

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the phenomenon of suicide from a contextual behavioral perspective.
  2. Discuss empirical support for using ACT with clients at risk of suicide.
  3. Describe systemic and therapist internal barriers to working collaboratively with clients to effectively manage suicide risk.
  4. Create a CBS/ACT consistent safety plan to manage suicidal crises.
  5. Use functional suicide risk assessment for case conceptualization and treatment planning.
  6. Describe creative hopelessness, values, and committed action work that can be used to help clients build lives they will choose to live even in the presence of psychological pain. 

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists
ACBS staff

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Obsessive Compulsive and Anxiety Disorders in Children and Adolescents

Workshop Leader: 
Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D.
Patricia Zurita Ona, Psy.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

This workshop combines two professionals whose careers have largely focused on the use of ACT to treat obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders. Dr. Twohig is a US citizen and Dr. Zurita Ona is Bolivian but works and resides in the USA. Dr. Twohig has conducted his work within a research setting with additional applied work in a university clinic. Dr. Zurita Ona’s works has occurred in a private clinic with related scholarship activities. Both work with children, adolescents, and adults. Additionally, they have been collaborating professionally for the past two years and have a common conceptualization of obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders and their treatment.

Obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders include: obsessive compulsive disorder, trichotillomania, social phobia, panic disorder, separation anxiety disorder, and phobias. While the literature on ACT for obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents lags behind the data for adults, there has been a notable amount of work conducted supporting its effectiveness. These data show that a moderately unified ACT protocol is effective for a variety of presentations of obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders. Only moderate adjustments need to be made for different clinical presentations.

In this two-day workshop we will first update the attendees on the research in this area. There are a handful or large randomized trials and smaller single subject designs using ACT for children and adolescents with obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders. Next, we will present the overarching ACT conceptualization of obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders. We will present the conceptual and procedural adjustments that would need to occur for each general presentation. This background information would likely take one-fourth of the training time. The remaining training time will showcase this work for children and adolescents. The audience will learn to facilitate exposures, monitor and facilitate processes of change within exposures, teach and track outcomes that are consistent with the ACT model. A unique behavioral intervention, the Choice Point, will be presented as a formulation and intervention to augment the impact of exposure sessions. We will teach the procedures didactically, with video, and role play.

About Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D.: 

Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist in the state of Utah and a Professor of Psychology at Utah State University. He received his B.A. and M.S. from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, his Ph.D. from the University of Nevada, Reno, and completed his clinical internship at the University of British Columbia Hospital. He is past-President of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science, the organization most associated with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). His research focuses on the use of ACT across a variety of clinical presentations with an emphasis on obsessive compulsive and related disorders. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed articles and two books: An ACT-Enhanced Behavior Therapy approach to the Treatment of Trichotillomania (with Woods) and ACT Verbatim for Depression and Anxiety (with Hayes). His research has been funded through multiple sources including the National Institute of Mental Health.

About Patricia Zurita Ona, Psy.D.:

Dr. Zurita Ona, Dr. Z, is a Licensed Clinical Psychologist in California. Her clinical work started first as school psychologist and then as a clinical psychologist. She has significant experience working with children, adolescents, and adults with OCD, trauma, anxiety, and emotional regulation problems. . Dr. Z is the founder of the East Bay Behavior Therapy Center, a boutique therapy practice, where she runs an intensive outpatient program integrating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Exposure Response Prevention (ERP) to support clients getting stuck from obsessions, figure out what they care about, and do stuff that matters to them.

Dr. Z attends local, national, and international conferences on a regular basis in order to keep up with current clinical research and deliver up-to-date therapy services to her clients. In addition to her doctoral training, Dr. Z has nominated as a Fellow of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science; she's a graduate of the International OCD foundation Behavior Therapy Training Institute (BTTI) for the treatment of pediatric OCD and adult OCD; her clinical work is primarily based on exposure and Response Prevention, the recognized front-line treatment for OCD, anxiety and related condition disorders. Dr. Z is intensively trained in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT). Over the last 10 years, Dr. Z has been learning, practicing, and teaching Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Learn the diagnostic differences between obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders
  2. Learn the research on ACT for obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders in children and adolescents
  3. Learn to conceptualize obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders from an ACT standpoint
  4. Learn how to conduct exposures for obsessive compulsive and anxiety disorders from an ACT model
  5. Identify the ACT core processes in regard to the “choice point model”
  6. Learn how to track outcomes when working with these clinical issues  

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical, Research

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists
ACBS staff

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction & Skills Building - CLOSED

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction & Skills Building - CLOSED

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction & Skills Building

*This introductory ACT workshop will use a novel ‘flipped classroom approach’, so you must register by 7 June to attend this workshop.*
 
Workshop Leader: 
David Gillanders, DClinPsy
Sonja V. Batten, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

This introductory ACT workshop will use a novel ‘flipped classroom approach’. In a flipped classroom, learners are given access to pre-recorded materials to work through at their own pace in advance of the workshop. This way, we will be able to deliver a good deal of conceptual learning (The HEAD of ACT), you will be able to watch videos of simulated therapy (The HANDS of ACT) and be able to arrive at the live workshop already knowing quite a lot about ACT. The online live workshop time is therefore able to be used to interact around the materials, practice experientially (The HEART of ACT) and deepen your learning. In total the pre-recorded elements will amount to approximately 10 hours of self-directed study, using pre-recorded presentations and videos.

LEARNERS MUST COMMIT TO ENGAGING IN THIS FREE MATERIAL AS A CONDITION OF ATTENDING THE LIVE WORKSHOP.

Pre-Workshop Learning

Participants will be guided through the ACT foundational hexaflex, learning about each of the six core processes. You will also learn about the application of each of these core processes through case conceptualization. You will be able to watch videos of therapy with simulated patients. The trainers will provide examples of specific exercises and metaphors, helping you to understand the importance of the function, rather than the form, of ACT interventions. We will set up an email group to allow you to ask questions of the material and get answers prior to the workshop. This material will be made available well in advance of the workshop, allowing you time to go through it at your own pace.

Live Online Workshop

During the workshop, we will use experiential exercises, discussion, and role plays to deepen your understanding of the processes, and give you chances to begin using ACT principles to apply to your own work.

The two peer-reviewed ACT trainers, David Gillanders and Sonja Batten, are fully-versed in ACT and are Fellows and Founding Members of ACBS, with extensive experience delivering ACT training internationally. Their open and compassionate style models the ACT therapeutic stance, while demonstrating skills and responding to participant questions based on research-informed knowledge.

About David Gillanders, DClinPsy: 

David Gillanders is a Chartered Clinical Psychologist, member of the British Psychological Society, Health & Care Professions Council, British Association of Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy and a founding member of the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science. He is the Head of Clinical and Health Psychology at the University of Edinburgh. Formerly working for the NHS, he has extensive experience of working psychologically with people with both chronic physical and mental health problems from both an ACT and traditional CBT perspective. David has trained several hundred therapists in using an ACT approach across the globe and also supervises others using an ACT approach. He is a peer reviewed ACT trainer with ACBS, and the former ACBS Training Committee Chair, responsible for developing the current strategy to showing evidence of training competency and undertaking research in the area of ACT training

About Sonja V. Batten, Ph.D.:

Sonja V. Batten, Ph.D., is a clinical psychologist with a specialization in traumatic stress, who has worked in policy, clinical, and research leadership positions in the public and private sector. Dr. Batten is a recognized ACT trainer, a Past-President of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, the author of Essentials of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and the co-author of Committed Action in Practice. Dr. Batten is an experienced leader with a demonstrated history of working in the management consulting industry; skilled in Organizational Development, Health Care Operations, Leadership Development, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; a Licensed Clinical Psychologist, certified Change Management Practitioner, and experienced Coach and Mentor.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Know the ACT model conceptually
  2. Know the ACT model from the inside out (how the ACT processes ‘feel’)
  3. Have greater self awareness of own responses to difficult events in professional and possibly personal settings and be able to conceptualize those from within the ACT model
  4. Have better skills in responding flexibly to internal and external struggles in professional and possibly personal settings
  5. Be able to conceptualize cases / client work from an ACT perspective
  6. Understand the links between ACT and behavioral analysis more clearly
  7. Use their behavioral understanding of ACT to make more precisely targeted interventions.
  8. Be able to begin to apply ACT strategies within their professional context
  9. Apply multiple strategies for facilitating committed actions by clients
  10. Have a clear direction and resources for further study and training

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Clinical

Components: Online self-paced learning, email Q&A, Conceptual analysis, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Experiential exercises, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction & Skills Building - Portal

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Introduction & Skills Building - Portal

Welcome!

Hi everyone, you have found your way to our private portal for our Pre World Conference Workshop, flipped classroom virtual learning environment! Between now and the 12th and 13th June you will be able to work your way through material at your own pace. The material is a combination of video presentations, text, reflective questions, audio exercises, videos of simulated therapy patients, journal articles, and case conceptualisation forms for you to download and use.

Some of the content that we have made available has not been visible when using Safari, so far Chrome has had no problems, so you might want to develop a preference for Chrome to navigate to this site. For example - right below this section of text you should see a Welcome video from Sonja and David. If you cant see it, try using Chrome. If you are having tech issues you can either email David at david.gillanders@ed.ac.uk or you can also email the acbs team at acbs@contextualscience.org

Everything is clearly marked either 'ESSENTIAL' or 'ADDITIONAL'. The items marked essential; we are going to assume that everyone has covered these. Whilst there will be a bit of time for brief Q&A in the live sessions about that stuff, some of that Q&A will also be done using the comments and chat function beneath each item. The 'ADDITIONAL' items are really for your own curiosity, and to deepen your learning, if you are able to give it the time.

We estimate that if you do only the essential activities you will need to invest approximately 7 to 10 hours prior to the live workshops. If you begin this week (week beginning Monday 17th May) that equates to approximately two hours per week. Of course, you could leave it all to the last minute and do it all the day before.....(sound familiar? Us too. Let's see if this time we could choose to do it differently). We think this way of learning will be sweeter and richer if you give it a bit of time, over a longer period of time. You will find things on the way that you will be able to try out in your work and so you could potentially arrive at the workshops already having given some of these ideas a try.

Lastly, we really want to begin the process of forming a learning community together prior to the live sessions, so after watching the welcome video below, I am going to invite you to use the comments to introduce yourself, tell us your name, where you live, a brief bit about yourself, and maybe see if you are willing to share one (or more) hopes and fears about the workshop.

Let's use this is an opportunity to begin getting to know each other and to begin listening, appreciating other perspectives, practising kindly awareness, compassion, to ourselves and to others. We are really looking forward to this way of working with you all,

Best wishes

David & Sonja


 

admin

1: The Background and History of ACT

1: The Background and History of ACT

In this lesson you will get some background, the reason why ACT developed the way it did, and that will help to contextualise the roots of of this work.

ESSENTIAL: Click on this link to watch the video. This will take you to a platform called Media Hopper. The video can be made full screen, by clicking on the two diagonlal arros in the menu bar below the video. In addition, if you hover over the video with your mouse, two horizontal arros will appear on the right of the screen. By clicking on the two horizontal arrows you can switch between seeing the presenter or the slides as the larger of the two windows. You can also pick up the 'within picture' part of the video and move it around so that you can put the smaller picture window where you want it, for example if it is obscuring some text on a slide.

You can also choose to have the presenter and slide view equal in size or one smaller than the other, by clicking on the small TV picture icon just below the two horizontal arrows. Again this only appears when you hover over the video with your mouse.

ESSENTIAL: Respond to the question(s) using the comments function below

ADDITIONAL: Download and read the paper by Robert Zettle

David Gillanders

2: The ACT Model - conceptually and 'self as lab'

2: The ACT Model - conceptually and 'self as lab'

In this session you will get an introduction to the ACT Hexaflex model of Psychological Flexiblity. The six core processes leading to inflexibility are described and explained, with brief examples: Experiential Avoidance, Cognitive Fusion, Being caught up in the past or future, Attachment to a narrowly defined conceptualised self, Lack of awareness of values, and Inaction. In addition you will learn about the six core Psychological Flexibility processes that are the flip side: Accetpance, Cognitive Defusion, Present Moment Awareness, Self as Context, Values and Comitted Action. 

As well as learning ACT conceptually, this lesson will also introduce these processes experientially. You will find below six audio recordings that each focus on one (or more) of the core processes, to give you a flavour of how they feel from the inside and to give you a chance to begin learning how to conduct experiential exercises that can evoke these processes.

A word about Experiential Learning

We are offering these audio exercises as an invite to step inside the ACT processes. They are typical of the kinds of exercises that you might use with clients. They can be powerful and meaningful. We would like you to gve them a try in a spirit of invitation. There is absolutely no coercion here. Only you can know what is happening in your life right now and whether any exercise is right for you. Download the guide and disclaimer document below, which will give you more of a feel for what each exercise is trying to do. Make a choice about your own level of willingness. Choose a time when you will be in a place that is comfortable for you and you are not likely to be interupted. Choose a place where you can give the exercises your full attention. Don't listen whilst driving and so on. We reccommend not doing them all at once, but spreading them out over a few days. After listening, journal about your experience of listening, connecting with the process. What did you notice? How did you respond? 

ESSENTIAL: Watch this Introduction Video Here

ESSENTIAL: Watch this narrated PowerPoint that describes the ACT model conceptually

ESSENTIAL (but invitational - you can say no): Download and read the guide and then listen to the six audio tracks below to explore psychological flexibility from the inside.

ESSENTIAL: (but invitational - you can decide what you feel safe enough to share): Use the comments below to share extracts from your journalling, as you encounter these processes from the inside.

ADDITIONAL: Download and read the paper by Mike Twohig

David Gillanders

3: Assessment & Case Conceptualisation

3: Assessment & Case Conceptualisation

In this lesson we begin to look at how to apply the principles you have been learning with clients. The examples we use are in clinical or health settings, but the same model and principles apply if you are working in coaching, organisational psychology, education, social work or other fields. 

In our assessment we do use a lot of generic core skills and we ask very similar types of questions that you might already be familiar with. We ask our client to tell us about what has brought them for therapy, what their problems are, how they began and developed. We emphasise how they are responding to their issues and what the consequences of their responses are, perhaps more than many other models of therapy. We also ask them to talk about what they would most want in life if they weren't struggling with these issues. The learning activities for this lesson are:

 

ESSENTIAL: Watch this video presentation about assessment and case conceptualisation

ESSENTIAL: Watch these two videos of David working with John, a man with Irritable Bowel Syndrome. Video One   Video Two      Be sure to share reflections or ask questions about these videos in the comments on this page.

ESSENTIAL: Download and review this blank case conceptualisation form that is mentioned in the presentation. Also download this version of the form that has been completed for John (the client with IBS). 

ESSENTIAL: Take the time to work through the blank form thinking of a client that you know well. It can be someone you are curently working with or someone you have worked with in the past. Use this form to create a case conceptualisation for that client. In the live sessions you will be gven the option to roleplay being your client in a small group. Be aware of confidentiality and consider changing a few details if you need to to protect that. You will bring these case conceptualisations to the live sessions so keep the form somewhere safe. The idea is to give people a chance to have a practice, so its a good idea to choose someone who your peers in this workshop could work with (its not an opportuntity to show others how complex your caseload is!) That said, you also don't want it to be too easy, try and find a case where the person is stuck and has tried a lot of different things, but that is not so stuck that it will be hard to even get going with them. 

This form is to help you think it through, and isn't necessarily something you would share with the client or work with the client on, though you could have it as a guide as you engage in the collaborative process of assessment.

ESSENTIAL: Post in the comments below about the process of thinking through your client this way, and use the comments to ask any questions or clarify anything unclear.

David Gillanders

4: Getting started

4: Getting started

As you saw in the work with John, we move through a process of assessment and 'workability analysis' in the early stage of intervention. This process is referred to as 'Creative Hopelessness' and it is one of the most challenging parts of the model for many therapists. We are actively and persistently walking into the stuckeness with our client to help them to contact the consequences of the things they have done to try and be rid of their problems. In so doing, we will likely encounter pain, frustration, disappointment and regret to name just a few. We want the client to be in touch with a feeling that 'the strategy I am using to control or get rid of this problem is not working and will be unlikely to work' - we wnt them to get hopeless about that strategy. We do this so that they will let go of responses (strategies) that don't work, to allow more creative, new strategies to be shaped.

It can be helpful in this stage to use a metaphor to illustrate how you are understanding the problem and what your work together will be about. There are many metaphors that serve this purpose of organising the work, in this lesson you will see david continuing to work with John and develop the Sailing Boat Metaphor.

This lesson's learning activities are:

ESSENTIAL: Watch this video of Intervention Strategies in ACT

ESSENTIAL: Watch this video of continuing the work with John

ESSENTIAL: Ask questions and provide your reflections in the comments below.

David Gillanders

5: Core metaphors

5: Core metaphors

In this lesson we show you another commony used metaphor: The Passengers on the Bus. We also walk you through how metaphors work, giving a little glimpse into Relational Frame Theory. In the therapy video you will see I also weave into the basic metaphor other ACT interventions strategies - in particular the use of 'Physicalizing' thoughts, giving them a name, creating perspective on them. This metaphor has such broad use and it can very helpfully organise the work in any setting. 

ESSENTIAL: Watch this video of David working with Anne - a woman with social anxiety and low self esteem. 

ESSENTIAL: Watch this video of how metaphors work

Feel free to make reflections, comments and questions in the comments below.

ADDITIONAL: Download and read this paper on the RFT understanding of metaphor

 

And that is also the end of the pre workshop flipped classroom learning. We hope you have digested, reflected, assimilated and taken on some of these ideas, we look forward to seeing you live and helping you to use the skills and knowledge that you have been learning here to work with your clients, to address your own barriers to interventions and to deepen your practice of ACT.

David Gillanders

6. Optional viewing

6. Optional viewing

The activities on this page are all optional, if you want to see more about how things went with John, the man with IBS, you can have a look at the following videos:

Willingness

From willingness to values

From values to action

These also give a sense of how the work might unfold. You dont see me doing a lot of defusion or self related work with John, its more about the processes described.

Further reading and links to other resources:

This is my developmentally paced reading list:

ACT Reading list May 2021

* indicates my recommended picks

Getting started gently (light reading)
*Twohig, M. P. (2012). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Cognitive and Behavioral Practice, 19(4), 499–507. doi:10.1016/j.cbpra.2012.04.003

*Batten, S. (2011) Essentials of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, London, Sage Publications Ltd.


OK: so I see the idea, how do I know the evidence is up to scratch?
Graham, C. D., Gouick, J., Krahé, C., & Gillanders, D. (2016). A systematic review of the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in chronic disease and long-term conditions. Clinical Psychology Review, 46, 46–58. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.cpr.2016.04.009


A-Tjak, J. G. L., Davis, M. L., Morina, N., Powers, M. B., Smits, J. a J., & Emmelkamp, P. M. G. (2014). A Meta-Analysis of the Efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Clinically Relevant Mental and Physical Health Problems. Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics, 84(1), 30–36. doi:10.1159/000365764


Swain, J., Hancock, K., Dixon, A., & Bowman, J. (2015). Acceptance and commitment therapy for children: A systematic review of intervention studies. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 1–13. doi:10.1016/j.jcbs.2015.02.001


Levin, M. E., Hildebrandt, M. J., Lillis, J., & Hayes, S. C. (2012). The impact of treatment components suggested by the psychological flexibility model: a meta-analysis of laboratory-based component studies. Behavior therapy, 43(4), 741–56. doi:10.1016/j.beth.2012.05.003


Ost, L.-G. (2014). The efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 61, 105–21. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2014.07.018


Atkins, P. W. B., Ciarrochi, J., Gaudiano, B. A., Bricker, J. B., Donald, J., Rovner, G., … Hayes, S. C. (2017). Departing from the essential features of a high quality systematic review of psychotherapy: A response to Öst (2014) and recommendations for improvement. Behaviour Research and Therapy. http://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.05.016


Ost, L. G. (2017). Rebuttal of Atkins et al . ( 2017 ) critique of the Ost (2014) metaanalysis of ACT. Behaviour Research and Therapy, 97, 273–281. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2017.08.008
See the editor’s note and all three articles here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0005796717302486


Stockton, D., Kellett, S., Berrios, R., Sirois, F., Wilkinson, N., & Miles, G. (2019). Identifying the underlying mechanisms of change during acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT): A systematic review of contemporary mediation studies. Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy, 47(3), 332–362. https://doi.org/10.1017/S1352465818000553


Gloster, A. T., Walder, N., Levin, M., Twohig, M., & Karekla, M. (2020). The Empirical Status of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Review of Meta-Analyses. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 18(September), 181–192. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcbs.2020.09.009


WOW: There seems to be something in here, so how do I learn how to do it?
*Join the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science (ACBS) at www.contextualscience.org Minimum fee is $15 and you can download lots of articles, therapy materials, measures etc. You can see my training page there with lots of goodies, including mp3 audio files of exercises: http://contextualscience.org/david_gillanders_training_page

Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., & Wilson, K. G. (2011). Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (2nd Edition): The Process and Practice of Mindful Change (2nd ed.). New York: Guilford Press.

Harris, R. (2009). ACT made simple : an easy-to-read primer on acceptance and commitment therapy. Oakland: New Harbinger. (You can even download the first two chapters for free along with lots of other goodies at: http://www.thehappinesstrap.com/free_resources )

Stoddard, J. A., Afari, N. A., Hayes, S. C. (2014) The Big Book of ACT Metaphors: A Practitioner’s Guide to Experiential Exercises and Metaphors in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Oakland CA: New Harbinger

Luoma, J., Hayes, S., & Walser, R. Learning ACT: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Skills Training Manual (2nd Edition). New Harbinger, 2018. 

