ACBS World Conference 17 - Dublin, Ireland, 25-30 June, 2019

ACBS World Conference 17 - Dublin, Ireland, 25-30 June, 2019

This event has concluded. Please join us in July 2020 in New Orleans, Louisiana, USA or online in 2021.

What is the World Conference?

The World Conference brings together clinicians and researchers to present cutting-edge research in, among other modalities, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), Relational Frame Theory (RFT), and Contextual Behavioral Science, as well as experienced trainers to lead experiential workshops so that you can learn how to better serve your clients. 

The World Conference welcomes psychologists, social workers, professional counselors, marriage and family therapists, psychiatrists, physicians, drug counselors, health researchers, language researchers, behavior analysts, teachers, organizational psychologists, students and more.... Anyone in a similarly related helping or research field is invited to attend.

Registration in the full conference includes lunch, coffee/tea breaks, open access to workshops, research symposia, posters, panel discussions, plenary sessions with CBS researchers and practitioners, and our IGNITE sessions.

Pre-Conference intensive, 2 day workshops: 25-26 June, 2019
Conference kick off: evening 26 June, 2019
Conference sessions: 27-30 June, 2019 (concluding at noon on 30 June)

  

Program

A draft of the program and the schedule is now available. Take a look at our Dublin Pre-Conference Intensive workshops here.

Registration

Registration is closed for this event.

Conference Highlights

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Ambassador and Ambassadee Program

Ambassador and Ambassadee Program

Ambassador and Ambassadee Program In Dublin

The Women in ACBS SIG and the ACBS Membership Committee are excited to announce the Dublin World Conference Ambassador & Ambassadee Program! This program is intended to cultivate inclusivity, connection, and community in ACBS. These are values we all share and now is the time for some committed action.

Participation is easy and need not be especially time consuming – one coffee, lunch date, or small group gathering could go a long way.

In order for the program to work, we need you!

To sign up please click the link below

http://kingston.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_83bnwGqrdyyi2Ut

About the Program

This program is hosted and organised by the Women in ACBS SIG and ACBS membership Committee. The aim of this initiative is to foster community, connection, and inclusivity at the ACBS conference. We want to support delegates to feel welcomed at the conference by providing opportunities for support and connection so delegates want to come again and again, and also want to get involved in ACBS more widely.

This program will allow ACBS conference attendees (“Ambassadees”) to be matched with people who are seasoned ACBS conference attendees (“Ambassadors”) to aid in networking and provide a better overall conference experience for all.

An Ambassadee is:

• A first time ACBS conference attendee or those new to CBS OR

• Attendees who have previously attended the conference but would like to expand their network or who still doesn’t feel part of the wider ACBS community

• Attendees who are motivated to make the most of their conference experience, committed to communicating and meeting with their Ambassador, and appreciative of the time that their Ambassador devotes to them.

An Ambassador is:

• ACBS professional members who have been to the conference at least once before and are keen to expand their networks OR

• ACBS professional members interested in helping other ACBS conference attendees make the most out of their experience OR

• Current and past leaders of ACBS (both in official positions, or those considered leaders in academia or practice, including peer reviewed trainers and those on their journey to becoming peer reviewed trainers.

• Someone who can explain how to get more involved in ACBS (e.g.joining committees; volunteering; participating in social events, etc.).

Participation as an Ambassador involves only minimal effort, including the following:

• Connect with the Ambassadee(s) (you can have up to 4) at least once prior to the annual conference via e-mail or phone.

• Meet with the Ambassadee(s) at once or more onsite at the conference (coffee, a drink, whatever you prefer).

• Help the Ambassadee(s) network at the conference by introducing him or her to some of your colleagues where possible.

How do I meet up with my Ambassador or Ambassadee?

• Ambassadors will email Ambassadees before the conference in order to make a plan to meet

• Participants may chose to meet individually whenever they chose

• Alternatively, there are two planned group events planned for participants

◦ Thursday June 27th at 8am: Morning meet-up

◦ Thursday June 27th at lunch: Lunch meet-up

Why Should You Volunteer to be an Ambassador?

• It is a great privilege to represent ACBS and facilitate connection, inclusiveness and community

• The Conference Ambassador Program is flexible and you and your Ambassadee can work out the particulars so it works with (not against) your schedules.

• You may have just the right professional interests that make you aperfect match for another conference attendee. We need individuals with varying backgrounds to allow for ‘best fit’.

• The Ambassador Program also allows you to share your expertise with an Ambassadee and to foster new professional (and personal) relationships.

How it will work?

• Ambassadors will be contacted one weeks prior to the start of the conference with the names and contact details of their Ambassadees.

• The Ambassadors are then invited to contact their Ambassadees to arrange when and where to meet at the conference.

• To support opportunities for wider networking, we will publish a list of Ambassadors, so Ambassadors can get together with each other and with their Ambassadees. We recommend meeting as early as possible during the conference.

How to sign up?

In order to sign up as an Ambassador or an Ambassadee please complete the short survey using the link below. The survey will take 3-5

minutes to complete. The deadline to register is June 14th.

http://kingston.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_83bnwGqrdyyi2Ut

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Continuing Education (CE) Credits

Continuing Education (CE) Credits

Possible credit hours:

  • 2-day pre-conference workshops: 13 hours
  • ACBS World Conference 2019 (attending all CE events): Approx. 21- hours

 

Types of Credit Available:

  • CE credit is available for psychologists. 
  • CE credit for BCBAs is available for select events.
BCBA eligible pre-conference workshops:
Advances in RFT: Implications for Clinical Behavior Analysis - Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D., Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.,Colin Harte, M.Sc.
BCBA eligible WC17 conference sessions: Click here to download. Eligible sessions are indicated in yellow.

The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science maintains responsibility for this program and its content. CE rules require that we only issue credits to those who attend the entire workshop. Those arriving more than 15 minutes late or leaving before the entire workshop is completed will not receive CE credits.

Information about the CE Process at the Event:

Please remember to scan in and out at the beginning and end of each session using our scanner system. If there is a problem and the scanners are not working, please make sure to sign in and out on the paper check-in sheet provided. We cannot give CE credit if you do not scan/sign in and out.

Please DO NOT SCAN in and out for coffee/tea breaks. CE credits are NOT available for IGNITE sessions, Chapter/SIG/Committee meetings, or other lunch time sessions.

You will need to complete an evaluation for each session you attend, in order to earn CEs (of any type offered). The evaluations will all be done online. You can complete your evaluations at http://contextualscience.org/evals. These online evaluations must be completed by Sunday, 14 July 2019. We will email you a printable copy of your certificate by 15 August 2019. This email will come to you from “ACBS”. If you do not receive it, please email support@contextualscience.org.

If you do not complete all evaluations corresponding to our attendance records by the date listed above (14 July 2019), you have until 22 August 2019 to contact ACBS to contest or correct the number of hours/credits earned. An additional fee of $20 USD will apply if the error is due to incomplete evaluations.

After 22 August 2019, corrections/contestations will be considered on a case-by-case basis and additional fees will apply.

BCBA credits are sponsored by Foxylearning.  Thank you Foxylearning!

Certificate with Number of Hours Attended

As an alternative to a CE certificate, some credentialing agencies (please check with yours) may accept a certificate with the number of hours attended. This requires that an individual verifies their attendance by signing in and out of each session that they attend during the event. The cost for this type of certificate is €10.

Not sure if you need CEs?

Check with your licensing agency, and/or sign in/out on the yellow sheets provided, and you can determine your eligibility immediately after the event (still adhering to the evaluation deadlines mentioned above). If you do not scan or sign in/out, or complete necessary evaluations by the deadline, that cannot be “corrected” later.


Fees:

A €40 fee will be required to earn CEs.  If you attend either a pre-conference workshop(s), World Conference, or both, only €40 is due. If you register for multiple events separately, please only pay the fee one time. This fee is non-refundable (unless you cancel your registration in its entirety before the cancellation deadline). Attendance verification (sign in/out) and evaluations also may be required.

BCBA credits are charged at $8 USD per credit hour, after the event.

Refunds & Grievance Policies: Participants may direct any questions or complaints to ACBS Executive Director Emily Rodrigues, acbs@contextualscience.org, or through the Contact Us link on this website.

  • CEs are only available for events that qualify as workshops, symposia, invited lecture, panel discussion, or plenary sessions. Poster sessions, IGNITE sessions, sessions shorter than 1 hour, social evening events, Chapter/SIG/Committee meetings, and some other specialty sessions do not qualify for Continuing Education. Early morning movement sessions do qualify for CEs unless otherwise noted in the abstract of the session in the conference program.
  • (Note: CE credits are only available for professionals. You may not earn CE credits with a student registration.) 
ACBS staff

Evening and Social Events

Evening and Social Events
MONDAY, 24 JUNE, 2019

15:00-17:30

Pre-Conference Workshop Registration (DCU Accommodations lobby; Sports Club Residences Building)
WEDNESDAY, 26 JUNE, 2019
18:30-20:30

Opening Social/ Chapter & SIG Event (DCU Helix) (Cash bar available) Guests (family & friends) of registered attendees are welcome at this event.)

 
THURSDAY, 27 JUNE, 2019
Approx. 18:45-21:00 Offsite Social Downtown Dublin - St. Patrick's Cathedral (buses leave DCU 18:15; buses leave St. Patrick's 20:45/21:00) (guest transportation/tickets available)  
FRIDAY, 28 JUNE, 2019
18:15 Busing to downtown Dublin (Limited busing will be available for a return at the drop off location at 21:15, 21:30, 21:45 and 22:00)  
SATURDAY, 29 JUNE, 2019

18:00-19:30

Networking Dinner/Social (DCU Helix) - Attendees will receive a boxed dinner and one drink ticket. Guest tickets are available for purchase  

20:00-22:30

Follies begin at approx. 20:30

Follies! in the Mahony Hall (A cash bar will be available. Guests (family & friends) of registered attendees are welcome at this event.)  
22:30-00:45 Dance Party! (Music & dance floor... what more do you need?)  
Anonymous (not verified)

First Timer’s Guide to the ACBS World Conference in Dublin

First Timer’s Guide to the ACBS World Conference in Dublin

Welcome!


We have compiled this guide to assist first-time conference attendee’s in making their time at the ACBS World Conference as productive and stress-free as possible. There’s no “right” way to attend the conference nor is there a set number of sessions or events to attend. You should attend the conference with the plan to make connections, learn, and have fun.

Planning for the Conference

Getting there: Check here for airport transfer information to get you to the venue or accommodations.

General Conference Schedule: Please find the schedule of events which will help you plan your days here - https://contextualscience.org/wc17_gen_schedule.

What Should I Bring?

Tote Bag: You’ll want a bag, and the conference give away is NOT a bag this year. You’ll be carrying a lot of stuff: The Program (unless you opted out of receiving this print publication when you registered), handouts, notepad/tablet, snacks, a sweater, and a computer.

Snacks and a water bottle: ACBS provides lunch each day along with Coffee/Tea breaks in the morning and afternoon. If you’d like to supplement that, shop at the grocery store (on or off campus) and stock up on fruit, granola bars, or energy bars – items that are portable and filling to sustain you through the day. Your brain will thank you!

Comfortable Shoes & Clothes: This is not the time to wear new shoes, even if you look amazing in them. Bring your favorite comfortable shoes. ACBS conferences are a bit more informal that other similar conferences when it comes to dress. Most people wear slacks/shorts/jeans and a button-down shirt, blouse, or something similar. Be comfortable. (Oh, and a sweater is a good idea in case a room is chilly.)

Choosing Conference Sessions (2019 Preliminary Program)

Sometimes selecting which of 165 education sessions to attend requires some time. There is a lot of cool research, some really useful practical training, thought provoking invited speakers, and a wide variety of topics. Expand your horizons and have fun. Read through the sessions available. Keep a list of these available sessions, but don’t stress about definitively picking one over another until the time comes. You will end up chatting with other attendees about pending sessions and they may lean toward one or the other or even suggest one you had not considered. Another strategy is to find (or recruit) a buddy to attend a different session in the same time slot and then meet up afterward to share information.

You will notice there are several different types of sessions available throughout the conference. We’ve included a brief explanation of each type to assist with choosing your sessions:

Workshops are training sessions of 1.5 or 3 hours and usually focus on a combination of experiential and/or didactic exercises. The workshops 27-30 June are open to all, no additional registration is required.
• The Ignite presentation is a short, structured talk in which presenters present on ideas and issues they are most passionate about using a “deck” of 20 slides that auto-advance every 15 seconds for a total of 5 minutes each.
Symposia are a series of three or four 15-20 minute presentations focused on either empirical research or conceptual, philosophical, historical, or methodological issues. A discussant highlights and integrates the contributions of various speakers in the symposium and moderates questions from the audience.
Panel discussions consist of 3 to 5 speakers selected for some shared interest or expertise in an area. Panelists respond to one or more questions or issues, with time allotted for interaction among the speakers and with the audience.

Networking at the Conference

The Conference Ambassador/Ambassadee Program: This program is hosted and organised by the Women in ACBS SIG and ACBS Membership Committee. The aim of this initiative is to foster community, connection, and inclusivity at the ACBS conference. We want to support delegates to feel welcomed at the conference by providing opportunities for information and connection, so delegates want to come again and again, and want to get involved in ACBS more widely.

This program will allow ACBS conference attendees (“Ambassadees”) to be matched with people who are seasoned ACBS conference attendees (“Ambassadors”) to aid in networking and provide a better overall conference experience for all.

To register for the program, please complete the survey found here by June 14th: https://kingston.eu.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_83bnwGqrdyyi2Ut

The First Timer’s Event/Rookie’s Retreat: Attending this event can help you get oriented to the conference, meet some attendees, and start your networking! The First Timer’s Event/Rookie’s Retreat will be held on Wednesday, 26 June at 18:00-18:45 in The Blue room, DCU Helix.

Chapter/SIG (Special Interest Group) Meetings: You are welcome and encouraged to attend any Chapter and SIG meetings that are occurring during the conference which interest you. You do not need to be a member of these groups to attend and this is a great way to meet people who live locally to you or who have similar interests. 

Evening and Social Events: ACBS conference social events (dinner, mixers, follies, dance party, etc) generally have high attendance. These events are a good opportunity to chat with others in a relaxed environment and have fun. You will find the schedule for evening and social events here: https://contextualscience.org/evening_and_social_events.

Quick Tips

• Clothing: Dublin area temperatures in June are cool, but comfortable. Daily highs are predicted to be between 17-20 degrees Celsius (62-68 degrees Fahrenheit). Dress comfortably. In general, it does rain about one third of the month of June, so you will want to be prepared for some rainy days.
• All sessions from Thursday morning through Sunday noon, are included with your conference registration. Workshops given during these times are complimentary.
• If you’re an early riser and want a nice start to your day, check out our morning movement and meditation sessions. CEs are even available!
• You will be meeting other therapists/researchers so be prepared to help them remember you by sharing your business card. If you don't have a business card, don't worry! ACBS is an informal conference and you can always snap a picture of someone's name tag and message them later through our membership directory.
  

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General Schedule of Events - 25-30 June, 2019

General Schedule of Events - 25-30 June, 2019

MONDAY, 24 JUNE, 2019

15:00-17:30

Pre-Conference Workshop Registration (DCU Accommodations lobby; Sports Club Residences Building)  
TUESDAY, 25 JUNE, 2019
7:30-16:30 Pre-Conference Workshop Registration (DCU Helix)  
9:00-17:15 Pre-Conference Workshops (DCU Helix & DCU Business School) Coffee/Tea, 10:30-10:45
Lunch, 12:00-13:15
Coffee/Tea, 15:30-15:45
WEDNESDAY, 26 JUNE, 2019
8:00-16:30 Pre-Conference Workshop Registration (DCU Helix; Conference attendees may begin to register after 13:30)  
9:00-17:15 Pre-Conference Workshops (DCU Helix & DCU Business School) Coffee/Tea, 10:30-10:45
Lunch, 12:00-13:15
Coffee/Tea, 15:30-15:45
18:00-18:45 Rookies Retreat: ACBS Conference Orientation (Student and First Time Attendee event) (The Blue Room, DCU Helix)  
17:45-20:00 Registration (DCU Helix)  
18:30-20:30

Opening Social/ Chapter & SIG Event (DCU Helix) (Cash bar available) Guests (family & friends) of registered attendees are welcome at this event.)

 
THURSDAY, 27 JUNE, 2019
7:30-16:45  Registration (DCU Helix)  
8:00-9:00 Chapter/SIG/Committee Meetings (DCU Helix & DCU Business School)  
9:00-18:00 Conference Sessions (DCU Helix & DCU Business School) Coffee/Tea, 10:15-10:35
Lunch, 12:05-13:20
Coffee/Tea, 14:50-15:10
Break, 16:40-17:00
Approx. 18:45-21:00 Offsite Social Downtown Dublin - St. Patrick's Cathedral (buses leave DCU 18:15; buses leave St. Patrick's 20:45/21:00) (guest transportation/tickets available)  
FRIDAY, 28 JUNE, 2019
8:00-16:45  Registration (DCU Helix)  
8:00-9:00 Chapter/SIG/Committee Meetings (DCU Helix & DCU Business School)  
9:00-18:00 Conference Sessions (DCU Helix & DCU Business School) Coffee/Tea, 10:15-10:35
Lunch, 12:05-13:20
Coffee/Tea, 14:50-15:10
Break, 16:40-17:00
18:15 Busing to downtown Dublin (Limited busing will be available for a return at the drop off location at 21:15, 21:30, 21:45 and 22:00)  
SATURDAY, 29 JUNE, 2019
8:00-16:45   Registration (DCU Helix)  
8:00-9:00 Chapter/SIG/Committee Meetings (DCU Helix & DCU Business School)  

9:00-18:00

Conference Sessions (DCU Helix & DCU Business School)

Coffee/Tea, 10:15-10:35
Lunch, 12:05-13:20
Coffee/Tea, 14:50-15:10
Break, 16:40-17:00

18:00-20:30

Networking Dinner/Social (DCU Helix)  

20:30-22:30

Follies! in the Mahony Hall (A cash bar will be available. Guests (family & friends) of registered attendees are welcome at this event.)  
22:30-00:45 Dance Party! (Music & dance floor... what more do you need?)  
SUNDAY, 30 JUNE, 2019
8:30-12:00  Registration (DCU Helix)  
9:00-12:05 Conference Sessions (DCU Helix & DCU Business School) Coffee/Tea, 10:15am-10:35pm
ACBS staff

Invited Speakers for the World Conference 17

Invited Speakers for the World Conference 17

Plenary Speakers

Thursday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Frank Bond, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Frank W. Bond, PhD is Professor of Psychology and Management at Goldsmiths, University of London, where he is also Director of the Institute of Management Studies (IMS).

Jonathan R. Dowling, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Jonathan R. Dowling, Ph.D. is a postdoctoral research fellow with Professor Frank Bond at Goldsmiths, University of London.

They will be giving the following presentation: ALIVE and Thriving: The Evolution of CBS in Theory and Practice.

Click here for a complete bios and session abstract.


Thursday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., Boston University 

Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University, where he is the Director of the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. He will be giving the following presentation: An Individual Complex Network Approach to Intervention Science.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Friday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Christine Caldwell, Ph.D., University of Stirling

Christine Caldwell is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling. A psychologist by training, with a PhD in primatology, Caldwell’s current work incorporates methods from comparative, cross-cultural, developmental, and cognitive psychology. She will be giving the following presentation: Harnessing the power and potential of human cultural evolution.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Friday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Janet Helms, Ph.D., Boston College 

Janet E. Helms is the Augustus Long Professor in the Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology and Director of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture at Boston College. She will be giving the following presentation: The Power Dynamics of White Racial Identity in Social Interactions.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Saturday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

In 2015 Dr. Barnes-Holmes accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium.

Christine Caldwell, Ph.D., University of Stirling

Christine Caldwell is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling. 

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., University of Nevada

Steven C. Hayes is Nevada Foundation Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada.

Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., Boston University

Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is Professor of Psychological and Brain Sciences at Boston University, where he is the Director of the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. 

Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., University of Almeria, Spain

Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Functional Analysis Doctoral Program at University of Almeria, Spain. She is also Director of Master in Contextual Psychology in Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY).

David Sloan Wilson, Ph.D., University of Binghamton

David Sloan Wilson is SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University.

They will be giving the following presentation: Future Directions in the Role of Symbolic Meaning in Intentional Human Evolution  

Click here for complete bios and a session abstract.


Saturday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Louise Hayes, Ph.D. , The University of Melbourne & Orygen Youth Mental Health

Louise Hayes is a clinical psychologist, author, and speaker. She is a Senior Fellow with The University of Melbourne and Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health. She will be giving the following presentation: How we can use the broad platform of CBS to build depth into models of human development.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


 

Invited Speakers

Jan De Houwer, Ph.D., Ghent University

Jan De Houwer works at Ghent University (Belgium) where he heads the Learning and Implicit Processes Laboratory. His research is related to the manner in which spontaneous (automatic) preferences are learned and can be measured. He will be giving the following presentation: Complex learning: How multiple environmental regularities jointly influence behavior.

Sean Hughes, Ph.D., Ghent University

He will be giving the following presentation: Complex learning: How multiple environmental regularities jointly influence behavior

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Andrew Gloster is a professor at the University of Basel, Switzerland where he heads the Division of Clinical Psychology and Intervention Science. He will be giving the following presentation: From Individuals, to Groups, and up to the Population: Implementing Intervention Science Across Multiple Contexts.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Inez Myin-Germeys, Ph.D., KU Leuven, Center for Contextual Psychiatry

Inez Myin-Germeys started the Center for Contextual Psychiatry, a research center with currently about 30 researchers, at KU Leuven in 2015. She will be giving the following presentation: A contextual approach to psychiatry: Momentary Assessment and Intervention. 

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Southern Illinois University

Dr. Rehfeldt has been a professor in the Behavior Analysis and Therapy program at Southern Illinois University for nineteen years, and is currently Interim Director of the Rehabilitation Institute. She will be giving the following presentation: Toward an Effective and Relevant Science of Behavior.

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract.


Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Francisco J. Ruiz is a professor at Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz (Colombia). He will be giving the following presentation: Interfacing Research on Clinical RFT and ACT: The Case of RNT-Focused ACT

Click here for a complete bio and session abstract. 
 

ACBS staff

Invited Speakers - Bios and Abstracts

Invited Speakers - Bios and Abstracts

Plenary Speakers

Thursday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Frank Bond, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Frank W. Bond, PhD is Professor of Psychology and Management at Goldsmiths, University of London, where he is also Director of the Institute of Management Studies (IMS). Prior to establishing the IMS in 2011, Frank was Head of the Department of Psychology at Goldsmiths, and he began his academic career at University College London. For over 20 years, Frank has used randomised controlled trials and longitudinal studies to examine contextual behavioural science approaches and theories for predicting and influencing human health and performance in work, educational, community, and clinical contexts. He has also examined how individual differences-most notably, psychological flexibility-interact with organisational structures, processes, and strategies to enhance performance- and health-related variables. He has conducted this research in organisations ranging from the UK government and the BBC, to the European Space Agency, and the "Team GB" British Olympic team. His research has been published widely and has been cited over 14,000 times in academic and professional publications. Frank is proud to be a peer-reviewed ACT trainer, Fellow and Past-President of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Sciences.

