The effectiveness of an ACT informed intervention for managing stress and improving therapist qualities in clinical psychology trainees

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APA Citation: 

Stafford-Brown, J. & Pakenham, K.I. (2012). The effectiveness of an ACT informed intervention for managing stress and improving therapist qualities in clinical psychology trainees. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 68(6), 592-613.
DOI: 10.1002/jclp.21844

Publication Topic: 
ACT: Empirical
Publication Type: 
Article
Language: 
English
Abstract: 

OBJECTIVES:
Clinical psychology trainees (CPTs) are vulnerable to high stress, which can adversely affect their personal and professional functioning. This study evaluated the effectiveness of a group acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) informed stress management intervention for CPTs.

DESIGN:
Outcome measures were work-related stress, distress, life satisfaction, counseling self-efficacy, self-compassion, and therapeutic alliance. A cohort-controlled design, where an experimental group (n = 28) was compared with a waitlist control group (n = 28), was utilized, with a 10-week follow-up.

RESULTS:
Group comparisons showed statistically significant intervention effects for the main outcome measures, which were maintained at follow-up. Mediational analyses showed that changes on most outcomes were mediated by ACT mindfulness and acceptance processes.

CONCLUSIONS:
Findings support the effectiveness of a group ACT program for CPTs regarding stress reduction and improving therapist qualities.

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