*Villatte, M., Villatte, J. L., & Hayes, S. C. (2016). Mastering the Clinical Conversation: Language as Intervention. New York: Guilford Press. (also a website to support this work with videos: https://languageasintervention.com

Westrup, D. (2014). Advanced Acceptance & Commitment Therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.


I’m hooked: give me more!
*Wilson, K. G., & Dufrene, T. (2008). Mindfulness for Two: An acceptance and commitment therapy approach to mindfulness in psychotherapy. New Harbinger, Oakland. Its also supported by a website http://www.onelifellc.com/Workshop_Goodies.html

Tirch, D., Schoendorff, B., & Silberstein, L. R. (2014). The ACT Practitioner’s Guide to the Science of Compassion: Tools for Fostering Psychological Flexibility. Oakland CA: New Harbinger.

Polk, K. L., Schoendorf, B., Webster, M., & Olaz, F. O. (2016). The Essential Guide to the ACT Matrix: A step by step approach to using the ACT Matrix model in clinical practice. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

Mmmm, maybe I need more background in behaviour analysis…

*Ramnero, J., & Torneke, N. (2008). The ABC’s of Human Behavior: Behavioural Principles for the Practicing Clinician. New Harbinger, Oakland, CA.

http://www.tastybehaviorism.com/Welcome.html


I am a psychology geek and I want to know everything…
Zettle, R. D. (2005). The Evolution of a Contextual Approach to Therapy : From Comprehensive Distancing to ACT. International Journal, 1(2), 77-89.

Wilson, K. G. (2001). Some Notes On Theoretical Constructs: Types and Validation from a Contextual Behavioral Perspective. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 1(2), 205-215.

My brain is exploding but I need more – give me the strongest stuff you’ve got!!!!!!
Torneke, N. (2010). Learning RFT: An Introduction to Relational Frame Theory and its Clinical Application. Context Press, Reno, NV.

Foody, M., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., Törneke, N., Luciano, C., Stewart, I., & McEnteggart, C. (2014). RFT for clinical use: The example of metaphor. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 1–9. doi:10.1016/j.jcbs.2014.08.001

Foody, M., Barnes-Holmes, Y., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Luciano, C. (2013). An empirical investigation of hierarchical versus distinction relations in a self-based ACT exercise. International Journal of Psychology and Psychological Therapy, 13(3), 373–385.

Barnes-Holmes, Y., Boorman, J., Oliver, J. E., & Thompson, M. (2018). Using conceptual developments in RFT to direct case formulation and clinical intervention : Two case summaries. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 7(November 2017), 89–96. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jcbs.2017.11.005


This is more than just a therapy – this is a vision of a different kind of psychology, tell me more…
Hayes, S. C., Barnes-Holmes, D., & Wilson, K. G. (2012). Contextual Behavioral Science: Creating a science more adequate to the challenge of the human condition. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 1(1-2), 1–16. doi:10.1016/j.jcbs.2012.09.004

Wilson, D. S., Hayes, S. C., Biglan, A., & Embry, D. D. (2014). Evolving the future: Toward a science of intentional change. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 37(4), 395–416. http://doi.org/10.1017/S0140525X13001593

Biglan, A. (2015). The Nurture Effect: How the science of human behavior can improve our lives and our world. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications.

I don’t like reading too much, isn’t there an easier way?
Russ Harris’s YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC-sMFszAaa7C9poytIAmBvA/videos

Online Learning Courses from Russ Harris: Psychwire

Free Videos from ACBS: https://contextualscience.org/free_videos

Arthurs Place: A resource for young people with Juvenile idiopathic arthritis. I  (David) made three short films for them about using ACT strategies to live well with persistent health problems:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wK_RKnSGYdU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Wl046560jno&t=2s
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11sCEJI7hCI

Acting out the Passengers on the Bus Metaphor in Group Therapy
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hdeA-FKDLLc

Purchase the ACT in Action DVD’s (Steven Hayes) to stream:
https://www.psychotherapy.net/video/steven-hayes-act

Online and in person training (Primarily US based) (including some free videos and webinars)
https://www.praxiscet.com/

The ACT Matrix Academy
https://www.theactmatrixacademy.com/

Dr Kevin Polk
http://www.drkevinpolk.com/learn-about-act/

Podcasts

People Soup - a podcast by Ross McIntosh about psychological flexibility in teams, organisations and life in general

Psychologists Off the Clock - a podcast about the science and practice of living well

Cocktails & Courageous Conversations - webinar / conversations by Rikke Kjelgard

The original ACT in Context Podcast

David Gillanders

Committed Action Presentation

Committed Action Presentation

Here's the slide deck on committed action from the workshop!

Sonja Batten

Be A Brief and Powerful Clinician: Use Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) to Help Many

Be A Brief and Powerful Clinician: Use Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) to Help Many

Be A Brief and Powerful Clinician: Use Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (FACT) to Help Many

Workshop Leader: 
Kirk Strosahl, Ph.D.
Patricia Robinson, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

Drs. Kirk Strosahl and Patti Robinson will present a practical workshop on Focused Acceptance and Commitment (FACT) June 12-13, 2021. This 7.5-hour workshop offers a brief introduction to the theoretical basis of FACT and hands-on tools for use in mastery of FACT foundation skills. Participants will learn to assess, conceptualize and deliver powerful brief interventions. After the training, participants will better understand how to shift from traditional services centered on diagnostic-based treatment to the FACT services offering brief intermittent care promoting psychological flexibility over the lifespan.

Participants are encouraged to identify another registrant as a learning partner who they will work with during skill development exercises. Otherwise, the presenters will pair you with another attendee prior to the workshop.

About Kirk Strosahl, Ph.D.: 

Kirk Strosahl, Ph.D., is one of the founders of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and specializes in the application of ACT as a brief intervention. He has practiced for 30 years in a variety of brief intervention contexts, including brief therapy clinics and primary care. He has written several professional books on the brief applications of ACT, including “Brief Interventions for Radical Change: Principles and Practice of Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy” and “Inside This Moment: Promoting Radical Change in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy” (Robinson & Gustavsson, co-authors, 2012, 2015). In 2018, he co-authored (along with Patricia Robinson) the second edition of their best-selling self-help book, “The Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Depression: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Move Through Depression and Live a Vital Life” (Robinson, co author, 2018). Dr. Strosahl has conducted numerous training workshops around the world; his approach to teaching is clinician oriented and skill based. Because of this, Dr. Strosahl has often been referred to as the “hands of ACT”.

About Patricia Robinson, Ph.D.:

Patti Robinson, Ph.D., of Mountainview Consulting Group, is widely regarded as one of the pioneers of ACT, and a master clinician specializing in brief applications of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She currently consults with primary care systems around the United States that are seeking to integrate behavioral services into the general health care setting. She is the author of numerous articles and book chapters and has published six books, including Real Behavior Change in Primary Care: Improving Patient Outcomes and Increasing Job Satisfaction (New Harbinger, 2010), Behavioral Consultation and Primary Care: A Guide to Integrating Services (with Jeffrey T. Reiter) (Springer, 2007), Brief Interventions for Radical Change: Principles and Practice of Focused Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (New Harbinger, 2012), and the Mindfulness and Acceptance Workbook for Depression, 2nd Edition (New Harbinger, 2018).

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

Day 1:

  1. Describe the FACT model and its application to address psychological and medical problems
  2. Use FACT assessment strategies
  3. Use FACT to conceptualize treatment
  4. Assess and measure psychological flexibility
  5. Engage patients in strong clinical conversations about values and “workability” of solutions to problems of living

Day 2:

  1. Gain skill in merging conceptualization and intervention
  2. Identify in-the-moment opportunities for enhancing Psychological Flexibility
  3. Create SMART behavioral experiments that promote behavioral variability
  4. Use the Life Path intervention as an initial visit intervention
  5. Create a resilience plan, after assessing your Psychological Flexibility and vitality

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists
ACBS staff

Empowering psychological interventions by incorporating cutting-edge RFT research

Empowering psychological interventions by incorporating cutting-edge RFT research

Empowering psychological interventions by incorporating cutting-edge RFT research

Workshop Leader: 
Francisco J. Ruiz, Ph.D.
Louise McHugh, Ph.D.
Bárbara Gil-Luciano, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

This workshop aims to introduce the basics of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) and the implications of “cutting-edge” Clinical RFT research. The workshop will be divided into three parts. In Part 1, we will present the basic concepts of RFT through multiple clinical examples. In Part 2, we will present an RFT conceptualization of self-as-context and defusion and how it can be used to empower the exercises and clinical interactions aimed at moving these processes. Lastly, in Part 3, we will present recent research in the RFT conceptualization of worry and rumination and how it can be used to develop briefer ACT interventions. Multiple experiential exercises and role-plays will be presented across the four parts of the workshop to develop skills in Clinical RFT

About Francisco J. Ruiz, Ph.D.: 

Francisco J. Ruiz received his doctoral degree in Psychology in Universidad de Almería (Spain) under the supervision of Dr. Carmen Luciano in 2009. He worked in several Spanish universities before accepting a professor position in Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz (Colombia) in 2015. In this position, he designed one of the first Ph.D. programs in Psychology in the country and has been awarded as a “Distinguished Researcher” of the institution. He has published about 70 scientific articles focused on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT). During the last few years, he and his colleagues are developing a model of ACT that focuses on dismantling dysfunctional patterns of repetitive negative thinking (RNT). This model incorporates previous research on Clinical RFT and new empirical developments.

About Louise McHugh, Ph.D.:

Louise McHugh, Ph.D., is associate professor of psychology at University College, Dublin; has published over 90 papers in the area of Contextual Behavioural Science; is a peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) trainer; fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral. Science; author of A Contextual Behavioral Guide to Self and coeditor of The Self and Perspective Taking.

About Bárbara Gil-Luciano, Ph.D.:

Barbara Gil-Luciano is a Ph.D. in Psychology and an ACT therapist with adults and adolescents. She trains in ACT in the Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY) and Nebrija University. She has authored multiple publications in ACT and Clinical RFT.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the clinical implications of the three properties of relational framing.
  2. Describe the relational framings involved in self-as-context and defusion processes.
  3. Design enhanced self-as-context exercises according to recent RFT research.
  4. Design enhanced defusion exercises according to recent RFT research.
  5. Describe the central role of worry and rumination in psychological inflexibility.
  6. Design exercises to disrupt worry and rumination processes according to the RFT analysis.

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Clinical, Research

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Here, Now, and Between Us: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and the power of the therapeutic relationship

Here, Now, and Between Us: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and the power of the therapeutic relationship

Here, Now, and Between Us: Functional Analytic Psychotherapy and the power of the therapeutic relationship

 

Workshop Leader: 
Mary P. Loudon, Ph.D.
Sarah Sullivan-Singh, Ph.D.
Mavis Tsai, Ph.D.
Robert J. Kohlenberg, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

As numerous pressures push our profession towards manualized intervention toolkits targeted at nomothetically-defined outcomes, this workshop aims to cultivate your ability to harness the wellspring of therapeutic opportunity available within each unique relationship we create with our clients. This is the promise of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: a Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS) therapy for those who value basic behavioral science as much as they feel awed by the power of the therapy relationship.

We will begin by presenting a clear theoretical rationale, rooted in basic behavioral tenets, for integrating a particular type of interpersonal focus within any therapy approach you already practice. Five simple, yet profound, rules of practice comprise this framework: 1) identify clinically-relevant behavior occurring in session via functional analysis, 2) evoke these behaviors during the therapy hour, 3) shape these behaviors with your immediate authentically attuned responses, 4) customize and refine your responding by observing the impact of your interpersonal reinforcers on the client, and 5) work with the client to generalize improved in-session behavior into life outside of therapy. In this workshop, you will have the opportunity to practice seeing and hearing your clients through this lens of compassionate functional analysis and to enhance your awareness of tools for reinforcing client improvements.

As technical as the underlying behavioral roots of FAP are, the therapy that emerges from them is fundamentally human and emotionally intimate as it calls on both client and therapist to engage in reciprocal transactions of candid behavior. The relationship comes alive and transforms into an in-vivo laboratory in which you invite the client to attempt new, more effective behaviors in service of their values and goals within the therapy session. As the work progresses, FAP therapists shape and reinforce improvement by illuminating the positive impact it has on both them and the therapy relationship. In short, we encourage clients to practice, “right here, right now,” behaviors that are functionally equivalent to those they wish to implement in their lives outside of session. Because clients emit new behaviors in your presence, they benefit from the enhanced reinforcement of your immediate and sincere responding. Hence, increasing your own self-awareness, courage, and judiciousness in how you share your authentic self and emotional vulnerability allows you to augment the potency of your in-the-moment responses to clients.

Following a logical arc that weaves together essential didactic elements of theory, CBS rationale, and ethical considerations, the workshop will also introduce a curriculum of new experiential exercises that provides balance among intellectual, practical, and personal development. Of note, we will encourage you to reveal yourself, including your vulnerability, to the extent that it supports your learning and development both personally and professionally and with an ongoing, thoughtful consideration of your needs and limits within the workshop setting. Along the way, you will create a FAP Case Conceptualization for a client, begin a FAP Therapist Case Conceptualization for yourself, and practice the 5 Rules of FAP in “real-plays” with peers in small groups. We will prepare you to learn from these experiential exercises, and to take FAP on the road with you to your clients, via didactic presentations, live demonstrations, segments of video from therapy sessions conducted by the trainers, and a compendium of FAP-consistent clinical tools and resources that you will take home with you.

Whether you are new to FAP or have been practicing FAP for years, our hope is that you will leave the workshop with a deepened awareness of yourself, an awakened excitement about the possibilities of the therapy relationship, and an enlivened commitment to igniting it with each of your clients. As trainers, we plan to do the same.

About Mary P. Loudon, Ph.D.: 

Dr. Loudon is an internationally recognized expert in Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) who earned her doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Washington where she developed expertise in contextual behavioral science (CBS) approaches including FAP, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and Mindfulness-Based therapies. After completing her post-doctoral fellowship with Dr. Mavis Tsai, she became a Certified FAP Trainer and has since led/co-led over 25 FAP training workshops, intensives, and courses. Dr. Loudon has innovated new training techniques and content, and has taught, supervised, and provided consultation for hundreds of practitioners domestically and abroad.

In 2009, Dr. Loudon was appointed Clinical Faculty at the University of Washington in the Department of Psychology and since this time she has provided clinical supervision to doctoral students in FAP, ACT, and EFT. In her private practice, she works with individual adults and couples across a wide span of concerns including anxiety, emotional avoidance and disconnection from self or others, low mood, grief, trauma, and interpersonal connection and intimacy. She also provides therapy for therapists - an endeavor especially suited for professionals who want to improve their therapeutic skills while cultivating deeper courage, awareness, and love in their personal lives.

In 2014, Dr. Loudon co-founded The Seattle Clinic, a community of over 20 practicing psychologists who bring together expertise in a wide variety of 3rd wave therapies including FAP, ACT, DBT, and MBCT. She spearheaded and continues to co-lead the in-house FAP/ACT Consultation Team, while offering periodical 12-week FAP Therapist Training Programs for unaffiliated therapists. In the coming year, she will be launching a pre-internship FAP practicum for graduate students with Dr. Sullivan-Singh. She also offers consultation to outside groups of practitioners interested in staring FAP Consultation groups of their own.

Finally, Dr. Loudon has maintained an interest and expertise in minority and LGBT psychology throughout her academic and clinical career, devoting her graduate research to the psychological effects of bias on members of stigmatized minority groups. As a psychologist and a member of the LGBT community, it is Mary’s passion to harness the power of interpersonal connection in service of social justice. To this end Dr. Loudon has been involved in the development and implementation of CBS-based approaches to anti-racism work. Specifically, she collaborated with other CBS scientists, clinicians, and researchers to create an ACT & FAP based anti-racism workshop which has been offered in a variety of settings.

About Sarah Sullivan-Singh, Ph.D.:

Dr. Sullivan-Singh earned her doctoral degree in clinical psychology from UCLA and completed a postdoctoral fellowship within the University of Washington Rehabilitation Medicine Department before beginning her independent practice. She is a Clinical Instructor within the University of Washington (UW) Psychology Department where she supervises graduate students treating clients using ACT and FAP. Dr. Sullivan-Singh routinely guest lectures to psychology interns and psychiatry residents in the UW Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences (student feedback available upon request). Currently, she is also providing ongoing consultation and clinical supervision to a randomized-controlled trial at the UW Center for the Science of Social Connection of a brief FAP intervention for individuals who report high fears of intimacy.

About Mavis Tsai, Ph.D.:

Dr. Tsai, co-originator of FAP, is a clinical psychologist and senior research scientist at University of Washington’s Center for Science of Social Connection. She is the co-author of five books on FAP (some of which have been translated into Portuguese, Spanish, Japanese, Italian, Korean and Persian), and over 70 articles and book chapters. She is an ACBS Fellow, and received the Washington State Psychological Association’s Distinguished Psychologist Award in recognition of significant contributions to the field of psychology. She gave a TEDx talk “Create Extraordinary Interactions”, has presented “Master Clinician” sessions at the Association for Behavior and Cognitive Therapy, has led numerous workshops nationally and internationally, and trains online clinicians all over the world in FAP. As Executive Director of the Nonprofit Organization ‘Awareness, Courage & Love Global Project” which brings FAP to the general public, she trains volunteers to lead chapters in six continents to create a worldwide- network of open-hearted change-seekers who strive to meet life’s challenges through deepening interpersonal connection and rising to live more true to themselves.

About Robert J. Kohlenberg Ph.D.:

Dr. Kohlenberg received his doctorate at UCLA and is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Washington where he served as the Director of Clinical training. He is certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology, received the Washington State Psychological Association’s Distinguished Psychologist Award, and is a Fellow of ACBS, Society for Exploration of Psychotherapy Integration, and American Academy of Clinical Psychology. He is the co-originator of Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP), has attained research grants for FAP treatment development, has co-published many papers and six books, including Functional Analytic Psychotherapy: A Guide for Creating Intense and Curative Therapeutic Relationships.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the 5 Rules of FAP and the behavioral theory underlying them.
  2. Delineate functional classes of behavior that may get expressed differently across contexts, including in outside life, (O1s/2s), as a therapist (T1/2s).
  3. List 3 strategies for reinforcing client target behaviors in session.
  4. Demonstrate ability to recognize and evoke clinically relevant behavior and to utilize genuine responses to extinguish and punish problematic behaviors.
  5. Prepare a FAP case conceptualization and treatment plan for one client that demonstrates the application of functional analysis to client behavior and awareness of the impact of your own therapist behavior on the client.
  6. Discuss ethical considerations related to cultivating intense therapeutic relationships with clients when using FAP, and describe the benefits of engaging with a FAP-informed Consult Team.

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Life from the Feet Up: Supporting Client Change through ACT Process and Therapeutic Relationship

Life from the Feet Up: Supporting Client Change through ACT Process and Therapeutic Relationship

Life from the Feet Up: Supporting Client Change through ACT Process and Therapeutic Relationship

Workshop Leader: 
Robyn Walser, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) has transformed the lives of clients and clinicians in many ways and—as part of a broader shift in the practice of psychotherapy emerging from a new theory of human language —has had a significant impact in the field of psychology. ACT has flourished in areas of application, research base, and clinical use around the world. Not only does it have a broad reach that continues to grow, it also tends to have a distinctive and personal impact. Done with intention and presence, ACT links us to the very qualities of what it means to be alive and whole, to be a conscious and experiencing being. Yet, the behavioral processes implemented in ACT may be learned and understood at many levels and may remain challenging to implement in a flexible, consistent, process-based, and effective fashion. Functional analysis remains a vital yet sometimes elusive aspect of ACT. As well, multiple levels of process are present in any therapy, including those processes beyond ACT’s 6 core. Moving beyond simple technique and into a fluid ACT intervention requires attending to intrapersonal, interpersonal, and overarching and ongoing processes in the context of the psychotherapeutic relationship. Engaging in an on-going functional analysis feeds these processes and informs the case conceptualization. Digesting the theory and research behind ACT and understanding its content, processes, techniques, and foundational goal—psychological flexibility—is about inviting clients back into the vitality found in human joy and pain in the movement toward meaning. Connecting workshops participants to on-going functional analysis and the multiple levels of process found in ACT from a more in-depth, experiential, or heartfelt place will be the focus of this workshop. Didactic presentation, video, role-play and experiential exercises will be used to convey the material.