Jonathan R. Dowling, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

My academic and professional experience has focused on implementing, testing and developing RFT, ACT and newer contextual behavioural science approaches. I was awarded annual academic scholarships and received a first-class honours degree in Psychology at the National University of Ireland, Galway. Following this, I undertook a PhD at University College Dublin under the supervision of Dr. Louise McHugh which was funded by the Irish Research Council's Enterprise Partnership Scheme. As part of this scholarship I received additional funding and an applied traineeship under the supervision of clinical and organisational psychologists at The Performance Partnership Ltd for the duration of my PhD. Over the past two years I have worked as a postdoctoral research fellow with Professor Frank Bond at Goldsmiths, University of London. From my PhD, to my current role, my research has primarily focused on testing and developing theoretical CBS accounts of how people relate to one another, and act for a purpose. Through this work I have consulted with a wide range of organisations from the Health Service Executive and the Law Society of Ireland, to large multi-national law firms and the European Space Agency.

ALIVE and Thriving: The Evolution of CBS in Theory and Practice

ALIVE (Actively Living as an Individual, Vitally Engaged-in-relating in the World) is an RFT and CBS based model for predicting and influencing how people can learn to interact in their everyday lives so that they experience a greater sense of meaning and vitality. ALIVE helps people to learn how to respond to their ever-changing situations, so that they can live as the person they can-be. It emphasises that individuals can use their felt experiences (e.g., a sense of fear, isolation or belongingness), so that they can understand how ably they have lived in a way that really matters to them-as the person they wish to be. ALIVE can then help them to learn how to act more flexibly, so they can see possibilities for how to live more adept, significant lives in their shared world. Findings from over 10 studies, involving thousands of participants, will be considered. They indicate that by acting as a person wishes to be, they tend to have a better quality of life, relate and communicate with others more successfully, attain greater financial compensation at work, and are less suicidal, even after accounting for personality variables and IQ.


Thursday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., Boston University 

Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is professor of psychology at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, where he directs the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. He has an actively funded research program studying various aspects of emotional disorders with a particular emphasis on anxiety disorders and cognitive behavioral therapy. He has won many prestigious professional awards, including the Aaron T. Beck Award for Significant and Enduring Contributions to the Field of Cognitive Therapy by the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He is a fellow of the APA and APS and was president of various national and international professional societies, including the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy. He was also an advisor to the DSM-5 Development Process and a member of the DSM-5 Anxiety Disorder Sub-Work Group. Dr. Hofmann has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters. He is currently editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research and associate editor of Clinical Psychological Science. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed journal articles and 15 books. For more information, visit http://www.bostonanxiety.org/

An Individual Complex Network Approach to Intervention Science.

Contemporary psychiatric classification systems assume that psychological problems are expressions of latent disease entities. However, there is little evidence to support this restrictive assumption. Critics point to the comorbidity problem, the heterogeneity within each diagnostic category, and many other issues that question the validity of the latent disease model. An alternative to this view is the complex network approach. This approach does not rely on the assumption that psychological problems are expressions of latent disease entities, but it does not rule it out either. Instead, the complex network approach assumes that mental health problems exist as systems of inter-connected elements, similar to a functional analytic approach with many variables (i.e., nodes) that may be associated through unidirectional, bidirectional, excitatory, and inhibitory links (i.e., edges). When applied to intervention science, the clinically most relevant tasks are (1) to develop an individual (i.e., person-specific) network that reflects the psychological problem space of the person, and (2) to disturb this individual network such that it turns from a maladaptive to an adaptive individual network structure. As is true for many complex networks, such a change can occur abruptly once the network reaches a tipping point. A dynamic complex network approach directly links classification to intervention. This approach could be used to predict treatment change, relapse, and recovery. It is concluded that the complex network approach offers a less restrictive and more externally valid alternative to the latent disease model, while offering exciting new directions for future research in psychiatry and is in line with personalized medicine.


Friday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Christine Caldwell, Ph.D., University of Stirling

Christine Caldwell is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling. She is regarded as a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural evolution, and is best known for the innovative methods she has developed for studying population-level patterns of cultural change and variation under laboratory conditions, involving human participants. A psychologist by training, with a PhD in primatology, Caldwell’s current work incorporates methods from comparative, cross-cultural, developmental, and cognitive psychology. Much of her research is geared towards understanding how and why it is that human cultures tend to accrue changes that are increasingly useful and/or efficient, relative to their precursors.

Harnessing the power and potential of human cultural evolution

Human culture supports the inter-generational accumulation of skills and knowledge, such that later generations can benefit vicariously from the cumulative experience of their predecessors. However, it remains unclear how exactly human social transmission supports such a facility, and why we do not seem to see it in other species. Furthermore, little attention has been paid to the question of how we might best harness such effects, to ensure we preserve and propagate valuable innovations, and avoid disseminating traits that might have detrimental group-level effects. In recent years, experimental approaches have enabled valuable progress in elucidating the conditions necessary for cumulative culture in humans. These studies have begun to shed light on the unresolved issues mentioned above. This plenary will discuss key concepts from the field of cultural evolution, and will review the experimental literature and the insights these studies have generated.


Friday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Janet Helms, Ph.D., Boston College 

Janet E. Helms is the Augustus Long Professor in the Department of Counseling, Developmental, and Educational Psychology and Director of the Institute for the Study and Promotion of Race and Culture at Boston College. She is past president of the Society of Counseling Psychology (Division 17 of the American Psychological Association [APA]). Dr. Helms is a Fellow in Division 17 (Counseling Psychology), Division 45 (Ethnic Diversity), and Division 35 (Psychology of Women) of the APA. In addition, she is a member of the Association of Black Psychologists, the American Psychological Society, and the American Educational Research Association. Dr. Helms has written over sixty empirical and theoretical articles and four books on the topics of racial identity and cultural influences on assessment and counseling practice.

The Power Dynamics of White Racial Identity in Social Interactions

A common theme in most societies of racial/ethnic diversity is that marginalized populations do not benefit from health care services as much as do their white or dominant-culture counterparts. In such societies, most services are provided either by white therapists or by intervention models based on race-free conceptualizations of human development. Service providers’ lack of sensitivity to cultural (né racial) factors have been blamed for the disparities, and there have been many calls for racially-responsive training. The supervision process is one site through which such training can occur. Nevertheless, race and related power dynamics are often invisible forces in the supervision process as well as the supervisor’s own development because they were not explicit foci in the supervisors’ training programs’ philosophies, missions, or climates. Yet unacknowledged racial dynamics may determine the quality of supervisory relationships and may account for why supervisees, attempting to cope with their own racial issues in supervision or address such issues with their clients, report being traumatized by their supervisors. Most white supervisors, who may have received training by which they guide their treatment interventions with clients and supervisees generally, have not received formal training in white racial identity or social interaction theories. Consequently, when faced with racial dynamics in supervision, each event becomes a new major challenge. This presentation, will (1) introduce white racial identity theory, (2) examine power dynamics in relationships, and (3) present social interaction theory.


Saturday Morning (9:00-10:15)

Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

Dr. Dermot Barnes-Holmes graduated from the University of Ulster in 1985 with a B.Sc. in Psychology and in 1990 with a D.Phil. in behavior analysis. His first tenured position was in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork, where he founded and led the Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Science unit. In 1999 he accepted the foundation professorship in psychology and head-of-department position at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. In 2015 he accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium. Dr. Barnes-Holmes is known internationally for the analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behavior between the years 1980 and 1999. He was awarded the Don Hake Translational Research Award in 2012 by the American Psychological Association, is a past president and fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, is a fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis, International, is a recipient of the Quad-L Lecture Award from the University of New Mexico and most recently became an Odysseus laureate when he received an Odysseus Type 1 award from the Flemish Science Foundation in Belgium.

 Christine Caldwell, Ph.D., University of Stirling

Christine Caldwell is a Professor of Psychology at the University of Stirling. She is regarded as a pioneer in the field of experimental cultural evolution, and is best known for the innovative methods she has developed for studying population-level patterns of cultural change and variation under laboratory conditions, involving human participants. A psychologist by training, with a PhD in primatology, Caldwell’s current work incorporates methods from comparative, cross-cultural, developmental, and cognitive psychology. Much of her research is geared towards understanding how and why it is that human cultures tend to accrue changes that are increasingly useful and/or efficient, relative to their precursors. 

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., University of Nevada

Steven C. Hayes is Nevada Foundation Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of 44 books and over 625 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and its application of the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. He is the developer of Relational Frame Theory, an account of human higher cognition, and has guided its extension to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Dr. Hayes has been President of Division 25 of the APA, the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science. He was the first Secretary-Treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, and served a 5-year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in NIH. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. Google Scholar data ranks him as among the top most cited scholars in all areas of study (http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/58). For more information visit www.stevenchayes.com.

Stefan Hofmann, Ph.D., Boston University

Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is professor of psychology at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, where he directs the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. He has an actively funded research program studying various aspects of emotional disorders with a particular emphasis on anxiety disorders and cognitive behavioral therapy. He has won many prestigious professional awards, including the Aaron T. Beck Award for Significant and Enduring Contributions to the Field of Cognitive Therapy by the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He is a fellow of the APA and APS and was president of various national and international professional societies, including the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy. He was also an advisor to the DSM-5 Development Process and a member of the DSM-5 Anxiety Disorder Sub-Work Group. Dr. Hofmann has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters. He is currently editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research and associate editor of Clinical Psychological Science. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed journal articles and 15 books. For more information, visit http://www.bostonanxiety.org/

Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., University of Almeria, Spain

Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., is Professor of Psychology and Director of the Functional Analysis Doctoral Program at University of Almeria, Spain. She is also Director of Master in Contextual Psychology in Madrid Institute of Contextual Psychology (MICPSY). She focuses her work in tracking the connection of philosophical, basic and applied dimensions as a contextual integrative tree of knowledge connected to others. She has directed thirty doctoral theses and has published pivotal papers in Behavior Analysis, RFT and ACT. She published the first Spanish ACT book in 2002 with Kelly Wilson and a new book is being on its way. She has a vibrating and creative style both while teaching, doing research and working with clients.

David Sloan Wilson, Ph.D., University of Binghamton

David Sloan Wilson is SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University. He has made fundamental contributions to evolutionary science and its applications to human affairs. He is well known within the ACBS community for working with Steve Hayes and others to integrate evolutionary science with contextual behavioral science. His most recent books are Evolution and Contextual Behavioral Science (co-edited with Steve Hayes) and Evolving the Future: Completing the Darwinian Revolution.

Future Directions in the Role of Symbolic Meaning in Intentional Human Evolution

Evolutional and contextual behavioral perspectives have become increasingly close over the last several years, but while all agree that meaning, purpose, consciousness, and intention has special relevance to human beings, the harder core of the evolutionary and behavioral community have been nervous about applying these concepts to the experimental analysis of their own domains. That appears to be changing. Evolutionists agree that consciousness and meaning systems evolved, but some are beginning to argue that human beings can evolve "on purpose." Behaviorists agree that purpose and consciousness are behavioral phenomena, but some are beginning to argue that these processes alter the operations of contingencies of reinforcement. This set of changes creates risks but also opportunities for contextual behavioral science. In particular, it means that CBS ideas are now of more direct relevance to cognitive perspectives, both applied and basic, on such issues as "expectancy" or "intention;" and perhaps that contextual behavioral ideas can be used to create forms of applied evolution science that have previously not existed. In this panel a group of experts in cognitive behavior therapy, evolution science, relational frame theory, behavior analysis discuss these issues so as to explore the possibilities of connection and collaboration inside new perspectives on the role of symbolic meaning in intentional human evolution.


Saturday Evening (17:00-18:00)

Louise Hayes, Ph.D., The University of Melbourne & Orygen Youth Mental Health

Louise Hayes is a clinical psychologist, author, and speaker. She is a Senior Fellow with The University of Melbourne and Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health. She is also a peer reviewed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy/Training (ACT) trainer. She is the co-author of the best-selling book, Get Out of Your Mind and into your Life for Teenagers: A Guide to Living an Extraordinary Life, and also – The Thriving Adolescent: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Positive Psychology to Help Teens Manage Emotions, Achieve Goals, and Build Connection. A new book for teenagers using DNA-V will be out soon. Together with Joseph Ciarrochi she conducts research and treatment development; her latest work is DNA-v, a treatment model based on CBS. Louise is also an active clinician, working with adult and adolescents in private practice. She is also an active humanitarian, taking mental health professionals into the Himalaya to develop their mindfulness skills and raising funds for poor children in remote Nepal. For more information on Louise go to – www.louisehayes.com.au or www.thrivingadolescent.com

How we can use the broad platform of CBS to build depth into models of human development

The talk will describe how contextual behavioural science, as a science with breadth and depth, can be applied far wider than the common ACT hexagon model. This is especially so when we apply it to the lifespan and adaptation of humans. A broad CBS focus allows us to consider how growth is influenced by developmental life history, including: attachment to others, behavioural and symbolic learning, social, cultural and physical environments. A broad focus requires us to step out of our known literature and applications and into other theoretical and empirical literature. In this talk, we will look at how this approach was taken to build a cohesive CBS model of human development and growth called DNA-v (Hayes, L & Ciarrochi, J. 2015). The talk will share how difficult it can be to step out of what we know, and how much growth there is once we do. With DNA-V we have begun to examine growth and development as a lifelong task, from infancy to death.


 

Invited Speakers

Jan De Houwer, Ph.D., Ghent University

After receiving his PhD from the University of Leuven (Belgium) in 1997, Jan De Houwer was a Lecturer at the University of Southampton (UK) from 1998 to 2001. Since 2001, he is works at Ghent University (Belgium) where he heads the Learning and Implicit Processes Laboratory. His research is related to the manner in which spontaneous (automatic) preferences are learned and can be measured. Regarding the learning of preferences, he focuses on the role of stimulus pairings (associative learning). Jan De Houwer (co-)authored more than 300 publications in international journals including “Psychological Bulletin” and “Behavioral and Brain Sciences”. He was co-editor of the journal “Cognition and Emotion” and is a member of the editorial board of several journals including “Journal of Experimental Psychology: General”, “Psychological Bulletin”, and “Personality and Social Psychology Review”.

Complex learning: How multiple environmental regularities jointly influence behavior

Learning can be defined as the impact of environmental regularities on behavior. Complex learning refers to situations in which multiple regularities jointly influence behavior. One possibility is that the effect of one regularity is moderated by another regularity, as is the case when two regularities intersect (i.e., have elements in common). A second possibility is that meta-regularities (regularities in the presence of regularities) influence behavior. Meta-regularities are particularly interesting because they allow for relational learning, that is, learning about the relation between elements. For instance, just as stimuli can acquire different functions (e.g., function as a discriminative stimulus or contextual relational cue) so too can relations. This idea opens up new questions about the conditions under which relations can acquire functions. Moreover, it is in line with the proposal that seemingly simple forms of learning are in fact instances of arbitrarily applicable relational responding.


Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Andrew Gloster is a professor at the University of Basel, Switzerland where he heads the Division of Clinical Psychology and Intervention Science. He has published over 80 scientific papers and several books and treatment manuals. His contextual behavioral science research program has empirically tested numerous aspects of the CBS model including clinical trials, public health, biological, and genetic variables, pro-social behaviors in groups, and technological interventions. He is a licensed psychotherapist, a passionate mentor and trainer, and President of the Association of Contextual Behavioral Science Foundation.

From Individuals, to Groups, and up to the Population: Implementing Intervention Science Across Multiple Contexts

Contextual science aims to understand human behavior, including behavior involved in ACT therapy. To date, a large majority of CBS research has focused on ACT trials. This growth is both important and impressive. But how well do CBS principles apply beyond the therapy room? This question will be explored by examining empirical evidence across multi-levels of analysis and multiple contexts. A Multi-level approach to scientific development holds the promise that a few salient principles will apply across contexts of human behavior and that when they are targeted, will reliably result in useful change. The multi-level approach is not without challenges, however. In this talk I will review empirical studies from across levels of analysis that highlight the promises and challenges of this approach. For example, studies that included biological variables will be examined to identify clues about conditions that promote vs. inhibit psychological flexibility. Epidemiological evidence will be presented that explores how and when the CBS model applies at the population level. Evidence from clinical trials will be examined that offers insight about how to intervene with treatment non-responders and simultaneously explore the conditions that promote implementation at the system level. Finally, these elements will be tied together by examining a micro-intervention that may be utilized with small groups to promote pro-sociality.


Inez Myin-Germeys, Ph.D., KU Leuven, Center for Contextual Psychiatry

Inez Myin-Germeys studied Psychology at the KU Leuven in Belgium and then moved to Maastricht University in the Netherlands were she did her PhD on the topic 'The primacy of context'. In 2010 she was appointed full professor of Ecological Psychiatry at Maastricht University.

In 2015, she moved back to KU Leuven where she started the Center for Contextual Psychiatry, a research center with currently about 30 researchers. She is an international authority in the field of Experience Sampling Methodology and in the field of psychosis research. She has published over 350 papers and was recipient of an ERC consolidator grant.

A contextual approach to psychiatry: Momentary Assessment and Intervention

Psychopathological symptoms are natural experiences emerging in the realm of ordinary daily life, often in interaction with contextual factors. In the mental health field, there is a growing awareness that the study of these symptoms in the context of everyday life, using Experience Sampling Methodology, may provide a powerful and necessary addition to more conventional research approaches. In my talk, I will first focus the assessment of the capacity for social interaction as an important factor in the development of psychopathology. I will discuss these findings in light of the conceptual development of embodied and embedded cognition.

Next, I will focus on the added value of digital technology to augment the effects of therapy in the daily life of patients. We have developed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in Daily Life, in which patients will be provided with an app after each session with their therapist to practice and integrate these new skills in their normal daily life. I will present the first results of the INTERACT study, a randomized clinical trial of ACT in DL in 150 individuals at the early stages of psychosis.


Ruth Anne Rehfeldt, Ph.D., Southern Illinois University

Dr. Rehfeldt holds a BA in psychology from the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, WA (1993), and masters and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Nevada (1998), where she was a student of Dr. Linda J. Hayes. Dr. Rehfeldt has published over 100 articles and book chapters in behavior analysis, many of which included students as co-authors. Her expertise focuses specifically on basic and applied investigations of verbal behavior, Relational Frame Theory, and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. She co-edited a book with Yvonne Barnes-Holmes entitled, Derived Relational Responding: Applications for Learners with Autism and other Developmental Disabilities, and is currently co-editing a text on applied behavior analysis of language and cognition with Jonathan Tarbox, Mitch Fryling, and Linda Hayes. Dr. Rehfeldt served as the editor and business manager for The Psychological Record for 12 years. She is or has been an editorial board member for a number of behavior analytic journals, including Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis and The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, and has held a number of leadership positions within the Association for Behavior Analysis International. Dr. Rehfeldt has been a professor in the Behavior Analysis and Therapy program at Southern Illinois University for nineteen years, and is currently Interim Director of the Rehabilitation Institute. She is also the coordinator of University accreditation and is a trained peer reviewer with the Higher Learning Commission, which is a regional institutional accreditor. Dr. Rehfeldt has won a number of teaching and research awards during her time at Southern Illinois University. 

Toward an Effective and Relevant Science of Behavior

The controversy over whether behavior analysts should not only examine, but intervene on, private events has not ended. Reluctance to incorporate analyses of covert language processes into applied behavior analyses has limited our field’s scope. Large societal problems flourish, often due to the unique abilities of humans to verbally discount delayed and probabilistic outcomes. The purpose of this presentation is to discuss how the concepts encompassed by functional contextualism can be applied to several very diverse areas of social concern, including: 1) staff optimism and compassion in human service settings; 2) health prevention behaviors; and 3) marine conservation. I will articulate the often underappreciated relationship between relational learning and psychological inflexibility and experiential avoidance, and will describe how concepts such as acceptance, values, and committed actions can have an impact in building the adaptive repertoires needed to resolve a number of small and large-scale issues of social significance. 


Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Francisco J. Ruiz received his doctoral degree in Psychology in Universidad de Almería (Spain) under the supervision of Dr. Carmen Luciano. He worked in several Spanish universities before accepting a professor position in Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz (Colombia) in 2015. In this position, he designed one of the first Ph.D. programs in Psychology in the country and has been awarded as “Distinguished Researcher” of the institution. He has published more than 60 scientific articles focused on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT). During the last few years, he and his colleagues are developing a model of ACT that focuses on dismantling dysfunctional patterns of repetitive negative thinking (RNT). This model incorporates previous research on Clinical RFT and new empirical developments.

Interfacing Research on Clinical RFT and ACT: The Case of RNT-Focused ACT

A unique characteristic of ACT is the possibility of being updated and enhanced according to the clinically-relevant research conducted within RFT. However, empirical research on Clinical RFT is still relatively scarce and the findings are being incorporated in ACT texts and protocols in a slow pace. This invited address aims to present a historical overview of the empirical research on Clinical RFT and its recent developments to show how these findings can be integrated into ACT. This will be discussed in the context of the development of a model of ACT that focuses on dismantling dysfunctional patterns of repetitive negative thinking (RNT) such as worry and rumination. This model is called RNT-focused ACT and interfaces previous research on Clinical RFT and new empirical and theoretical developments. The empirical evidence of this model already accumulates ten clinical studies that have shown the high efficacy of (very) brief RNT-focused ACT protocols in areas such as adult and children emotional disorders, clinical psychology trainees, gifted children with school difficulties, and adolescents with deficits in interpersonal problem-solving skills.

ACBS staff

Offsite Networking Event & Poster Session - Saint Patrick's Cathedral

Offsite Networking Event & Poster Session - Saint Patrick's Cathedral

As a fun networking event, ACBS is organizing a networking event and poster session on 27 June, 2019 at the Saint Patrick's Cathedral.

This event is complimentary for ACBS World Conference registrants, and included with your registration. Guest tickets may be purchased below.


What: Networking Event and Poster Sessions

When: 27 June, 2019 at 18:45-21:00 

Where: Saint Patrick's Cathedral (buses leave DCU 18:15; return buses leave St. Patrick's 20:45/21:00) (guest transportation/tickets available below)

Cost: €30 Euros per Adult; €20 Euros per child (6+ years) (child ticket does not include "drink tickets", soft drinks/ water included)

 

Guest Tickets not available for purchase onsite after 13:00, Wednesday, 26 June.

 (Entry includes St. Patrick's Cathedral entry, light appetizers, three drink tickets, and motor coach transportation to/from DCU.) 

Anonymous (not verified)

Pre-Conference Workshops for WC17

Pre-Conference Workshops for WC17

25-26 June, Dublin, Ireland

Unforgettable. Inspiring. Cutting-edge. Inviting. ACBS Pre-Conference Workshops are well-known as a source for world-class CBS, evidence-based trainings. Here is the heart of ACBS. Where therapists and researchers of all ages sharpen their skills, and push their limits. Where expert trainers from across the globe converge as a creative force aiming to shape and support all those in attendance. Where life-long friends reconnect, or meet for the first time.

What to Expect

The 2019 Pre-Conference Workshops offer exciting new opportunities that will engage therapists and researchers of any skill level. Highlights include:

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT): Participate in experiential and didactic workshops to learn this empirically supported therapy
Relational Frame Theory (RFT): Apply this modern perspective on cognition and language to your own research or practice
Exposure Response Prevention Therapy (ERP): Explore the application of ERP for anxiety with youth and adults with couples
Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT): Engage compassionate emotions within your clients with a processed-based approach
Prosocial: Use Prosocial concepts to build productive and collaborative relations within and between groups

Combining therapy role-plays, experiential exercises, case presentations, data graphics, focused lectures, and small group discussions, you can expect high-quality training from ACBS Pre-Conference Workshops. Continuing Education Credits are available.

