Integrating acceptance and mindfulness with cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder

Printer-friendly version
APA Citation: 

Levitt, J. T., & Karekla, M. (2005). Integrating acceptance and mindfulness with cognitive behavioral treatment for panic disorder. In S.M. Orsillo & L. Roemer (Eds.), Acceptance and mindfulness-based approaches to anxiety (pp. 165-188). New York: Springer.

Publication Topic: 
ACT: Conceptual
ACT: Empirical
Publication Type: 
Book
Language: 
English
Keyword(s): 
Panic disorder, CBT, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), panic control treatment
Abstract: 

It is generally recognized that panic disorder causes functional impairment in those who suffer from it. The diagnosis of panic disorder is related to numerous costs both to the individual and to society at large, such as lost productivity and increased health care utilization (Klerman, Weissman, Oullette, Johnson, & Greenwald, 1991). Fortunately, recent studies illustrate that effective treatment of panic disorder (PD) produces significant medical cost offsets and, most importantly, meaningful improvements in quality of life (Salvador-Carulla, Segui, Fernandez-Cano, & Canet, 1995; Telch, Schmidt, Jaimez, Jacquin, & Harrington, 1995). Thus, effective treatments for PD may not only help patients overcome their anxiety in the short term, but may also help them live more functional lives in the long term. Although traditional cognitive-behavioral treatments (CBT) for PD are moderately effective, dropout rates of 25% and above are common, and, of those offered treatment, only approximately 50% are considered responders at treatment end (e.g., Barlow, Gorman, Shear, & Woods, 2000).

This page contains attachments restricted to ACBS members. Please join or login with your ACBS account.