About Robyn Walser, Ph.D.: 

Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D. is Director of TL Consultation Services, Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and works at the National Center for PTSD. As a licensed psychologist, she maintains an international training, consulting and therapy practice. Dr. Walser is an expert in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and has co-authored 6 books on ACT including a book on learning ACT. She has most recently written a book entitled: The Heart of ACT,  released in 2019. Dr. Walser has expertise in traumatic stress, depression and substance abuse and has authored a number of articles, chapters and books on these topics. She has been doing ACT workshops since 1998; training in multiple formats and for multiple client problems. Dr. Walser has been described as a “passionate, creative, and bold ACT trainer and therapist” and she is best known for her dynamic, warm and challenging ACT trainings. She is often referred to as a clinician’s clinician. Her workshops feature a combination of lecture and experiential exercises designed to provide a unique learning opportunity in this state-of-the-art intervention. http://www.tlconsultationservices.com/

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Explain what is meant by exploring ACT processes from the perspective of personal internal experience and how it is relevant to therapy.
  2. Describe the role and function of interpersonal process in the implementation of ACT.
  3. Describe functional analysis and its role in the overarching and ongoing process of ACT intervention and case conceptualization.
  4. Explain how intrapersonal and interpersonal behavioral patterns inform a functional approach.
  5. Explain how different levels of process participate in and inform the therapeutic relationship.
  6. Explain what is meant by ACT processes and their flexible use with respect to the six core components of ACT tucked inside of therapeutic relationship.
  7. Explain how ACT metaphors and experiential exercises can be tailored to fit the client’s experience and language practices including the social and cultural contexts.
  8. Describe barriers to fluid implementation of ACT and how to work through these barriers in an ACT consistent fashion.
  9. Describe the role of personal values in guiding the work done in ACT therapy and how to apply it across sessions.
  10. List the benefits of mindfulness as a practice as well as an ongoing process during session, including how it can be used to cultivate compassion. 

Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists
ACBS staff

Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy for Everyone

Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy for Everyone

Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy for Everyone

Workshop Leader: 
Dennis Tirch, Ph.D.
Laura Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

We know that developing mindfulness, acceptance and compassion can lead to growth in well-being and psychological flexibility. But, how can we focus our efforts, and robustly train these capacities for our clients and ourselves? How do we awaken the compassionate mind, to move ever more fully into lives of meaning, purpose and vitality?

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) training can be a path to personal growth and performance enhancement for therapists practicing just about any approach. Over the last 10 years, thousands of ACT practitioners, in particular, have added CFT tools to their repertoire, changing the game and exploring new ways of working with their personal and professional selves. During the past 15 years, CFT has been found to be beneficial for people experiencing a wide range of difficulties, and recent advances in research and practice have suggested that compassion may be one of the most important processes in psychotherapy effectiveness. 

This deeply experiential workshop will explore the foundational series of mindfulness and compassion imagery practices that make up the heart of CFT. Participants will learn these practices through direct, personal experience, learning CFT from the inside out. In addition to meditative exercises, we will demonstrate and practice ways to build up self-compassion through the psychotherapy relationship, using classic compassion training methods in the natural flow of a therapy session. We will review and explore the relationship between compassionate mind training and psychological flexibility, grounding our work in evolutionary science, attachment theory, and contextual behavioral theory. An array of learning tools will be used, including guided mindful compassion practice, role-play exercises, self-reflection, mindful movement, narrative, video and case examples.

Wherever you may be in your professional journey, from beginner to seasoned expert, you may find that these methods can complement and strengthen your therapeutic approach. No previous CFT experience is necessary, and the trainers are aiming to help ACT and FAP therapists, in particular, as they integrate a compassion focus into the work they do. This workshop presents a novel approach to understanding the therapy – aimed at helping participants to advance their compassion work. This is an opportunity to integrate the dimensions of compassion work into your practice, while renewing your understanding of the fundamental dynamics of mindfulness and compassion. Together, we will build a road map towards increased compassion-based living, mindful courage, and psychological flexibility.

About Dennis Tirch, Ph.D.: 

Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., is President of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and the Founder of the Center for Compassion Focused Therapy in New York. Dr. Tirch is the author/co-author of numerous books, chapters, and peer-reviewed articles on ACT, CFT, CBT, and Buddhist psychology. Dr. Tirch also serves as an Associate Clinical Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Medical Center, and as President of The Compassionate Mind Foundation, North America. Dr. Tirch provides workshops and courses globally in mindfulness, compassion and acceptance, both in person and online. Dr. Tirch is a Fellow of ACBS, and is a Fellow and Consultant/Supervisor with the Academy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Dr. Tirch is a Dharma Holder, Board Member, and Co-Founder of the Flowing Heart Temple (Ryushin-ji) of The Zen Garland Order, in New York.

About Laura Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D.:

Laura R. Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D., is the Director of the Center for Compassion Focused Therapy. Dr. Silberstein-Tirch is a clinical psychologist, supervisor and compassion-focused therapy (CFT) trainer who presents internationally on mindfulness, compassion and acceptance. She is the author of How to Be Nice to Yourself: The Everyday Guide to Self-Compassion and co-author of Experiencing ACT from the Inside Out, Buddhist Psychology and CBT a Clinician’s Guide and The ACT Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Compassion. She is a founding member and Past-President of the New York City chapter of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science and the Executive Director, The Compassionate Mind Foundation, North America. Her research interests include psychological flexibility and emotions as well as CFT for anxiety and depression.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe and work with an ACT-friendly CFT definition of compassion in practice.
  2. Teach others how evolutionary science explains the powerful links we see among attachment dynamics, compassion and psychological flexibility.
  3. Work with the three-circle model of emotion regulation found in CFT.
  4. Have a working knowledge of the 7 core attributes of compassionate flexibility, and how they can be assessed, conceptualized and developed in psychotherapy.
  5. Deploy compassion in the therapeutic relationship to create a context of embodied compassion for themselves and their clients.
  6. Use compassion focused imagery with clients and themselves.

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists
ACBS staff

Nurturing Roots to Reach New Heights: Revisiting Foundations of ACT as Clinical Behavior Analysis for Mastering Flexible, Process-Based Implementation

Nurturing Roots to Reach New Heights: Revisiting Foundations of ACT as Clinical Behavior Analysis for Mastering Flexible, Process-Based Implementation

Nurturing Roots to Reach New Heights: Revisiting Foundations of ACT as Clinical Behavior Analysis for Mastering Flexible, Process-Based Implementation

Workshop Leader: 
Emily K. Sandoz, Ph.D.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 2:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is defined by its behavior analytic roots and its focus on building flexibility into the behavioral repertoire. Many ACT clinicians, however, find behavior analytic language lacking in its ability to capture and inform the clinical work they do every day. Instead, ACT assessments and interventions are typically guided by less specific, “mid-level terms,” such as acceptance, defusion, and values. While mid-level terms certainly reduce the barriers to learning ACT as a new approach, they may unnecessarily limit the clinicians’ application of ACT to the creation and use of techniques, exercises, and metaphors that target flexibility components. This workshop offers practice with an alternative approach to ACT mastery - ACT as clinical behavior analysis.

ACT as clinical behavior analysis is simply the direct clinical application of functional contextual behavioral science and behavior analytic theory, typically in a talk therapy format. Many have dismissed behavior analysis as cold, rigid, and overly technical. However, practicing ACT as clinical behavior analysis tends to bring clinicians closer to practicing in a way that is connected, compassionate, and closely attuned to the therapist-client interaction. Far from building in rigidity, practicing ACT as clinical behavior analysis fosters innovation and therapist growth.

Using an experiential approach that progressively builds skills across two days, participants will practice the functional analysis of moment-to-moment therapy process in service of building clients’ psychological flexibility. These practice opportunities will begin with only the most basic philosophical assumptions underlying ACT and move through principles that are increasingly specific, converging on the ACT components that are typically described in mid-level terms. Participants will leave the workshop with a simple but effective behavioral framework in hand for providing clients opportunities to develop flexible, adaptive, and expansive patterns of behavior that extend far beyond the therapy room.

About Emily K. Sandoz, Ph.D.: 

Dr. Emily K. Sandoz is the Emma Louise LeBlanc Burguieres/BORSF Endowed Professor of Social Sciences in the Psychology Department at the University of Louisiana at Lafayette. Emily is the Director of the Louisiana Contextual Science Research Group and the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science. She has co-authored three books on acceptance and commitment therapy for struggles with eating and body image, along with chapters and journal articles on ACT, Relational Frame Theory, values, the therapeutic relationship, and psychological flexibility. Emily has led more than 70 professional training workshops around the world, and serves as a peer-reviewed ACT trainer. She also practices as a Clinical Psychologist, focusing on clinical behavior analysis of body-related difficulties.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe three clinical implications of functional contextualism for clinical behavior analysis.
  2. Analyze talk therapy interventions in terms of the function game vs. the correspondence game.
  3. Analyze talk therapy interventions by tracking the functional relationship between context and behavior.
  4. Analyze talk therapy interventions by tracking behaviors under aversive and appetitive control.
  5. Demonstrate clinical behavior analytic interventions based on analyses of aversive and appetitive control.
  6. Describe the psychological flexibility model of clinical behavioral intervention in behavioral terms.
  7. Demonstrate interventions that manipulate immediate conditions to build psychological flexibility.

Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Therapy in the Symbolic Context: The Role of Culture, Story and Symbols

Therapy in the Symbolic Context: The Role of Culture, Story and Symbols

Therapy in the Symbolic Context: The Role of Culture, Story and Symbols.

Workshop Leader: 
Darin Cairns, M.A.
 
CE credits available for this Two-Day Event: 7.5
Saturday, 12 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
Sunday, 13 June 2021 - 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Central European Summer Time)
 
Workshop Description:

"Our clients' personal stories and narratives about themselves are arguably the most important focus of all forms of therapy. These stories and narratives can trap our clients in emotional states that are seemingly ingrained, circular and permanent. Some stories are so powerful that even after insights and seemingly new learning and breakthroughs occur in session we often find that the stories and narratives have returned by the time of the very next session. The insights and discoveries from RFT have allowed us to understand how these stories develop for a person, why they have the power they do and what the factors are in a person's life that maintain them. With these insights, clinicians can use evidence based science driven approaches to identify what narratives to focus on in therapy and develop effective and precise therapeutic strategies on a case by case basis to foster and create new empowering personal stories and narratives that lead to personally meaningful psychological flexibility that will lead to lasting and ongoing development"

This workshop will be of assistance to Clinicians working with different populations in various ways;

For those Working with Children and Families
- How to promote functional development through the use of language and modelling in the home
- Identifying narratives that lead to harmful parenting practices and dysfunctional family systems
For those working with adolescents
- How to understand the role of social media and cultural processes that impact identity development
- How to understand the role of social group processes and evolving norms in creating the identity stories that
For those working with ACT (and other forms of CBT or interpersonal therapies)
- How to better inform your understanding of how and why various approaches work
- How to better understand the developmental processes that influenced out clients narratives
- How to identify the maintaining variables in your clients narratives and what to do about them
- How to utilise the various story creating 'tools' to guide your therapeutic approach based on your clients ways of learning
- How to capture and utilise the processes within the therapeutic relationship and space to create narratives that are meaningful and lasting for their clients

It is not known when exactly our ancestors discovered fire. We do know though that it was one of the greatest discoveries of humankind. Fire can provide energy to create, warmth to comfort and the means to burn and destroy. Being able to create, capture and use fire was a tremendous advantage to humans. It was not our greatest advantage though. Fire was to become just another tool in the enormous array of tools we were to discover, create and capture. Our actual first great achievement was our skill at passing information to each other. We could pass on information with intent and every generation watched and learned from the generation before it how to better build and use the technology of fire. Our gift from learning from another, whilst at a level never seen in any other species, was not unique to us though. Many mammals could do it. Then came our second gift. We developed the ability to share information in symbols. Words, gestures, pictures, icons and text. Symbols could bridge time and space. We could influence a person we had never met. We could leave symbols in the form of manuals, stories, parables, metaphors, idioms, poems, memes for every generations following to interpret. We began not just to model how to make fire but to discuss it, explore it, imagine its potential and theorise on ways we could learn more than just what an elder showed us. So effective was the symbolic process, we now we have 7-year-old children who understand concepts that were once considered the work of wise elders. This is the benefit of the social species becoming the social-symbolic species and we created a rich cultural tapestry to maintain this ability that is so automatic you may not realise you are using it right now.

Recently several fields ranging from Anthropology through to Neuroscience have converged in their study of symbolic learning. One of the key discoveries has been that the symbolic ability that gifted us the remarkable knowledge and reasoning capacity we now have is too much for our neurology itself to contain. It is now apparent that as we evolved the brain 'handed off' the bulk of the symbolic process to the social system. Due to this need we have created cultures to sustain our symbolic demands. It is now accepted that our minds are part of and contained in our culture through our drawings, stories, media, books, movies, ceremonies and teachings. Symbolic influence is everywhere. Once we learn to think and communicate symbolically, we are never really disconnected from the culture again and our thoughts are never really our own. Culture reflects our minds and our minds informed by our cultures. Even when physically alone we are never symbolically alone again - our culture and social influences are always in our 'mind'. This is the power of the symbolic world we live in.

We now see people more reliant on symbolic processes than ever before as we live through our social media and devices at an ever increasing rate. At the same time we see narratives used to deflect, confuse and create bias with greater skill and intention than ever before. Whilst control of the 'narrative' and seeking to influence through control of information is not new the amount and speed of information we must try to make sense of is something we as a species have never before encountered. Where once we may have needed to learn how to manage gossip and peer pressure from people we largely directly knew, we now find our identities almost completely disembodied onto social media and peer groups can seemingly be infinite and everywhere at once. Where once we could assess a speakers credibility through coherence and lines of evidence we are increasingly aware that those who seek to inform us have learned it is more profitable to play to our biases - or foster conflict - than tell us what they actually think or experienced. Our symbolic system is increasingly our greatest risk. It is apparent we are now in a world where we have never been more symbolically connected and informed and less attached to the experiences these symbols were meant to help us understand. So, just as we learned to understand fire so we could harness it and not be destroyed by it, we must now do the same with symbolic processes that gave us that ability in the first place – for the same reasons.

Therapy can be viewed as an intensive distilled and focussed version of the social-developmental processes that develop and shape humans (attachment, modelling, shared experience and a steady stream of symbols passing back and forth between the therapist and client). Given it is the ‘hothouse’ version of the social symbolic process it is apparent that we can and should understand how symbols work if we are to understand not just the human condition and functioning but the therapeutic process itself. By doing this we can better tailor our intervention approaches but also better develop approaches informed by the cultures we and our clients live within whilst reflecting what the latest science is telling us about human development and functioning.

In this workshop I will rely on various sources of research about how symbolic abilities develop and come to function and how they are then maintained throughout the lifespan. From this foundation I will then outline how these key discoveries and understanding of how symbols work can be used in clinical practice. This will include;

  1. Understand the foundational and pivotal developmental processes that develop and maintain symbolic abilities.
  2. Understanding symbolic ‘vehicles’ like story, metaphor and phrases and the roles they play in adaptive and maladaptive functioning.
  3. Understand how culture influences mind at multiple levels of social functioning.
  4. How to use these vehicles with precision and skill in therapy and assess efficacy of those vehicles.
  5. Using symbolic 'enhancers' like writing, drawing and role play to ground but also increase the potency of symbolic processes.
  6. Understanding how symbolic processes can be harmful both from internal symbolic processes (eg rumination, self criticism, cognitive bias) to external symbolic processes (the power of media, social media and other cultural influences)
  7. Understand how symbols gain influence and power at the expense of experience and wellbeing.
  8. Recognise the key symbolic processes for psychological flexibility and wellbeing and how to help your client create them.
  9. Learn how to help our clients recognise negative and positive symbolic processes and use them to create healthy lifestyles and patterns of living.
  10. The role of culture, group and identity as symbolic processes that therapy must consider for lasting change.

About Darin Cairns, M.A.: 

Darin Cairns is a Clinical Psychologist and has been working in private practice for the past 15 years after working for the Western Ausralian government for 7 years. In that time he has consistently worked in three domains of practice concurrently; Developmental Psychology, designing and implementing developmental programs for children with Autism and related domains, Clinical Psychology working with children, families and adults across an array of mental health fields and in the Forensic context assisting Courts in managing high conflict family systems. He is founder and co-director of the Charles St Clinic. He has presented over 250 workshops on child development, relational frame theory and applications of learning theory to clinical practice.

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how symbolic learning processes work
  2. Explain and analyse how to use metaphor, narrative and imagery to create targeted learning outcomes
  3. Design and apply techniques for enhancing the potency of symbolic learning through writing, drawing and role play
  4. Explain how the developmental processes that lead to symbolic capacities provide insight and understanding of how psychological flexibility leads to improved well being
  5. Understand how to analyse a clients social influences both historical and current from the perspective of symbolic learning
  6. Describe and analyse how culture impacts wellbeing and what we can teach our clients to do about it.

Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Experiential exercises, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance

CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Viviendo en contacto con el corazón: El análisis clínico de la conducta y los principios basados en contingencias y conducta relacional

Viviendo en contacto con el corazón: El análisis clínico de la conducta y los principios basados en contingencias y conducta relacional

Viviendo en contacto con el corazón: El análisis clínico de la conducta y los principios basados en contingencias y conducta relacional

“Living with heart”: Clinical behavior analysis and the principles based on contingencies and relational responding

*Workshop delivered in Spanish. Simultaneous English translation will be available.*
 
Líder del taller:
Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.
 
Créditos CE disponibles para este evento de dos días (CE credits available for this Two-Day Event): 7.5
Sábado, 12 de junio de 2021 - 2:30 p.m. hasta las 6:30 p.m.**** UTC/GMT +2 (Horario de verano de Europa Central) ***Este es un cambio tardío debido a un conflicto personal del presentador. Lamentamos las molestias que esto pueda ocasionar (publicado el 11 de junio de 2021). ***Note, this is a late change do to a personal conflict of the presenter.  We apologize for any inconvenience this might cause (posted 11 June, 2021).
Domingo, 13 de junio de 2021 - 2:00 p.m. hasta las 6:00 p.m. UTC/GMT +2 (Horario de verano de Europa Central)
 
Descripción del taller:

La condición humana permite vivir en sufrimiento y vivir con sentido. Ambos son repertorios del YO, aprendidos en la historia personal, como dos modos, flexible e inflexible, de interacturar con uno mismo o de relacionarse con la propia conducta. En este workshop se presentarán tales repertorios desde los principios basados en las contingencias y en el comportamiento relacional. A través de diferentes ejemplos del patrón inflexible, se expondrán los principios relacionales involucrados en las vertientes principales por las que transcurre el proceso de construcción del repertorio flexible. Por un lado, (1) los principios implicados en facilitar el contacto con el repertorio limitante desde “el corazón”, como metáfora del sentido personal, y el inicio de una apertura de horizonte con sentido personal. Y, por otro lado, tanto (2) los principios implicados en producir una relación deíctica/jerárquica entre uno mismo y sus propias conductas, como (3) los principios dirigidos a clarificar y amplificar las funciones motivacionales del sentido personal con el fin de que se conviertan en funciones jerárquicas y activen acciones su control. Finalmente, la conocida como “relación terapéutica” será filtrada a lo largo de este proceso.

The human condition allows for living a life of suffering and a life with meaning. Both are behavioral repertoires in relation to the SELF, and are learned through a personal history, as two types, flexible and inflexible, of interacting with oneself or of relating to one's own behavior. Both repertoires will be described in this workshop on the shoulders of principles based on contingencies and relational responding. The different strategies for building flexible repertoires on the basis of the client's inflexible repertoire will be filtered through different relational processes. On the one hand, (1) the principles involved in facilitating contact with the limiting repertoire from "the heart", as a metaphor for personal meaning, and the onset of a horizon with meaning. On the other hand, (2) those principles involved in building a deictic/hierarchical relation between oneself and one's own behaviors, and (3) those principles needed to clarify and amplify the motivational functions for them to become hierarchical functions that activate behaving in several domains. Finally, the "therapeutic relationship" will be filtered through these processes.

Acerca de Carmen Luciano, Ph.D.: 

La Dra. Carmen Luciano es referente mundial en la investigación, desarrollo y expansión de la psicología contextual (Terapias Contextuales y su teoría de base, la Teoría del Marco Relacional).

Inició su trabajo y docencia académica en 1979 en la Universidad de Granada. Desde 1995 es Catedrática de Psicología en la Universidad de Almería. Se doctoró en Psicología por la Universidad Complutense de Madrid en 1983. Fue investigadora postdoc Fulbright en Boston University y en Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies (Cambridge, EEUU) con B.F. Skinner, realizando múltiples estancias diversas en universidades norteamericanas y europeas como profesora e investigadora invitada. Ha colaborado con numerosos investigadores internacionales y nacionales. Actualmente mantiene una colaboración investigadora muy estrecha con Dermot Barnes-Holmes en la Universidad de Gent y con Francisco J. Ruiz en la Fundación Universitaria Konrad-Lorenz.

Ha llevado a cabo investigaciones en el análisis funcional del lenguaje y sus aplicaciones clínicas dirigiendo desde 1986 el Grupo de Investigación Análisis Experimental y Aplicado del Comportamiento, y dirigiendo desde 2004 el Máster y Doctorado con Mención de Calidad en Análisis Funcional en Contextos Clínicos y de la Salud (Universidad de Almería). Los hallazgos generados en este contexto han sido aclamados internacionalmente por su relevancia en el enfoque contextual.

Carmen Luciano graduated in 1978 and received her Ph.D. in the Complutense University of Madrid in 1984. Professor of Psychology in the University of Almeria since 1994 – and Assistant Professor in the University of Granada from 1979 to 1993. Her research dedication began on the experimental analysis of language in 1982. Her Postdoc Fulbright research stay in Boston University and the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies, in 1985-86, was centered in studying problem-solving behavior with Skinner’s supervision. This was a critical point in her career as a basic researcher. She was involved in equivalence research, rule-governed behavior and, shortly after, in research of RFT and ACT. She has, and is, doing experimental-applied RFT research on coherence, deictic and hierarchical framing in the context of identifying the behavioral principles of experiential avoidance, values, defusion, the self and responding to one’s own behavior, false memories, metaphors, and brief ACT protocols. She teaches ACT focused on promoting that emotions, thoughts, and valued motivation be brought to the present to build a flexibility repertoire.