Be sure to review the list of workshops below to see your full list of options.

When, Where, and How Much?

These workshops will be held the two days immediately preceding the ACBS World Conference 17.

Tuesday, 25 June, 2019 - 9:00 - 17:15
Wednesday, 26 June, 2019 - 9:00 - 17:15

They will be held at the DCU Helix on the Dublin City University campus in Dublin, Ireland.

More general Registration information can be found here.

Above prices include lunch each day, twice daily coffee/tea on site, and a general certificate of attendance.

*(US Dollar amount is provided for information only and may be updated from week to week based on current exchange rates. Euro (EUR) amount will not change. If your bank account or credit card is in EUR, and your bank charges a currency transaction fee to USD, you may see a slight variation in the amount charged, based on the day's exchange rate.)

Additional information about registrations, refunds, etc., can be found here.


Learn about the specific workshops here.

ACBS staff

Complete List of Pre-Conference Workshops - WC17 Dublin

Complete List of Pre-Conference Workshops - WC17 Dublin

ACBS World Conference 17, Pre-Conference Workshops - Register now!

25-26 June, 2-day workshops:

Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D., Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.,Colin Harte, M.Sc.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D., Bryan Roche, Ph.D., Evelyn Gould, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA, Giovambattista Presti, M.D., Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate)

Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D., Eric Morris, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

lore m. dickey, Ph.D., Aisling Leonard-Curtin, M.Sc., C.Psychol., Ps.S.I.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate)

Russ Harris
(Beginner)

Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D.
(Clinical, Research; Intermediate, Advanced)

Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., Laura Silberstein, Psy.D., Mary Welford, D.Clin.Psy.
(Clinical; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Matthieu Villatte, Ph.D., Robyn Walser, Ph.D.
(Clinical; Intermediate, Advanced)

David Sloan Wilson, Ph.D., Paul Atkins, Ph.D., Monique Silva, Lori Wiser, M.B.A., Ian MacDonald, Ph.D.
(Clinical, Research; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

Kelly Wilson, Ph.D.
(Clinical, Research; Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced)

ACBS staff

ACT Made Simple: A Quick Start Guide To ACT Basics and Beyond

ACT Made Simple: A Quick Start Guide To ACT Basics and Beyond

ACT Made Simple: A Quick Start Guide To ACT Basics and Beyond

 
Workshop Leader: 
Russ Harris
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

Russ has a unique model for training, which he calls ‘ACT Made Simple’, because it covers so much material in a short space of time. He proudly proclaims each workshop a ‘jargon-free zone’ – and bases his training on three core values: simplicity, clarity, and having fun.
In this beginners-level workshop, you will learn how to apply ACT simply, quickly and effectively in clinical practice. By the end of two days, you will know:

  • The six core principles of ACT, and how to adapt them to different clinical populations
  • Five powerful tools to develop and strengthen psychological acceptance
  • Ten powerful ways to rapidly reduce the believability of negative thoughts (without challenging them)
  • A sound understanding of mindfulness, and how to use it therapeutically
  • How to innovate your own mindfulness techniques
  • How to effectively utilise ACT in a wide variety of clinical problems
  • How to effectively use interventions based on metaphor, paradox and experiential exercises
  • How to apply ACT in your own life, to create a sense of vitality, meaning and fulfilment
  • How to use ACT to help you cope with the stresses of difficult clients
  • How to access and experience a transcendent sense of self
  • How to fundamentally change your relationship with unwanted thoughts and feelings
  • How to help clients connect with their core values, and take committed action
  • How to use the "choice point" tool to map and structure your sessions
  • How to develop self-compassion in yourself and your clients

About Russ Harris, Ph.D.: 

Russ Harris, author of the international best-selling self-help book ‘The Happiness Trap’, is a world-renowned trainer of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT). Russ’s background is in medicine. As a GP he became increasingly interested in the psychological aspects of health and wellbeing, and increasingly disenchanted with writing prescriptions. Ultimately this interest led to a total career change. He now works in two different, yet complementary roles – as a therapist and as a coach.

Since 2005, Russ has run over 600 workshops and provided ACT training for over 30,000 health professionals, including therapists, coaches, counselors, doctors, and psychologists. He has authored three ACT textbooks (including ACT Made Simple), and four ACT-based self-help books (including The Reality Slap). He has also been co-author of a further two self-help books. The Happiness Trap, is now the most widely-translated ACT book in the world, with over 600,000 copies sold worldwide, and editions in over 30 languages.

Russ has a unique model for training, which he calls ‘ACT Made Simple’, because it covers so much material in a short space of time. He proudly proclaims each workshop a ‘jargon-free zone’ – and bases his training on three core values: simplicity, clarity, and having fun. His highly-acclaimed ACT workshops are brief, powerful, and life-enhancing. Participants regularly report not only major improvements in their therapy and/or coaching, but also in their personal lives – and evaluation forms frequently praise his ability to make complex ideas seem very simple.  

Learning Objectives:
By the end of this workshop you will know:

  1. The basic core processes of the ACT model
  2. How to develop and strengthen psychological acceptance
  3. A range of techniques for defusion from difficult thoughts
  4. Flexible ways of using mindfulness therapeutically without meditation
  5. How to use interventions based on metaphor, paradox and experiential exercises
  6. How to apply ACT in your own life, to cope with stress and increase fulfilment
  7. How to access and experience a transcendent sense of self
  8. How to help clients connect with their core values, and take committed action
  9. How to use the "choice point" tool to map and structure your sessions
  10. How to develop self-compassion in yourself and your clients 

Target Audience: Beginner

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

ACT, Clinical RFT, and ERP: Getting Under the Hood of Exposure-Based Treatment

ACT, Clinical RFT, and ERP: Getting Under the Hood of Exposure-Based Treatment

ACT, Clinical RFT, and ERP: Getting Under the Hood of Exposure-Based Treatment

 
Workshop Leader:
Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D.
Eric Morris, Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

Epidemiological studies have estimated a lifetime prevalence rate of 28.8% for anxiety disorders (Kessler et al, 2005), and a recent meta-analysis of 87 studies across 44 countries estimated the global current prevalence of anxiety disorders at 7.3% (4.8–10.9%, adjusted for methodological differences across studies; Baxter, Scott, Vos, & Whiteford, 2013). While exposure-based treatment for anxiety and OCD in youth and adult populations has robust empirical support, there is room for improvement. In terms of outcomes, intent-to-treat analyses suggest that approximately 1 in 5 individuals drop out of exposure treatment (Hofmann and Smits, 2008; Ong et al. 2016), and a significant proportion either do not improve or relapse (eg Ginsburg et al., 2014; 2018). Moreover, clinicians are unlikely to use exposure-based treatment even when it is needed (Freihart et al, 2004; Deacon et al., 2013; Sars & Van Minnen, 2015), due to their own experiential avoidance (Meyer et al., 2014; Scher, Herbert & Forman 2015). To complicate matters, simply adding ACT to ERP does not lead to demonstrably improved outcomes (Twohig et al., 2018). So, while exposure works, it could work better, and clinicians could get much more skilled and flexible in its use. Very likely, this will take a patient-centered “microanalytic approach” (Twohig et al., 2018) to improve outcomes of exposure-based approaches.

That is the focus of this 2-day workshop: we hope to get “under the hood” of how exposure-based treatments work at the level of basic learning processes; to explore clinicians’ common myths and barriers to offering and “flexibly persisting” in using exposure-based treatment; and to demonstrate how to use ACT and clinical RFT to help enhance exposure-based treatment in developmentally sensitive ways for youths and adults. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and more specifically, clinical RFT, may be used to design and implement individualized exposure-based treatment across anxiety and OCD. Thus, this two-day workshop will teach how clinicians may use ACT and clinical RFT to enhance exposure-based treatment through supporting curiosity, willingness, and flexibility with individual cases across anxiety disorders and OCD. Specifically, the presenters will a) discuss behavioral (inhibitory learning) and neurobiological models of fear and uncertainty and exposure-based treatment; b) teach how to conduct exposure-based treatment with various presentations of anxiety and OCD; c) give an overview of ACT and its evidence-base; and c) demonstrate how to incorporate specific ACT interventions into flexible exposure to strengthen and contextualize inhibitory learning, d) address clinicians’ own barriers to consistently and effectively offer exposure-based treatments (knowledge, clinician psychological flexibility, myths about ERP). Participants will be given opportunities to engage in experiential exercises, role- and real-plays, and case discussions in which to practice the principles taught. Clinical examples will be used to illustrate therapeutic techniques, in addition to the workshop’s didactic content.

References

Baxter, A. J., Scott, K. M., Vos, T., & Whiteford, H. A. (2013). Global prevalence of anxiety disorders: a systematic review and meta-regression. Psychological Medicine, 43(5), 897-910.

Deacon, B. J., Farrell, N. R., Kemp, J. J., Dixon, L. J., Sy, J. T., Zhang, A. R., & McGrath, P. B. (2013). Assessing therapist reservations about exposure therapy for anxiety disorders: The Therapist Beliefs about Exposure Scale. Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 27(8), 772–80.

Freiheit, S. R., Vye, C., Swan, R., & Cady, M. (2004). Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety: Is Dissemination Working? the Behavior Therapist, 27(2), 25-32.

Ginsburg, G. S., Becker, E. M., Keeton, C. P., Sakolsky, D., Piacentini, J., Albano, A. M., Compton, S. N., Iyengar, S.,Sullivan, K., Caporino, N., Peris, T., Birmaher, B., Rynn, M., March, J., Kendall, P. C., (2014). Naturalistic follow-up of youths treated for pediatric anxiety disorders. Journal of the American Medical Association Psychiatry, 71(3),310-318.

Ginsburg, G. S., Becker-Haimes, E. M., Keeton, C., Kendall, P. C., Iyengar, S., Sakolsky, D., Albano, A. M., Peris, T., Compton, S. N., Piacentini, J. (2018) Results from the child/adolescent anxiety multimodal extended long-term study (CAMELS): primary anxiety outcomes. Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, 57 (7), 471-480.

Hofmann, S. G., & Smits, J. A. (2008). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for adult anxiety disorders: a meta-analysis of randomized placebo-controlled trials. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry, 69(4), 621-632.

Kessler, R. C., Berglund, P., Demler, O., Jin, R., Merikangas, K. R., Walters, E. E. (2005). Lifetime prevalence and age-of-onset distributions of DSM-IV disorders in the National Comorbidity Survey Replication, Archives of General Psychiatry, 62(6), 593-602.

Meyer, J. M., Farrell, N. R., Kemp, J. J., Blakey, S. M., & Deacon, B. J. (2014). Why do clinicians exclude anxious clients from exposure therapy? Behaviour Research and Therapy, 54(1), 49–53.

Ong, C. W., Clyde, J. W., Bluett, E. J., Levin, M. E., & Twohig, M. P. (2016). Dropout rates in exposure with response prevention for obsessive-compulsive disorder: What do the data really say? Journal of Anxiety Disorders, 40(1), 8 – 17.

Sars, D., & Van Minnen, A. (2015). On the use of exposure therapy in the treatment of anxiety disorders: a survey among cognitive behavioural therapists in the Netherlands, BMC Psychol 3 (1), 26.

Scher, Herbert & Forman 2015 Scherr, S. R., Herbert, J. D., & Forman, E. M. (2015). The role of therapist experiential avoidance in predicting therapist preference for exposure treatment for OCD. Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, 4(1), 21-29.

Twohig, M. P.; Abramowitz, J. S.; Smith, B. M.; Fabricant, L. E.; Jacoby, R. J.; Morrison, K. L.; Bluett, E. J.; Reuman, L.; Blakey, S. M.; and Ledermann, T. (2018). Adding acceptance and commitment therapy to exposure and response prevention for obsessive-compulsive disorder: a randomized controlled trial, Psychology Faculty Publications. Paper 1755. https://digitalcommons.usu.edu/psych_facpub/1755 

About Lisa Coyne, Ph.D.: 

Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D. is a licensed clinical psychologist who has worked to improve the psychological well-being of children, teens and families for nearly 20 years. After teaching as a tenured professor in the APA-Accredited Clinical Psychology at Suffolk University for 9 years, she is an Assistant Professor at Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, where she founded the McLean Child and Adolescent OCD Institute (OCDI Jr.). She has also founded the New England Center for OCD and Anxiety (NECOA), a specialty clinic serving children, adolescents, and adults with anxiety and OCD. She is a peer-reviewed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Trainer, and a Faculty member of the Behavior Therapy Training Institute (BTTI) of the International OCD Foundation (IOCDF). She has published numerous peer-reviewed articles and chapters on anxiety, OCD, and parenting and is the author of The Joy of Parenting: An Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Guide to Effective Parenting in the Early Years.

About Eric Morris, Ph.D.:

Eric Morris is the Director of the La Trobe University Psychology Clinic. He is a clinical psychologist and researcher based in Melbourne, registered to practice in Australia. He has been practising Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for nearly 20 years, including supervising and training therapists using contextual cognitive behavioural therapies. He is a founding member and a former chair of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Special Interest Group (ACTSIG) of the British Association for Behavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapies. Dr. Morris has also served as a Board member and President of the Australia & New Zealand Chapter of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science. He is a co-editor of a book on ACT and mindfulness therapies for psychosis (published by Wiley-Blackwell in April 2013), co-author of a self-help guide, ACTivate Your Life: Using Acceptance and Mindfulness to Build a Life that is Rich, Fulfilling and Fun (published by Constable & Robinson in March 2015) and co-author of a groups manual ACT for Psychosis Recovery (published by New Harbinger in March 2018).

Learning Objectives:

Following this workshop participants will be able to:

  1. Describe how an approach to exposure based on ACT and clinical RFT differs from exposure conducted from a traditional habituation rationale
  2. Engage in useful discussion around common exposure myths and have ways to engage clients, colleagues and services in supporting evidence-based use of exposure
  3. Engage clients and their caregivers in effective rationales for exposure-based therapy, based on a psychological flexibility paradigm, and with attention to developmental differences across children, adolescents, and adults
  4. Prepare and utilize the process of a functional behavioural assessment and case conceptualization to develop a collaborative exposure plan with clients
  5. Demonstrate how to develop therapeutic relationship characterized by acceptance, values, compassion and commitment, that supports the client in engaging in exposure-based treatment
  6. Apply various methods suggested by the inhibitory learning paradigm to enhance exposure-based treatment, including using multiple contextual cues, stimulus variability. exposure menus, affect labelling, etc.
  7. Engage clients using valuing as action and direction to “contextualise” exposure and place exposure-based tasks under appetitive control
  8. Use clinical RFT methods to enhance tracking and contact with contingencies to usefully explore expectancy violation
  9. Use clinical RFT methods to foster flexible perspective-taking to enhance engagement in exposure tasks and promote functional senses of self
  10. Assess progress in exposure-based treatment using within-task and across-session methods 

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Advances in RFT: Implications for Clinical Behavior Analysis

Advances in RFT: Implications for Clinical Behavior Analysis

Advances in RFT: Implications for Clinical Behavior Analysis

 
Workshop Leader:
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.
Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D.
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.
Colin Harte, M.Sc.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

The overarching aim of the workshop is to explore the implications of recent conceptual advances in RFT for clinical practice, especially in ACT. The workshop will be divided into 3 parts. Part 1 will examine “cutting-edge” developments in RFT, focusing on the Hyper-Dimensional Multi-Level (HDML) framework for analyzing the dynamics of arbitrarily applicable relational responding (AARR). Part 2 will illustrate how the HDML framework may be used to facilitate links between RFT and clinical assessment and treatment, with working examples. Part 3 will elaborate on Part 2 using real case material and role plays, provided by both workshop leaders and workshop attendees.

Attendees are strongly encouraged to bring with them an example of one of their own clinical cases.

About Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.: 

Since October 2015, Dr. Yvonne Barnes-Holmes has been the Senior Research Fellow of an Odysseus I Award on “Toward a Relational Frame Theory Account of Human Psychopathology within a Functional-Cognitive Framework” and Associate Professor in Behaviour Analysis, both at the Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University. She was formerly tenured faculty, including Head of Department, at the Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland Maynooth since 2003. She graduated from the latter in 2001 after completing an experimental Ph.D entitled Analysing relational frames: Studying language and cognition in young children. Since 2001, she has been involved in attracting 4million+ euros in funding. She is supervising or has graduated 19 doctorates and 7 Masters. She has published 120+ articles and book chapters and given 400+ talks and workshops. She is a recognized World Trainer in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Her areas of research interest include: the development of language and cognition; functional analyses of psychological suffering, especially depression, PTSD and psychosis; Behavioural and cognitive psychotherapies, especially acceptance and change therapies; and Critical psychology/psychiatry.

About Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D.:

Since October 2015, Dr. Ciara McEnteggart has been a postdoctoral researcher of Odysseus at the Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University. Ciara graduated from the Department of Psychology, National University of Ireland Maynooth in 2015 after completing an experimental Ph.D under the supervision of Dr. Yvonne Barnes-Holmes on an experimental analysis of voice hearing. To date, Ciara has published 28 articles and 7 book chapters which center around the conceptual development of Relational Frame Theory and the understanding of human psychological suffering and its alleviation. Ciara’s research interests center around the conceptual development of Relational Frame Theory (RFT; a basic account of human language and cognition), and how such developments can facilitate a deeper understanding of human psychological suffering and its alleviation. As part of the Odysseus project, the team are investigating various relational features of human behavior and how they may function in psychological suffering (e.g. the impact of rules on behavior, relational perspective-taking, distinctions between fear and avoidance), with the principal aim of creating a functional taxonomy of various patterns of suffering. In parallel, Ciara is also working on a number of clinical conceptual developments, for example, how RFT can both inform and enhance clinical work in areas such as assessment, interventions, and the therapeutic relationship. More specifically, Ciara recently offered a relational frame account of dissociation and its relationship with hearing voices in psychosis using a trauma-based developmental model. Creating linkages between the basic science and clinical applications is central to her research and clinical work.

About Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D.:

Dr. Dermot Barnes-Holmes graduated from the University of Ulster in 1985 with a B.Sc. in Psychology and in 1990 with a D.Phil. in behavior analysis. His first tenured position was in the Department of Applied Psychology at University College Cork, where he founded and led the Behavior Analysis and Cognitive Science unit. In 1999 he accepted the foundation professorship in psychology and head-of-department position at the National University of Ireland Maynooth. In 2015 he accepted a life-time senior professorship at Ghent University in Belgium. Dr. Barnes-Holmes is known internationally for the analysis of human language and cognition through the development of Relational Frame Theory with Steven C. Hayes, and its application in various psychological settings. He was the world's most prolific author in the experimental analysis of human behavior between the years 1980 and 1999. He was awarded the Don Hake Translational Research Award in 2012 by the American Psychological Association, is a past president and fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science, is a fellow of the Association for Behavior Analysis, International, is a recipient of the Quad-L Lecture Award from the University of New Mexico and most recently became an Odysseus laureate when he received an Odysseus Type 1 award from the Flemish Science Foundation in Belgium.

About Colin Harte, M.Sc.:

Colin’s primary research interest is in the analysis of arbitrarily applicable derived relational responding (AARR) as defined by Relational Frame Theory (RFT). He is particularly interested in the way in which RFT can be used to develop a basic account of rule governed-behaviour. Namely, the potential impact of derived rules, and the dynamics of AARR generally (i.e. level of derivation, coherence, complexity and flexibility), on creating and maintaining this type of behaviour (i.e. persistence in rule-following). As such, the title of his doctoral dissertation is “The role of learning through derived rules or instructions in creating maladaptive behaviours in non-clinical, clinical and sub-clinical populations”. Other interests include Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), and the clinical implications of RFT for the understanding and treatment of human psychological suffering.

Learning Objectives:
Attendees will be able to:

  1. Describe the levels of the HDML framework for RFT
  2. Describe the dimensions of the HDML framework
  3. Provide examples of how relating within the HDML is relevant to clinical behavior analysis
  4. Provide examples of how orienting within the HDML is relevant to clinical behavior analysis
  5. Provide examples of how evoking within the HDML is relevant to clinical behavior analysis
  6. Understand how the HDML can assist with the functional assessment of clinically relevant verbal behavior
  7. Understand how the HDML can assist with functional analyses of clinically relevant verbal behavior
  8. Learn to apply the HDML in the assessment of clinical behavior
  9. Learn to apply the HDML in the treatment of clinical behavior
  10. Begin to use the HDML in clinical case studies 

Target Audience: Advanced

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

CBT, ACT, and the Coming Era of Process-Based Therapy

CBT, ACT, and the Coming Era of Process-Based Therapy

CBT, ACT, and the Coming Era of Process-Based Therapy

 
Workshop Leader: 
Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.
Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

For decades, evidence-based therapy has been defined in terms of scientifically validated protocols focused on syndromes. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) has historically been identified with that approach, but it is rapidly changing. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has long taken a more process-based approach in its adherence to a psychological flexibility model. A process-focus is now emerging for a number of methods within the family of CBT as the era of “protocols for syndromes” passes away. This workshop will feature didactic presentations, demonstration of practical strategies, “real plays,” and exercises focused on how to utilize the core competencies of both ACT and CBT more generally in a pragmatic way that honors the behavioral, cognitive, and acceptance and mindfulness wings of the tradition. The approach that results represents a new form of idiographic functional analysis guided by models that integrate a coherent set of change processes. PBT is not a new therapy – it is a new model of evidence-based therapy more generally that alters how we thing about all existing forms of evidence-based intervention. Attendees will leave the workshop better able to manage the gap between ACT and other forms of CBT, or indeed evidence-based work from any competing model, and to apply a broader range of change processes to their cases nested under the consilience provided by a functional contextual evolutionary account.

