Model and processes of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for chronic pain including a closer look at the self

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APA Citation: 

Yu, L., & McCracken, L. M. (2016). Model and processes of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for chronic pain including a closer look at the self. Current pain and headache reports, 20(2), 12.

Publication Topic: 
ACT: Conceptual
Publication Type: 
Article
Language: 
English
Keyword(s): 
Chronic pain, Self, Acceptance and commitment therapy, Psychological flexibility
Abstract: 

Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) is one of the so called “third-wave” cognitive behavioral therapies. It has been increasingly applied to chronic pain, and there is accumulating evidence to support its effectiveness. ACT is based on a model of general human functioning called the psychological flexibility (PF) model. Most facets of the PF model have been examined in chronic pain. However, a potential key facet related to “self” appears underappreciated. Indeed, a positive or healthy sense of self seems essential to our well-being, and there have been numerous studies of the self in chronic pain. At the same time, these studies are not currently well organized or easy to summarize. This lack of clarity and integration creates barriers to progress in this area of research. PF with its explicit inclusion of self-related therapeutic processes within a broad, integrative, theoretical model may help. The current review summarizes the PF model in the context of chronic pain with a specific emphasis on the parts of the model that address self-related processes.

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