Dr. Luciano is Director of the Experimental/Applied Analysis of Behavior Research Group since 1986, where she has supervised over thirty doctoral theses. She is the Director of the Functional Analysis Doctoral Program in the University of Almeria, and the Master in Contextual Therapies Program at the Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY). Her research has received international, national, and regional public funds. She has collaborated with research groups from different countries and she has spread the functional analysis perspective in meetings, courses, research presentations, and many publications. She is known for her exciting, precise, and creative style while teaching, working with clients, and doing research.

Objetivos formativos:

Después de este taller, los participantes podrán:

  1. Describe la inflexibilidad y la flexibilidad en términos relacionales.
  2. Analizar el papel de las contingencias y la respuesta relacional en la construcción de un repertorio de flexibilidad.
  3. Describe el proceso que implica ayudar al cliente a contactar con su propio comportamiento y los resultados obtenidos en el contexto de valores.
  4. Demostrar el proceso definido por el encuadre deíctico y jerárquico involucrado en ayudar al cliente a interactuar con su comportamiento de manera flexible.
  5. Identificar el proceso relacional al ayudar al cliente a contactar y ampliar las funciones motivacionales.
  6. Demostrar el proceso involucrado en hacer valores motivaciones para funcionar como funciones jerárquicas.

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe inflexibility and flexibility in relational terms.
  2. Analyze the role of contingencies and relational responding in building flexibility repertoire.
  3. Describe the process involved in helping the client to contact his/her own behavior and the results obtained in the context of values.
  4. Demonstrate the process defined by deictic and hierarchical framing involved in helping the client to interact with his/her behavior in a flexible way.
  5. Identify the relational process when helping the client to contact and amplify the motivational functions.
  6. Demonstrate the process involved in doing values motivations to function as hierarchical functions.
 
Público objetivo: Nivel intermedio, Nivel avanzado, Clínico, Investigación
Target audience: Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical, Research
 
Componentes: Análisis conceptual, Ejercicios experienciales, Presentación didáctica, Role play
Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play
 
El paquete incluye: Un certificado general de asistencia
Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance
 
CEs Available (7.5 hours): CEs for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

ACBS Annual World Conference 11

ACBS Annual World Conference 11

This event has concluded.  Please find information regarding the upcoming ACBS World Conference here.


Handouts and Powerpoints from World Conference 11 can be found here.


What is the World Conference?

The World Conference brings together clinicians and researchers to present cutting-edge research in ACT, RFT, and Contextual Behavioral Science, as well as experienced trainers to lead experiential workshops so that you can learn how to better serve your clients.

The World Conference is for psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychiatrists, physicians, drug counselors, health researchers, language researchers, behavior analysts, students and more.... Anyone in a similarly related helping or research field is invited to attend.

We offer CEs in Psychology (these are USA based credits), and California MFT & LCSW credits. More info here.

Registration in the full conference is all-inclusive and includes lunch, coffee/tea breaks, open access to workshops, research symposia, posters, panel discussions, plenary sessions with CBS researchers and practitioners, and our new IGNITE sessions.

Pre-Conference Intensive Workshops

First class intensive (2-day) workshops held the 2 days prior to the World Conference get things started off right. Learn ACT, RFT, CBS, FAP, Compassion Focused Therapy, and more from leaders in their field.

Program

Our Full Program is available here.

* Asterisk indicates a Peer-Reviewed ACT Trainer presenting

Conference Highlights

  • Invited Speakers: Steve Hayes, Paul Gilbert, Eva Jablonka and more... learn more about them here
  • A great venue for networking & fostering local and international collaboration
  • Lunches and coffee/tea are included so that you have more time to network
  • Conference activities take place on the beautiful campus of the University of New South Wales (Kensington Campus), near Coogee Beach. 
  • Bring the family! - Our conference hotels are right by the Beach, and only 30 minutes from downtown Sydney via public transportation
  • Evening events provide additional opportunities to network and relax after other conference activities are done for the day (Tues.- Ocean view networking; Wed.- BBQ dinner; Thurs. - Follies!; Fri. - optional Sydney Harbour Cruise)
  • Workshops, Workshops, Workshops. Half-day workshops are included (no extra charge), with your conference registration.  These are one-of-a-kind learning opportunities.


WC11 Audio Recordings

To access the audio recordings from WC11, please make sure you are logged in to your ACBS member account, and then click here.

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Conference Venue

Conference Venue

 

 

 

All daytime conference sessions will occur on the beautiful campus of the University of New South Wales.

We'll be at the Kensington Campus at: UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia

It is approximately 7 km south of central Sydney, and 3 km west of Coogee Beach.

Both Sydney and Coogee Beach are easily accessible by Public Transportation.

The Registration Desk will be on the South side of Clancy Auditorium, on UNSW's campus, and will open by 7:30am on Monday, July 8.  (Alternatively you can pick up your badge and materials in the lobby of the Crowne Plaza Coogee from 5-7pm on Sunday, July 7).

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Continuing Education (CE) Credits

Continuing Education (CE) Credits

Possible credit hours:

  • 2-day pre-conference workshops: 13 hours
  • ACBS World Conference XI (attending ALL events): approx. 23.75 hours

Types of Credit Available:

  • CE credit is available for psychologists. (APA type, USA)
  • CE credit is available for LCSW and MFT credits with the State of California.

This program is sponsored by the Association for Contextual Behavioral. The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science maintains responsibility for this program and its content. APA CE rules require that we only issue credits to those who attend the entire workshop. Those arriving more than 15 minutes late or leaving before the entire workshop is completed will not receive CE credits.

ACBS is an approved provider of continuing education for MFCCs and/or LCSWs by the California Board of Behavioral Sciences, provider #PCE 4653.

Aussies!

It is up to the individual to record their own PD points. You do not need any official documentation of hours from ACBS to self-report. A general certificate of attendance (available to all WC11 attendees onsite) is all you need from ACBS. For verification contact the Psychology Board of Australia and / or The Australian Psychological Society:

http://www.psychologyboard.gov.au/Registration/General.aspx

http://www.psychology.org.au/medicare-psychology/cpd-requirements/

Fees:

A $45 fee will be required to earn CEs.  If you attend either a pre-conference workshop, World Conference, or both, only $45 is due.  If you register for multiple events seperately, please only pay the fee one time.

Refunds & Grievance Policies: Participants may direct any questions or complaints to ACBS Executive Director Emily N. Rodrigues, acbs@contextualscience.org, or through the Contact Us link on this website.

  • CEs are only available for events that qualify as workshops, symposia, invited lecture, panel discussion, or invited plenary sessions. Poster sessions, chapter/sig meetings, and IGNITE sessions do not qualify for Continuing Education.
  • CEs can only be awarded if attendence is confirmed (sign in at the time of the event), and if evaluations are completed in a timely fashion. (Note deadlines listed on email correspondence.)
  • (Note: CE credits are only available for professionals. You may not earn CE credits with a student registration.)
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General Schedule of Events - July 8-12

General Schedule of Events - July 8-12

2-day Pre-Conference Workshops

July 8, 2013 - 9:00am-5:00pm

July 9, 2013 - 9:00am-5:00pm 

ACBS World Conference XI

July 9, 2013 - 6:00pm - July 12, 2013 - 5:45pm


By day...

Sunday, July 7, 2013

5:00pm-7:00pm

Registration (lobby of the Crowne Plaza Coogee)

Monday, July 8, 2013

7:30am-9:00am

Registration (on UNSW campus)

9:00am-5:00pm (Breaks, 10:45am-11:00am; Lunch, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Break,  3:15pm-3:30pm)

Workshops

Tuesday, July 9, 2013

8:00am-9:00am

Registration

9:00am-5:00pm (Breaks, 10:45am-11:00am; Lunch, 12:30pm-1:30pm; Break, 3:15pm-3:30pm)

Workshops

6:00pm-8:30pm

Registration (Ocean's Bar, Crowne Plaza Coogee)

6:00pm-late

ACBS World Conference XI

Opening Social at the Ocean's Bar at the Crowne Plaza Coogee with unobstructed views of the ocean, one free drink (conference attendees only, with ticket), and discounted pricing on dinner at this private event. (Conference Attendees, Pre-Conference Attendees, and their guests welcome.)

Wednesday, July 10, 2013

8:00am-9:00am

Morning Yoga session

7:30am-4:30pm

Registration (UNSW campus, rear, south side, of Sir John Clancy building)

8:00am-9:00am

Chapter/SIG/Committee Meetings

9:00am-5:45pm (Breaks, 10:15am-10:30am; Lunch, 12:00pm-1:15pm; Break, 4:15pm-4:30pm)

Conference Sessions

5:45pm-8:30pm

Australian BBQ and Poster Session (UNSW campus)

5:45pm-8:15pm+

Poster Session (Group 1 will have their posters on display from Wednesday lunch, for presentation 5:45pm-7:00pm; Group 2 from 7:00pm-8:15pm and to leave them up until the end of lunch on the following day)

Thursday, July 11, 2013

8:00am-9:00am

Morning Yoga session

8:00am-9:00am

Chapter/SIG/Committee Meetings

9:00am-5:45pm (Breaks, 10:15am-10:30am; Lunch, 12:00pm-1:15pm; Break, 4:15pm-4:45pm (varies))

Conference Sessions

8:00pm-11:00pm (Follies begin at approx. 8:30pm)

Follies! at the Roundhouse on UNSW campus (A cash bar will be available.  The venue has told me that it is ok for people to bring snacks or food if you want.  They just ask that it not be too messy, as we'll need to quickly clear out the tables after the Follies for dancing. All family & friends are welcome at this event.)

11:00pm-1:00am

Dance Party!

Friday, July 12, 2013

8:00am-9:00am

Morning Yoga session

9:00am-5:45pm (Breaks, 10:15am-10:30am; Lunch, 12:00pm-1:15pm; Break, 4:15pm-4:30pm)

Conference Sessions

5:55pm-10:45pm

Optional Sydney Harbour Cruise (advanced purchase tickets required), bus will leave UNSW campus by about 5:55pm, and return back to Crowne Plaza Coogee at approximately 10:45pm.

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Invited Speakers for the World Conference 11

Invited Speakers for the World Conference 11

Darin Cairns has over 15 years experience in treating children, adults and families for a range of psychological disorders. He has specialised in emotional, neurological and developmental disorders. Clinically, Darin has expertise in child, adolescent, family therapy and developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders. He also has extensive experience in adult mood disorders and works as a single expert witness.

 

Darin is well known for his work with children, adolescents and adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASD). Darin has set up award winning early intervention services in Western Australia for children with ASD and related conditions. He was initially trained in Applied Behaviour Analysis (ABA), Clinical Behaviour Analysis and Functional Analytic Psychotherapy. After many years working with developmental specialists and clinicians his frustration at not being able to bridge the gap from ABA to complex behavioural and emotional domains lead him to Relational Frame Theory (RFT). He has since applied Relational Frame Theory (RFT) to hundreds of developmental programs for children with autism spectrum disorders and special needs and continues to practice clinically using therapies developed from RFT such as Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and other third wave Cognitive Behavioural Approaches.


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Paul Gilbert, Ph.D.

Paul Gilbert is the head of the Mental Health Research Unit as well as Professor of Clinical Psychology at the University of Derby. He has a degree in Economics (Wolverhampton, 1973), Masters in Experimental Psychology (Sussex, 1975), PhD in Clinical Psychology (Edinburgh, 1980) and a diploma in Clinical Psychology awarded by the British Psychological Society (1980). He was made a fellow of the British Psychological Society for contributions to psychological knowledge in 1993, and was president of the British Association for Cognitive and Behavioural Psychotherapy in 2003. He has also served on the government depression NICE guideline committee. He has published and edited 21 books, over 100 academic papers and 39 book chapters. He is currently a series editor for a 'compassionate approaches to life difficulties' series. After years of exploring the processes underpinning shame and its role in a variety of psychopathologies, his current research is exploring the neurophysiology and therapeutic effectiveness of compassion focused therapy.


Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.

Steven C. Hayes is Nevada Foundation Professor at the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of 35 books and over 500 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and the application of this to the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. Dr. Hayes has been President of Division 25 of the APA, of the American Association of Applied and Preventive Psychology, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, and of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies. He was the first Secretary-Treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, which he helped form and has served a 5 year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in the National Institutes of Health. In 1992 he was listed by the Institute for Scientific Information as the 30th “highest impact” psychologist in the world. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies.


Eva Jablonka, Ph.D.  has a Ph.D. in Genetics from the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel. Her post-Doctoral studies were in the Philosophy of Science, and in Developmental Genetics. She is a professor in the Cohn Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Ideas, Tel-Aviv. Her main interest is the understanding of evolution, especially evolution that is driven by non-genetic hereditary variations, and in the evolutionary transition to phenomenal consciousness. The co-authored books listed below examine and discuss some of these issues.

Eva Jablonka and Marion J. Lamb (1995) Epigenetic Inheritance and Evolution – The Lamarckian Dimension. Oxford University Press; Avital E. and Jablonka E. (2000) Animal Traditions: Behavioural Inheritance in Evolution. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press; Eva Jablonka and Marion J. Lamb (2005) Evolution in Four Dimensions. Genetic Epigenetic, Behavioral and Symbolic Variation in the History of Life. MIT Press. Snait B. Gissis and Eva Jablonka (2011) Transformations of Lamarckism: from Subtle Fluids to Molecular Biology. MIT Press.


Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., is founder and leader of the Tobacco & Health Behavior Science Group in the Division of Public Health Sciences at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center. A licensed clinical psychologist, he is also an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Washington. His current research program focuses on comparing ACT with traditional CBT for smoking cessation in separate randomized trials of each of these delivery formats: (1) individual face-to-face, (2) group, (3) phone, (4) web, and now 5) smartphone. He and his team are the recipient of grants totaling 7 million US dollars, including a National Institutes of Health study to conduct arguably the largest randomized trial of ACT to date (5 years, 2500 participants). His team's most recent results are from a randomized trial showing that web-based ACT had over double the quit smoking rates as compared to the US government's program.


Anthony Biglan, Ph.D. is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute and the Co-Director of the Promise Neighborhood Research Consortium. He has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure.

In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which recently released its report documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. As a member of Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, he has helped to develop a strategic plan for implementing comprehensive evidence-based interventions throughout Oregon.


Thomas J. Dishion - Dr. Dishion is no longer able to attend.


 

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Sydney Harbour Cruise (Optional) - July 12, 2013

Sydney Harbour Cruise (Optional) - July 12, 2013

As a fun farewell event, ACBS is organizing transportation and registration for a Sydney Harbour Cruise immediately following the ACBS World Conference 11.

July 12 (Friday), 7:30pm-10:00pm


The cruise is themed "Christmas in July", and will have some Australian favorites on the menu.

The ticket includes transportation from the ACBS World Conference directly to the port, and return busing to Coogee immediately following the cruise.

If you'd like to purchase additional tickets for partners or children (or if you decided after registering for the conference) you may sign up and pay here:

As of June 27, this event is sold out.  You can ask at the registration desk onsite if anyone has contacted us to sell a ticket they can no longer use.

Space is limited! Because we are facilitating this event through a 3rd party, refunds for this event can only be made until the 1st of June, 2013.


 

Purchasing a ticket through ACBS for a cruise on Sydney Princess Cruises, in no way extends liability for this event to ACBS.  Sydney Princess Cruises maintains sole responsibility and liability. ACBS only assumes responsibility for the transportation portion of the event. If the cruise is sold out while ACBS is collecting reservations for the cruise, ACBS will provide tickets based on the order the registrations were received, and will gladly refund any payments for which tickets can not be given.

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WC11 Conference Program (July 10-12, 2013)

WC11 Conference Program (July 10-12, 2013)

 

Final Program (July 10-12) - Complete (pdf, 11 MB) Posted June 25, 2013

* Asterisk indicates a Peer-Reviewed ACT Trainer presenting

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WC11 Symposia Detail (July 10-12, 2013)

WC11 Symposia Detail (July 10-12, 2013)

Below are all of the Symposia being presented at the ACBS World Conference 11 in Sydney, Australia. The information below includes individual paper abstracts not included in the printed version of the program.


Symposia Detail ● Wednesday ● July 10

Wednesday Morning 10:30am

10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Psychosis: Recent evidence

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Literature review, Original data

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Clin. Interven. & Interests, Other, Psychosis, Mindfulness, Schizophrenia

Target Audience: Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 107 (level 1)

Chair: Joseph Oliver, Ph.D., South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Discussant: Steven Hayes, Ph.D., Department of Psychology University of Nevada

·The Lifengage RCT of ACT for people experiencing persisting positive symptoms of psychosis: Initial results

John Farhall, La Trobe University

Frances Shawyer, La Trobe University; Monash University

Neil Thomas, La Trobe University; Monash University

Steven Hayes, University of Nevada

David Castle, University of Melbourne

David Copolov, Monash University

The Lifengage trial aimed to address criticisms of earlier clinical trials of ACT for people with psychosis, by recruiting an adequate sample, randomising participants to ACT or an established comparison therapy, using published measures, and meeting CONSORT criteria for trial quality. Ninety-six participants with a diagnosis of schizophrenia and medication-resistant persisting positive symptoms were randomised to 8 sessions of ACT or Befriending therapy. Independent assessments of symptoms, functioning and ACT-related mediators were completed at baseline, post-therapy and 6-months follow-up. The main results will be discussed in relation to the applicability and efficacy of ACT for this sub-group of people living with psychosis, and research directions prompted by the study.

·Group Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Psychosis: The ‘ACT for Life’ Study

Louise Johns, King's College London

Eric Morris, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Joseph Oliver, South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Lucy Butler, King's College London

Background: Evidence from randomised controlled trials demonstrates the utility of ACT for psychosis in terms of reducing relapse rates and psychotic symptoms. Protocols for ACT have been developed for brief group therapy, but these have not been evaluated formally within routine clinical services.

Aims: This study aims to evaluate effectiveness of ACT delivered in group format in community treatment settings for people with psychosis.

Method: The study used a waiting list control design, with measurement points at follow up, 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Participants completed measures of life interference, anxiety, depression, process measures (mindfulness, cognitive fusion, valued living) and satisfaction. Service use post intervention was also measured.

Results and Conclusions: This paper will present the final outcome data from the study. Results showed improvements in overall anxiety, depression and reductions in life interference by client problems. The role of process variables and service use will also be discussed. The paper will also describe the practical aspects of delivering the ACT intervention in real world settings, and will illustrate the group content with the use of clinical case material.

·The Exploration of Depression in Schizophrenia (ExoDiS)

Ross White, University of Glasgow

Andrew Gumley, University of Glasgow

Rosemary Moore, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Jackie Smith, NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde

Corinna Stewart, University of Glasgow

Background: Depression is a significant problem amongst individuals with a diagnosis of Schizophrenia and is associated with poor quality of life.

Aims: The Exploration of Depression in Schizophrenia (ExoDiS) study aimed to (a) establish the prevalence of depression in a geographical cohort of individuals with a diagnosis of Schizophrenia, (b) characterise this group in terms of key correlates of depressed mood.

Method: The study used a cross-sectional design. Participants completed the Calgary Depression Scale for Schizophrenia, The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, the Significant Other Scale, the Warwick Edinburgh Mental well-being Scale, The Self-Compassion Scale, and the Beck Cognitive Insight Scale.

Results and Conclusions: The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II had significant correlations with the depression measures, and many of the other measures used in the study. The implications that these findings have for future clinical trials of ACT for post-psychotic depression will be discussed.

As an intervention, ACT is well suited to working with people with psychosis, offering a method to develop and enhance values based living in the presence of often highly distressing and unwanted experiences. Since the early studies investigating ACT for psychosis interventions, by Bach and Hayes (2002) and Gaudiano and Herbert (2004), interest in this area has continued grow, culminating in the recent volume, ‘ACT and Mindfulness for Psychosis’ (Wiley-Blackwell). Evidence in this area has also continued to develop with the publication of a number of research trials. This symposium will bring together recent evidence from several studies. The Lifengage paper will present outcome data from the large RCT for ACT for positive symptoms of schizophrenia. The ACT for Life paper will describe outcomes from an ACT group-based intervention for psychosis. The ExoDiS paper will report on data exploring the role of depression and ACT process variables in psychosis. Together, the results from these studies will be discussed in relation to future directions for the field.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe the up-to-date evidence for ACT and mindfulness based interventions for psychosis.

2. Explain key ACT process variables in relation to psychosis and understand issues concerning measurement.

3. Outline current knowledge gaps and future directions for ACT psychosis research and interventions.

 

12. Contextual Medicine Special Interest Group Symposium 1: Strategy, purpose, issues, roadmap

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play

Categories: Functional contextual neuroscience and pharmacology, Theory & Philo., Related FC approaches, Seamlessly integrating medicine with behavioral/evolutionary science, Philosophy

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 309 (level 3)

Chair: Rob Purssey, MBBS FRANZCP, Private Practice and University of Queensland

Discussant: Tony Biglan, Ph.D., Oregon Research Institute

·Contextual Medicine - strategy and purposes: Creating a unifying, empowering clinical dialogue, embracing whole person/societal care

Rob Purssey, MBBS FRANZCP, Private Practice and University of Queensland

The Contextual Medicine Special Interest Group of ACBS was founded in mid-2012 defining our Topics of Interest as; human physiology, neuroscience, medicine, and their relations within the broader field of evolutionary science; integrating CBS case conceptualization with models and language familiar to medical practitioners; the functional contextual study of the effect of drugs on human behavior; and public health, socio-cultural, and economic issues relevant to practices of medicine including prescribing practices, and local variation in such issues. This paper lays out the functional contextual philosophy of science foundations, showing how FC assumptions (aontology, monism, pragmatic truth, “cause” entirely functional and situation specific for a purpose) can integrate the “physical” and “psychological” seamlessly, while illuminating how scientist / clinician values and purpose, being an integral part of the whole, are fundamental to “truth” of our work and findings.