Recommended readings:
Hayes, S. C. & Hofmann, S. G. (2017). The third wave of CBT and the rise of process-based care. World Psychiatry, 16, 245-246. doi: 10.102/wps.20442
Hayes, S. C. & Hofmann, S. G. (Eds.) (2018). Process-based CBT: The science and core clinical competencies of cognitive behavioral therapy. Oakland, CA: New Harbinger Publications. ISBN-13: 978-1626255968.
Hofmann, S. G. & Hayes, S. C. (in press). The future of intervention science: Process based therapy. Clinical Psychological Science. Doi: 10.1177/2167702618772296
Hayes, S. C., Hofmann, S. G., Stanton, C. E., Carpenter, J. K., Sanford, B. T., Curtiss, J. E., & Ciarrochi, J. (in press). The role of the individual in the coming era of process-based therapy. Behaviour Research and Therapy. DOI: 10.1016/j.brat.2018.10.005

About Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D.: 

Steven C. Hayes is Nevada Foundation Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada. An author of 44 books and over 625 scientific articles, his career has focused on an analysis of the nature of human language and cognition and its application of the understanding and alleviation of human suffering. He is the developer of Relational Frame Theory, an account of human higher cognition, and has guided its extension to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Dr. Hayes has been President of Division 25 of the APA, the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies, and the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science. He was the first Secretary-Treasurer of the Association for Psychological Science, and served a 5-year term on the National Advisory Council for Drug Abuse in NIH. His work has been recognized by several awards including the Exemplary Contributions to Basic Behavioral Research and Its Applications from Division 25 of APA, the Impact of Science on Application award from the Society for the Advancement of Behavior Analysis, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapy. Google Scholar data ranks him as among the top most cited scholars in all areas of study (http://www.webometrics.info/en/node/58). For more information visit www.stevenchayes.com

About Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D.:

Stefan G. Hofmann, Ph.D. is professor of psychology at the Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, where he directs the Psychotherapy and Emotion Research Laboratory. He has an actively funded research program studying various aspects of emotional disorders with a particular emphasis on anxiety disorders and cognitive behavioral therapy. He has won many prestigious professional awards, including the Aaron T. Beck Award for Significant and Enduring Contributions to the Field of Cognitive Therapy by the Academy of Cognitive Therapy and the Alexander von Humboldt Research Award. He is a fellow of the APA and APS and was president of various national and international professional societies, including the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies and the International Association for Cognitive Psychotherapy. He was also an advisor to the DSM-5 Development Process and a member of the DSM-5 Anxiety Disorder Sub-Work Group. Dr. Hofmann has been identified as a Highly Cited Researcher by Thomson Reuters. He is currently editor of Cognitive Therapy and Research and associate editor of Clinical Psychological Science. He has published more than 300 peer-reviewed journal articles and 15 books. For more information, visit http://www.bostonanxiety.org/

Learning Objectives:
After this workshop you will be able:

  1. to describe the limitations and weaknesses of the contemporary medical model
  2. to distinguish different treatment models in CBT and their underlying philosophies as they bear on the key processes to target
  3. to show that you can apply an understanding of the core processes of ACT and of CBT more generally to cases
  4. to describe how PBT approach can lead to an idiographic, functional diagnostic system that has treatment utility
  5. to link a process-based case analysis of evidence-based intervention kernels.
  6. to describe the implications of ergodic assumptions for the collection of process-based evidence
  7. to demonstrate an ability to turn case information into a preliminary but testable network analysis of the case
  8. to list ways of measuring key change processes of a case
  9. to diagram a case conceptualization network
  10. to describe how ACT meets the key features of a process-based therapy

Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical, Research

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

Doing Experiential and Process-Based Therapy - CLOSED

Doing Experiential and Process-Based Therapy - CLOSED

Doing Experiential and Process-Based Therapy

This workshop has closed due to reaching its registration maximum.


 
Workshop Leader: 
Matthieu Villatte, Ph.D.
Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

In acceptance and commitment therapy as well as other third-wave therapies the combination of mindfulness, values, and behavioral commitment processes have well -served clients to make positive life change. While wide dissemination of these interventions has occurred over the past decade, their application within a truly experiential and process-oriented framework often remains challenging for therapists. The desire for transparency, the need to make rapid progress, the requirements to rely heavily on manualized protocols, or simply the difficulty of transforming theoretical knowledge into concrete practice as well as a focus on techniques disconnected from process, can lead therapists to be too directive and didactic, or conversely, abstract and confusing. The larger processes occurring within and across the therapy can be lost to techniques and standard exercises. The experiential nature and process of therapy no longer bringing vitality to the work. The opportunity to develop the autonomy of clients in the sometimes subtle and pragmatic observation of their experience and the flexible and effective practice of the clinician is thereby undermined. Experiential techniques lose their power of deep transformation; exchanges become less personal and meaningful; therapeutic work becomes less interesting and satisfying even to the therapist, and the therapeutic relationship is lost to application of impersonal procedures.

The goal of this training is to assist you in developing or furthering your skill in experiential and process-oriented practice. Focus on the therapeutic relationship with emphasis on recognizing interpersonal and intrapersonal processes that can guide intervention will be explored. We will build on the principles of contextual behavioral science and relational frame theory, which have been particularly well developed for clinical work in ACT, but are adaptable to all 3rd wave approaches (ex. Mindfulness-based therapies, dialectical behavior therapy, meta-cognitive therapy) and experiential therapies in general (e.g. psychodynamic, hypnosis, gestalt).

What will you learn in this course?

  • Grounding your clinical practice in a stance of curiosity, openness, and equality.
  • Relying on the therapeutic process rather than on techniques topographically defined to carry your sessions.
  • Doing experiential work grounded in the interpersonal and intrapersonal context.
  • Doing experiential work without reliance on standard metaphors and exercises, in natural conversations with your clients.
  • Selecting, building, and delivering experiential exercises and metaphors that are linked to the client’s experience and housed in the therapeutic relationship.

Through practical exercises, demonstrations, and role plays:

  • You will learn to shape your clients’ ability to be in touch with and observe their own experiences, and to draw conclusions adapted to their personal life choices (e.g. how to evoke observation rather than using didactic psycho-education).
  • You will develop the ability to adapt to any situation without departing from your experiential stance (e.g. how not to fall into excessive explanations or battles of arguments with dependent, rigid, overly compliant or stuck clients).
  • You will learn to engage process inside of an effective interpersonal relationship using experiential exercises and metaphors in a way that strengthens the therapeutic relationship (e.g. how to co-develop metaphors with the client and how to integrate them into a natural conversation).

About Matthieu Villatte, Ph.D.: 

Matthieu Villatte, Ph.D. is an Assistant Professor at Bastyr University in Seattle, WA in the United States.

He obtained his doctoral degree in psychology in France, where he was trained as a clinical psychologist. He moved to the US in 2010 to complete a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Nevada, Reno under the mentorship of Steven Hayes, PhD. He then worked as an assistant professor in clinical psychology at the University of Louisiana and at the Evidence-Based Practice Institute of Seattle for several years. He joined Bastyr University as an Assistant Professor in 2018.

Matthieu Villatte is the author of numerous books and chapters on mindfulness, acceptance, experiential therapies, and contextual behavioral science, such as the first manual published in French on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mastering the Clinical Conversation: Language as Intervention, co-authored by Jennifer Villatte and Steven Hayes.

He is also a peer-reviewed trainer in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy recognized by the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS). He has facilitated over a hundred clinical trainings in the US, Canada, Australia-New Zealand, South America, and Europe. Over the past few years, he has also run dozens of online trainings gathering participants from all continents.

About Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D.:

Robyn D. Walser, Ph.D. is Director of TL Consultation Services, staff at the National Center for PTSD, co-director of the Bay Area Trauma Recovery Center and is Associate Clinical Professor at University of California, Berkeley. As a licensed clinical psychologist, she maintains an international training, consulting and therapy practice. Dr. Walser is an expert in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and has co-authored 4 books on ACT including Learning ACT, 2nd Edition, The Mindful Couple, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for the Treatment of Posttramatic Stress disorder and ACT for Clergy and Pastoral Counselors: Using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy to Bridge Psychological and Spiritual Care. A fifth book: The Heart of ACT will be released in 2019. She also has expertise in traumatic stress and substance abuse and has authored a number of articles, chapters and books on these topics. She has been doing ACT workshops since 1998; training in multiple formats and for multiple client problems. Dr. Walser has presented her research findings and papers at international and national conferences, universities and hospital settings; and she has been invited to international conferences to speak about ACT. She is invested in developing innovative ways to translate science-into-practice and continues to do research and education on dissemination of ACT and other therapies. She has had a number of leadership roles in international and national organizations and she served as Member At Large and President for the Association for Contextual and Behavioral Science.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe and implement the components of the contextual behavioral therapeutic process
  2. Describe and implement the components of the experiential therapeutic stance
  3. Implement techniques connecting the therapeutic process to the client’s life
  4. Describe the components of the experiential work on awareness
  5. Implement process and techniques helping clients observe and describe psychological experiences
  6. Implement process and techniques helping clients track functional relationships among experiences
  7. Demonstrate multiple processes and how to bring them into therapeutic relationship and practice
  8. Implement perspective taking techniques increasing the client’s awareness
  9. Describe the utility of context and how it functions in therapy
  10. Implement techniques to build experiential metaphors with the client
  11. Learn to attend to interpersonal and intrapersonal processes that can help guide the therapy 

Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

Focusing on the Meaning and Development of the Therapeutic Relationship: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Evolution Science

Focusing on the Meaning and Development of the Therapeutic Relationship: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Evolution Science

Focusing on the Meaning and Development of the Therapeutic Relationship: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Evolution Science

 
Workshop Leader: 
Kelly Wilson, Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

+ Therapeutic Relationship
+ Social Toxins
+ Social Network
+ Evolution Science
+ Experiential Learning
+ Multiple Live Demos by Dr. Wilson
+ Directly Relevant to Any Applied Setting

This workshop will feature the work of Dr. Kelly G. Wilson and will focus on the therapeutic relationship and more broadly on social connection in an evolutionary context. Therapeutic relationship is widely recognized as central to effective treatment. This should not surprise us. One of the great commonalities in serious psychological suffering is a sense of isolation, of  not being fully heard, understood, truly known. Sometimes psychological struggles are physically isolating. However, deep loneliness, the experience of being alone, can take hold even when a person appears socially connected. Humans are social mammals, and, for us, social isolation and social hostility are toxins. We tolerate acute instances of social toxins pretty well. However, persistent exposure to social isolation and/or social hostility is a risk factor for virtually every source of disease burden in the modern  world—including both mental health and physical disease burden.

Set in an evolutionary context, the workshop will offer a personal and powerful guide to the therapeutic relationship in from an ACT perspective. What can happen when you slow down, let go of your usual patterns of managing hard content, and shift your attention from fixing and consoling to listening and appreciating? What happens in that relationship when we offer the same quality of attention to the clinical conversation that we offer to our breath in a mindfulness meditation? Clients can be truly heard and, will sometimes, hear themselves for the first time.

Although this workshop will not be an introduction to ACT, it will be delivered in plain language that will be understandable to participants with no background in ACT. No jargon. For those with an ACT background, the workshop will deepen your understanding of ACT principles and your ability to use those principles flexibly to create and enhance therapeutic connection. The workshop will be appropriate for therapy beginners to veteran ACT therapists. The skill sets and sensitivities targeted in this workshop are broadly relevant to human services including all aspects of physical and mental health care, but also to management and education. Researchers are welcome to participate. Deep immersion in ACT processes has the potential to improve our research questions.

The workshop will be densely experiential. Principles will be described briefly, and we will focus our time and attention on practice. We will practice exercises and interviews that can change your interactions with your very next client.

Dr. Wilson will offer multiple live demonstrations to illuminate interviewing method, pace, and targets.  

About Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D.: 

Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., is a Professor of Psychology at the University at Mississippi. He was the Founding President of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science and was among the first cohort of ACBS Fellows. Dr. Wilson has devoted himself to the development and dissemination of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and its underlying theory and philosophy for more than 25 years. He has published more than 90 articles and chapters, as well as 11 books including the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: The Process and  Practice of Mindful Change, Mindfulness for Two, and Things Might Go Terribly, Horribly Wrong. He has central interests in the application of behavioral principles to understanding topics such as purpose, meaning, values, therapeutic relationship, and mindfulness.

Dr. Wilson’s love of teaching resulted in his winning multiple teaching awards at his home institution, including the Elsie M. Hood Award for Undergraduate Teaching and also the University of Mississippi Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching and Mentoring. Dr. Wilson has presented workshops and provided consultancy in 32 countries.  

Learning Objectives:
Participants will be able to:

  1. Describe the nature of social toxins from an evolutionary perspective
  2. Describe the impact of social toxins on health and wellbeing
  3. Describe the development and potential meaning of the therapeutic relationship
  4. Implement simple interview methods to foster therapeutic connection
  5. Deliver interventions that use mindful interviewing
  6. Deliver interventions that foster motivation for values work
  7. Discriminate and choose between problem-solving and appreciation-centered therapeutic perspectives in treatment
  8. Intervene to foster active, deliberate choosing between problem-solving versus appreciation-centered perspectives with clients
  9. Describe the roles of defusion and acceptance processes in the development of relationship
  10. Describe the role of values and commitment processes in the development of relationship  

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical, Research

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

Mastering Compassion Focused Therapy: Taking CFT Beyond The Basics

Mastering Compassion Focused Therapy: Taking CFT Beyond The Basics

Mastering Compassion Focused Therapy: Taking CFT Beyond The Basics

 
Workshop Leader: 
Dennis Tirch, Ph.D.
Laura Silberstein, Psy.D.
Mary Welford, D.Clin.Psy.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

Drawing on behavioral theory, affective neuroscience, evolutionary psychology, and Buddhist practice, Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) was originally developed as a means of working with shame and self-criticism. Over the past 15 years, CFT has been found to be of benefit to those experiencing a wide range of difficulties such as anxiety, chronic pain, psychosis, trauma, and eating disorders. This workshop will review foundational CFT concepts, and will then take participants beyond the basics into advanced CFT experiential exercises that can address a range of problems.
This is an opportunity to integrate deeper dimensions of compassion work into your practice, while renewing your understanding of the fundamental dynamics of mindfulness and compassion. No previous CFT experience is necessary, and the trainers are aiming to help ACT and FAP therapists, in particular, as they integrate a compassion focus into the work they do.

This workshop will present the working definition of compassion utilized in CFT, will review Professor Paul Gilbert's CFT model of emotion regulation, and will go further to explore how compassion functions as a series of interacting processes and procedures. This constellation of psychotherapy processes can strengthen our ability to turn towards painful experiences, help us work with human suffering, and can cultivate values-based movement in our clients’ lives, and in our own. Participants will leave this workshop armed with a range of specific, new techniques, and an enhanced understanding of what the embodied compassion motive represents. For example, participants will learn how to use compassion embodiment in the therapeutic relationship, active meditative imagery practice and specific CFT chair-work and role-play practices to help clients work courageously with life challenges.

Appropriate for newcomers to CFT and veterans alike and taught by leading CFT experts from the Europe and North America, this workshop presents a novel approach to understanding the therapy – aimed at helping participants to advance their compassion work. Together, we will build a road map towards increased compassion based living, mindful courage and psychological flexibility. 

About Dennis Tirch, Ph.D.: 

Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., is The Founder of the Center for Compassion Focused Therapy in New York City and an Associate Clinical Professor at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mt. Sinai Medical Center. Dr. Tirch is the author/co-author of numerous books, chapters, and peer-reviewed articles on ACT, CFT, CBT, and Buddhist psychology. Dr. Tirch is the President-Elect of The Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and The Compassionate Mind Foundation, USA. Online and in-person, Dr. Tirch provides workshops and trainings globally in mindfulness, compassion and acceptance based interventions. Dr. Tirch is a Fellow of ACBS, and is also a Fellow and Consultant/Supervisor with the Academy of Cognitive Therapy. Dr. Tirch is a member of the Zen Garland Order, and is a lay teacher of Buddhism.

About Laura Silberstein, Psy.D.:

Laura R. Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D., is the Director of the Center for Compassion Focused Therapy, and serves as an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. Dr. Silberstein-Tirch is a clinical supervisor and compassion-focused therapy (CFT) trainer who presents internationally on mindfulness and compassion and is co-author of Buddhist Psychology and CBT a Clinician’s Guide and The ACT Practitioner's Guide to the Science of Compassion. She is a founder and President of the New York City chapter of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science and the Compassionate Mind Foundation USA. Her research interests include psychological flexibility and emotions as well as CFT for anxiety and depression.

About Mary Welford, D.Clin.Psy.: 

Dr Mary Welford is a Consultant Clinical Psychologist working in the South West of England and served as Chair of the Compassionate Mind Foundation for 4 years. Mary is particularly interested in the application of Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) across the spectrum of human experiences, from anxiety and depression to psychosis and personality difficulties. In addition to her private practice work, Mary has developed a Compassion in Schools program and trains a range of individuals in Compassion Focused Therapy both in the UK and overseas. Mary is the author of The Compassionate Mind Approach to Building Your Self Confidence and Compassion Focused Therapy for Dummies. She’s currently writing book for Children, Adolescents & Young People.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to describe and work with the CFT definition of compassion in practice.
  2. Participants will be able to work with the three-circle model of emotion regulation found in CFT.
  3. Participants will have a working knowledge of the 12 core competencies of compassion, and how they can be assessed, conceptualized and developed in psychotherapy.
  4. Participants will learn to utilize the therapeutic relationship to create a context of embodied compassion in CFT practice.
  5. Participants will learn to assist clients in working with "multiple self" experiences, bringing compassion to challenging emotional "selves."
  6. Participants will understand the relationship between courage and compassion, and how compassion can help us work with our threat system.
  7. Participants will learn methods for assisting clients to develop courage in facing threat based experiences.
  8. Participants will be able to teach their clients how compassion can help build psychological flexibility.
  9. Participants will be able to use compassion focused imagery in helping clients develop mindfulness, compassion and flexibility.
  10. Participants will be able to build on compassion focused imagery and multiple-self work, using compassion focused chair-work in group or individual psychotherapy.

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

Mindfulness-based Affirmative Practice for LGBTQ+ People

Mindfulness-based Affirmative Practice for LGBTQ+ People

Mindfulness-based Affirmative Practice for LGBTQ+ People

 
Workshop Leader: 
lore m. dickey, Ph.D.
Aisling Leonard-Curtin, M.Sc., C.Psychol., Ps.S.I.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

In this workshop we will cultivate our own compassion and values as clinician’s toward meeting the challenges of moving through life as a gender or sexual minority (GSM). This workshop will facilitate an awareness of the ways that GSM histories, and the therapist’s own history of cultural messages about gender and sexuality, might arise in the therapeutic relationship. Through the integration of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) and compassion-focused therapy (CFT), participants will grow in their ability to relate as gendered and sexual beings. From this place, powerful and therapeutic relationships can blossom.

Transgender people have existed throughout history. Though having a trans identity may seem like a relatively new concept, this is far from the truth. The problem lies in the fact that few, if any, mental health professionals have received training in how to work with trans people. This session will serve as broad introduction to affirmative practice with trans people.

Affirmative practice is defined as: counseling that is culturally relevant and responsive to [transgender and gender nonconforming] TGNC clients and their multiple social identities, addresses the influence of social inequities on the lives of TGNC clients, enhances TGNC client resilience and coping, advocates to reduce systematic barriers to mental and physical health, and leverages TGNC client strengths (Singh & dickey, 2017, p. 4). The definition will serve as an outline for the content of the session. We will begin by providing basic definitions and concepts that are critical to understanding the lives of transgender clients. Similarly, we will share key research and statistics around sexual minorities. Without this basic knowledge of gender and sexual minorities, providers are likely to encounter missteps in their practice. From there we will explore social inequities and the impact they have on the lives of gender and sexual minorities. We will explore ways to bolster resilience among our clients and ways to dismantle systemic barriers.

This two-day workshop will include a variety of approaches to learning. We will share a video titled Affirmative Practice with Transgender and Gender Diverse Clients. We will also use a variety of activities, role-plays, real-plays and case examples to bring the material to life for the participants.

About lore m. dickey, Ph.D.: 

lore completed his trained as a Counseling Psychologist at the University of North Dakota in 2011. He completed his pre-doctoral internship year at Duke University in Counseling and Psychological Services. Following graduation, Dr. dickey completed a 10-month post-doctoral fellowship at the Morehouse School of Medicine in the Satcher Health Leadership Institute.

Dr. dickey began his career in academia. He has served as an assistant professor at the University of Southern Mississippi (2012-2013), Louisiana Tech University (2013-2016), and Northern Arizona University (2016-2018). While at Louisiana Tech he also directed a Psychological Services Clinic, which is a training clinic serving the general public in the Ruston area. While at NAU he served as the Doctoral Training Director for the Combined Counseling/School Psychology PhD program. He has taught over 25 different courses at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

In the fall of 2018, Dr. dickey began work with North Country HealthCare as a behavioral health consultant. He works in the Bullhead City clinic in northwestern Arizona. In just two months time he has become one of the most productive behaviorists in the organization.

Dr. dickey’s love of advocacy began in childhood, specifically through his involvement with the Girl Scouts. He learned at a young age the importance of assuring that everyone has a voice at the table. lore has been very involved in professional organizations. He served as the co-chair for the American Psychological Association task force for the development of Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients. He has presented throughout the world on topics related to understanding the transgender experience and is considered an expert. He was recently recognized with a Presidential Citation from the American Psychological Association for his work in this area.

In addition to receiving numerous awards for his work, he is also a prolific writer. His second book came out on December 1, 2018. This book, titled A Clinician’s Guide to Gender-Affirming Care: Working with Transgender and Gender Nonconforming Clients addresses the ways in which mental health providers can work with trans clients of all ages. 

About Aisling Leonard-Curtin, M.Sc., C.Psychol., Ps.S.I.:

Aisling Leonard-Curtin, M.Sc., C.Psychol., Ps.S.I., is a chartered counseling psychologist with the Psychological Society of Ireland who lives with her wife Trish in Dublin. She is a TEDx speaker, co-director of Act Now Purposeful Living, has a small private practice, and consults with a number of organizations to deliver acceptance and mindfulness workshops. Aisling is a peer-reviewed acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and functional analytic psychotherapy (FAP) trainer.

Aisling co-edited Mindfulness and Acceptance for Gender and Sexual Minorities. Aisling teaches on many university training programs, and regularly gives workshops and talks internationally throughout Europe, North America and Australia. She has over a decades experience working in a wide range of settings including adult psychiatry, psycho-oncology, educational, health and community settings.

Aisling co-authored The Power of Small, a self-help book, which will be released in early 2019. Aisling has led workshops on sexuality since 2012. Her passion is making psychological concepts easy to understand and apply for all in the community. Aisling is particularly passionate around LGBTQ+ issues having came out as a sexual minority herself.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Define affirmative clinical practice for LGBTQ+ people
  2. List three or more barriers faced by LGBTQ+ people
  3. Demonstrate the use of affirmative language
  4. Select clinical approaches that are sensitive to the client’s needs
  5. Write a letter of referral for hormones or surgery
  6. Develop a treatment plan for a transgender client
  7. Describe how to engage in advocacy to dismantle barriers
  8. Learn how to conceptualize LGBTQ+ issues from an ACT, FAP and CFT perspective
  9. Experience functional contextually based experiential exercises in the area of learning histories related to gender and sexuality
  10. Sharpen your ability to notice key ACT and FAP processes as they occur in the moment in relation to gender and sexual identity 

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Clinical

Components: Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists

Read lore dickey's latest article, "Top Five Things to Say (or not) to Transgender People" here
ACBS staff

Prosocial: Using CBS to improve relations within and between groups - CLOSED

Prosocial: Using CBS to improve relations within and between groups - CLOSED

Prosocial: Using CBS to improve relations within and between groups

This workshop has closed due to reaching its registration maximum.

 
Workshop Leader: 
David Sloan Wilson, Ph.D.
Paul Atkins, Ph.D.
Monique Silva
Lori Wiser, M.B.A.
Ian MacDonald, Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

Prosocial is a practical process that draws upon ACT, CBS, and Evolutionary Science for building more productive and collaborative relationships within and between groups. This workshop will provide you with an introduction to Prosocial, the basic science that underpins the approach and the practical tools that you can use to improve the groups you care about.

The workshop will begin with the origins of Prosocial in Lin Ostrom's Nobel Prize winning work on the commons and its extension using evolutionary theory and contextual-behavioral science, as well as the broader vision for the Prosocial initiative. We will use experiential exercises to practice using the ACT matrix in the context of groups to surface and integrate individual and collective interests in a way that is safe and engaging. We will also demonstrate how and why we have adapted Ostrom's Core Design Principles to have the most impact in groups of all sorts. We will practice using the guided tools on the Prosocial website to help you assess and facilitate groups including measurement tools that you can use to diagnose and report to your groups. Participants will leave the workshop with a flexible toolkit of modular activities that you can use in different combinations to suit the needs of different groups.

The Prosocial community already consists of over 100 facilitators, drawn largely but not entirely from ACBS members. This workshop will prepare you to join that community which is already helping one another to accomplish positive cultural change at multiple levels, including individuals, groups, and multi-group ecosystems.

In the spirit of Contextual Behavioral Science, Prosocial is also a basic scientific research program to study cultural evolution in real-world settings, in addition to a practical method for accomplishing positive cultural change. We encourage the participation of both practice-oriented and research-oriented ACBS members in this workshop. The ideal practice-oriented participant is already experienced working with groups and wants to explore how Prosocial can add to their existing toolkit. The ideal research-oriented participant is already conducting basic scientific research on topics related to prosociality and cultural change and wants to explore new opportunities for research in real-world settings afforded by Prosocial.  

   

About David Sloan Wilson, Ph.D.: 

David Sloan Wilson has made fundamental contributions to evolutionary science and its applications to human affairs. He is well known within the ACBS community for working with Steve Hayes and others to integrate evolutionary science with contextual behavioral science. His most recent books are Evolution and Contextual Behavioral Science (co-edited with Steve Hayes) and Evolving the Future: Completing the Darwinian Revolution.

About Paul Atkins, Ph.D.:

Paul Atkins is a trainer, facilitator, coach and researcher. He is project coordinator for the Templeton World Charity fund grant to build, implement and research the Prosocial process as well as lead facilitator trainer. Paul has also applied Prosocial to help resolve conflicts and improve the performance and wellbeing of teams in organisations including schools, innovation networks, corporations and government departments. His research has mostly been focused on the effects of mindfulness-related interventions on relationships, wellbeing and identity. He co-edited the book Mindfulness in Organisations (CUP) and is lead author with David Sloan Wilson and Steve Hayes on the forthcoming book titled Prosocial: Using Evolutionary Science to Build Productive, Equitable, and Collaborative Groups. He is past President of the Australia and New Zealand Association for Contextual Behavioural Science and a Fellow of the international Association for Contextual Behavioral Science.

About Monique Silva:

Monique is a User Experience designer with over 7 years experience working in tech. She works as a consultant on a range of digital products with clients like HSBC, Corona and Google, helping make their online experiences engaging, intuitive and easy to use. User Experience is all about guiding behaviour through the careful design of an online environment, so her work involves direct application of concepts from psychology and behavioural economics. She uses both quantitative and qualitative research methods on her day-to-day, such as ethnographic research and A/B tests, as well as analytics data to inform her design decisions.

She now leads the design and development of the Prosocial website, a central plank of the initiative, implementing a range of digital tools to help both facilitators and groups. This involves designing an online tool to help groups learn and implement Prosocial with ease, a community forum where facilitators and researchers can communicate and share knowledge, and a range of other supports and online resources for facilitators. 

About Lori Wiser, M.B.A.:

Lori is an accomplished senior marketing executive whose career spans positions in Public Relations, Account Services, Consumer Insights, and Strategy, working on global brands such as McDonald’s, Verizon, and Volkswagen.
 
Ms. Wiser’s behaviorally-driven strategic approach leverages the social sciences including: ethnography, evolutionary psychology, anthropology, and behavioral economics to build analytic models. Her work has helped win industry awards, such as a Silver Anvil and a Gold Effie.

Lori also loves to root for the underdog and has significant experience in the non‐profit sector, focusing on what she calls the “chronically marginalized in our society”. She has also worked closely with public affairs directors to lobby on Capitol Hill for various causes.

She is sought as a guest lecturer on college campuses by the Advertising Educational Foundation and won a “Best Speaker Award in 2012.”

Lori is an avid reader, cyclist, and appreciates a good red wine. She is married with two daughters, a German Shepherd named Gigi and a precocious cat named Stan Lee.

About Ian MacDonald, Ph.D.:

Ian F. McDonald received his Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution and Behavior at Binghamton University in 2018 with D.W. Wilson as his thesis advisor. His thesis used the principles of Prosocial to analyze the Intentional Communities movement. Ian is in charge of developing the scientific database for Prosocial and also expects to develop a practice working with groups as a Prosocial facilitator.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Introduce the evolutionary worldview that underpins the practical method and scientific research program including understanding ACT/RFT as "the wise management of evolutionary processes". 
  2. Collaboratively explore ways of using the individual ACT matrix in the context of groups.
  3. Practice framing up a collective ACT matrix to target the groups needs and integrate diverse interests into shared purpose and identity.
  4. Experiment with variants of the collective ACT matrix to deepen understanding of the Core Design Principles and apply them in ways that work for your group.
  5. Introduce the "design principles" approach to working with groups, including the core design principles needed by nearly all groups and auxiliary principles needed by some groups but not others.
  6. Understand the range of groups to which you can apply Prosocial including corporations, voluntary groups and government agencies, but also families, community groups, schools or even broad scale culture change.
  7. Learn new online tools for assessment, diagnosis and reporting of group issues.
  8. Describe how the skills of working at the level of single groups can be scaled to working at the level of multi-group ecosystems.
  9. Join an international community of practitioners and scientists to support one another implementing and researching Prosocial in a diversity of locations and contexts.
  10. Write a short Prosocial process plan for your own group based on what you learned in the workshop.

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced, Clinical, Research

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists
ACBS staff

Transforming Language & Transforming Children’s Lives: How exploring the cutting edge of RFT can supercharge therapeutic and educational interventions for children and adolescents

Transforming Language & Transforming Children’s Lives: How exploring the cutting edge of RFT can supercharge therapeutic and educational interventions for children and adolescents

Transforming Language & Transforming Children’s Lives: How exploring the cutting edge of RFT can supercharge therapeutic and educational interventions for children and adolescents

 
Workshop Leader:
Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D.
Bryan Roche, Ph.D.
Evelyn Gould, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA
Giovambattista Presti, M.D., Ph.D.
 
Dates & Location of this 2-Day Workshop:
DCU Helix, Dublin City University
 
CE credits available: 13
9:00 - 17:15 on Tuesday, 25 June, 2019
9:00 - 17:15 on Wednesday, 26 June, 2019
 
Workshop Description:

Clinicians who work with young people know how important it is to have the most effective interventions that our science can offer on hand as soon as possible. Thankfully, over three decades of research has given us the tools and framework to build powerful interventions to help alleviate the psychological suffering of children and adolescents. Drawing on the science of RFT, this two day workshop will provide training in both ACT and the new SMART framework for educational intervention.

On day 1, Dr. Sarah Cassidy and Dr. Bryan Roche will review the research methods and concepts that led to the development of the SMART program, and in so doing will provide a light introduction to Relational Frame Theory for non-experts. The relevance of relational skills to a host of educational, developmental and behavioral problems will also be outlined, as well as coaching provided on how to select for and manage clients who may benefit from such interventions. The workshop will also involve a walk through the online SMART program and provide step-by-step guidance for teachers, clinicians and researchers who wish to monitor clients or research participants undergoing the training.

This first day of the workshop aims to address many of the barriers to therapy or learning that often seem unsurpassable with children. This training aims to assist therapists and clinicians in breaking down several barriers to learning by demonstrating how, for very specific populations, we can teach the foundational skills that will help children and adolescents to access their environments. We will also cover case studies with various populations of young learners, from persons diagnosed with various difficulties such as ADHD, Dyslexia, Dyspraxia, general and specific learning difficulties and language delay, and provide a brief outline of newer variations of this programme that are currently being developed for use in the treatment of OCD, anxiety, and psychological inflexibility more generally.

On day 2 Dr. Evelyn Gould and Dr. Nanni Presti will introduce ACT as a transdiagnostic, behavior analytic approach to addressing a wide range of clinical and non-clinical behavioral and emotional challenges in children and adolescents. ACT demands that the clinician consider the role of both verbal (i.e., rule-governed and relational processes) and direct environmental contingencies, when attempting to understand child behavior problems. Function-based interventions can then be developed to promote psychological flexibility and increase engagement in values-directed behavior. An ACT approach also demands consideration of the key contexts that children and adolescents operate within, including their family, community, school and peer group. The development of strategies to effectively engage and empower caregivers is particularly important, to promote adaptive parent-child interactions, and ensure the generalization and maintenance of treatment gains beyond the treatment setting. By fostering the development of a flexible, contingency sensitive repertoire, ACT-based interventions can empower families to raise more resilient children who are better able to adapt to life’s challenges, thus laying the foundations for a rich and meaningful adult life.

The second day of this workshop will present a developmentally sensitive and individualized ACT approach to working with children and adolescents. Case studies will be presented, with opportunities for participants to practice newly acquired skills. Participants will explore a contextual-behavioral conceptualization of child development (including the progressive emergence of an arbitrary relational repertoire), and how this informs the development of effective ACT-based interventions for families. We will demonstrate how the ACT model can be adapted to match each child’s age, interests, context, and developmental level, including adaptations for children and adolescents with specific learning challenges, such as those with autism spectrum disorder. Strategies for effectively engaging caregivers will be presented, in addition to exploring the design and implementation of ACT-infused interventions across a variety of contexts. The training will emphasize the benefits of combining ACT with more traditional behaviorally based procedures.  

About Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D.: 

Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D., is an Educational, Child and Adolescent Psychologist. She specialises in the assessment and treatment of learning and emotional/behavioural difficulties with clinical populations. She is the Senior Psychologist at The Smithsfield Clinic, a private practice for children, adolescents and their families using largely ACT and RFT based treatment methods. She has also worked as an educational psychologist within the Irish school system for the last 18 years, conducting assessments and advising parents and schools how to best support children with learning and behavioural challenges. Dr. Cassidy also lectures in Psychology at Maynooth University, Ireland, where her specialist research areas include child and adolescent developmental psychology and educational psychology. She received her Ph.D in the field of Relational Frame Theory and its articulation with intellectual development. She was author of the first empirical demonstration of the positive effects of intensive derived relational responding skill interventions on intelligence (Cassidy, Roche & Hayes, 2011), and has co-authored several papers since that have validated and extended this effect. Dr. Cassidy is a very experienced workshop leader and has delivered over 30 workshops in the domain of ACT, RFT and educational psychology. She is co-founder of Relational Frame Training Ltd, which developed the online SMART training software.

About Bryan Roche, Ph.D.:

Bryan Roche, Ph.D., is a senior lecturer in Psychology at Maynooth University, Ireland. He was co-editor of the first text on Relational Frame Theory (Hayes, Barnes-Holmes & Roche, 2001) as well as the more recent Advances in Relational Frame Theory (Dymond & Roche, 2013). He is author or co-author of over 100 book chapters and empirical articles on Relational Frame Theory, with a specific focus on empirical process-level analyses of fear and avoidance conditioning and its transformation in accordance with relational networks, and the enhancement of intellectual abilities using relational frame theory based interventions to increase relational responding fluency. He is co-founder of Relational Frame Training Ltd, which developed the online SMART training software.

About Evelyn Gould, Ph.D., BCBA-D, LABA:

Evelyn Gould is a Clinical Behavior Analyst and Research Associate at the Child and Adolescent OCD Institute (OCDI-Jr) at McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School. The OCDI-Jr program provides residential level of care for adolescents struggling with treatment refractory OCD and related disorders. The program emphasizes evidence-based behavioral interventions, including ERP (Exposure and Response Prevention) and ACT (Acceptance and Commitment Therapy). Dr. Gould currently works under the supervision of Dr. Lisa Coyne, Licensed Clinical Psychologist, Researcher, and world-expert in ACT and the treatment of childhood anxiety disorders. Dr. Gould also has extensive experience working with children and adolescents with ASD (and their families) across settings, and has fulfilled a variety of clinical, training, and research roles in the USA, UK, and N.Ireland over the years. Evelyn remains passionate about the provision of high-quality clinical services for children, adolescents, and their families, and the dissemination of Behavior Analysis. Dr. Gould is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science, and an Editorial Board Member for Behavior Analysis in Practice. She is also actively involved in a number of Special Interest Groups (SIGs), including the ABAI ACT and Psychological Flexibility SIG, the ACBS Children and Families SIG, and the Women in ACBS SIG.

About Giovambattista Presti, M.D., Ph.D.:

Giovambattista Presti is Associate Professor of Psychology at Kore University of Enna and past President of ACBS, founding member of the European Association for Behavior Analysis and President of the Italian professional Association of Behavior Analysts (SIACSA). He is an ACT Peer Review Trainer and has extensive experience in developing ACT for kids and adolescent treatments in clinical and non-clinical setting. His background is rooted in Behavior Analysis and Applied Behavior Analysis and a great part of his clinical work and research is also devoted to children and adolescent with ASD. His research interests include basic and RFT research to language development and reading. He values training practitioners to offer children those opportunities that life has denied to them.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Describe the relevance of Relational Frame to intellectual development and the formation of “language traps”.
  2. Identify the key features of a uniquely CBS perspective of childhood development and adolescence.
  3. Identify when relational skills enhancement is required to alleviate specific learning difficulties.
  4. Demonstrate how to use the SMART training currently available online, or develop their own relational skill enhancement interventions.
  5. Describe strategies for managing clients struggling educationally.
  6. Describe the core components of ACT-based interventions for children and adolescents
  7. Identify key developmental factors to consider when attempting to design and implement ACT-based interventions for children and adolescents.
  8. Demonstrate metaphors or experiential exercises tailored to the child’s relational skills and interests that could be used in the clinical setting.
  9. Identify key strategies for promoting the generalization and maintenance of treatment gains beyond the treatment setting.
  10. Describe the benefits of combining traditional Applied Behavior Analytic strategies with ACT 

Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Clinical

Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Case presentation, Role play

Package Includes: A general certificate of attendance, lunch, and twice daily coffee/tea break on site.

CEs available: for psychologists, BCBA
ACBS staff

Program

Program

Conference (27-30 June)

Conference Brief Schedule (Final) posted 5 June

The document above shows the schedule of sessions with the presenters of each session. 

Learn more about the Plenary presenters and other Invited Speakers here

Conference Program (Final) posted 5 June

This includes all of the abstracts and details about all of the oral presentations that will be delivered at the World Conference.

Complete list of Posters (with abstracts) that will be at the WC17.

Complete list of Symposia (with abstracts) that will be at the WC17.

Complete list of Ignites (with abstracts) that will be at the WC17.

Program Updates/Addendum (as of 22 June, 2019)

Please meet your 2019 WC17 Conference Program Committee here.

 

Pre-Conference Workshops (25-26 June)

Complete information about our Pre-Conference workshops (25-26 June) can be found here.

We have the following experiential workshops available:

 

App

All conference information can be found on our app as well. 

  1. Go to your phone's app store. Search for Yapp. Install Yapp on your phone.
  2. Open Yapp.
  3. Click on "+" at the top.
  4. Type ACBS in the box that says Enter Yapp Id and click "Add".
  5. The ACBS World Conference logo will appear on your screen. Click on the logo and the app will open.

Registration

Please register at your convenience.

ACBS staff

Program Committee

Program Committee

Program Committee Chairs

David Gillanders, D.Clin.Psychol.

David Gillanders is a Chartered Clinical Psychologist, member of the British Psychological Society, Health & Care Professions Council, Association of Clinical Psychologists (UK), British Association of Behavioural & Cognitive Psychotherapy and a founder member of the Association for Contextual Behavioural Science. He is Head of Clinical & Health Psychology at the University of Edinburgh. He leads a programme of research into the application of contextual behavioural science to living well with ill health, as well as research into training, supervision and basic measurement in behavioural science. He has published more than 35 peer reviewed articles and several book chapters, and is co-author of the self-help book, Better Living with IBS. He is a peer reviewed ACT trainer with ACBS. The peer review is the international association’s mark of high quality, high fidelity ACT training.

Louise McHugh, Ph.D.

Dr. Louise McHugh is an Associate Professor at University College Dublin, Ireland and a world leading researcher in the area of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Relational Frame Theory. She is a Fellow of the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science (ACBS) and has published over 80 papers in the area of CBS. She was an editor for the New Harbinger text The Self and Perspective Taking and author of the amazon best seller A Contextual Behavioral Guide to the Self. She is a Recognized Peer Reviewed ACT Trainer and an Action Editor for the Journal of Contextual Behavioral Science.

 

If you have questions about your submission(s), please contact David and Louise

RFT Track Chair: Lynn Farrell


Reviewers:

Niloo Afari
Priscilla Almada
Paul Atkins
Alexandra Avila
Richard Bennett
John Blackledge
Marie Blom
Matt Boone
Micheal J. Bordieri
Connie Chong
Joseph Ciarrochi
Charlotte Dack
JoAnne Dahl
Frederick Dionne
Chad Drake
Beate Ebert
Lynn Farrell
Nuno Ferreira
Diana Ferroni Bast
Paul Flaxman
Victoria Follette
Manuel Garayar
Brandon A. Gaudiano
Andrew Gloster
Tim Gordon
Evelyn R. Gould
Jenn Gregg
Nic Hooper
Sean Hughes
Nick Hulbert Williams
Maria Karekla
Deidre Kavanagh
Karen Kate Kellum
Ama Kissi
Tien Kuei
Danielle Lamb
Lou Laspragato
Joseph Lavelle
Jenna LeJeune
Francis Lemay
Aisling Leonard-Curtin
Mike Levin
Fredrick Livheim
Jessica A. Madrigal-Bauguss
Staci Martin Peron
Brian McGuire
Rhonda Merwin
Anja Meyer
Orla Moran
Eric Morris
Teresa Mulhern
Amy Murrell
Ahmet Nalbant
Martin O'Connor
John O'Neill
Fabián Olaz
Ray Owen
Nanni Presti
Laura Rai
Hank Robb
Miguel Rodriguez-Valverde
Graciela Rovner
Fran Ruiz
Emily Sandoz
Laura Silberstein-Tirch
Alison Stapleton
Corinna Stewart
Ian Stewart
Jill Stoddard
Taslim Therani
Ian Tyndall
Servinc Ulusoy
Nigel Vahey
Vasilis Vasileiou
Jennifer Villatte
Chad Wetterneck
Robert Whelan
Joann Wright
Fatih Yavuz
Amie Zarling
ACBS staff

WC17 Ignite Detail

WC17 Ignite Detail

Friday, 28 June
15:10-16:40
Location: Q119

Session 83

• DNA-V as an integrated framework for quality of life, psychological wellbeing and physical health outcomes for children and young people with heath conditions  

James Lemon, DClinPsy, NHS Dumfries And Galloway (UK)

This talk is written by both young patients and staff and presents an overview of how DNA-V and we, a medical paediatric healthcare service have been co- evolving over several years. We have ‘co-learnt’ DNA-V with patients and then ‘co-developed’ a training package to share with other patients, and parents. We now asses levels of DNA-V skills periodically, such as at the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) annual medical reviews, which occur every six months, at screening sessions, and when patients with particular health conditions are beginning to transition to secondary school. If appropriate we can then offer a range of DNA-V approaches. We are now co-developing a group programme. We have taught multi-disciplinary staff DNA-V, which they can use within the context of their own speciality. The data we have collected shows that our scores for overall psychological wellbeing are above what would be expected, our treatment adherence levels are higher than expected and our complaints levels have reduced. Objective physical outcomes for particular patient groups have improved significantly.

• "I'd Rather Feel the Thorn than to Never See the Rose!" An Anthology of ACT Congruent Music.  

Victoria Samuel, South Wales Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Wales, UK.
Dale Thomas, Trainee Clinical Psychologist, S.Wales Doctorate in Clinical Psychology, Wales, UK

Background ACT terms and processes can be ambiguous and hard to conceptualise for clients or students unfamiliar with the approach. Music can be emotive and memorable and can be powerful in influencing our affective state; music can soothe, inspire, empower, motivate, validate and affirm our experiences. Methods Over a period of 3 years the first author collated songs depicting key ACT processes and concepts. An exercise used during her teaching on local doctoral programmes in clinical psychology, in which students were encouraged to identify ACT congruent songs, provided a wealth of extra additions for the ACT playlist. The first author worked with the second author, a doctoral student, to shortlist the diverse songs into an ACT anthology of 5 minutes in duration. Results In this engaging, emotive, fun and high-energy ACT presentation, the music will ‘speak for itself’ taking us through a varied journey of ACT processes through ACT congruent lyrics. Conclusion Music can be a powerful resource; facilitating and solidifying awareness and use of ACT concepts and processes for professionals, clients and students alike.

• Health values: Exactly what they say on the tin (Except not always and quite rarely)  

Alison Stapleton, University College Dublin
Martin O'Connor, University College Dublin

Emmet Feerick, University College Dublin
John Kerr, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Empirical research has shown that participants’ levels of health values directedness are not related to their reported engagement in certain important health behaviors (such as physical activity, dietary quality, and alcohol consumption). Suggesting that, although topographically congruent with health values, the aforementioned health-related behaviors are not functionally congruent with participants’ health values. Based on this research, the proposed Ignite presentation will elaborate on the apparent disconnect between health values and health behaviors. Attendees will be introduced to different health values frequently endorsed by participants and asked to pair these values with seemingly congruent behaviors. The proposed Ignite presentation seeks to highlight that functional congruence tops topographical congruence, or rather that health values are exactly what they say on the tin (except not always and quite rarely).

• A Beginners Guide to ACT Process Measures: Quantitative and Case-Study Insights into Picking an Effective Assessment System to Track Progress in Treatment  

Ronald Rogge, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Jennifer Daks, M.A., University of Rochester

Brooke Dubler, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Katherine Saint, M.A., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

With the recent proliferation of process measures in the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy literature, we sought to examine the various strengths and weaknesses of the AAQ-II, CompACT, OESQ, and MPFI scales: (1) in a sample of 2,385 online respondents and (2) in a case study of a client receiving ACT for a depressive disorder. Quantitative results revealed that all of the flexibility scales were strongly linked to both psychological distress and individual wellbeing. However, the results further highlighted that newer multidimensional scales (the 3-dimension CompACT, the 12-dimension MPFI) offered greater insights into current functioning, often doubling the amount of variance explained by the AAQ-II alone. Both the quantitative analyses and the clinical case study vividly demonstrate the more nuanced and clinically meaningful patterns that emerge when multiple dimensions of flexibility and inflexibility are tracked. In particular, the results suggested the MPFI (and the MindFlex Assessment System that makes the MPFI easily usable online) offers researchers and clinicians the most conceptually comprehensive scale to represent the Hexaflex model. Concrete guidelines for selecting scales will be provided.

• Investigating the Psychometric Properties of the Values Wheel with a Clinical Cohort  

Kate Barrett, University College Dublin
Martin O'Connor, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, University College Dublin

Background: Previous research demonstrated the psychometric properties of a novel, idiographic values-measure: the Values Wheel (VW). This study reports on the psychometric properties of the VW with a clinical cohort. Method: Fifty-one adult clients who were engaged with the mental health services attended an assessment session comprising a battery of questionnaires measuring mental health, well-being, life satisfaction, ACT processes, as well as a values card sort task and the VW. Results: The VW demonstrated partial evidence of structural validity, such that scores were positively related to well-being and life satisfaction outcomes, and negatively related to depression. Significant positive correlations were observed with alternative values-measures, suggesting the VW demonstrates good convergent validity. The discriminant validity of the VW was partially supported, as no significant correlations with two unrelated constructs were found. Evidence for the incremental validity of the VW was also indicated, as scores accounted for unique proportions of variance in well-being and life satisfaction outcomes, beyond psychological flexibility alone. Conclusions: Outcomes provide preliminary support for the psychometric properties of the VW with a clinical population.