·We Have a Stone in Our Shoe: Saving the World with Contextual Science

Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Chronic mental health problems have increased dramatically. From 1987 to 2007 children on disability for mental disorders in the US has gone from around 16,000 to 561,000. The National Institutes of Health seeks causes in genetics and neurological dysfunction. From an evolutionary perspective, the causes cannot possibly be “broken brains” or “broken genes.” Such a search is akin to the following: If a person had a stone in their shoe, we could scan, x-ray, and do tissue cultures, check for swelling and inflammation. We could administer opiate drugs to reduce pain. But we would never find the cause. Opiates might allow walking, but they would cause great disability. Decontextualized medicine allows people to tolerate damaging environments. This is not restricted to mental health. Blood pressure medications allow people to live in environments that dangerously raise blood pressure, and diabetes drugs allow toxic dietary environments. I will argue for an evolutionary approach to health that offers direct suggestions for minimal requirements for sustained wellbeing in the modern world.

·“Assume that…”: The Clinical Application of Functional-Contextualist Science-Making Processes

Julian McNally, Private Practice, The ACT of Living

Much of the scope and depth of the ACT-RFT research enterprise derives from the willingness of its leaders to examine and establish their own assumptions and contrast them with the assumptions underlying competing models. Doing so has allowed for the development of logical connections between philosophy, research methodology and clinical practice. If this assumption-establishing process makes for good science - i.e. increases the ability to predict and influence with greater precision, scope and depth - could it be helpful for pursuing value-directed living? This paper aims to demonstrate that:

• assumptions govern actions constantly and powerfully,

• they are largely invisible, but can be revealed,

• they can be created or chosen, and;

• these last two processes can be influenced in conversation.

If time permits, sample interventions will be demonstrated.

Contextual Medicine seeks to integrate functional contextual behavioral science with models & language familiar with medical practitioners to address human physiology, neuroscience & medicine. Evolutionary CM science could impact public health, socio-cultural & economic realms to improve human well being, integrating basic research from epigenetic to social with clinical interventions from medication to therapy to public policy. This inaugural CM SIG Symposium will lay out the foundations, map a seamless biological, behavioral & cultural strategy, and critically examine where mainstream mechanistic assumptions have led us. We will offer suggestions for the minimal requirements for sustained well being, and a vision for progress using clinical applications of functional contextual science making processes.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe the contextual medicine strategy of science, purpose of discipline, and the implications of its assumptions.

2. Apply evolutionary principles to explain recent epidemiological evidence of rapidly increasing psychological health morbidity in developed countries.

3. Create questions to uncover disabling assumptions.

Wednesday Afternoon 2:45pm

23. Relational Frame Theory research in Australia: First steps

Symposium (2:45-4:15pm)

Components: Didactic presentation

Categories: RFT, RFT, IRAP, deictic framing

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: James E. Duguid, University of Western Sydney

Discussant: Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., University of Western Sydney

·The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure: Measurement from a functional contextual point of view

James E. Duguid, University of Western Sydney

Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., University of Western Sydney

Ian Stewart, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway

The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) provides RFT researchers with a functional contextual measure of implicit cognition. The IRAP provides an alternative to mechanistic methodologies that have been popular for many years in social psychology. The IRAP provides a measure of brief and immediate relational responding as participants respond quickly and accurately to stimuli on a computer screen. IRAP research highlights not only the importance of context on relational responding, but the potential to predict behaviour months in advance. This paper will provide an overview of the IRAP, discuss recent developments in IRAP research as well as the author’s recent research on attitudes to body-size, and consider the importance of functional contextual measures in Contextual Behavioural Science.

·A Qualitative Measure of Deictic Framing

Paul Atkins, Ph.D., Australian National University

A primary aim of ACT is to help create a more flexible and adaptive relationship to the self and identity. But self-report measures are inadequate for capturing the depth and richness of change in identity resulting from mindfulness interventions. We describe a qualitative coding scheme based upon a functional theory of self-referencing behaviour that can be applied to any text to measure complexity and flexibility of self-reference and perspective taking. The scheme distinguishes between more or less flexible conceptualizations of the self, self as experienced in the present moment and self as a perspective from which experience is observed. A validation study based upon interviews before and after a community-based Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) course demonstrated high inter-rater agreement (Cohen’s Kappa = .59) and significant changes in identity associated with less rigid self-categorizations (p < .002), more flexible self-references (p = .035) and more references to self as an observer of experience (p = .015). The qualitative data revealed reduced reliance upon rigid rule-governed behavior and an increase in more flexible, contingency-sensitive responding. The measure provides a precise but semantically rich approach to understanding self-reference that is widely applicable to researching mindfulness interventions in a variety of contexts.

·A Qualitative Measure of Self-Rules

Robert Styles, Australian National University

Building on the previous talk, I present a method of interviewing that probes critical incidents for contextual and verbal contingencies governing behaviour as well as a method for coding these interviews in terms of the construction of a sense of self and self-rules in use. I present results from a study correlating these measures of selfing and self-rules with other commonly used self-report measures of mindfulness, perspective taking, and wellbeing.

Relational Frame Theory is the focus of research in many centres around the world, however this is only a recent development in Australia. RFT provides a comprehensive account of human language and cognition that is relevant to both basic research and applied settings. The papers presented in this symposium will highlight the early developments of RFT research at two universities in Australia. Each paper will highlight developments in measurement, present results from ongoing research, and discuss the importance of this research in Contextual Behavioural Science.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain a new qualitative measure of self-construal.

2. Explain a new qualitative measure of self-rules.

3. Discuss the importance of functional contextual measures in RFT research.

 

24. Contextual control and transformation of function during the expansion of relational networks: Experimental findings and clinical implications

Symposium (2:45-4:15pm)

Components: Original data

Categories: RFT, Clin. Interven. & Interests, Transformation of functions

Target Audience: Interm.

Location: Mathews 309 (level 3)

Chair: Roberta Kovac, Ms, Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analisys

Discussant: Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

·The transfer of social exclusion and inclusion through stimulus equivalence classes

Louise McHugh, University College Dublin

Anita Munnelly, University College Dublin

Charlotte Dack, University College London

Georgina Martin, University College Dublin

Previous studies have reported that ostracism (to be excluded or ignored) can have distressing effects on individuals. One method in which ostracism has been studied in the experimental context is through a virtual ball-toss game, known as Cyberball. In this game, participants may be excluded or included from the ball-toss game, and participants typically report lower feelings of self-esteem, control, belonging and meaningful existence following exclusion from the game. The present study sought to explore the transer of feelings of exclusion and inclusion through stimulus equivalence classes. Participants were first trained and tested on two three-member equivalence classes (e.g., A1-B1-C1; A2-B2-C2). Next, all participants were exposed to the Cyberball exclusion game.  In this game, one stimulus (C1) from one equivalence class was assigned as the Cyberball game name. During a subsequent transfer test, participants were asked to rate how they thought they would perform on other online games, corresponding to member of both equivalence classes. Participants reported that thet felt they would be excluded from online games if they were members of the same equivalence class as C1. In contrast, participants reported that they felt they would be included in online games if they were member of the other equivalence class. Results demonstrate that feeling of exclusion and inclusion can transfer through equivalence classes.

· The transfer of sameness and opposition contextual-cue functions through equivalence classes

William F. Perez, Ph.D., Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analysis

Roberta Kovac, Ms, Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analysis

Daniel de Moraes Caro, Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analysis

Yara C. Nico, Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analysis

Adriana P. Fidalgo, Nucleo Paradigma of Behavior Analysis

According to the Relational Frame Theory, relational responding is always under control of contextual cues (e.g., CRel). The present study aimed to investigate whether the contextual control of relational responding in accordance with sameness and opposition would transfer through equivalence classes. First, participants were exposed to a nonarbitrary training in order to establish two nonsense figures as contextual cues for sameness and opposition. After that same and opposite relations were establish among arbitrary stimuli (Same/A1–B1; Same/A1–C1, Opposite/A1–B2; Opposite/A1–C2) and derived relations were tested. In the next phase, contextual cues for sameness and opposition were included in the equivalence class of horizontal and vertical lines, respectively. The transfer of contextual control was tested replacing the nonsense figures originally established as contextual cues by the vertical and horizontal lines on training and test trials without feedback. By the end of the procedure, an arbitrary meaning was established for one member of the relational network and transformation of meaning was tested for the other members. Five of 10 participants achieved positive results for the transfer of the contextual-cue functions and three of them also presented the transformation of function on the transformation of meaning test.

·Generalization of thought suppression functions via trained and derived 'same' and 'opposite' relations

Louise McHugh, University College Dublin

Ian Stewart, National University of Ireland Galway

Nic Hooper, University of Wales Newport

This paper reports on a study that investigated generalization of thought suppression functions via trained and derived 'same' and 'opposite' relations. In Experiment 1, participants were first exposed to matching-to-sample procedures to establish contextually controlled 'same' and 'opposite' relational responding. They were then trained and tested for formation of two five-member relational networks composed of 'same' and 'opposite' relations. In the final stage they were instructed to suppress all thoughts of a particular word, which had previously appeared in one of the two relational networks, while a number of words appeared on the computer screen in front of them in a quasi-random cycle including the to-be-suppressed word, and words either in the same (experimental) relational network as the latter or in a different (control) relational network. During this final phase, participants could remove any word from the screen by pressing the spacebar. Findings showed that they removed the target word more frequently and faster than other words; removed words in trained relations with the target more frequently and faster than words in derived relations with it; removed words in 'same' relations with the target more frequently and faster than words in 'opposite' relations with it; and removed words in the experimental relational network more frequently and faster than words in the control relational network. These patterns were seen both at an individual as well as at a group level. In Experiment 2, which involved training and testing a network involving more 'opposite' than 'same' relations, a somewhat similar but weaker pattern was observed. Implication and research directions are discussed.

Educational Objectives:

1. Relate original data on the area of language and cognition to its applications in everyday life, mainly to clinical implications.

2. Understand how transformation of functions can be produced in an experimental setting.

3. Demonstrate the importance of basic research to clinical work.

 

Wednesday Afternoon 4:30pm

28. ACT with Parents

Symposium (4:30-5:45pm)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Beh. med., Parenting

Target Audience: Intro., Interm.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Meredith Rayner, Ph.D., Parenting Research Centre

Discussant: Giovanni Miselli, Ph.D., AUSL Reggio Emilia

·Mindful pregnancy and childbirth: Effects of a mindfulness based intervention on women’s psychological distress and well-being in the perinatal period

Cassandra Dunn, University of Adelaide

Emma Hanieh, University of Adelaide

This pilot study explored the effects of an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy group on pregnant women. Participants reported a decline in measures of depression, stress and anxiety; with these improvements continuing into the postnatal period. Increases in mindfulness and self-compassion scores were also observed over time. Themes identified from interviews describing the experience of participants were: ‘stop and think’, ‘prior experience or expectations’, ‘embracing the present’, ‘acceptance’ and ‘shared experience’. Childbirth preparation classes might benefit from incorporating training in mindfulness.

·Psychological Flexibility, ACT and Parent Training: Different models for integrating ACT into services for families with a children diagnosed with Autism or PDD

Giovanni Miselli, Ph.D., AUSL Reggio Emilia

In Italy, behavioral parent training format has been enhanced with ACT elements, used as a way to reduce the barriers that may restrict new skill acquisition and employment for parents of children diagnosed with Autism and PDD. Recent evidence and theorization underline the role of some of the core processes in the impairment of parents’ ability to develop and employ new effective parenting skills and namely: experiential avoidance (feeling incompetent and ineffective) and Fusion (with thoughts and stories about their child’s disorder and misbehaviors or their own inability as parents). The program has been used in Private and Public Health Care Services as a part of comprehensive Early Intensive Behavioral Interventions reaching more than 300 families. Traditional Psychological Flexibility in Parenting has also been introduced and evaluated. Advantages, difficulties and data from different models that have been field tested in group, couple and individual formats will be presented, explored and discussed.

·Take a Breath: Pilot of a group intervention for parents of children with life-threatening illness delivered using online technology

Meredith Rayner, Ph.D., Parenting Research Centre

Frank Muscara, Murdoch Children's Research Institute

Parents with children diagnosed with a life threatening illness have been found to be at high risk of Acute Stress Disorder and Post Traumatic Stress symptoms. The Take A Breath program utilises an ACT approach to assist parents to develop effective mechanisms for coping with their child’s diagnosis, treatment and recovery by assisting parents to develop greater psychological flexibility. The aim is to help parens better manage the impact of distressing thoughts and emotions on daily functioning, reduce post traumatic symptoms in parents and ultimately improve family functioning and child psychological functioning and quality of life. Preliminary data from the pilot of the online group program delivered to parents of patients from the oncology, neurology, cardio and paediatric intensive care units at Melbourne’s Royal Children’s Hospital will be presented. The program is being piloted in an online interactive group format to increase accessibility for parents outside the Melbourne metropolitan area.

This symposium will present pilot data and discuss a variety of novel ways in which Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has been incorporated into three parent interventions. Traditional ABA, CBT and psycho education are commonly used in parent programs. This symposium presents pilot data on three parent interventions incorporating ACT components. The first paper discusses the results of a pilot study that explored the effects of an 8-week mindfulness-based cognitive therapy group on pregnant women. The second paper presents advantages, difficulties and data from parent interventions field tested in group, couple and individual formats parents of children diagnosed with Autism and PDD. The third paper presents preliminary pilot data for an ACT online group intervention for parents of children diagnosed with a life threatening illness.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe the differences between acceptance and mindfulness techniques and traditional behavioural parenting training.

2. Utilize outcomes/implications of current pilot studies to design and implement similar programs in one's institution/facility.

3. Identify some techniques to incorporate the use of acceptance and mindfulness with traditional behavioural parenting training.

 

29. Living from Inside the Skin: Psychological Flexibility and Physical Self Care

Symposium (4:30-5:45pm)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation

Categories: Beh. med., Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Performance-enhancing interventions, Beh. med., Theory & Philo., RFT, ACT, Depression, Anxiety, Chronic Pain, Health, Obesity, Health Anxiety

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 309 (level 3)

Chair: Caroline Horwath, University of Otago

Discussant: Jennifer Gregg, San Jose State University

·Psychological flexibility, eating habits and 3-year weight gain: Results from a nationwide prospective study of mid-age women

Sara Gdovin, MSc, University of Otago

Sookling Leong, MSc, University of Otago

Andrew Gray, Biostatistican, University of Otago

Caroline Horwath, Ph.D., University of Otago

Psychological flexibility may be associated with differing abilities to pursue healthy food habits in the presence of uncomfortable thoughts/emotions. We hypothesized that greater psychological flexibility would be associated with healthier eating habits and prevention of weight gain over 3 years.

In 2009, 1601 participants were recruited from the NZ Electoral Roll (response 66%). The 3-year retention was 78%. Participants provided self-report data on height, weight, food patterns, and (baseline only) psychological flexibility (AAQ-II). There was evidence of a plateau in baseline BMI over a range of AAQ-II values with quadratic increases for lower levels of flexibility. Lower psychological flexibility was associated with increased odds of binge eating one or more times per week (OR 1.65/10 units, 95% CI: 1.47, 1.84, p < 0.001) and weight control (trying to maintain or lose weight, OR 1.25/10 units, 95% CI: 1.08-1.45, p=0.003). Psychological flexibility was not associated with change in BMI (p=0.168) but was with BMI stability (remaining within 3% of baseline, OR 0.88/10 units, 95% CI: 0.77-1.00, p=0.050) over three years.

·Acceptance, awareness, belief, and authentic goals: Identifying the distinctive psychological profiles of underweight, overweight, and obese people in a large American sample

Joseph Ciarrochi, University of Western Sydney

Baljinder Sahdra, University of Western Sydney

Sarah Marshall, University of Western Sydney

Philip Parker, University of Western Sydney

ACT has been shown to be beneficial for weight management, but little is known about how the ACT “ingredients” or process measures relate to potential differences in people who are underweight, overweight or obese. We utilized a planned missing data design to administer a large survey to a sample of Americans (n = 7884; 3748 males; 4136 females; Mean age =47.9, SD=16). We assessed the core process targeted in ACT, including psychological flexibility, dimensions of experiential acceptance, mindfulness, defusion, authentic valuing, and committed action. Profile analyses revealed that being moderately overweight (BMI from 25 to 30) was not associated with inflexibility or its components. Relative to normal weight people, both underweight and obese people were psychologically inflexible, but the underlying makeup of that inflexibility differed. Underweight people (BMI < 18.5) showed a profile of low social worth (self-esteem), high behavioural avoidance, distress intolerance, and controlled goals (e.g., ones done out of guilt or due to external pressure.). However, they also expressed moderate to high efficacy in being able to achieve their goals (hope) and moderate progress in actually achieving them. In contrast, obese individuals tended to score moderate to low on all indices of flexibility, expressed little hope, and felt they were making little progress on their goals. We discuss the implications of these different profiles for ACT interventions.

·ACT for Health Anxiety

Lisbeth Frostholm, Ph.D., Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Ditte Hoffmann Jensen, Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Trine Eilenberg, M.A., Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Louise Kronstrand Nielsen, M.A., Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Eva Oernboel, M.A., Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Per Fink, MD, Ph.D., Research Clinic for Functional Disorders, Aarhus University, Denmark

Health anxiety (HA) or hypochondriasis is a disabling and persistent disorder with a high prevalence in primary care, and insufficient treatment opportunities and knowledge of treatment processes. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has shown positive effect for HA in a number of trials, but no clinical trials has yet examined the possible effect of ACT for HA. In this paper we will provide 1) an introduction to the diagnosis health anxiety, 2) an overview of the manual, we have developed for ACT group treatment for HA, 3) present results on patient satisfaction with the treatment, symptom reduction (Illness worry, using the Whiteley-7), and possible mechanisms of change (’psychological flexibility’ (AAQ-II) and ’mindfulness-skills’ (FFMQ) from an uncontrolled pilot study including 34 patients for a 6 months’ follow-up period. 4) Finally, we will present preliminary results from a randomized controlled trial of ACT group therapy for severe HA including 128 patients and outline the next steps in the development of evidence-based treatments for HA.

·The ACT of Self Forgiveness: A gateway to psychological flexibility?

Grant Dewar, The University of Adelaide

The ACT of self forgiveness contains within it the possibility and opportunity to enter into a new approach to life. This presentation will review current approaches to the treatment of psychological distress and the link between self forgiveness and restoration of psychological health. This will include: conceptualisation of the links between a lack of self forgiveness and psychological distress; the use of measures of forgiveness; and, a proposed framework for the use of concepts of self forgiveness in treatments that utilise ACT to provide a full range of benefits (including mental health, family and social well-being).

In particular this presentation will outline an approach to treatment of a 46 year old female experiencing chronic pain and who is a recovering alcoholic. The treatment utilises self forgiveness within a framework of Therapy with a primary focus on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. The approach described utilises self forgiveness as a means to facilitate openness to new perspectives on both past transgressions and present moment action. Multiple factors have been proposed as contributors to alcohol dependence including heritable traits, cognitive constructs, familial, social and environmental influences. However the catastrophic consequences of inappropriate behaviour associated with alcohol can form major barriers to recovery and treatment. In the approach described it is the flexible use of ACT in the therapeutic alliance and the focus on self forgiveness which a pathway for recovery and provides tools for relapse prevention.

Implications of this approach for therapists and those seeking assistance with overcoming the burden of past events are considered. The important role of processes of stuck thinking, story telling and worry are examined and the innovative integration of self forgiveness into current therapeutic processes utilising ACT are underscored.

Research from the CBS perspective is converging to suggest that caring for the body in a way that allows for valued living demands psychological flexibility. Whether coping with physical health problems, struggling with body-related distress, or struggling with life in a way that has significant body costs, engagement, openness and purpose in the way we inhabit our bodies seems to have a significant impact on our well-being. The papers in this session will explore the ways that psychological inflexibility interferes with physical self-care while psychological flexibility promotes it. The first paper includes data from a large questionnaire study revealing the divergent psychological profiles of underweight and obese Americans in terms of awareness, acceptance, self-efficacy and chosen goals. The second paper will present data from a large longitudinal study considering the role of psychological flexibility in predicting healthier eating habits and BMI. The third paper will consider health anxiety (i.e., hypochondriasis) from a flexibility perspective, reviewing health anxiety and the role of psychological inflexibility in its development and maintenance, along with preliminary effectiveness data from a pilot and an RCT on ACT-based treatment for health anxiety. Finally, the fourth paper will explore the integration of forgiveness as an important part of flexibility-based treatments through a case study of a woman struggling with chronic pain and alcoholism.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe the link between underweight/overweight and acceptance, defusion, valued action.

2. Discuss the effect and possible mechanisms of change in ACT treatment for HA.

3. Explain the use of the concept of Self Forgiveness as a perspective for the application of Acceptance and Committment Therapy.


Symposium Detail ● Thursday ● July 11

 Thursday Morning 10:30am

35. Compassion in Context: Viewing Compassion Focused Therapy From an CBS-Consistent Perspective

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Experiential exercises

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Theory & Philo., Compassion, Self-Compassion, Training, Depression, Anxiety

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews Theatre C

Chair: Paul Gilbert, Ph.D., FBPsS, OBE, Mental Health Research Unit, Kingsway Hospital

Discussant: Jason Luoma, Ph.D., Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research, and Training Center

·Learning ACT with Compassion

Martin Brock, University of Derby

Consistent with contemporary forms of cognitive behavioural psychotherapy, developing skills in compassion focused therapy or ACT effectively involves experiential learning which can be tricky. Clinician training literature shows that experiential teaching can improve educational outcomes in comparison to didactic methods alone and self-practise and self-reflection can facilitate understanding of techniques, with particular regard to their contextual use, and a deeper awareness of the self and CBT as a tool for personal change. Experiential components of CBT training are often described as being useful but workshop participants can report feeling hesitant to engage, doubts about what has actually been ‘learned’ or a sense of disconnection between the ‘workshop experience’ and clinical application. These dilemmas can be useful to explore as they might well mirror the ‘client experience’.' This presentation will consider how compassion and psychological flexibility can influence engagement in experiential learning and the functional value of the experiential component of ACT training. Opportunities to share experience of learning experientially and suggestions for refining experiential components will be offered.

·An ACT consistent Compassion Focused Therapy intervention for chronic Dysthymia and Generalized Anxiety Disorder: Single case study and conceptual analysis

Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., The Center for Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy

Recent advances in psychotherapy theory and practice have suggested that compassion may be a significant, active process in psychotherapy effectiveness (Gilbert, 2010; Baer, 2010; Hofman et. al., 2011; Goetz et. al., 2010; Neff et. al.; 2007). As a result, cognitive and behavioral technologies are emerging, which aim to directly train clients to develop mindful compassion as an element of the treatment of anxiety and depression (Gilbert, 2010; Tirch, 2012; Neff & Germer, 2011). This presentation will introduce participants to the theory and interventions used in Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) (Gilbert, 2009). CFT is based upon empirically supported psychological processes, affective neuroscience, evolutionary science, and meditation disciplines. CFT employs a conceptual and technical approach that is consistent with ACT and other contextual CBT tools. During this presentation, participants will learn, in detail, how CFT practices may be used to help clients with anxiety disorders. A single-case, clinical research example will be provided that demonstrates the effectiveness and change processes involved in an ACT consistent CFT intervention for chronic, generalized anxiety disorder and dysthymia. Participants will learn the CFT evolutionary model, including the nature of our three basic emotion regulation systems, and how to apply this theory in practical ways to a case formulation and intervention that is consistent with the psychological flexibility model.

·Gender and compassion: The development, experience and function of compassion in women and men

Laura Silberstein, Ph.D., The Center for Mindfulness and Compassion Focused Therapy

Although considered to be an evolved universal human capacity, there are important individual differences and processes in how people learn and respond to various forms of compassion. More specifically, researchers have observed certain gender differences in the motivation, experience and cultivation of compassion. These gender-based tendencies or patterns may have the potential to impact an individual’s experience of compassion. This presentation proposes and begins to explore questions, such as: “What do we know about possible behavioural differences between men and women that would influence the experience of compassion for themselves and others? Are gender differences more or less significant than other individual differences in CFT? When it comes to CFT, how are learning histories, social mentalities, and psychological flexibility processes considered in terms of gender sensitive treatment? What would gender sensitive CFT involve? What are the possible risks or concerns of gender sensitive treatment approaches to CFT?” These questions will be explored by reviewing the state of the research and exploring related evolutionary, genetic, cultural, social learning and associated behavioural patterns and processes.

This symposium examines fundamental definitions of compassion, and highlights how commitment and acceptance lie at the heart of compassion. Dr. Paul Gilbert will discuss how the acceptance that emerges from a compassionate mind does not mean non-action, but rather involves a courage that may be the fundamental attribute involved in the development of both commitment and acceptance. As blocks to compassionate commitment and acceptance may arise from the function of fear of compassion, Dr. Gilbert will address the major fears of compassion that present in a clinical context and how they can be addressed. Martin Brock, MSc, will discuss ways to enhance sensitivity to, and engagement with, compassion in the process of ACT training through experiential learning. Dr. Dennis Tirch will present a case example of an ACT consistent intervention that focuses on compassion in the treatment of depression and chronic anxiety. Dr. Laura Silberstein will discuss the conceptual and research bases for gender differences in compassion. Discussant, Dr. Jason Luoma, will consider the role of context in compassion and shame from a functional contextualist perspective. As such the historical, personal, genetic, and cultural context in which emotions are situated will be a part of the conversation. Data that relate to this topic will be reviewed.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain the fundamentals of CFT’s underlying evolutionary theory of emotion regulation, attachment, behavior and cognition.

2. Assess functional dimensions of compassion in a range of contexts such as psychotherapy training, the treatment of depression, and gender differences.

3. Analyze the dynamics of a functional contextualist perspective on compassion.

 

38. ACTing with technology: Intervention trials incorporating the use of mobile and internet technology

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Performance-enhancing interventions, Modern technology in ACT-interventions

Target Audience: Intro.

Location: CLB Theatre 2

Chair: Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., University of Western Sydney

Discussant: Chris Horan, D.Psych. Candidate, Australian National University

·How mobile text-messages and the Internet can be of service in delivering an ACT-intervention for achieving smoking cessation

Stella Nicoleta Savvides, Ph.D. Candidate, University of Cyprus

Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Modern technology has begun to influence research in psychological fields and more specifically in the field of ACT. Traditional interventions (e.g. psychoeducation, CBT) for smoking cessation have limited success for adolescent groups who are not particularly motivated to quit. ACT for smoking cessation in youth presents with promising results, however more research is still needed. An ACT-based group intervention with the aid of ACT-text messages, involving adolescents (ages 15-18), was compared to a no-messages ACT group. The results show an advantage for the ACT-based messages intervention in increasing psychological flexibility and decreasing smoking (reflected in CO measurements). An ACT-based pilot intervention over the Internet is also investigated with college students, and compared to a psychoeducational internet intervention to determine the usefulness of adapting an established ACT manual for smoking cessation over the internet. It is expected that the ACT-based internet intervention will be more effective for smoking cessation than the psychoeducational internet intervention. Results of these studies will be discussed and implications for future research will be presented.

·Mobile technology fostering ACT-practice in daily life

Tim Batink, Ph.D. Candidate, Maastricht University

Dina Collip, Ph.D., Maastricht University

Marieke Wichers, Ph.D., Maastricht University

ACT teaches us to deal with our experiences in the present moment, in such a way that we can behave according to our values. However, clients do have to get out of their lives and into our therapy-office to learn to work with ACT. Mobile technology can help clients to train with ACT in their natural environment and learn to integrate ACT into their daily lives. In this exploratory study, we are examining the feasibility and effectiveness of a supplementary mobile ACT-intervention combined with experience sampling (a structured diary method) in a small clinical-sample from a broad-spectrum mental health centre. The mobile intervention, delivered by the PsyMate (PDA), will be described, the hurdles we had to overcome will be discussed and preliminary results will be presented. We will conclude with future plans and applications.

·Developing an ACT smartphone intervention with potential high impact

Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center & University of Washington

Julie A. Kientz, Ph.D., University of Washington

Katrina Akioka, B.S., Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

Smartphone behavior change apps are growing exponentially due to their ability to provide low cost interventions directly to users whenever needed and wherever they are located. As an experiential and context-based intervention, ACT has the potential to be a highly impactful stand-alone smartphone-based intervention. Yet a critical challenge is distilling ACT's core processes, metaphors, and exercises into an intuitive, engaging, and accessible smartphone intervention. Responding to this challenge, we recently developed a video and audio-based ACT smartphone intervention for quitting smoking called Smart Quit. This talk describes the process of designing the Smart Quit intervention. The focus will be on the core development principles, intervention goals, storyboarding, selection and recording of exercises and metaphors, and usability testing. Lessons learned and implications for the design of ACT smartphone interventions will be discussed.

In the last decade, technological advancements in mobile connectivity, social networking and computing power have enabled the development of applications that make it easy for clients to apply ACT outside the therapy room, in their natural environment. In order to maximize the potential of these applications and to manage any associated risks, it is important that these interventions are studied carefully. This symposium will look at ACT-interventions incorporating these technologies (texting, internet, pda & smartphone app’s). Experiences on the development of these technology-based ACT-interventions will be shared and preliminary findings will be presented.

Educational Objectives:

1. Apply mobile technology in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, describing feasibility and effectiveness.

2. Review and evaluate new technologies (text messages and the internet) as a useful and effective modality for ACT delivery.

3. Design a stand-alone ACT smartphone app.

 

39. As Easy as ABC: Using Derived Relational Responding and Psychological Flexibility to Promote Success and Psychological Health in University Students

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Original data

Categories: Edu. settings, Performance-enhancing interventions, RFT, Values, Statistics, GRE

Target Audience: Intro.

Location: CLB Theatre 3

Chair: Danielle Moyer, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Discussant: Kelly Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

·Goals Worth Reaching: Investigating the Impact of a S.M.A.R.T. Goals Intervention with and without a Valued Living Component on Students in an Introductory Psychology Class

Danielle Moyer, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Emmie Hebert, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Emily Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana Lafayette

Academic adjustment in college involves both academic success and a sense of belonging in the college environment. The earlier academic adjustment occurs, the stronger its impact on long-term achievement and performance in high stakes, high threat situations. Students' academic adjustment benefits both from opportunities to contact their values and support in setting appropriate goals. The current study will evaluate the impact of goal-setting, values affirmations, and the combination of the two in students in an introductory psychology course. Participants will be exposed to a short intervention involving either writing about a deeply held value, establishing appropriate goals, or both. Their adjustment will then be examined in terms of academic performance, academic belongingness, and psychological wellbeing.

·Raising the Confidence Coefficient: Derived Relational Responding, Statistics Anxiety, and Core Statistics Skills

Emmy Lebleu, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Emmie Hebert, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Mike Bordieri, M.S., University of Mississippi

Emily Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana Lafayette

Statistics courses are often a major challenge for students in behavioral science degree programs. Many students must take the class multiple times before they can make the passing grade, and the coursework often leads to increased stress and anxiety. Moreover, this increased anxiety is often correlated with poor performance in these courses. The current study offers a method of helping students to better understand statistics based on derived relational responding that may also indirectly target statistics anxiety. Participants engaged in a computer task that trained relational responding to statistics stimuli after completing self-report measures of psychological flexibility and statistics anxiety. The results of this study are intended to illuminate the learning processes involved in learning statistics and what roles statistics anxiety and psychological flexibility play in those processes.

·Don’t Forget to Breathe! The Impact of Flexibility versus Suppression Induction on Preparation for the Graduate Record Examination

Skylar Fusilier, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Shiloh Eastin, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Emmie Hebert, University of Louisiana Lafayette

Emily Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana Lafayette

The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) presents a significant challenge for many students wishing to attend graduate school in psychology. Most students report marked anxiety associated with the GRE, the avoidance of which can make adequate preparation nearly impossible. Thus, GRE scores are likely to reflect not only a student's skill on the tasks assessed, but also his or her psychological flexibility with GRE-related anxiety. Emerging research suggests that brief interventions can impact psychological flexibility in a way that decreases avoidance and increases engagement. The current study examined the impact of flexibility or suppression-based inductions on GRE practice engagement and performance. Participants were undergraduate and graduate student volunteers with substantial goals for GRE improvement. Preliminary data suggest increased engagement in GRE practice following flexibility-based training and provide support for the dissemination of brief, effective interventions to address GRE-related anxiety.

University students are faced with a number of obstacles and decisions throughout their experience that are both important and sometimes very stressful. The papers in this symposium will examine how Contextual Behavioral Science can be used to facilitate wellbeing and growth in university students as they transition through school and reach important milestones for their academic goals. The first paper will look at the effects of a values-based goal setting intervention on performance in an introduction to psychology class. The second paper will examine an intervention based on derived relational responding designed to aid students in understanding, and possibly lowering their anxiety in, their undergraduate statistics class. Finally, the third paper tackles one of the last big challenges for any student planning to continue their education: the GRE. The role of avoidance in research participation will also be discussed throughout.

Educational Objectives:

1. Apply functional contextual based research to improvement of academic program development.

2. Integrate derived relational responding techniques into programs designed to build student skill repertoires.

3. Discuss methodological challenges related to recruitment and assessment in studies that stimulate avoidant behavior.

 

40. ACT in Developing Nations

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Original data

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Global Mental Health

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 102 (level 1)

Chair: Ross White, Ph.D., University of Glasgow

Discussant: Ross White, Ph.D., University of Glasgow

·Commit and ACT in Sierra Leone

Beate Ebert, MSc, Private Practice

Ross White, Ph.D., University of Glasgow

Corinna Stewart, BSc, University of Glasgow

Representatives of commit + act visited Sierra Leone in 2012 to deliver workshops in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to local social workers. Ninety-two people attended workshops in Freetown and Bo. A range of measures were used to evaluate the workshops including the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, the Valuing Questionnaire, the Primary Care PTSD Screen, and the Satisfaction With Life Scale. Individuals completed measures before the workshop, immediately following the workshop, and at three-month follow-up. Data was collected from 46 individuals across all three time-points (50% follow-up rate). Results indicated that there were significant changes across the three time-points in: AAQ-II (p < 0.001), SWLS (p < 0.001) and VQ (p < 0.05) scores. The nature of change and internal consistency scores suggest that the AAQ-II has promise for use in Sierra Leone. Results also support the effectiveness of ACT training for boosting psychological flexibility in people attending workshops.

·ACT as a brief intervention: One versus seven ACT sessions to treat phobia of enclosed spaces

Karen Vogel, BSc, Institute of Psychiatry, Faculty of Medicine São Paulo (presented by Michaela Terena Saban

The phobia of enclosed spaces (and associated avoidance of restraint, confinement and asphyxiation situations) presents particular difficulties in urban centers, where there is a need to share small spaces (elevators, public transportation, airplanes, congested tunnels). This study compared the effectiveness of a brief (one session) Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention with a seven session intervention to treat phobia of enclosed spaces.

A randomized trial with two parallel groups was performed. After initial evaluation, a sample of fifteen participants received one treatment session using a protocol developed by Páez-Blarrina et al. (2008), whilst another sample of fifteen participants received seven ACT sessions. Beck Depression Inventory (Beck et al, 2002), Clautrofobia Inventory (Gouveia et al, 2008) and IDATE (Spielberger,1979) were the measures used.

Results supported the effectiveness of the ACT brief intervention protocol to treat phobia of enclosed spaces and an increase in levels of psychological flexibility.

·A Study of ACT and Chronic Pain: Alternative Measures

Michaele Terena Saban, Pontifical Catholic University of São Paulo; Psychiatry Institute of Clinical Hospital of São Paulo Medical School

Francisco Lotufo Neto, Psychiatry Institute of Clinical Hospital of São Paulo Medical School

This is a pilot study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) applied to patients with chronic pain in a Brazilian hospital. Based on data of preview studies (Dahl, Wilson & Nilsson, 2004; McCracken, Vowles & Eccleston, 2005; Vowles et al., 2007; Vowles, McCracken & Eccleston, 2007; and Wicksell, Melin & Olsson, 2007) indicating that ACT improves quality of life of this population, it has used an adaptation of Vowles and Sorrell protocol “Live with Chronic Pain: An Acceptance-based Approach” (2007) with the total of eighth sessions intervention applied on three patients, to investigate if the results were similar to the literature. The methodology was a multiple baseline design. Assessments were completed at several timepoints (before, during, post-intervention and follow-up) using questionnaires, observation of the sessions and self-registration of pain episodes. The results indicate that the self-registration measure is effective for monitoring behavioral processes and variables that influence the pain and the quality of life.

The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) is a truly international society that draws members from many corners of the world. The ‘CBS Dissemination in Developing Nations Special Interest Group’ aims to promote the importance of contextual behavioral science for improving mental health in developing nations. This symposium will include presentations on ACT-related research that has been conducted in Sierra Leone and Brazil. Important themes that will be discussed include: the cross-cultural transferability of ACT-related processes, and adaptations that can be made to protocols and assessment tools to meet the needs of local populations.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain research investigating the implementation of ACT interventions in developing nations.

2. Assess the cross-cultural transferability of ACT-related processes.

3. Discuss adaptations that can be made to ACT protocols and assessment tools to meet the needs of local populations.

 

42. The development and trial of an ACT framework for working with parents of children with disabilities

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Original data, Didactic presentation

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Parenting

Target Audience: Interm.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Jeanie Sheffield, Ph.D., School of Psychology, The University of Queensland

Discussant: Jeanie Sheffield, Ph.D., School of Psychology, The University of Queensland

·Development and Trial of an ACT Approach with Parents of Children with an Autism Spectrum Disorder

Kate Sofronoff, Ph.D., School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Jeanie Sheffield, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Koa Whittingham, PhD, Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Objectives: To develop and trial a brief ACT intervention for parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and to develop a consistent measure of Experiential Avoidance.

Design: Pre- post- and follow-up pilot design plus qualitative data collected.

Participants: Ninety parents of children with ASD.

Method: Participants completed the ACT sessions within two different studies. The data have been combined for the purposes of this presentation.

Results: Qualitative data indicated that parents found the ACT sessions to be extremely useful. Significant increases were found in levels of parent reported adjustment indicators such that they reported lower depression, anxiety and stress after completing the ACT sessions. Parents also reported greater psychological flexibility on the measures of acceptance and mindfulness. It is, however, only by combining these two groups that outcomes can be demonstrated, the effect sizes are relatively small in this population.

Conclusions: ACT is useful for these parents but more work is still to be done on developing sensitive outcome measures.

·Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as an adjunct to an evidence-based parenting intervention for parents of children with acquired brain injury: A randomised controlled trial

Felicity L. Brown, BSc, School of Psychology, Queensland Children's Medical Research Institute, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Koa Whittingham, Ph.D., Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Roslyn Boyd, Ph.D., Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Lynne McKinlay, MBBS, FRACP, FAFRM, Queensland Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane

Kate Sofronoff, Ph.D., School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Objective: Parents of children with ABI experience high levels of psychological distress. This study aimed to determine the efficacy of a parenting intervention, Stepping Stones Triple P (SSTP), combined with an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) workshop, in improving child and parent outcomes following pediatric ABI.

Participants: 59 parents of children with ABI.

Method: Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group (ACT plus SSTP) or a waitlist control group.

Results: Relative to the waitlist group, parents in the treatment group showed significant improvements on measures of child behavioural and emotional functioning, parenting style, parent psychological flexibility, parent distress, and family and couple functioning. The role of experiential avoidance as a mediator of outcomes will be discussed.

Conclusions: ACT-based interventions may be helpful in enhancing experiential acceptance in this population, and when used in conjunction with parenting programs, may have important implications in improving capacity of parents to respond effectively to parenting challenges.

·Improving Outcomes for Families of Children with CP with a Parenting Intervention combined with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Koa Whittingham, Ph.D., Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Matthew Sanders, Ph.D., Parenting and Family Support Centre, The University of Queensland

Lynne McKinlay, MBBS, FRACP, FAFRM, Queensland Paediatric Rehabilitation Service, Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane

Roslyn Boyd, Ph.D., Queensland Cerebral Palsy and Rehabilitation Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane

Objectives: To establish the efficacy of Stepping Stones Triple P (SSTP) combined with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for families of children with CP.

Design: RCT with three groups (SSTP, SSTP +ACT, waitlist control)

Participants: Sixty-seven parents (97.0% mothers; mean age 38.7 ± 7.1 years) of children (64.2% male; mean age 5.3 ± 3.0 years) with CP

Method: Participants were randomly assigned to; SSTP (10 hours group intervention + 1 hour phone consultations), SSTP +ACT (14 hours group intervention + 1 hour phone consultations) or waitlist control. Primary outcomes were child behavioural and emotional problems and parenting style. Analysis consisted of a series of ANCOVAs.

Results: At post-intervention, relative to the waitlist group parents in the SSTP + ACT group showed significant improvements on a range of measures of child behaviour and functioning and parenting style. In contrast, significant differences between the SSTP alone group and the waitlist group were found for two measured variables only.

Conclusions: Adding ACT to SSTP proved efficacious for families of children with CP.

Parents of children with disabilities experience higher levels of stress and distress than parents of typically developing children. High levels of distress and experiential avoidance impact on capacity to parent effectively. An ACT framework may be particularly useful as a first step in working with this population, in order to enhance psychological flexibility and resilience to meet the ongoing challenges of parenting a child with a disability. This symposium of 3 papers will describe the development of session content, measures, and pilot work of an ACT framework, with parents of children with an autism spectrum disorder, acquired brain injury, and cerebral palsy. The results of 2 randomised controlled trials will also be presented, and limitations and future research directions discussed.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain how an ACT framework to increase psychological flexibility can be used with parents as a first step in undertaking specific parenting interventions.

2. Describe how a standard ACT measure can be modified and tailored for use with specific populations.

3. Analyze evaluation trials of an ACT intervention in the context of parenting stress and parenting practices.

 

Thursday Afternoon 2:45pm

53. Fundamental research and applications of Relational Frame Theory

Symposium (2:45-4:15pm)

Components: Original data, Conceptual analysis

Categories: RFT, Superv., Train. & Dissem., Prof. Dev., Theory & Philo., Children, Older adults, Cognition, RFT Dissemination

Target Audience: Intro., Interm.