• Should I give this talk?  

Kori Schagunn, University College Dublin

The aim of the proposed ignite presentation will be to examine the speaker’s new research idea: how improv comedy could be used in teaching psychological flexibility through improvisation. Psychological flexibility is an imperative skill that affects an individual’s quality of life. It is the ability to persist in values based actions whilst experiencing unwanted internal events such as thoughts and emotions which in turn enable behavioural adaptability. Improv comedy is an unscripted performance that is made up “on the spot” and is usually performed by a group or team. There are exercises within improv comedy that the speaker argues may teach and/or increase psychological flexibility. The exercise ‘new choice’ will be examined as an example of how improv could potentially assist in the learning of psychological flexibility. All of this will be examined while the speaker grapples with their “unwanted, away-moving” thought process that began with one sticky question: ”should I give this talk?”.

• Comfort Zone Challenges - a "fun" way to practice ACT skills  

Michael Herold, The Art of Charm

Comfort Zone Challenges are exercises that are designed to push participants out of their comfort zone in social settings. They are provoking anxiety, particularly in regards to embarrassment and rejection. They are most commonly exercised in group settings, to facilitate mutual support and motivation. Common Exercises: Lie down in a public area as if you were taking a sunbath. Walk down a busy street and high-five as many people as you can. Tell a joke to a stranger (preferably a joke that isn't even funny). And many more. As participants become intimately aware of unhelpful private experiences leading up to their "challenge", they are then able to practice psychological flexibility. The ACT processes are something that we cover in the theoretical part of our workshops - before and after the practical exercises. The biggest impact happens the moment a participant realizes that these exact same skills he or she practiced to perform one of those challenges can be used in anxiety-provoking real-life situations: in their social life, professional life or anywhere else.

• !The Young Ones! #Transdiagnostical #grouptherapy #youngsters #buildingbridges #humor #changetheculture #mentalhealth  

Kim Helmus, Amsterdam UMC

In this inspiring Ignite talk you will hear about and experience how, a practice based initiative for Young people with different kinds of symptoms and struggles WORKS. Initiative-taker and researcher Kim Helmus shares how she and her colleagues implemented this initiative five years ago within the biggest mental health organization in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. The Young Ones is an initiative that helps to change the organization from within towards more flexibility, defusion around ‘mental health diagnoses’, spreads humor, increases the joy within the departments and helps young people to cope with life differently. We hope to inspire you to take initiative! #cooperation with INTERACT Belgium/Netherlands #Phd_research #Act

• How to Arrive: engaging your psychological flexibility before the consultation begins  

Ray Owen, DClinPsy, Wye Valley NHS, Herefordshire, UK

Any health or social-care professional finds some consultations more anxiety-provoking than others. This is true for the counsellor about to see a client after a therapeutic rupture, the oncologist about to break unexpectedly bad news or the social worker having to explain to angry parents why safeguarding measures have been started. According to CBS approaches, dealing with complex situations will be helped by the professional responding in a psychologically flexible manner to the external and internal events of the consultation, even if the content of the interaction is not explicitly ACT-related (e.g. the doctor breaking bad news above). Unfortunately, anticipatory anxiety can prompt psychological inflexibility in professionals as well as anyone else, potentially leading to difficult consultations being handled less well right from the start. This IGNITE presentation will demonstrate a brief (maximum 20 seconds), easily-taught ACT-based procedure, which was originally developed for hospice nurses and doctors to help them enter a difficult consultation in an Aware, Engaged, Open stance. It can also be applied in psychotherapy, or other human interactions (formal or informal).

Saturday, 29 June 
15:10-16:40
Location: Q122

Session 133

• CBS Writ Large: Committed Actions and Opportunities  

Tiffany Rochester, Charles Street Clinic

ACBS has at its core a tenet to create and use Contextual Behavioural research to reduce human suffering and improve well-being. We do this in CBS labs, therapy rooms and other settings across the world, but in the current political, social and environmental climate we live in, is this enough? How do we do more, and should we? We are small, but we could be mighty! In this Ignite, I will share with you dreams and plans for how we can use the strength of our community to infuse CBS into the areas that matter to us most - from actions that take less than two minutes, through to incredible opportunities for growth as a whole organisation. We have the science - are we willing to take it to the world?

• Growing up in war- the impact on children and how CBS can help  

Felicity L. Brown, Ph.D., War Child Holland

Globally, 1 in 10 children live in an area affected by armed-conflict, and we are currently experiencing unprecedented numbers of refugees and internally displaced people, of which the majority are youth. Most armed-conflicts occur in low and middle-income countries (LMICs), and these LMICs also host almost 90% of the world’s refugees. Unfortunately, we know that tremendous care gaps exist in access to mental health and other services- particularly in LMICs. This can be further exacerbated by the destruction of essential infrastructure during armed-conflict. Thus the damaging effects of war and displacement frequently lead to dramatically increased youth risk factors at all ecological levels, and high mental health needs, in the very contexts where health and support systems are least equipped to cope with the burden. How can we take evidence-based practices from CBS and develop innovative solutions to tackle this immense need, and cruel disparity?

• Where is the service user voice in our research?  

Christine E. Ramsey-Wade, University of the West of England

Health intervention research has been criticised for a lack of focus on investigating acceptability, before examining efficacy and effectiveness. There are clear moral and ethical arguments for giving voice to service users’ experiences of helpful and unhelpful factors in health interventions, thereby ensuring that our research is relevant to their needs. While such work is now usually a requirement of funding bodies, it may still be viewed as simply a hurdle to be mounted before the real research begins. A lack of investment in this stage of the research process can weaken later quantitative evaluations, and is arguably symptomatic of a wider under-valuing of qualitative research in psychology. Qualitative research is vital to understand mechanisms of change, identify target populations, and inform intervention development. This presentation will seek to provoke debate around the place of accessibility research. It will review different ways in which this work can be undertaken, by for example contrasting patient participation with patient involvement. It will then describe a recent study exploring the accessibility of an 8-week mindful eating programme.

• From outside in to inside out: getting loose and letting yourSELF in the therapy room: Brazil Chapter Sponsored  

Raul Vaz Manzione, Centro Paradigma; Private Practice

Beginner ACT therapists can often get attached to rules on how to "behave appropriately" as an ACT therapist. Sometimes this might entail the message: "Being who I am it's not okay" which can lead to patterns of experiential avoidance in session. This IGNITE session aims to talk about on how by bringing your own self to the room can be helpful to the therapist and clients itself and empower your therapeutic work.

• How media helps to shape society toward psychological inflexibility  

Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Christina Doro, Psy.D., Institute for Life Renovation, LLC

Using humor and absurdity, this Ignite session will highlight how media portrays events and research in ways that shape society's belief toward "healthy normality." Authors will depict how this increases not only intolerance, but also associated difficulties with experiential avoidance and the conceptualized self. As society evolves, increase in distorted beliefs can shape values and interfere with acts of workability, further challenging the implementation of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy with patients. Authors will discuss the utility of openly discussing media and societal belief trends with patients as a way of increasing theoretical credibility and getting "unstuck" with patients.

• Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A model for therapist self-care in the workplace  

Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Courtney Purdy, Psy.D., Institute for Life Renovaton, LLC

This Ignite session will apply the Hexaflex to illustrate how clinicians can apply our own ACT principles to not only reconcile, but also evolve from our work with patients. The presentation will highlight the unique—and often bizarre, funny, and frightening—situations that we encounter as clinicians, and how we can use our therapeutic skills to normalize and make sense of our interesting work with patients, and be better at what we do by behaviorally modeling the process we are teaching.

• Enough! An ACT Clinician’s Journey to Find Lagom: Women in ACBS SIG Sponsored  

Leslie A. Veach, M.S., NCC, LPCS, East Carolina University - Center for Counseling and Student Development

Early in my career, a client told me about the Swedish concept of “Lagom,” loosely translated as “enough.” Not having an exact word for this in English, we spent several sessions discussing what this meant to her. The concept spoke to me, and over the years I found myself coming back to it again and again as a way to clarify my own values and reassess how I define “enough.” For me, it has meant living in harmony with myself and others. In this brief presentation, I will humbly share my experience as a daughter, mother, wife, friend, counselor, and human how through study, reflection and committed action I have embraced diverse cultural concepts to defuse from the unworkable and embrace balance. I hope to ignite ideas for attendees on how they can do the same.

• Live better: An online ACT based self-help course in Icelandic.  

Orri Smarason, Lifdu betur
Sigurður Ólafsson, M.A., Lifdu betur
Guðný Einarsdóttir, M.Sc., Lifdu betur

Until recently no publicly available literature or information existed on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy in the Icelandic language. Lifdu betur (Live better), an online self help course, has now published the first publicly available ACT materials in Icelandic. The course consists of short video lectures, a small booklet, a workbook and a number of guided present moment awareness exercises. The talk will cover how the idea came about, the landscape of psychotherapy in Iceland, how the course was developed and how it has been received.

• ACT for Psychosis in Community-Based Mental Health Institutions  

Hüseyin Şehit Burhan, Karaman State Hospital, Turkey
Merve Terzioğlu, Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery
Furkan Bahadır Alptekin, Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Psychiatry, Neurology and Neurosurgery

The last 10 years rapidly developing community-based mental health institutions in Turkey serves particularly patients who were diagnosed with psychotic disorders. However, the application of evidence-based therapy methods is limited in these institutions. In a small city, we applied ACT-based group therapy for psychosis with the clients of the mental health institution. The results were very satisfactory. ACT-based interventions for psychosis can be implemented as an effective method in community-based mental health institutions serving thousands of customers across the country.

• Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the End of life: from resignation to acceptance.  

Alessia Medioli, Ph.D., ASCCO, ACT ITALIA
Giuseppina Majani, Ph.D., ASCCO, ACT ITALIA

This study aims to show the usefulness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in a Geriatric Acute Care Unit by analyzing a case report which shows the approach to end of life from patient’s, caregiver’s and physician’s perspectives. The advanced stage of the disease asks to patient, family and clinicians to change their perspective, since death is no longer an antagonist to fight but becomes an event to be accepted and managed. The intervention moves from to cure to caring. Renato is an 82 years old patient whose weight loss initially considered by family and doctors as a consequence of depression was actually due to a total dysphagia. This fact required an attention shift from the possibility to manage the patient’s problems to the need to accept the situation limits from the different points of view. ACT made possible to calibrate the psychological intervention according to value priorities change connected to end of life.

ACBS staff

WC17 Posters

WC17 Posters

Please note: You must be logged in as an ACBS member in order to view the content below.

WC17 Posters

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WC17 Posters

WC17 Posters

Poster files will be added as we receive them. If you would like your poster file to be added to this list, please email it to Laura at acbsstaff@contextualscience.org.

Location: Saint Patrick's Cathedral

Thursday, 27 June, 2019, 18:45-19:45 - Poster Session #1 

Thursday, 27 June, 2019, 19:45-20:45 - Poster Session #2

Image denotes ACBS Junior Investigator Poster Award Recipients

 

Thursday, 27 June, 2019, 18:45-19:45 - Poster Session #1

1. Is satisfaction in valued living domains is a key to forestalling effects of burnout in healthcare providers?

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Healthcare Provider Burnout

Abbie Beacham, Ph.D., Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy
Jennifer Reese, M.D., Childrens Hospital of Colorado

Background. Healthcare provider burnout, recently identified as a public health crisis, is associated with satisfaction in valued areas of life and a sense of flourishing and perceived resilience. The interrelatedness of values consistent living and higher levels of resilience may be especially salient. Method. We examined Importance and Satisfaction in valued life domains in healthcare professionals (N=133; Physicians=43%) who completed online surveys. Surveys included the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule, Brief Resilience Scale and Valued Directions Questionnaire. Results. Among those who rated high importance(I) in valued domains, less than half rated satisfaction(S) at least equal to importance (I-SDifference Range=1.21-2.6). Highest I-SDifference was in the Health/Self-care domain with 87.9% rating importance >7/10 but 18.8% rated satisfaction > importance. Linear regressions predicting Resilience scores, conducted for each of 10 value domains, accounted for significant variance in Resilience scores (all p’s < .001). Discussion. In our sample of busy health care professionals, it may not be surprising that levels of satisfaction in important life domains were less than desired. Notably, as flourishing ratios increased the I-SDiff scores decreased, suggesting that an effective avenue for enhancing resilience may be through targeting valued areas of living and positive activities in those domains. An effective avenue for enhancing resilience and mitigating burnout effects may be to target enhanced valued living. Results from data collection (underway) regarding Acceptance of work-related stress(ors), valued living and resilience in healthcare providers will also be presented.

2. The development of the Psychological Inflexibility Scale – Infertility and study of its psychometric properties

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Infertility; Psychological inflexibility assessment; Psychometric properties

Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC) -UC
Marina Cunha, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC) -UC
Bárbara Monteiro, M.Sc., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga
José Pinto-Gouveia, M.D., Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC) -UC

Background: Infertility is described as an emotionally challenging condition and the identification of emotion regulation processes such as the ones involved in psychological inflexibility may be relevant for psychological intervention programs targeting people with fertility issues and for research purposes in this particular population. Considering that general measures may not capture specificities of the infertility context, the current study aimed to develop a new self-report instrument, the Psychological Inflexibility Scale – Infertility (PIS-I), and explore its factor structure and psychometric properties. Method: An initial pool of 14 items was developed based on literature review and clinical expertise. The sample included 313 subjects presenting an infertility diagnosis (287 women and 26 men). Participants were recruited through the national patients association, gave their informed consent and completed online the following self-report questionnaires: PIS-I; Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ); Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales (DASS-21); Fertility Problems Inventory (FPI) and the Infertility Self-efficacy Scale (ISE). Results: Principal Component Analysis revealed a single-component accounting for 63% of variance. Factor loadings ranged from .69 to .87. Cronbach alpha was .95. PIS-I showed a significant positive association with AAQ, DASS-21, and FPI and a significant negative association with ISE. Discussion: To our knowledge this is the first self-report measure aiming to assess psychological inflexibility within the specific context of infertility. The PIS-I showed to be a reliable and valid measure of psychological inflexibility targeting people who are dealing with an infertility diagnosis.

3. Patient complexity factors among people with pain who smoke cigarettes: Psychological flexibility, nicotine dependence, and pain relationships

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Psychological flexibility, nicotine dependence, and pain

Anayansi Lombardero, Ph.D., University of Alaska, Anchorage
Annika Flynn, University of Alaska Anchorage
Andrew Richie, University of Alaska Anchorage

Background: Patient complexity is becoming increasingly prevalent in health settings. Multiple co-occurring medical and psychological conditions can negatively impact treatment outcomes. Research indicates that psychological flexibility plays a role in improving pain outcomes among people with chronic pain. Given these promising findings, it is important to investigate its associations with tobacco use disorder and other comorbid disorders among people who experience chronic pain. Methods: Cross-sectional survey. Results: Participants (N = 45) were all cigarette smokers (M = 15 cigarettes per day, SD = 9.19) recruited from multidisciplinary pain treatment centers. The mean age was 48 (SD = 12.6), 62% of participants were female, 89% were White, 7% had a college degree, and 22% were employed. Forty percent screened positive for depression, 18% had a positive PTSD screen, and 11% screened positive for alcohol misuse. Psychological inflexibility was associated with nicotine dependence (r = .33, p = .025), pain interference (r = .38 p = .010), pain related anxiety (r = .77, p < .001), depression (r = .73, p < .001) and PTSD (r = .79, p < .001). Nicotine dependence was associated with depression (r = .30, p = .045), pain related anxiety (r = .40, p = .006), and PTSD (r = .32, p =.033). Discussion: Psychological, tobacco use, and pain-related factors appear to interact with each other with implications for the care of complex patients in multidisciplinary pain treatment centers. Future studies should examine the role of psychological inflexibility in the development and maintenance of these disorders.

4. Self-Compassion, Disease Acceptance and Psychological Flexibility in Quality of Life and Body Image of Dermatological Patients

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Diana Constante, CESPU, Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies
Ana Teixeira, Ph.D., CESPU, Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies
José Rocha, Ph.D., CESPU, Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies
Vera Almeida, CESPU, Institute of Research and Advanced Training in Health Sciences and Technologies

Psoriasis is an inflammatory, chronic skin disease with high prevalence and negative physical and psychological repercussions. This study aims to evaluate the importance of self-compassion, disease acceptance and psychological flexibility in quality of life and body image of the dermatological patients. The Sociodemographic and Clinical Questionnaire, the Self-Compassion Scale, the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire – Body Image (CFQ-BI), the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire – II (AAQ-II) and the Psoriasis Disability Index (PDI), were administered to 75 individuals diagnosed with psoriasis. The t-test for one sample, the Pearson correlation coefficient test and the multiple linear regression were used. Results demonstrate associations between quality of life and body image with clinical and mindfulness variables. The disease acceptance, psychological flexibility and self-judgment predicted 34.1% of quality of life. Additionally, over-identification and self-kindness predicted 43.4% of body image. Clinical strategies should include these dimensions in order to facilitate a better and integrated care to dermatological patients.

5. Mindful-Kids Project

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Edurne Maiz, Ph.D., University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Ignacio de Tomas, Basque Culinary Center, Mondragon Unibertsitatea
Uxune Etxeberria, BCC Innovation, Technological Center of Gastronomy

Background: In the last few years, great attention has been paid to the mindful eating technique as an approach derived from mindfulness to address unhealthy eating behavior. Recent studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of an induction to the mindful eating as a strategy to reduce food and fat intake in adults. However, there is limited information in relation to mindful eating interventions in children. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether a brief session of mindful eating could promote healthier dietary food choices in children. Method: A sample of 101 children ranging from ages 8-11 were recruited. 50 children (Mindful eating group) participated in a session with mindful eating exercises aimed at being conscious of how the five senses are linked with consumption of food. 51 children (Control group) participated in a creative workshop. Statistical analyses were conducted using Chi-square tests and an ANCOVA test (p< 0.05). Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups on subjective hunger and satiety score, food intake, food choices and liking variables. However, statistically significant differences were found in the level of dominance. Discussion: A higher independence sensation was detected in the control group comparing to the Mindfulness group. It is suggested that a mindful eating session could be a less familiar activity than a creativity workshop. In conclusion, more sessions of mindful eating would be recommended to assess the effects of a mindful eating intervention in children’s eating behavior, in their emotional dimensions and food intake.

6. Examining the relationship between facets of mindfulness and holistic health

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness, health, well-being, self-care

Elizabeth Tish Hicks, B.A., Utah State University
Kristin Jay, Ph.D., Marist College

The current study investigates whether, without a specific meditation intervention, higher baseline levels of mindfulness are significantly related to and predictive of higher levels of holistic health, which was operationally defined as mindful self-care, physical/mental health, and well-being. Method: Mindfulness was measured via the Five Facet Mindfulness questionnaire (FFMQ; Baer et al., 2006), mindful self-care was measured via the Mindful Self-Care Scale- SHORT (MSCS; Cook-Cottone & Guyker, 2016), health was measured via the MOS 36-item short form health survey (SF-36; Ware & Sherbourne, 1992), and well-being was measured via the Scales of Psychological Wellbeing inventory (SPW, Ryff & Singer, 1998). Participants (92 undergraduates; 71 women; mean age 18.99 ± 1.22 years) completed the FFMQ, MSCS, SF-36, and SPW in the lab. Results: Pearson correlations will be used to examine the relationship between baseline levels of mindfulness and self-care, health, and well-being. Regression models will also be calculated to examine the predictive power of mindfulness on self care, health, and well-being. The researchers expect that higher baseline levels of mindfulness will predict higher levels of reported self-care, health, and well-being. This research will clarify the relationship between mindfulness and holistic health, and may provide further evidence to support the use of mindfulness practice to promote holistic health in terms of physical/mental health, well-being, and self-care behaviors.

7. Psychological Inflexibility predicts greater symptom interference in cancer survivors

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Cancer

Emily Cox-Martin, Ph.D., University of Colorado
Elissa Kolva, Ph.D., University of Colorado
Matthew Cox, Ph.D., Mental Health Institute, Colorado Department of Human Services
Levi Bonnell, MPH, University of Colorado

Background: Side effects related to a cancer diagnosis and its treatment can impact treatment adherence, quality of life, distress, and disability in patients across the cancer continuum. It is important to understand what factors might impact a patient's ability to cope and adjust to these difficulties in order to design effective psycho-oncology interventions. We investigated associations between cancer-related symptom interference and psychological flexibility in cancer survivors seeking psychological care. Methods: Participants had mixed solid tumor diagnoses, across the cancer continuum, with one or more psychology appointments at a large comprehensive cancer center. Psychological flexibility, measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II, and symptom interference, measured by the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory, were evaluated cross-sectionally. A multiple linear regression model predicted symptom interference based on psychological flexibility, controlling for symptom severity, physical functioning, age and gender. Results: Participants (n = 63) were mostly white (89%) and female (81%) with an average age of 51 (SD = 14.65). Overall, the model was significant (F(5, 54) = 27.36, p < 0.001), with an R2 of .71. Psychological inflexibility significantly predicted symptom interference (B = .074, p = .001). Discussion: These findings highlight psychological flexibility as a factor for clinical intervention in cancer survivors who may be experiencing high disease-related symptom interference.

8. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as an Intervention for Adolescent Chronic Pain Related to Pectus Excavatum: A Case Study

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Pediatric Chronic Pain

Hayley N Roberts, Psy.D., Children's Hospital Colorado, University of Denver

Background:Pectus Excavatum(PE) is a congenital chest-wall deformity where the sternum and chest-wall cave inwards toward the spine. While corrective surgery has shown positive effects on physical and psychosocial well-being of PE patients, it can often result in Chronic Post-Surgical Pain(CPSP). Surgery may positively alter the deformity’s aesthetic; however, physical and emotional recovery is likely post-surgery. This study reviews how Acceptance and Commitment Therapy(ACT) can effectively address CPSP during recovery. Method:I present a case report of an adolescent male with CPSP and pain-related anxiety. He had begun to withdraw from preferred activities and avoided potentially pain-inducing situations. He attended individual ACT-based psychotherapy as a part of a multidisciplinary pain team. Data was gathered through the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, Patient-Specific Functional Scale, and clinical observation. Results:The patient demonstrated improvements in valued choices and acceptance of physical and emotional struggle during treatment. An overall decrease in rating of pain and disability was seen. Furthermore, his perceived ability to engage in valued activities increased even when pain increased. Discussion:Although psychosocial struggles may begin with PE, simply removing the cause may not suffice to repair the psychological damage that develops over time. Some PE patients have dealt with a lifetime of emotional stressors and engagement in avoidant behaviors, which cannot be expected to resolve with surgery. Therefore, including psychotherapy within a patient’s reparative journey is critical to help patients shift their focus away from restrictive, avoidant behaviors towards values-based behaviors which can continue post-surgery. Fortunately, ACT provides an added benefit in addition to surgery.