Location: Mathews 107 (level 1)

Chair: Josh Pritchard, Florida Institute of Technology

Discussant: Darin Cairns, Charles Street Clinic, Perth

·A possible target for executive function intervention in older adults: Assessing mutual entailment of temporal relations

Denis O'Hora, National University of Ireland Galway

Catherine McGreal, National University of Ireland Galway

Michael Hogan, National University of Ireland Galway

John Hyland, Dublin Business School

When we report events or stimuli that we have experienced in reverse order, it seems to require mutual entailment of temporal relations. In the morning, we might hear an alarm, then see a person leave their bedroom and report that "she left the bedroom after the alarm". Such processes underlie executive function and this is known to degrade as we age. The current study compared performance of 23 younger (18-23 years) and 23 older (55-81 years) participants on a go/no-go order judgment task. In this task, two stimuli (A...B) were presented in sequence and, in probes, either a “Before” (A Before B) or an “After” (B After A) statement describing the order of the sequence stimuli was presented. Participants responded to confirm the statement (go) or did not respond to disconfirm it (no-go). Correct responses to “After” statements were slower than those for “Before” statements and younger adults responded more quickly and more accurately than older adults. When controlled for Before speed, older adults exhibited greater difficulty with mutual entailment than younger adults. These findings have implications for the understanding of memory and executive function deficits in older adults and suggest that interventions aimed at enhancing or preserving mutual entailment may be appropriate.

·Watering our Roots: Bringing RFT Back to ABA

Josh Pritchard, Florida Institute of Technology

Relational frame theory sprung from the behavioral traditions of BF Skinner as an extension of his interpretive account of language. Currently, it is a subject matter rarely touched upon in many behavior analytic degree programs. Despite its accumulating empirical support, RFT was again excluded from the 4th edition BACB™ task list. As such, it is unlikely to be added to many of the educational experiences of contemporary behavior analysts while obtaining their Master’s degree. In this paper, I will briefly outline the history/origins of applied behavior analysis and its interaction with relational frame theory before touching on the controversy which influences its continual exclusion from “ABA Proper” and an actionable plan to bridge the gap from those practicing in ABA (often in the DD/Autism world). In addition to providing this historical description This paper will be bolstered by my direct experience teaching RFT to graduate students in an ABA Master’s program as well as the inclusion of it in an online curriculum for the same.

·Reversing order and size judgements: Mutual entailment of non-arbitrary stimulus relations

Nicola Brassil, National University of Ireland Galway

Denis O'Hora, National University of Ireland Galway

Ian Stewart, National University of Ireland Galway

A number of studies have demonstrated that reversing order judgements takes time and effort. One suggested reason for this is that temporal order codes must be rewritten during reversal, a second is that the process requires mutual entailment. The current study analyzed reversed size and order judgments. Undergraduate participants (N=40) completed size and order judgement tasks in one of two counterbalanced orders. Acquisition, accuracy and response speed were compared. The size judgements task was learned in fewer trials than the temporal order task. However, once the tasks were learned, no significant difference was found between the two relations in accuracy. Reversal of both magnitude and temporal order relations significantly increased response times, but to a similar extent suggesting that both depended on similar processes, i.e. mutual entailment.

·Reading as derived responding: Exploratory studies in neurotypical, autistic and dyslectic kids

Giovambattista Presti, M.D., Ph.D., IULM University, Milan (Italy)

Melissa Scagnelli, IULM University, Milan (Italy)

Davide Carnevali, IULM University, Milan (Italy)

Melania Mazza, IESCUM, Italy

Federica Catelli, The RFT Lab at IULM University, Milan (Italy)

Relational Frame Theory (RFT) provides both a theoretical and an applied framework to understand language and other related cognitive skills including complex repertoires like reading. One mechanism that RFT enlightens is how symbolic behavior comes to bear and how sound, written word and “meaning” come to be equivalent. In addition it provides a framework to create programs to “teach reading” without directly targeting this behavior. On a theoretical level it challenges Skinner Verbal Behavior’s definition of the textual and taking dictation operant.

We trained neurotypical, autistic, dyslexic and dysgraphic kids who were able to tact (D stimulus) a picture in a conditional discrimination task to match a printed word in uppercase letters (A stimulus) with its picture (B stimulus) and the picture (B stimulus) with its printed word in lower case letters (C). Each stimulus class included three members. So, after testing for mutual and combinatorial entailment relations, we tested also other combinatorial relations namely A-D (reading printed words in uppercase letters), C-D (reading printed words in uppercase letters) and D-A and D-C (choosing uppercase and lowercase printed words conditionally to an auditory stimulus) relations. Correct responses ranged between 95 to 100% in three testing trials thus demonstrating the formation of a four-member class that included reading written words.

Following this first training, new triplets of words were progressively introduced until recombination of previously learned word formed new words. Carefully planning of this re-combinative strategy led to a progressive reduction of the number of trials for reaching master criterion in the A-B/B-C training and eventually to spontaneous reading of words never trained before.

When the subjects’ own writing samples were introduced to form a 6-member stimulus class (sound – printed uppercase word - printed lowercase word – handwritten uppercase word - handwritten lower case word - picture) with an additional training dyslexic and dysgraphic kids were able to read and write under dictation too. Stimulus control strategies were used to overcome problems with particular sign-sound relations that are considered critical for Italian speakers and a sign of dyslexia.

The results replicate and extend the generality of prior analyses of a reading programs based on stimulus equivalence and recombination of units. Differences with previously published researches will be addressed.

Relational frame theory is a pragmatic contextualist account of human language and cognition. This symposium reports recent studies in temporal, deictic and comparison relations. These studies address basic concerns but they also suggest avenues for intervention.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe recent findings in RFT.

2. Identify novel applications of RFT.

3. Apply RFT findings to novel issues.

 

54. How well does ACT work? Results from recent reviews and meta analysis

Symposium (2:45-4:15pm)

Components: Literature review

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Reviews and meta analysis

Target Audience: Intro.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Discussant: Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., University of Washington and Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center

·ACT as a “weapon of choice” for health-related problems

Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Eleni Karayianni, Psy.D., University of Cyprus

Recent years have seen a rise in clinical trials examining the effectiveness of ACT for a variety of problems. In an effort to examine the efficacy of ACT, several meta-analyses were conducted broadly comparing ACT to CBT. Simultaneously, we have seen the recognition of ACT as an evidence-based treatment for specific conditions such as chronic pain. However, there has not been an examination of the efficacy of ACT as applied to health problems. The present meta-analysis aims to systematically analyze the application of ACT for health-related conditions, emphasizing the identification of mediators of change. A thorough literature search identified all published ACT clinical trials involving health problems (e.g., chronic pain, cancer). Effect sizes were computed quantifying the effectiveness of ACT compared to control conditions (e.g., TAU). Discussion will relate the current evidence supporting ACT as the treatment of choice for health problems, highlighting caveats and areas for future growth.

·The expanding efficacy of ACT: Results from a meta analysis on clinical applications

Jacqueline A-Tjak, MSc, PsyQ and A-Tjak Cursussen

Several meta-analysis have been published on the efficacy of ACT (Hayes et al, 2006; Öst, 2008; Powers et al, 2009). Meanwhile a lot of studies have been published. A meta-analysis limited to the domain of clinical treatment of psychiatric disorders and diagnosable somatic illnesses with accompanying psychological problems is now warranted. In our meta-analysis we analyse around 40 RCT's and rate their methodological quality as measured against the criteria from Öst (2008).

·ACT outcome studies in context: A benchmarking perspective

Matthew Smout, Ph.D., Centre for Treatment of Anxiety and Depression, University of Adelaide, University of South A

While considerable attention in the literature has been given to whether ACT studies are sufficiently methodologically rigorous and demonstrate efficacy over a comparison condition, relatively little attention has been given to the end-state functioning achieved by clients in ACT studies, particularly in comparison to other leading approaches. Here, data from ACT outcome trials will be compared with benchmark studies for different psychological problems. Implications for treatment and further developing ACT protocols will be discussed.

How well is ACT holding up to the measures of good research according to its own criteria and those of the larger scientific community? Now that more and more data become available from well executed controlled trials, meta-analysis and reviews give us an important perspective on what these results mean in a bigger context. Results from two meta-analysis and a review will be presented. The presentations will cover the following:

1) A meta-analysis on the application of ACT for health-related conditions, emphasizing the identification of mediators of change.

2) A meta-analysis of ACT as a clinical treatment of psychiatric disorders and diagnosable somatic illnesses with accompanying psychological problems, with an assessment of methodological rigor.

3) A review on the end-state functioning achieved by clients in ACT studies, in which data from ACT outcome trials will be compared with benchmark studies for different psychological problems.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain the efficacy of ACT resulting from a meta-analysis investigation for a variety of health related problems.

2. Explain the efficacy of ACT compared to waiting list, placebo therapies and established treatments on four areas of clinical treatments.

3. List for which problems ACT has shown comparable or superior end-state functioning to other leading psychotherapies and for which problems it has yet to achieve this.

 

Thursday Afternoon 4:30pm

59. Functional Contextual Global Health: One Size does not Fit All

Symposium (4:30-5:45pm)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation

Categories: Theory & Philo., Clin. Interven. & Interests, Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Global Mental Health, Australian Aboriginal population, Functional contextualism

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 107 (level 1)

Chair: Emma Hanieh, D.Psych., The ACT Centre

Discussant: Matthew Smout, Centre for Treatment of Anxiety and Depression

·Promoting Global Mental Health: The role of contextual science

Ross White, Ph.D., DclinPsy, University of Glasgow

The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that four out of five individuals living in low and middle-income countries (LMIC) who require treatment for mental, neurological and/or substance use disorders do not receive it. Global Mental Health is an area of study concerned with addressing inequities and inequalities in mental health provision across the globe. WHO policies support the scaling-up of psychiatric services in LMIC despite widespread concerns about the cross-cultural validity of diagnoses and a paucity of evidence to support biomedical theories of mental health disorders. Concerns have been raised that an over-reliance on scaling up psychiatric services has led to insufficient emphasis being placed on social and cultural determinants of human distress. The possibility that consortia of international experts may have served to undermine local experience and expertise is highlighted. The paper will highlight the important role that contextual science can play in promoting mental health in a way that is truly global.

·ACT with the Australian Aboriginal Population

Emma Hanieh, D.Psych., The ACT Centre

This presentation will look at the very important issue of whether or not Acceptance and Commitment Therapy is applicable to Aboriginal people living in remote locations. It will include an exploration of the model as it applies to Aboriginal women and their children facing difficult life circumstances within families and communities. It is designed to raise questions around whether ACT is broadly applicable to all client groups. This presentation is designed for not only professionals working within Aboriginal health, but also those who have a genuine interest in Australia’s remote population.

·Functional-contextualistic view of mental health: General approach

Stanislaw Malicki, Innlandet Hospital Trust, Norway; University of Social Sciences and Humanities, Warszawa, Poland

Modern medicine delivers the message that psychological problems are similar to medical illnesses. Physical health is seen as the absence of disease and, similarly, mental health is seen as the absence of abnormal processes. Current approach to mental health may result in stigma, rejection, devaluation and labeling of patients. The author’s aim is to outline functional-contextualistic approach to mental health. An approach that not only situates psychological problems within the context of personal history and current life circumstances, but also views symptoms as apparently unsuccessful strategies of coping with life problems. The fundamentals of functional-contextualism will be presented, followed by a discussion of their implications for understanding of mental health problems. The practical applications of functional-contextualistic philosophy of health to the relationship between clinicians, clients and their families will also be discussed.

This collection of presentations serves to inform how an approach firmly embedded in functional contextualism may provide a potential and viable alternative to mainstream symptom-focused health provision. The importance of social and cultural factors at both a global level and within populations that are less well researched, such as the Australian Aboriginal population, is explored. Are functional contextualism and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) applicable at this level? And if so, what factors need to be taken into account in order to optimally meet the global needs of people in the 21st century? This session serves to be a thought provoking one that encourages us to think outside the box and at an intensely global and adaptive level.

Educational Objectives:

1. Understand the important role that cultural beliefs and practices play in how mental health is conceptualized in different parts of the world.

2. Describe the potential health and mental health issues affecting Australia's Aboriginal population.

3. Discuss the applicability of ACT to a remote Aboriginal population.

 

60. Addressing Complex Clinical Presentations: Processes of Effective Change

Symposium (4:30-5:45pm)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Didactic presentation

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Performance-enhancing interventions, Superv., Train. & Dissem., Theory & Philo., Panic Disorder & Agoraphobia, Psychotherapy Integration, Motivational Interviewing and ACT, Emotion Regulation

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Robert Brockman, M.A. (clinical Psychology), University of Western Sydney, Private Practice - Sydney

Discussant: Jacqueline A-Tjak, PsyQ

·Treating the Treatment-Resistant: A Randomized Controlled Trial of ACT for Treatment-Resistant Panic Disorder and Agoraphobia - Preliminary Results

Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Rainer Sonntag, MD, Private Practice

Simone Heinze, Dipl.Psych, Technische Universität Dresden

Jürgen Hoyer, Ph.D., Technische Universität Dresden

Georg Eifert, Ph.D., Chapman University

Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Ph.D., Technische Universität Dresden

Objective: Non-responsiveness to treatment is generally acknowledged, yet seldom systematically addressed. This study examined the malleability of treatment refractory patients using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

Method: A randomized controlled trial; n = 51 cases of patients diagnosed with primary panic disorder and/or agoraphobia with prior state-of-the-art treatment (mean number of previous sessions = 42.2) were treated with an ACT manual administered by novice therapists and followed up for six months. Patients were randomized to either immediate treatment (n = 33) or a four-week wait-list (n = 10) with delayed treatment (n = 8). The brief treatment consisted of only 8 sessions, implemented twice weekly over four weeks. Primary outcome measures were the Mobility Inventory (MI), Clinical Global Impression (CGI), Panic and Agoraphobia Scale (PAS), and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-II). Numerous secondary assessments were administered that were both consistent with and divergent from ACT theory.

Results: At post-treatment, patients who received ACT reported significantly more improvement than the wait-list on the CGI and PAS (partial eta square: .25 & .14), nearly significant (p < .08) on the MI (partial eta square = .05), and non-significant on the AAQ (partial eta square = .03). Secondary measures were largely consistent with ACT theory, with significant differences between the ACT and WL cases on ACT consistent measures, but not on inconsistent measures. Follow up assessments were obtained from 84% of the sample. Both follow-up and process of change will be analyzed and presented.

Conclusions: Despite a clinically difficult sample, small sample size, and very brief treatment administered by novice therapists, patients reported significantly greater changes in functioning and symptomatology than the wait-list. These data suggest that ACT is a viable treatment option for treatment-resistant patients. This study was one of the first to examine a psychological treatment option for non-response to traditional state-of-the-art psychological treatments; further work in this area is clearly needed. 

·The Relationship between Schema Modes and Psychological Flexibility: Initial data, and exploration of the usefulness of the construct of schema modes as a therapeutic metaphor for use with multi-problem and personality disordered patients

Robert Brockman, University of Western Sydney, Private Practice, Sydney

Schema Therapy sits alongside ACT as a newer form of cognitive and behavioral therapy which is steadily acquiring empirical evidence of efficacy. However, whilst ACT has been acquiring empirical support for use with a very broad range of disorders and problems, the empirical support for schema therapy is generally confined to personality disordered populations, particularly borderline personality disorder, and with impressive early results (Gieson-boo et al 2006, etc.). Meanwhile, there has been increasing interest within ACBS over the past 12 months in the utility of schema therapy constructs and techniques within an ACT/RFT framework (e.g. McKay, Lev, Skeen, & Hayes, 2012). This paper will give a brief overview of the schema mode model of personality disorder before presenting some initial cross-sectional data on the relationship between schema modes and psychological flexibility which demonstrates that psychological flexibility is intertwined throughout the schema mode model. The implications for possible improvements to schema therapy using ACT techniques will be briefly discussed before a more in depth discussion and demonstration of the utility of the use of the mode construct as a clinical metaphor to aid in improving psychological flexibility in multi-problem patients and patients with severe within-session therapy interfering behaviors.

·ACT and MI: Lessons from a Combined Group Intervention

Onna Van Orden, M.A., VA Maryland Health Care System

James Finkelstein, Psy.D., VA Maryland Health Care System

ACT and Motivational Interviewing (MI) have potential as complementary interventions (Wagner, Ingersoll, & Rollnick, 2012; Bricker & Tollison 2011). This paper discusses similarities among ACT and MI as styles that emphasize language, values, and compassion as well as key differences in theory, mechanisms of action, and goals. It will include preliminary data from a novel, combined ACT and MI group intervention within an ACT-based Intensive Outpatient Substance Abuse Treatment Program. Group participants are veterans from diverse backgrounds demonstrating difficulty with abstinence from drugs and alcohol. Pre- and post-intervention assessment includes the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II and measures of Stages and Processes of Change as described in the Transtheoretical Model of Intentional Behavior Change (Prochaska, DiClemente, & Norcross, 1992). This presentation will include discussion of clinical techniques, lessons learned about the potential “added value” of integrating ACT and MI, and future directions for interventions and research.

·ACT core processes from an emotion, affect, and mood regulation perspective

Michel André Reyes Ortega, Ph.D., México-ACBS & Universidad Iberoamericana Cd. de México

Emotion Regulation is a cognitive, behavioral, contextual and interpersonal process. When ineffective, it can be destructive and diminish life quality. Emotion Regulation has transdiagnostic value and clinical models who targets it can help to develop effective interventions for a wide variety of affective disorders with or without comorbidity. In this paper, an ACT based clinical model is described. The model acceptance and commitment strategies are analized from diferent models of emotion perspectives: Discrete, dimensional, associative, and goal based models are considered.

ACT is known as a treatment that has specific effectiveness for complex presentations and comorbidities. In fact, one of the strengths of ACT is that it can be used to address multiple problems simultaneously using a consistent conceptual model. The next phase of ACT treatment development and research thus will benefit from a clearer conceptualization of how ACT for multi-problem clients may or may not benefit from other models which may be complementary, such as motivational interviewing, emotion regulation, and schema therapy approaches. This symposium will focus not only on clinical applications and outcomes, but more importantly on processes of change that may make work with complex clinical presentations more effective.

Educational Objectives:

1. Discuss and critique viability of using ACT for non-responders to other treatments.

2. Describe the main emotion regulation transdiagnostic processes targeted by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy.

3. Apply the mode construct as a clinical metaphor to more effectively deal with problematic within session behavior.

Thursday Afternoon 4:45pm

63. Evaluating Mindfulness and Acceptance

Symposium (4:45-5:45pm)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data

Categories: Theory & Philo., Performance-enhancing interventions, Other, Performance-enhancing interventions, Other, Adolescent, Adult, Non-clinical, Questionnaire validation, Mindfulness

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 102 (level 1)

Chair: Sue Jackson, Ph.D., Queensland University of Technology

Discussant: Maria Karekla, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

·Flow: A mindful edge in performance

Sue Jackson, Ph.D., Queensland University of Technology

Flow is an optimal psychological state because it involves being totally focused in the present moment. When in flow, nothing disturbs or detracts from this concentrated state. Flow occurs when we are engaged in activities we enjoy, which also extend our capabilities. A present-moment awareness and a focused mindset are key psychological factors for experiencing flow. Awareness and focus can be developed through the practice of mindfulness. The focus on present-moment awareness and taking committed action in the service of identified goals makes ACT a useful model to work from in performance-enhancing settings. Helping performers to identify what is important to them, and then to take action that will help them move towards these goals in a present-focused way is consistent with both ACT and flow-focused interventions. In this presentation, the idea that the flow state associated with high-level performance can be one outcome of being mindful in a challenging situation will be explored.

·Validation of a Chinese version of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II in four non-clinical student or employee samples

Yang Ji, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

Zhuohong Zhu, Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences

The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II) was translated (into Chinese), revised, and validated. Across four samples (college-students, employees, or crisis-influenced college-students), exploratory and confirmatory results were satisfactory, general response model illustrated sufficient individual item information, and item three and seven were age-specific in functioning. In most cases, the AAQ-II correlated well with constructs relevant/similar to psychological flexibility (fusion/mindfulness/meaning/rumination), psychological wellbeing (general-symptoms/depression/anxiety/life-satisfaction/post-traumatic stress), and medical condition; predicted psychological indicators with higher incremental variances to alternative measures. Yet, mixed correlation results were found in subscale measures of meaning (MLQ) between crisis-influenced and uninfluenced samples; and incremental validities fell short when AAQ-II was compared with fusion (CFQ) or meaning (MLQ) measure in predicting life satisfaction, depression, or anxiety in student or employee samples. Studies suggested good psychometric properties of the AAQ-II supporting the ACT pathological model, but the AAQ-II requires additional measures to fully capture the construct of psychological flexibility across groups.

This symposium explores focusing on the present moment, values and acceptance as processes central to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Two perspectives will be presented. The first analyzes the relation between the concept of flow and being engaged in the present moment. The second presentation presents preliminary data on the validation of the AAQ scale in a Chinese population.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain the conceptual model of flow and the similarities between a mindful state and a flow state.

2. Design an experiment to test Mindfulness effects in the lab.

3. Compare the AAQ-II with alternative measures pertinent to ACT model or similar in psychological construct.

 


Symposia Detail ● Friday ● July 12

 Friday Morning 9:00am

71. Do you have to be cognitively flexible in order to be psychologically flexible?: ACT for those with cognitive impairment

Symposium (9:00-10:15am)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Case presentation

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Theory & Philo., Acquired Brain Injury, Cognitive Impairment

Target Audience: Interm.

Location: Mathews 102 (level 1)

Chair: Joseph Ciarrochi, Ph.D., School of Social Sciences and Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Australia

Discussant: Darin Cairns, The Cairns Psychology Group

·The utility of ACT in enhancing psychological flexibility for individuals with acquired brain injuries (ABIs)

Maria Kangas, Ph.D., Centre for Emotional Health, Department of Psychology, Macquarie University, NSW

To date, the efficacy of traditional Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) in treating emotional problems in cognitively impaired, ABI samples has demonstrated variable outcomes. In particular, cognitive restructuring, a meta-cognitive and core component of CBT is potentially challenging for persons with cognitive impairments. To this end, ACT may offer a compatible alternative in enhancing psychological flexibility in persons with ABIs experiencing psychosocial problems. In this presentation, a conceptual evaluation of the ACT model will be presented, specifically in terms of how each of the core components may be applied to persons with ABIs. A case presentation (based on a depressed and anxious adult diagnosed with a brain tumour), will be used to illustrate the potential utility of adapting each of the 6 core processes to enhance psychological flexibility and facilitate individuals to engage (or re-engage) in living a purposeful life following an ABI.

·The relationship between cognitive flexibility and psychological flexibility after acquired brain injury

Diane Whiting, School of Psychology, University of Wollongong; Liverpool Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit

Frank Deane, Prof., School of Psychology, University of Wollongong, Australia

Joseph Ciarrochi, Prof., School of Social Sciences and Psychology, University of Western Sydney, Australia

Hamish McLeod, Ph.D., Institute of Health and Wellbeing, University of Glasgow, Scotland

Grahame Simpson, Ph.D., Liverpool Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit, Liverpool Hospital; Rehabilitation Studies Unit, University of Sydney

Aim: This presentation will explore how the constructs of psychological and cognitive flexibility interact in individuals with an acquired brain injury.

Method: A total of 75 participants with an ABI were recruited from Liverpool Brain Injury Rehabilitation Unit and administered self report measures of mood, psychological flexibility (using measures of acceptance and action: AAQ-II & AAQ-ABI), avoidance and neuropsychological measures of cognitive flexibility on average 21 months after their injury.

Results: The measures of psychological flexibility correlated with measures of psychological distress in the predicted direction with higher levels of psychological flexibility significantly associated with lower levels of psychological distress. Functional measures of cognitive flexibility that assess the ’ability to shift’ were not related to psychological flexibility or distress. Broader measures of cognitive flexibility that capture additional cognitive processes were correlated with psychological flexibility but this relationship became nonsignificant when general intelligence was controlled.

Conclusions: Psychological flexibility does not appear to be related to cognitive flexibility, once general intelligence is considered.

·Using ACT with the cognitively inflexible: A case study

Dana Wong, Ph.D., School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Victoria

This presentation will illustrate how ACT can be used in clinical practice with clients who have limited cognitive flexibility. The case of a 38 year old male who suffered a severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a pedestrian versus train accident will be discussed. “Simon” has a longstanding history of depression, and from a cognitive perspective demonstrates impairments in speed of processing, visuospatial abilities, visual memory, and executive functions including idea generation and cognitive flexibility. ACT was used in a one-year period of psychological treatment early after injury, and then again four years later. ACT strategies were adapted to compensate for his specific areas of cognitive difficulty. While his cognitive inflexibility presented several challenges for therapy, the application of ACT for depression in this case resulted in an increase in subjective mood ratings, and achievement of a range of occupational, recreational, and psychosocial goals in line with his values.

This symposium will explore Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and the construct of psychological flexibility in the context of individuals with an acquired brain injury (ABI), who often display impairments in cognitive flexibility. Psychological flexibility is the desired outcome for treatment modalities such as ACT and is considered a fundamental component of psychological health. It is proposed that cognitive flexibility is a component of psychological flexibility, but there is limited evidence that aids our understanding of whether individuals with an ABI are able to improve their psychological flexibility. The symposium will incorporate three presentations: (1) A conceptual review of ACT and how it might be applied with people with ABI, (2) the presentation of empirical evidence exploring the relationship between psychological flexibility and cognitive flexibility and (3) a case presentation illustrating how ACT can be used in a person with traumatic brain injury.

Educational Objectives:

1. Understand and critique the components of ACT as they apply to individuals with cognitive impairment.

2. Analyze the extent to which cognitive flexibility impacts psychological flexibility.

3. Modify ACT for use with individuals with cognitive impairment.

 

72. Contextual Medicine Special Interest Group Symposium 2: Cutting edge data, current directions toward coherent clinical care

Symposium (9:00-10:15am)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Didactic presentation

Categories: Related FC approaches, Beh. med., 5HT, Pain

Target Audience: Intro., Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 107 (level 1)

Chair: Andrew T. Gloster, University of Basel

Discussant: Rob Purssey, MBBS FRANZCP, Private Practice and University of Queensland

·5HTT is Associated with Psychological Flexibility: Preliminary Results from a Randomized Clinical Trial

Andrew T. Gloster, University of Basel

Hans-Ulrich Wittchen, Technische Universität Dresden

Jürgen Deckert, University of Würzburg

Andreas Reif, University of Würzburg

Background: Research on flexibility may be instrumental in pinpointing evolutionary advantageous pathways To date, however, genetic and psychological theories of flexibility have existed largely separately. We therefore tested the importance of the interaction between psychological flexibility and the serotonin transporter (5HTT) that influences gene expression and has been associated with faster information processing.

Method: We tested whether the polymorphism (La/La vs. not La/La) impacted therapy response as a function of various endophenotypes (i.e., psychological flexibility, and other more established variables such as panic attacks, agoraphobic avoidance, general anxiety symptoms & anxiety sensitivity). Patients were recruited from a large multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial (n=160 treatment completers; n= 190 intent to treat). These patients were examined for pre-treatment to post-treatment changes across endophenotypes.

Results: 5HT polymorphism status (La/La vs. not La/La) differentiated pre-treatment to post-treatment changes in the endophenotype psychological flexibility (effect size difference d = 4.67, F = 8.9, p < .003), but none of the other tested endophenotypes (i.e., panic attacks, agoraphobic avoidance, general anxiety symptoms & anxiety sensitivity). This pattern was consistent for both completers and the intent to treat sample.

Conclusion: Based on the consistency with existing theory on behavioral flexibility, the specificity of the results across endophenotypes, and the consistency of results across analyses (i.e., completer and intent to treat) we cautiously conclude that 5HTT polymorphism and the endophenotype psychological flexibility represent an important explanatory variable involved in the treatment of PD/AG. If replicated and extended in other samples, the endophenotype psychological flexibility may help bridge genetic and psychological literatures.

·Chronic pain: From diagnosis to function, from management to multi-professional rehabilitation, a functional contextual medicine approach

Graciela Rovner, RPhT, MSc, BSc, Rehabilitation Medicine, Sahlgrenska Academy at Gothenburg University, Göteborg, SWEDEN

Graciela will present embryonal research in physical therapy and multi-professional pain rehab, exploring indicators, markers, and predictors building an algorithm to better assess and allocate patients in rehabilitation programs (in groups) and predict their outcomes. She will have preliminary data to explore from Swedish multi-professional ACT-based pain rehabilitation clinics (from a National registry) as well as from an ACT-based physical therapy trial conducted at a primary care setting in western Sweden.

·Individual differences influence quality of life in asthma patients: The role of anxiety, experiential avoidance, and gender

Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

Maria Stavrinaki, MSc, University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

Elena Hanna, B.S., University of Cyprus, Nicosia, Cyprus

Tonia Adamide, MD, Pneumonological Clinic, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus

Giorgos Georgiades, MD, Pneumonological Clinic, Nicosia General Hospital, Nicosia, Cyprus

Natalie Pilipenko, M.A., Ferkauf Graduate School of Psychology, Yeshiva University, New York, USA

Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the airways, resulting in airflow obstruction. Research emphasizes the influence of individual differences on the quality of life (QOL) of asthma patients. The aim of our study was to explore how gender impacts upon QOL, whilst measuring the role of three levels of anxiety: non-clinical, sub-clinical, and clinical. The extent to which experiential avoidance moderates this association was also investigated.

 Two hundred and four asthma patients (136 women) from the Nicosia general hospital completed a packet of questionnaires including the AQLQ, the PHQ, and the AAQ-II.

Results showed that women with asthma report poorer asthma-specific QOL compared to asthmatic men. Women in all three anxiety levels reported lower QOL on three of the four subscales.

These results may aid in the design of personalized health care programs which take into account both the psychological factors associated with and gender of asthmatic patients.

Contextual Medicine seeks to integrate functional contextual behavioral science with models and language familiar to medical practitioners to address human physiology, neuroscience, and medicine generally. Further CM SIG aspires to connect the broader field of evolutionary science to impact public health, socio-cultural, and economic issues relevant to all human health and wellbeing including research, and all clinical practices, including those of prescribing and using medications. This inaugural CM SIG symposium hopes to lay the foundations, map out a seamless strategy integrating biological, behavioral, and cultural perspectives, critically examine from an evolutionary perspective where current mainstream mechanistic directions are leading us, and offer hope with evidence of recent applications of an integrated contextual physical/psychological approach within the clinical medical areas of asthma management and pain rehabilitation.

Educational Objectives:

1. Explain the importance of psychological flexibility in the treatment of PD/AG.

2. Design personalized health care programs which take into account both the psychological factors associated with and gender of asthmatic patients.

3. Analyze tools for diagnosing and predicting outcomes for physical therapy rehabilitation patients.

 

73. The effect of brief component ACT training on personally relevant issues

Symposium (9:00-10:15am)

Components: Original data

Categories: Prevention & Comm.-Based, Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Self-as-context, Defusion

Target Audience: Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Andreas Larsson, Swansea University

Discussant: Emily Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana Lafayette

·Self as Context increases recall of self threatening information

Louise McHugh, Ph.D., Swansea University

Kali Barawi, School of Psychology, University College Dublin

Ates Erdogan, School of Psychology, University College Dublin

Jo Saunders, School of Psychological Sciences and Health, Strathclyde University

Previous research has suggested that we tend to show impaired memory for self threatening information, an effect known as mnemic neglect. Mnemic neglect is believed to be due to shallow processing or inhibition of self threatening information. Mnemic neglect, however, could be an example of emotional avoidance which we attempted to reverse with self as context training. Participants either participated in a short self as context intervention or unfocused distraction before being asked to read behaviours that differed on how central to the self they were and on valence. Participants were then asked to recall those behaviours. We found that recall of self threatening information was increased following the self as context intervention but not unfocused distraction. We also found a more general memorial improvement with other information relevant to the self showing improved recall following self as context training particularly forperipheral information. We suggest that self as context overcomes the emotional avoidance normally associated with self threatening information as well as increasing memory performance more generally.

·Self as Context reduces halluncination like experiences in undergraduate students

Orla Moran, School of Psychology, University College Dublin

Andreas Larsson, Swansea University

Louise McHugh, School of Psychology, University College Dublin

The impact of self as context work with individuals with psychosis has received much interest over the last few years. However, the effects of such interventions on individuals experiencing psychotic-like symptoms who may be ‘at risk’ of developing psychosis has so far sparked little research. The current study aimed to look at the effects of self as context training on a group of individuals from a nonclinical population who report hallucination-like experiences. In particular, the aim was to look at the effects of the self as context training on the distress and anxiety caused by these hallucination-like experiences, along with the frequency and intrusiveness of the experiences. Participants were recruited for the study based on their scores on the Launay Slade Hallucination Scale-Revised (LSHS-R). Fifteen participants were randomly allocated to either the mindfulness intervention or the no intervention control group. Participants were required to fill out six pre and post experimental self-report measures. The results indicated a significant reduction in the distress and anxiety associated with the hallucination-like experiences for the self as context intervention group. There was also a significant decrease in the reported frequency and intrusiveness of the experiences. The results of the current study highlight the potential efficacy of providing self as context training to those who may be ‘at risk’ of developing psychosis.

·Negative thinking, bang for your buck?

Andreas Larsson, Swansea University

Nic Hooper, Ph.D., Middle-Eastern Technological University

Paul Bennett, Swansea University

Louise McHugh, School of Psychology, University College Dublin

A central part of psychotherapy involves providing patients with coping strategies for negative thoughts. Two contemporary techniques for coping with negative thoughts are cognitive restructuring and cognitive defusion. Across two studies we aimed to compare the relative effectiveness of these two strategies. Both studies were identical with the exception of delivery (i.e., one to one vs. online). In both studies participants were either provided with a cognitive restructuring, defusion or no instruction control technique to manage a personally relevant negative thought. Across a five-day period participants were reminded, via SMS messages, to use their assigned strategy in managing the thought. Participants were also required to complete a daily online questionnaire assessing the total amount of unwanted thought intrusions and their level of willingness to experience the unwanted thought. Before and after the five-day period, participants reported the (1) believability, (2) comfort, (3) negativity and (4) willingness to experience their unwanted thought. The results indicated that both restructuring and defusion were effective in decreasing the believability and negativity, and increasing comfort and willingness to have the negative thought. Further analyses suggested that defusion tended to be more helpful than restructuring across all four domains and both delivery methods. The findings are discussed in terms of the efficacy of using defusion as a strategy for managing unwanted thoughts.

The current symposium comprises of three empirical papers. The unifying concern of which is to demonstrate the effect of brief component ACT training on clinically relevant issues such as memory for threatening information or hallucination like experiences. Paper 1 investigates the impact of a self as context intervention on memory of self-threatening information. The findings suggest that memory is enhanced by brief self as context training. Paper 2 looks at the effect of brief self as context training on hallucination like experiences in undergraduate students. The results support the utility of self as context training in reducing believability but not the occurrence of hallucination like experiences. Finally, Paper 3 compared the use of cognitive defusion and cognitive restructuring in two studies and using different delivery methods: face-to-face or posted online. Results indicate that although both methods are better than control, defusion is the more efficient technique. Together the symposium demonstrates that the effectiveness of individual components of the ACT model are altering clinically relevant behaviors.

Educational Objectives:

1. Demonstrate the effect of brief component ACT training on clinically relevant issues such as memory for threatening information or hallucination like experiences.

2. Explain how different different delivery forms for ACT component training can result in different outcomes.

3. Describe differences in the effect of Self-as-Context training for self-threatening information or hallucinations.

 

Friday Morning 10:30am

79. Implementation of ACT with serious mental illness

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Didactic presentation, Case presentation

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Prevention & Comm.-Based, ACT and Serious Mental Illness (Psychosis and Bipolar Disorder)

Target Audience: Interm., Adv.

Location: Mathews 107 (level 1)

Chair: Neil Thomas, Brain and Psychological Sciences Research Center, Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia

Discussant: Eric Morris, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

·The role of service user co-facilitators in delivering ACT for Recovery group interventions

Emma O'Donoghue, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust/Kings Health Partnership

Lucy Butler, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust/Kings Health Partnership

The ACT for Recovery project will assess the feasibility of training service user co-facilitators to deliver ACT psychosis (ACTp) workshops for clients and caregivers. Study one will collect preliminary data on service use and the economic impact of the intervention, in order to establish its cost-effectiveness in a larger study. We will also conduct the first randomized controlled evaluations of ACTp workshops for both service users and caregivers. Study two will qualitatively explore both the experiences of service user co-facilitators of being trained to deliver ACTp workshops and the experience of client and caregiver participants attending the workshops. Preliminary data on the role of disclosure from service user co-facilitators on processes such as stigmatization, perspective taking and defusion will be explored.

·What's happening inside ACT for psychosis sessions?: Consumer reports and session ratings from the Lifengage RCT

Tory Bacon, La Trobe University

John Farhall, La Trobe University

We examined the theoretical underpinnings of ACT by exploring its active therapeutic processes in its application to psychosis. Study one investigated the active therapeutic role of ACT for psychosis (ACTp) from a client’s perspective and its congruence with the underlying theoretical processes. Mindfulness, defusion, acceptance and values work were described as the most useful therapy components and as contributing to positive changes. Self-rated frequency of symptoms did not change, however a reduction in the intensity and distress associated with symptoms was reported. Study two objectively measured ACT-related in-session verbal behavior, the uptake of the ACT processes by participants and associations with outcome. All ACT components were active in sessions. Greater uptake of ACT processes in-session was related to positive outcome. Together these findings are consistent with the underlying theoretically defined, active components of ACT for individuals experiencing persistent symptoms of psychosis. Both studies also provide rich clinical data for the application of ACT in psychosis.

·Pole to Pole: The development of an ACT-based resource for Bipolar Disorder

Gordon Mitchell, Department of Clinical Psychology, Stratheden Hospital, Fife, Scotland

Pole to Pole is an approach designed for people with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder; the people in their lives (i.e. family and friends); and professionals who work with people with bipolar disorder (e.g. healthcare workers). The approach is based upon the principals of ACT and has been developed in collaboration with a local bipolar support group. The name Pole to Pole simultaneously recognises the bipolar nature of emotional experience and the concept of exploring this experience. The approach consists of a resource pack, containing activities to explore experiences and values, which people are guided through in three group sessions. The sessions are designed to help people to reflect openly on their experiences of bipolar, whether directly or as a carer, and to communicate about the impact the condition has had in their lives. We also include experiential exercises in the sessions to deliver concepts such as acceptance and valued-living.

The role of psychological flexibility has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of serious mental illness. Evidence is emerging of the effectiveness of ACT-based interventions for such problems. This symposium aims to present current implementations in ACT for serious mental illness, including bipolar and psychotic disorders. All three projects focus particularly on service user involvement and incorporating their experiences in the development of ACT for psychosis (ACTp) interventions. The first presentation will introduce the ACT for Recovery project, and discuss the practical benefits of training service user co-facilitators to deliver ACT workshops. The second will present the Lifengage project and discuss the active therapeutic role of ACTp from a clients’ perspective and its congruence with ACT theoretical processes. Keeping with the theme, the third presentation will discuss the practical application of ACT for people with a diagnosis of bipolar disorder and their caregivers in the Pole to Pole project.

Educational Objectives:

1. Implement ACT interventions for clients with serious mental illness and their caregivers.

2. Discuss emerging evidence of ACT interventions in serious mental illness.

3. Examine practical benefits of training and working with service user co-facilitators and consultants.

 

80. ACT for the next generation: A series of research papers with children and adolescents

Symposium (10:30am-Noon)

Components: Original data, Didactic presentation

Categories: Clin. Interven. & Interests, Edu. settings, Prevention & Comm.-Based, Adolescent Mental Health, Children

Target Audience: Intro., Interm.

Location: Mathews 123 (level 1)

Chair: Julian McNally, Private Practice

Discussant: Giovanni Miselli, AUSL Reggio Emilia

·The importance of mediational analysis for enhancing adolescent mental health in the classroom

Tamar Black, Monash University

Dr. Glenn Melvin, Centre for Developmental Psychiatry and Psychology, Monash University

Louise Hayes, Ph.D., Orygen Youth Research Centre, University of Melbourne

There have been few school based studies investigating the effectiveness of ACT with adolescents, and to date only two using ACT as part of a universal intervention. Research with adults has demonstrated that there are different mediators associated with changes for ACT and CBT. Participants in this study were Year 9 students in two Australian schools (N = 98) who were randomly allocated to either ACT or CBT as part of the regular school curriculum, and participated in an 8 week intervention during regular class time. The first objective of the current study was to investigate the relative efficacy of ACT compared to CBT. Initial results suggested that there were no significant effects of either intervention, at post or at the 6 and 12 month follow-up assessments. The second objective was to investigate the impact of psychological flexibility and describing one’s experience (a mindfulness sub-factor) on depression, psychological inflexibility, and self-efficacy as intervention outcomes for each intervention. Models of expected change were analysed using multiple regression analysis. Results suggested that there were different mediators associated with outcomes for the ACT and CBT interventions. Describing one’s experience was more strongly associated with general self-efficacy and academic self-efficacy for the ACT group than for the CBT group. For both groups, describing one’s experience was negatively associated with depression and psychological inflexibility. However, for the CBT group, describing one’s experience had a stronger negative association with depression, and for the ACT group, describing one’s experience had a stronger negative association with psychological inflexibility. The significance of these mediational findings will be discussed.

·Cool-Mind and Mind-Chill: ACT group based protocols using a CBT framework for children and young people with anxiety

Karen Hancock, Ph.D., The Children's Hospital at Westmead

Angela Dixon, Ph.D., The Children's Hospital at Westmead

Jessica Swain, University of Newcastle

Cassandra Hainsworth, The Children's Hospital at Westmead

Siew Koo, The Children's Hospital at Westmead

Karen Munro, The Children's Hospital at Westmead

While ACT treatment protocols are increasingly being developed for adults, those for children are lacking, with even fewer that have been empirically evaluated. This presentation describes an evidence-based ACT adaptation of the Cool Kids ® and Chilled ® programs, which are widely used scientifically evaluated CBT programs. Cool-Mind (for ages 7-11 years) and Mind-Chill (12-17 years) are 10 week ACT manualised programs that have recently been evaluated under a randomised clinical trial. They incorporate all six components of the ACT model. Examples of these concepts and activities for children are demonstrated in this presentation. Each session commences with a mindfulness exercise with children and parents before separating into parent and child groups. The concept and activities related to fighting fear in the CBT program are replaced with acceptance. Cognitive restructuring strategies are replaced with cognitive defusion strategies, with children learning “mindful thinking” as opposed to “detective thinking” or “realistic thinking”. The “mindful thinking worksheet” and other activities also encompass values. Committed action is addressed through the use of exposure via stepladders, with willingness being used as a guide for step progression. Not only was the program found to be a feasible treatment option for children with anxiety, it was positively evaluated by parents and children.

·Randomized Controlled Trial of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) versus Cognitive Be