9. Association of psychological flexibility, affect, and symptom interference with engagement in self-management activities in Multiple Sclerosis

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: multiple sclerosis

Jennifer K. Altman, Ph.D., University of Washington
Anne Arewasikporn, Ph.D., University of Washington; VA Puget Sound Health Care System
Aaron Turner, Ph.D., VA Puget Sound Health Care System; University of Washington
Kevin Alschuler, Ph.D., University of Washington
Dawn Ehde, Ph.D., University of Washington

BACKGROUND: When living with chronic illness, optimizing symptom self-management is important to support engagement in values-based activities. Psychological flexibility, affect and symptom interference have been associated with levels of engagement in meaningful activities in persons with chronic illnesses. This study explored the relationship among these variables on actions taken to manage multiple sclerosis (MS) by individuals enrolled in a self-management intervention study. METHOD: Participants (N=163; 87% female; Mage=51.7, SD=10.1) consisted of individuals diagnosed with MS who completed demographic items, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-2, Positive and Negative Affect, Modified Fatigue Impact, and Pain Interference scales. Linear regression (controlling for age and years since diagnosis) was conducted to ascertain the most salient predictors of MS Management actions in this sample. RESULTS: The final model accounted for one-fifth of total variance (F(7, 146)=6.28, p<.0001, Adj R2=.195) with higher levels of positive affect (β=1.15, p<.0001), and higher levels of fatigue impact (β=.307, p=.019) significantly associated with higher total number of MS Management actions. Notably, psychological flexibility, negative affect and pain interference were not significantly associated with number of MS Management actions (all p’s>.05). DISCUSSION: Participants with higher levels of positive affect and fatigue impact reported higher frequency of engagement in self-management activities. Results suggest that outcomes may be enhanced with increased focus on enhancing positive affect, and fatigue impact may be a motivating factor to engage in more self-management activities. Interventions focused on enhancing positive affect may promote engagement in self-management.

10. ACT with Military Members and Veterans: A Systematic Review

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Military Service Members

Jeremiah E. Fruge, M.S., Utah State University
Felicia J. Andresen, M.S., Utah State University
Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D., Utah State University

Service members and veterans (SM/Vs) of the United States military represent a large population and culture within our country.SM/Vs experience high prevalence rates of a variety of psychological disorders and disabilities that are detrimental to quality of life. Utilizing an evidence-based treatment that seeks to improve quality of life and is useful across diagnoses prevalent among SM/Vs is essential. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) represents a treatment that may satisfy this need. The present study examines the current state of the literature of ACT for SM/Vs. A systematic review of 198 separate papers found three RCT’s, 11 non-randomized multi-subject studies, and one case study that met inclusion criteria. Overall,results suggest ACT is a promising intervention for SM/Vs across multiple disorders(e.g. anxiety disorders, depression, chronic pain)as well as intervention delivery (e.g., in-person and telehealth) and type(e.g., group and individual therapy). While extant literature suggests ACT may be an effective intervention among SM/Vs,future research should (1) continue to examine which psychological disorders respond to ACT and (2) seek to understand what types of adaptations may be necessary to increase the effectiveness of ACT for SM/Vs.

11. Psychological flexibility, loneliness and body appreciation among women with lipoedema in Poland

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: lipoedema, lipedema, weight stigma, body apprecation, loneliness

Joanna Dudek, Ph.D., SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Background: Lipoedema, a type of Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue Disorders that affects mainly women, manifests itself with an accumulation of the fat in lower parts of the body and associated pain and bruising (Buck, Herbst, 2016). Despite the growing number of studies and treatment guidelines in a number of European countries, it is still little known and often misdiagnosed and mistreated in Poland. The aim of the study was to investigate psychological factors that might affect the quality of life in Polish women with lipoedema. Method: Ninety-eight women with lipoedema completed an Internet-based survey. They were asked to fill in a number of questionnaires, to assess i.a.: symptom severity, quality of life (WHOQOL-BREF), psychological flexibility (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II), loneliness (UCLA Version 3), and body appreciation scale (BAS-2). Results: Multiple hierarchical regression analyses showed that a higher level of quality of life was predicted by higher levels of psychological flexibility and body appreciation, and lower level of loneliness while controlling for symptom severity. Discussion: Future studies should investigate factors affecting the level of body appreciation in women with lipoedema, especially in the context of the level of knowledge of lipoedema and weight stigma associated with the misunderstanding that surrounds the disorder (Torre, Wadeea, Rosas, Herbst, 2018). Moreover, it might be interesting to look into the effectiveness of separate interventions to improve quality of life in women with lipoedema targeting either psychological flexibility, or loneliness, or body appreciation.

12. The Role of Psychological Flexibility in the Relationship Between Childhood Abuse and the Quality of Adult Dating Relationships in Female University Students

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Childhood abuse

Johanna Terry, M.A., Kean University
Adrienne Garro, Ph.D., Kean University
Donald Marks, Psy.D., Kean University
Aaron Gubi, Ph.D., Kean University

Past research has suggested childhood abuse can have lasting effects, which impact later romantic relationships (Cherlin, Burton, Hurt, & Purvin, 2004; Colman & Widom, 2004). This study aimed to shed light on how psychological flexibility potentially impacts this relationship between childhood abuse and quality of adult dating relationships in a female university population. Psychological flexibility can be defined as the ability to consciously contact the present moment and take part in valued-driven behavior (Biglan, Hayes, & Pistorello, 2008). The sample was comprised of female undergraduate students at a university in the Northeastern United States who are currently involved in a dating relationship. These participants were administered measures assessing the prevalence and intensity of childhood traumatic events, psychological flexibility and romantic relationship quality. Researchers hypothesized that the component of psychological flexibility would mediate the relationship between childhood abuse and quality of adult dating relationships, such that participants who have higher levels of psychological flexibility would endorse greater relationship quality. Although a predictive relationship was not found between overall childhood abuse/neglect and adult relationship quality, psychological flexibility was still found to significantly mediate the relationship. Results from this research support the utility of interventions that aim to increase psychological flexibility in individuals who have experienced childhood abuse.

13. Conscience and emotion: Does mindfulness improve performance in Emotional Stroop?

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Jose Errasti, Ph.D., University of Oviedo
Emilio López Navarro, Ph.D., University of Balearic Islands
Susana Al-Halabi, Ph.D., University of Oviedo
Carmen Rodríguez Muñiz, University of Oviedo
Hugo Martínez, University of Oviedo
Jennifer Marquez, University of Oviedo

Background: Mindfulness is a technique broadly used in clinical practice and research. Its effects over well-being are well-stablished, but it remains unclear until what extent the underlying process is an attentional or emotional one. Our study tests if a mindfulness brief induction can improve participants’ performance in a classic experimental task, comparing their execution with two active controls. Method: 120 psychology grade students were randomly allocated to the intervention conditions: mindfulness, relaxation, and control text. Mindfulness induction was performed following Eifert & Forsyth recommendations, while relaxation induction was an adaptation of Jacobsen’s instructions. Control text is based on the relevance about estimate other people. After randomization, participants fulfilled a sociodemographic questionnaire, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire and Prague Spirituality Questionnaire. Participants heard the audio of the intervention condition. After intervention, an Emotional Stroop task was launched. Emotional Stroop consisted in 240 trial presented in two blocks. Results: There were no differences between groups in FFMQ, STAI or PSQ. Although the results are not fully analysed, our first data show that there were no differences between groups in Emotional Stroop performance, but reaction time of mindfulness group was lesser in error trials of emotional words when compared with the other intervention groups. Discussion: Our results point to a differential effect of mindfulness that lessens the emotional reactivity to own perceived errors. Further research should address until what extent the relationship between the word and the clinical manifestations may mediate the effect of mindfulness.

14. Dismantling Mindfulness: Mechanisms involved in emotional awareness

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness, transdiagnostic mechanisms, medidas fisiológicas

Juan Camilo Vargas Nieto, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Background: In recent years there has been a growing explosion of therapeutic proposals based on Mindfulness, a type of contemplative meditation whose foundations date back to Eastern traditions (Bodhi, 2011). Mindfulness-based interventions have been recognized for their ability to reduce psychological distress in a wide variety of clinical disorders and have been effective in promoting adaptive emotional regulation in affective disorders such as anxiety and depression (Gross, 2014). I tried to decipher which are the "active ingredients" of the mindfulness-based workouts, the relationship between the skills associated with mindfulness and the psychological mechanisms involved. Method: For this reason, the present investigation aims to propose a protocol to evaluate the effects of a training program based on mindfulness on the skills of mindfulness, attentional control and its physiological correlates through the use of biofeedback and eye tracking equipment. . Expected results: It is expected to determine through a series of studies, the changes associated with mindfulness training on emotional awareness skills, as well as in basic psychological processes such as attention and in mechanisms such as emotional regulation, taking as a reference the physiological indicators obtained through biofeedback equipment.

15. Contextual case formulation model as a tool for understanding parental distress

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parental distress

Juho M. Strömmer, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä

Background: Parental distress and burnout symptoms are common among parents with chronically ill or disabled children. Without support parents with chronically ill children may be susceptible to burnout and other psychological symptoms. This may have negative effects on welfare of both the child and the parent, as well as the relationship between the caregivers. The aim of this study was to use contextual case formulation model in purpose to understand and describe parental distress related to parenthood of children with special needs. Methods: The participants were 21 Finnish parents with chronically ill or disabled children taking part in a randomized intervention trial. The data was collected during the pre-measurement phase. Individual case formulation models were constructed based on the data collected during a webcam interview. Results: The contextual case formulation models revealed three key themes common to all of the participants. These themes included relationship problems between the caregivers, the health care service providers ignorance of the parents’ wellbeing, and limited or non-existent personal time or personal space reported by the parents. Examples of the contextual case formulation models will be presented in the poster. Discussion: Contextual case formulation models can increase service providers’ understanding of parental distress especially among parents with chronically ill children, and could help to design effective preventative intervention and services.

16. Don’t worry, be flexible: Change in parent psychological flexibility predicts well-being in intensive interdisciplinary pediatric chronic pain treatment

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Pediatric Chronic Pain

Julia Benjamin, Ph.D., Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic
Cynthia Harbeck-Weber, Ph.D., LP, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic
Leslie Sim, Ph.D., LP, Department of Psychiatry and Psychology, Mayo Clinic

Background: Chronic pain affects 11-38% of youth (King et al., 2011), contributing to depression and poorer quality of life for patients and their parents. Interdisciplinary ACT-based programs with parental involvement foster improved youth functioning (Wicksell, Melin, Lekander, & Olsson, 2009). However, scant research has explored the benefit of these programs for parents’ adjustment. The present study sought to better understand changes in parent mental health following a 3-week interdisciplinary pediatric chronic pain program. Methods: Patients and parents completed measures at intake and three-month follow-up assessing parent depression (CES-D), quality of life (SF-36), pain catastrophizing (PCSP), and psychological flexibility (PPFQ), and child disability level (FDI). Using SPSS, we conducted paired t-tests and multiple regression analyses. Results: Our sample included 268 patient-parent dyads. Parents showed significant increases in mental health-related quality of life (t (262) = -6.88, p < .001) and decreases in depression (t (264) = 9.60, p < .001). Parent pain catastrophizing was not a significant predictor of parent mental health at follow-up, but change in psychological flexibility did predict parent mental health at follow up (CES-D: t = -5.36, p < .000). Discussion: These results highlight the potential of pediatric chronic pain treatment programs to support improved well-being for parents participating along with their child in an interdisciplinary pain program. Interventions targeting psychological flexibility, or the willingness to be present in the moment and make values-based decisions, have the potential to bolster the resilience of parents caring for a child with chronic pain.

17. Flexible Security: Psychological flexibility and attachment in romantic partnerships

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Attachment

Karen Twiselton, University of Edinburgh
Sarah Stanton, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh
David Gillanders, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh

Attachment style is found to impact on social functioning, and attachment insecurity is associated with poorer wellbeing and more difficult relationships. People with insecure attachment patterns are more likely to be more self-critical and lower in self-compassion. The current study investigated whether psychological flexibility buffers the relationship between insecure attachment and outcomes such as relationship quality and wellbeing. 1479 people in romantic partnerships (62% female, 18 - 76 years of age, mean age: 37 years, (SD = 11)) completed an online survey measuring attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety, self-compassion/self-criticism, psychological flexibility, relationship quality and both eudaemonic and hedonic wellbeing. Results showed a differential pattern of responding among those with anxious or avoidant attachment styles. For people with anxious attachment, psychological flexibility significantly predicted lower levels of self-criticism. Psychological flexibility moderated the relationship between avoidant attachment and self-compassion. Reductions in self-criticism and increases in self-compassion were associated with higher levels of eudaimonic wellbeing. Higher self-compassion also predicted higher levels of hedonic wellbeing. Psychological flexibility directly moderated the relationship between attachment avoidance and relationship quality for high levels of avoidant attachment. These data suggest that psychological flexibility could be a useful treatment target in improving the relationship quality and wellbeing of people who have experienced insecure attachment histories.

18. Novice therapist competence: Association to treatment outcome and early sudden gains

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Novice therapists

Katariina Keinonen, Ph.D. Student, University of Jyväskylä
Heidi Kyllönen, University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Objective: The aim of the current study was to explore the association between novice therapists’ competence and adherence ratings and outcome in a six-session ACT intervention for diagnosed depression. Additionally, the association between early sudden gains and competence was explored. Method: A total of 37 novice therapists were evaluated for competence and adherence using the ACT Adherence Scale. Two randomly selected sessions for each novice therapist were included in the sample (n = 74 sessions). The ratings were then analyzed in relation to the treatment results and early sudden gains. Results: The results reflected significant correlation between competence and adherence and the treatment result on the BDI-II (r = .37, p = .013 and r = .39, p = .009, respectively). However, only competence ratings were associated with larger early changes (r = .31, p = .032). In explaining the variation in treatment outcome, competence significantly contributed to the model only, when early sudden gains were not included. Conclusions: These preliminary results suggest that novice therapist competence is associated with outcome in a brief intervention for depression, but early sudden gains can explain more variation than competence.

19. Investigating the Psychometric Properties of the Values Wheel with a Clinical Cohort: A Validation Study

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Values, ACT

Kate Barrett, University College Dublin
Martin O'Connor, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, University College Dublin

Background: Previous research demonstrated the psychometric properties of a novel, idiographic values-measure: the Values Wheel (VW). This study reports on the psychometric properties of the VW with a clinical cohort. Method: Fifty-one adult clients who were engaged with the mental health services attended an assessment session comprising a battery of questionnaires measuring mental health, well-being, life satisfaction, ACT processes, as well as a values card sort task and the VW. Results: The VW demonstrated partial evidence of structural validity, such that scores were positively related to well-being and life satisfaction outcomes, and negatively related to depression. Significant positive correlations were observed with alternative values-measures, suggesting the VW demonstrates good convergent validity. The discriminant validity of the VW was partially supported, as no significant correlations with two unrelated constructs were found. Evidence for the incremental validity of the VW was also indicated, as scores accounted for unique proportions of variance in well-being and life satisfaction outcomes, beyond psychological flexibility alone. Conclusions: Outcomes provide preliminary support for the psychometric properties of the VW with a clinical population.

20. A couple's crossroad: a new way of conceptualizing couples integrating ACT and FAP

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: couple

Katia Manduchi, Private Practice
Domenica Pannace, Psychologist - Psychotherapist, Private Practice
Lorenzo Pellegrini, Psychologist - Psychotherapist, Private Practice

We introduce a new way of conceptualizing couples integrating ACT and FAP. This is possible because both models refer to functional contextualism and because functions, in behavioral analysis, facilitate the conceptualization of the case. In fact, the clinically relevant behaviors (CRB) identified through the FAP can be complementary to the Hexaflex. The six processes of psychological inflexibility can prevent the person from noticing and moving in the direction of "what is important", both individually and in the couple relationship, as well as in the therapeutic relationship. We will present two cases with couple problems that have allowed the development of a model of conceptualization of the couple following a third-generation approach of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. Using ACT we have conceptualized the cases with the application of the Hexaflex for each partner, for the couple and for the complete situation (he-she-couple). The integration of the FAP (Functional Analytic Psychotherapy) model with the Hexaflex for the couple allowed to conceptualize the clinically relevant behaviors of the couple (CRB) and of the therapist (T) in session.

21. Nonsuicidal Self-Injury and a Multidimensional Assessment of Psychological Inflexibility: Concurrent and Prospective Associations

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Nonsuicidal Self-Injury

Katie Callahan, B.A., University of Baltimore
John J Donahue, Psy.D., University of Baltimore
Shane Stori, B.A., University of Baltimore

Background: Nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) is a form of behavioral dysregulation reflecting the intentional destruction of bodily tissue without suicidal intent and has been suggested to serve an experiential avoidance (EA) function. However, EA is one psychological inflexibility facet, and while research supports the association between EA and NSSI (Armey & Crowther, 2008; Bentley et al., 2015), limited research has examined NSSI in relation to the broader psychological inflexibility construct. The primary aim of this study was to examine concurrent and prospective associations between psychological inflexibility and NSSI. Method: Participants with a history of NSSI (N = 106) completed measures of NSSI, psychological inflexibility, negative urgency, and depression at baseline, and three months later (N = 85). Results: Preliminary multivariate analyses suggest psychological inflexibility concurrently predicts NSSI recency (∆R2 = .04, p = .028), and longitudinally predicts NSSI intent (∆R2 = .07, p = .01), over-and-above established predictors. Dimensions of psychological inflexibility in relation to differing NSSI functions will also be explored. Discussion: Results will be discussed in relation to the utility of the psychological inflexibility model in understanding NSSI.

22. Psychological flexibility moderates the relationship between negative affect and alcohol use

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Substance Use, Alcohol Use, Psychological Flexibility

Kaylie Green, B.A., Pacific University
Joshua Kaplan, M.S., Pacific University
Andi M. Schmidt, M.Sc., Pacific University
Ashley Eddy, B.A., Pacific University
Candice Hoke Kennedy, M.S., Pacific University
Michael S. Christopher, Ph.D., Pacific University

Background: Problematic alcohol consumption has drawn attention within the field of contextual behavior science. Negative affect is a risk factor for problematic alcohol use. Research has suggested psychological flexibility may decrease problematic alcohol use, but it is unclear whether psychological flexibility can mitigate the impact of negative affect on alcohol use. Method: The current study investigated whether psychological flexibility moderates the relationship between negative affect and alcohol use in a representative sample of alcohol using American adults (N = 394), who were instructed to complete the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule Short Form (PANAS-SF) (Watson, Clark, & Tellegen,1988), Comprehensive Assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Processes (CompACT) (Francis, Dawson, & Golijani-Moghaddam, 2016), and the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test Self-Report Version (AUDIT) (Saunders, Aasland, Babor, De la Fuente, & Grant, 1993). It was hypothesized that participants high in psychological flexibility will display weaker relationships between negative affect and alcohol use than those with low psychological flexibility. Results: The interaction between negative affect and alcohol use was tested using bias-corrected bootstrapping based on 10,000 resamples and generated a confidence interval that did not contain zero (LCI= -.323, UCI= -.104), providing evidence for moderation (β= -.213 SE = .056, p < .001). Discussion: Psychological flexibility may protect against the development of problematic alcohol use among those who experience elevated negative affect. Potential clinical implications for addressing problematic alcohol use will be discussed.

23. Effects of Dyadic Coping and Psychological Flexibility on Stress in Parents of Children with Disabilities

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Disability, Parents, Dyadic Coping, Psychological Flexibility, Stress

Kristen Maglieri, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway
Denis O’Hora, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway
Brian Hughes, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway

Background: Despite the many challenges parents of children with disabilities face, some parents’ cope well with these stressors. Such parents are known to employ a range of coping strategies, but it is less clear how much support parents provide to one another (dyadic coping) and the impact this has on each partner’s health and wellbeing. The current study investigated the effects of dyadic coping and psychological flexibility on the wellbeing of mothers and fathers of children with disabilities. Method: In a sample of mothers and fathers (n =385), four hierarchical multiple regressions tested whether dyadic coping predicted stress and outcome variables over and above established predictors. Using the Actor-Partner Interdependence Model, a dyadic data analysis on couples’ data (n = 57), examined the specific actor-partner effects of dyadic coping, stress, and psychological flexibility on stress, physical health symptoms, depression and anxiety. Results: Dyadic coping explained additional variance over and above several predictors for stress and depression, but not for physical health and anxiety. Specific gender effects of positive dyadic coping were observed for men on stress, depression and anxiety. Finally, dyadic analysis revealed a significant actor-partner relationship for psychological inflexibility on stress for both mothers and fathers. Discussion: These findings indicate the relevance of the couple in understanding and treating stress in parents of children with disabilities. Dyadic coping influences stress and depression and positive dyadic coping is an important coping mechanism for men. Psychological inflexibility negatively affects one’s partner’s stress, possibly due to a failure to provide coping resources.

24. Mindfulness and Couple Conflict De-Escalation: Using a brief mindfulness exercise to decrease arousal and negative affect in couples

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Couple Therapy, Mindfulness, Conflict/Aggression

Kyle Horst, Ph.D., CSU CHICO
Paige Roberts, CSU CHICO
Mary Parker, CSU CHICO
Allison Urban, CSU CHICO

Few practical tools exist to aid couples in the de-escalation of conflict. Despite the growing body of research demonstrating the effectiveness of mindfulness-based treatments for a variety of issues, there is little to no evidence suggesting the use of mindfulness for couple conflict. This poster will outline a study of the impact of a brief mindfulness exercise on couple conflict. Study participants consisted of 10 couples who were asked to participate in a brief conflict discussion. Midway through this conversation, couples were asked to participate in a 10 minute mindfulness exercise. After the exercise couples were asked to continue their original conflict conversation. Couples were measured for negative affect, conflict resolution tactics, and other related couple process outcomes using both observational coding (Rapid marital interaction coding system (RMICS) and psychophysiological methods (facial electromyography (EMG) and skin conductance). Results indicate that the brief mindfulness exercise reduced levels of negative affect . These results indicate a potential utility of using mindfulness with couples in conflict.

25. Influence of personality traits and cognitive flexibility on the confidence of speaking in public

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Personality traits, confidence of speaking in public and Psychological Inflexibility

Laura Acuña, European University of Madrid, Spain
Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain

Background: Anxiety and fear when speaking in public is one of the most frequent problems among the university population. The lack of confidence to speak in public correlated positively with neuroticism and negatively with extraversion. Literature speaks only of these two personality traits. No others have been explored. This study wants to identify the relationship that exists between personality traits, the confidence of speaking in public and the experiential avoidance of university students of Madrid, Spain. Method: Measures of psychological infexibility or experiential avoidance Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II) (Bond et al., 2011) Measures of Personality traits: NEO Revised Personality Inventory or NEO PI-R (Costa & McCrae, 1999). Measures of Confidence as Speaker: The shortened Spanish version of the Personal Report of Confidence as Speaker, PRCS (Hidalgo, Inglés & Méndez, 1999) Results and discussion: 1. The lack of confidence to speak in public correlates positively with the personality trait Neuroticism and negatively with Extroversion. 2. Cognitive inflexibility correlates positively with the trait Neuroticism, and negatively with the feature extraversion, openness to experience and agreeableness. 3. The personality trait Neuroticism is one of the dimensions of the personality that maintains a significant association and positive correlation with the difficulty to speak in public and cognitive inflexibility. It means that a person with difficulty speaking in public will have cognitive inflexibility. 4. Females reported higher psychological infexibility than males. Females also showed greater difficulty in speaking in public than men.

26. Assessing the efficacy of an ACT hybrid intervention for anxiety disorders and the added value of a weekly phone call: Preliminary results from a randomized controlled trial

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anxiety, Psychological Flexibility, Mindfulness, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Lauriane Lapointe, D.Ps. Candidate, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
Joel Gagnon, Ph.D. Candidate, Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières
Guillaume Foldes-Busque, Ph.D., School of Psychology, Université Laval
Nadia Gagnon, M.Ps., Integrated Center of Health and Social Services of Chaudière-Appalaches
Frédérick Dionne, Ph.D., Université du Québec à Trois-Rivières

One-third of the general population will be affected by an anxiety disorder in their life. An increasing number of studies demonstrates the benefits of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders, but more studies are needed to assess the efficacy of ACT in various formats. This research sought to analyse the preliminary results from a 12-weeks ACT hybrid intervention (group therapy combined with a web-based component) on anxiety symptoms and psychological flexibility, and to verify if a weekly phone call to assist patients in their learning of web-based material would improve outcome. 58 outpatients suffering from anxiety disorders were randomly assigned to one of three conditions: ACT hybrid intervention supplemented by 6 weekly phone calls (n=24), ACT hybrid intervention (n=15) and waiting list (n=19). Mixed ANOVAs revealed a significant interaction effect between active conditions and time for anxiety symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale; F(2,55)=8.17, p=.0008, η2G=.068) and psychological flexibility (Acceptance and Action Questionnaire; F(2,55)=3.76, p=.030, η2G=.034). Post-hoc comparisons indicated that, compared to the ACT hybrid intervention without phone calls and the waiting list, participants in the ACT hybrid intervention with phone calls reported a significant reduction in anxiety symptoms and a significant increase in psychological flexibility. These preliminary results support the potential efficacy of an ACT hybrid intervention for anxiety and highlights the incremental value of a therapeutic contact during such interventions. The limitations of the study, the implications for the elaboration of hybrid interventions, and future development of this project are discussed.

27. Can technology distance us from our emotions?: An investigation into biofeedback and ACT for stress recovery

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Stress

Leticia Martinez Prado, Ph.D., IE University, IEU Wellbeing Centre
Masa Micunovic, IE University

Stress is often thought to be merely a routine part of everyday life. However, many are unaware of how detrimental failure to recover from stress can be - both to one's mental and physical health. This has even more relevance nowadays, with most people living faster paced and highly stressed lifestyles. There has been strong evidence to suggest that both biofeedback and ACT are effective in managing and reducing stress in a variety of populations. Although, notably there is far more research focused on biofeedback than on ACT. In order to explore the effectiveness of these approaches to stress recovery and cognitive diffusion, this study used three groups of ten students each to administer different tools through stress management workshops. The first group received a biofeedback workshop, the second an ACT workshop, and the third a combined approach. The study highlights the value of both approaches to stress recovery, demonstrating that both biological and psychological tools can be useful. However, the study also indicates that a combined approach is most effective for stress recovery and cognitive diffusion, and thus supports the movement towards more holistic and empirically sound therapies. The study also suggests that in this ever-evolving technological society, technology can actually provide an additional form of treatment and stress management, alongside more contextual therapies such as ACT.

28. ACT in crisis intervention: A critical review

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Crisis Intervention

Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain
Pablo Ruisoto, University of Salamanca

Recently number of lab-controlled studies in ACT have multiplied supporting the validity of the core therapeutic processes of ACT (A-Tjak, Davis, Morina, Powers, Smits, & Emmelkamp, 2015), but more naturalistic approaches such as brief interventions in crisis remains a challenge, although successful experiences keep building up (Stroshal, Robinson, Gustavsson, 2012). For example, brief interventions working with former child soldiers, street children and victims of violence (Dahl, 2011, 2012). Two main reasons justify this study: first, dose/effect studies have found that most change in therapy happens before session (Strosahl, 2010); second, some context, such as currents interventions with refugees. The aim of this paper is twofold: 1) to critically review studies focused on brief interventions for high distress situations outlining key principles of brief ACT intervention in crisis, and 2) to review the available data about its efficacy and effectiveness. Key concepts, such as suffering and change, and the relevance of developing value-based brief interventions in multicultural contexts with limited funds. Hopefully, this study will foster new efforts to increase public investment to address crisis.

29. The role of psychological (in)flexibility when facing highly stressful situations

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Crisis Intervention

Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain
Pablo Ruisoto, University of Salamanca

Background. The current humanitarian crisis in Mediterranean countries and its psychological consequences demand an affective answer. In recent decades, a large number of lab-controlled studies have supported the validity of psychological inflexibility as a core therapeutic processes involved in psychopathology and acceptance and commitment therapy. However, a more naturalistic approaches such the importance of this process while coping with highly stressful situations or humanitarian crisis remains understudied, although successful experiences keep building up. The aim of this paper is to critically review studies focused on process-based brief interventions for high distress situations outlining their key principles. Methods. A systematic review of full-text articles published in English in the last decade was conducted from Web of Science, using psychological inflexibility, stress, and crisis as keywords. Results. Results indicate first, that according to dose/effect studies, most change in therapy happens before session; second, that psychological flexibility may play a protective role when coping with highly stressful situations and humanitarian crisis. Key concepts, such as suffering and change, and the relevance of developing value-based brief interventions in multicultural contexts with limited funds, instead of expensive pathology centered long-term therapy will be further discussed underlying differences with biomedical model approach. Hopefully, this study will foster new efforts to increase public investment to address crisis.

30. An integrated treatment planning model for the simultaneous treatment of complex patients with multiple comorbidities

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Treatment Planning

Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Christina Doro, Psy.D., Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Rachael Unger, Psy.D., Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Amy Simler, Psy.D., Motivational Institute for Behavioral Health, LLC
Courtney Purdy, Psy.D., Institute for Life Renovation, LLC
Huda Abu-Suwa, M.S., Nova Southeastern University

Background: Recommended treatment planning for individual outpatient treatment of patients often includes a biopsychosocial and treatment targeting specific goals or outcomes pertaining to a few problem areas. Little research or guidelines have been presented for systematic methodology for treatment planning of highly complex patients presenting with multiple comorbidities in need of individualized, intensive, and integrated outpatient care. An individualized comprehensive intensive outpatient program for complex patients that has demonstrated effectiveness with complex cases outlines treatment planning methodology for treating these complex cases. Method: Existing treatment planning models have been adapted for the simultaneous treatment of multiple disorders and problems using a model of integrated care. Flow-chart diagrams are presented and highlighted with case examples. Results: Results indicated significant decreases in Beck depression Inventory (BDI) scores (t=4.96, p<.001), and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) state (t=4.90, p<.001) and trait scores (t=5.70, p<.001). Significant increases were found in quality of life measured by the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) overall t-scores (t=-6.10, p<.001) and skills measured by the Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) observe (t=-3.22, p=.006), describe (t=-3.01, p=.009), act with awareness (t=-3.05, p=.008), nonjudge (t=-3.39, p=.004), and nonreact (t=-2.69, p=.02) scores were also found. Discussion: Published observations about treatment planning are limited. Effective treatment planning of complex cases is especially multifaceted and intricate. While this provides methodology for systematic treatment of complex patients with multiple comorbidities and problems, more research is needed to validate the extent of its effectiveness and to continue to evolve its utility.

31. Development and analysis of ACT/RFT-based Group and Brief Individual Interventions for a Rheumatology population

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anxiety, depression, rheumatology, brief intervention, group intervention

Lorraine Maher-Edwards, CPsychol, Guys and St Thomas NHS Trust
Alex Quigley, ClinPsy, Guys and St Thomas NHS
Nora Ng, Guys and St Thomas NHS Trust

Background: Psychiatric comorbidities are common in patients living with rheumatological conditions (estimates suggest 20-25% point prevalence of depression and anxiety). Moreover, baseline and persistent symptoms of affective disorders are associated with poorer health outcomes and treatment response in these patients (Matcham et al., 2016). A recent systematic review concluded that, in this population, mood disorders are difficult to treat and the evidence base for psychological intervention is poor (Feist et al., 2017). Psychological inflexibility has been shown to be associated with poorer function and psychological wellbeing in chronic pain populations and more recently juvenile idiopathic arthritis (Feinstein et al., 2011) specifically. No studies have examined the effects of contextual based interventions for a rheumatology population. Methods: Rheumatology Patients with a variety of diagnoses received an ACT/clinical RFT based group intervention (6 weeks 3.5 hours/week) OR a 6-session one to one brief intervention with an experienced ACT-therapist. Participants completed a number of questionnaires including Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire-8 (CPAQ-8), work and social adjustment scale, mood measures, and the COMPACT measuring psychological flexibility. Results: The Reliable Change Index/Clinically significant change (RSI/CSC) method was used to compute individual scores for 10 participants who attended the group treatment and 10 who attended brief interventions (Jacobsen & Truax, 1991). Individual and summary effect sizes and scores will be presented in tabular and tramline graph format. Discussion: Format and efficacy of these 2 ACT/RFT-based interventions will be discussed and implications for development of Psychology Services for Rheumatology populations and directions for research will be discussed.

32. Journeys of recovery from alcohol dependence: a thematic analysis of personal accounts viewed through the lens of CBS
Applying ACT to Addictions SIG Sponsored
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Addiction

Lucy Dorey, University of Southampton
Judith Lathlean, University of Southampton

Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twenty-four participants who completed alcohol detoxification, at several points over a year. Participants were asked about the changes they had made, and specific examples of change were elicited. Interviews were analysed using thematic analysis, and principles compatible with a contextual behavioural perspective were used to develop a theoretical model of change. Active change often followed a crisis event, and involved changes in awareness, behaviour and decision making towards three common purposes: not drinking, day to day living and facing problems. Professional, family and peer-group relationships were central to this process, providing opportunities to open up, validation of expressions of vulnerability, and experiences of commonality with others. New `rules’ were adopted in order to initiate abstinence, which involved avoiding alcohol and triggers; avoidance based rules were gradually replaced by those that led to engagement with rewarding aspects of living. Contextual behavioural science combined with personal accounts of recovery offers insight into common processes of change underlying recovery from alcohol dependence across different routes to recovery; these processes warrant further research.

33. The Efficacy of Cultivating Self-Compassion (a healthy way of relating to oneself motivated by a desire to help not harm)

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Self-compassion

Madeleine Ferrari, D.Clin.Psy., Ph.D. Candidate, The University of Sydney and Australian Catholic University
Caroline Hunt, The University of Sydney
Ashish Harrysunker, Australian Catholic University
Maree J. Abbott, The University of Sydney
Alissa P. Beath, Macquarie University
Danielle A. Einstein, Macquarie University

Background/ Objectives: Self-compassion is a healthy way of relating to one’s self motivated by a desire to help rather than harm. Novel self-compassion based interventions have targeted diverse populations and outcomes. This meta-analysis identified randomized-controlled trials of self-compassion interventions, and measured their effects on psychosocial outcomes. Methods: This meta-analysis included a systematic search of six databases, and hand-searches of the included study’s reference lists. Twenty-eight randomized-controlled trials that examined validated psychosocial measures for self-compassion based interventions met inclusion criteria. Pre-post and follow-up data was extracted for the intervention and control groups and study quality was assessed using the PRISMA checklist. Results: Self-compassion interventions led to significant improvement across 11 diverse psychosocial outcomes compared to controls. Notably, the aggregate effect size Hedge’s g was large for measures of eating behavior (g = 1.76) and rumination (g = 1.37). Effects were moderate for self-compassion (g = 0.75), stress (g = 0.67), depression (g = 0.66), mindfulness (g = 0.62), self-criticism (g = 0.56), and anxiety (g = 0.57) outcomes. Further moderation analyses found that the improvements in depression symptoms continued to increase at follow-up, and self-compassion gains were maintained. Results differed across population type, and were stronger for group over individual delivery methods. Intervention type was too diverse to analyze specific categories and publication bias may be present. Discussion: This review supports the efficacy of self-compassion based interventions across a range of outcomes and diverse populations. Future research should consider mechanisms of change.

35. Study Protocol and Preliminary Findings from a One-Day ACT Workshop for Emotional Eating

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: emotional eating

Mallory Frayn, Ph.D. Candidate, McGill University
Sabrah Khanyari, McGill University
Bärbel Knäuper, Ph.D., McGill University

Emotional eating is the tendency to overeat in response to negative emotions and has been linked to both physical health concerns and psychological distress, regardless of weight status. However, emotional eating has only been addressed in the context of weight loss programs, so emotional eating interventions are not available for those who do not struggle with weight. The present study aimed to test the feasibility and acceptability of a one-day ACT workshop that teaches skills to reduce emotional eating regardless of weight. The workshop was delivered in a single day (~ 6 hours) and aimed to reduce emotional eating by improving values clarification, acceptance, and mindfulness. Preliminary results suggest both feasibility and acceptability; participants described appreciating the brevity of the program and its applicability to their everyday lives. Decreases in emotional eating were also observed at 2 weeks and 3 months post-intervention. The results from this study can be used to inform a larger scale randomized controlled trial (RCT) to determine the efficacy of the program in a larger sample.

36. Can self-compassion protect against the impact of early shame and safeness memories on later depressive symptoms and safe affect?

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Emotional memories

Marcela Matos, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Stanley R. Steindl, Ph.D., Compassionate Mind Research Group, University of Queensland
Alison Creed, Compassionate Mind Research Group, School of Psychology, University of Queensland

Background: Psychological interventions that aim to promote compassion have gathered support for their effectiveness in the treatment of psychopathology. Compassion focused therapy (CFT), in particular, is a promising treatment for depression, especially for patients presenting high levels shame. CFT works to cultivate compassion competencies and reduce fears of compassion, to promote mental health and positive affect, and alleviate distress. Although there is empirical support for the association between fears of compassion, early emotional memories and depression, this study aims to explore the role of compassion competencies in these associations. Method: 223 participants recruited from the general population completed self-report questionnaires measuring traumatic qualities and centrality of shame memories, early memories of warmth and safeness, compassion for others, from others and self-compassion, and depressive symptoms and safe affect. Results: Results revealed that shame memories’ traumatic qualities and centrality to identity were positively correlated with depressive symptoms and negatively with safe affect, compassion from others and self-compassion, while early memories of warmth and safeness were negatively correlated with depressive symptoms and positively with safe affect and self-compassion. Self-compassion had the strongest correlations with depressive symptoms and safe affect. Path analysis revealed self-compassion as the only significant mediator on associations between early emotional memories, depressive symptoms and safe affect. Discussion: Targeting shame memories directly is important, however the current study supports the added benefit of developing compassion competencies, and therefore developing the compassionate self, to reduce depressive symptoms and enhance safe positive affect.

37. Would YOU buy a used car from this man? Teaching deception to autistic children

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: autism

Maria Josè Sireci, Università Kore di Enna
Francesca Mongelli, Università Kore di Enna
Martina Leuzzi, Università Kore di Enna
Siana Saddemi, Università Kore di Enna
Giovambattista Presti, Università Kore di Enna

Background: Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) show severe deficits in understanding deceptions, both in the ability to lie to others and in the ability to understand when someone lies. Method: The study used multiple exemplar training to teach the generalized skill of identifying deceptive comments and responding appropriately to them to two subjects diagnosed with ASD (F. 9 yrs and B. 8 yrs). In a baseline phase interspersed during natural environment training (NET) sessions, a more natural form of utilizing ABA conducted in the child's typical environment, 8 deceptive comments were proposed by ABA trained therapists without offering any feedback after each child's response. In the training phase, therapists proposed four misleading comments in the same setting as baseline, offering social reinforcements after a correct answers and a prompt in the form of a question-guide for an incorrect answer. In the post-training phase, the comments proposed in baseline were re-tested. Results: Increasing trends in the data on first trials of novel deceptions were used as the primary indicator of the desired behavior change. Results show a rapid increase in the frequency of correct responses and generalization of the trained repertoire in the natural environment was also observed. Discussion: This pilot study extends the results of Ranick, Persicke, Tarbox , & Kornack (2012) to another language and social environment. These encouraging results provide further evidence that non-literal language deficits can be remediated using simple behavioral teaching procedures such as the provision of rules and multiple exemplar training.

38. What is said is not what is meant: Teaching irony to autistic kids

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: autism

Maria Josè Sireci, Università Kore di Enna
Francesca Mongelli, Università Kore di Enna
Martina Leuzzi, Università Kore di Enna
Siana Saddemi, Università Kore di Enna
Giovambattista Presti, Università Kore di Enna

Background: Individuals diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD show difficulties in using and understanding irony and sarcasm because the meaning is the opposite of what is said. Method: This study used rules, video clips, and in vivo training in multiple exemplars to teach two highly functioning children with autism (B. 8 years and F .9 years) to detect and respond appropriately to sarcastic comments. At baseline, 3 sarcastic and 3 real comments were embedded into a conversation, without giving any feedback or prompt, if a correct or incorrect response was given. Only when the children did not respond the therapist checked the listener behavior by saying “Have you heard what I have said?” or other similar comments. Short videos were showed in the training phase using sarcastic/real comments. The child was then asked to identify if the comment was sarcastic or real and every correct answer was followed by a social or tangible reinforcer. A correction procedure was implemented when the child failed. Results: A rapid increase in the frequency of correct response between baseline and treatment. Generalization of the trained repertoire was observed in the natural environment and across people, by including two people in post-training sessions who were never present during training. Discussion: Data extends Persicke, Tarbox, Ranick & St. Clair (2018) results to a new language and social environment. These encouraging results provide further evidence that non-literal language deficits can be remediated using simple behavioral teaching procedures such as the provision of rules and multiple exemplar training.

39. Involving in parenting practices in a more active and flexible way: Study on the Parental Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (PAAQ)

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parenting

Marina Cunha, Ph.D, ISMT - Coimbra, Portugal; CINEICC - University of Coimbra
Ana Xavier, Ph.D., CINEICC - University of Coimbra; Oporto Global University
Ana Galhardo, ISMT - Coimbra, Portugal; CINEICC - University of Coimbra
Adeline Navega, ISMT- Coimbra

Background: During childhood years, parents face several transitions and challenges with their children. Although these developmental transitions are normative, they may also be difficult. Experiential avoidance (EA) may occur in parenting context when parents are unwilling to experience psychological distress and make deliberate efforts to avoid, stop, minimize or control that emotional distress. Literature shows EA have a negative impact on both parents and children and their interaction, thus it seems important to identify the presence of EA. This study aims to explore the factor structure of the Parental Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (PAAQ), which assess parental EA when confronting with negative emotions of their children, and to analyse its psychometric properties in a sample of Portuguese parents of school-aged children. Method: The sample includes 381 parents (350 women and 31 men). All participants completed the following self-report questionnaires: PAAQ; Acceptance and Action Questionnaire; Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales; Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire. Results: The Portuguese version of the PAAQ showed a bi-factor structure similar to the original one (Inaction and Unwillingness) with satisfactory internal consistencies for both subscales. An adequate test-retest reliability for one-month interval was found. PAAQ revealed a significant positive association with experiential avoidance, negative emotional states and the perception children’s psychological difficulties. Discussion: Despite some limitations, this study highlights the importance of assessing EA in the parenting context (when dealing with children’s negative emotions). Our results may encourage further studies for development and refinement of psychological assessment tools in parenting context.

40. Fight with Mike: Bobo Doll experience to increase psychological flexibility

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT

Matteo Giansante, IRCSS Don Calabria Sacro Cuore Hospital Negrar Italy
Giuseppe Deledda, IRCSS Don Calabria Sacro Cuore Hospital Negrar, Italy
Dr.ssa Sara Poli, IRCSS Don Calabria Sacro Cuore Hospital Negrar, Italy
Eleonora Geccherle, IRCSS Don Calabria Sacro Cuore Hospital Negrar, Italy

The experience of the "standing doll", called Bobo Doll, can be very useful in clinical practice with facing life with some degree of psychology and inflexibility pugnacity. Already tried by Bandura and collaborators in the 1960s to study behavior childish, the Bobo Doll, which we will call Mike, can also be a valid ally in the third-generation behavioral psychotherapy. In line with the ACT (Acceptance and Committment Therapy) therapy, every living being, in fact, tries to instinctively escape the internal experience of suffering by implementing strategies of avoidance. The struggle, however, does nothing but create further emotional suffering by adding to the clean pain (biological) also considerable psychological suffering (dirty pain). This suffering is often linked to a shrinking of the customer's behavioral buffet compared to its own sphere of values. Mike offers a series of experiential exercises through which it is possible to conduct ours patient through all the six processes of ACT therapy, to achieve greater flexibility functional mental to the management of stressful events such as chronic pain. Starting from creative hopelessness the patient can recognize the uselessness of the fight against pain or emotions such as the anger in the goal of creating a life worth living.

41. Function over Form: Experiential Avoidance Explains Difficulties on Two Stressful Tasks Beyond DSM Symptoms

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Experiential avoidance, anxiety disorders

Meaghan Lewis, Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Tabitha DiBacco, Western Michigan University
Kyra Bebus, Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, B.S., Western Michigan University
Karissa Scholten, Western Michigan University
Sydney Tasker, Western Michigan University

Categorical models of psychopathology commonly conceptualize in terms of topography with little attention devoted to understanding the underlying function of processes that drive common psychiatric disorders such as mood/affective and anxiety disorders. While these disorders are commonly associated with impaired functioning in many domains (e.g., problem drinking, Levin et al., 2012) the function of these behaviors may be better conceptualized as a form of experiential avoidance (Boulanger, Hayes, & Pistorello, 2010). The goals of the present study were to evaluate the predictive validity of general psychiatric symptoms including state and trait anxiety symptoms, likely anxiety/depressive disorder diagnoses, and experiential avoidance strategies in a sample of university students who completed several challenging tasks. Trait experiential avoidance predicted difficulties on these stressful tasks above and beyond state and trait anxiety, depression, and paranoia, and was predictive of increased heart rate during these tasks. Non-parametric bootstrapping analyses revealed a significant indirect effect of experiential avoidance on the link between overall distress and electing to stop the stressful tasks early. Findings will be discussed with recommendations for improving assessment and treatment of psychopathology within an experiential avoidance paradigm.

42. Self-as-Context: A Laboratory-Based Component Analysis in a Stress-Exposed Population

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Self as Context

Megan Godbee, Macquarie University
Associate Professor Maria Kangas, Macquarie University

Background: Self-as-Context (SAC) is one of the six core components of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy model (ACT) (Hayes, Strosahl & Wilson, 1999). SAC refers to an awareness of an enduring sense of self that is distinct from, and higher than, internal experiences such as thoughts, emotions and physical sensations. Analysis of this component has only recently begun to gain momentum, with a recent systematic review identifying seven laboratory-based studies, two intervention studies and four correlational studies (Godbee & Kangas, 2018, in press). Results were mixed and research with larger sample sizes, random allocation and assessing the effectiveness of SAC in response to internal experiences other than thoughts and pain. Method: The current study was a laboratory-based study with an undergraduate university sample (N = 105) randomly allocated to a SAC, Cognitive Restructuring (CR) or Control condition. Participants were taught the intervention strategy corresponding to their group allocation in an individualised but standardised brief therapy session. They were then asked to use the strategy while listening to an audio-recording of themselves discussing a personal, distressing event and rate their emotional distress over time. Results: Participants in the SAC group reported significantly less distress than participants in the control group, while the CR group did not differ from the control participants. Discussion: The study provided preliminary evidence that SAC is effective in reducing distress in a stress-exposed sample. Strengths and limitations of the study, particularly the use of reduction in distress as an outcome measure for an ACT intervention, are discussed.

43. ACT for Psychosis in Community-Based Mental Health Institutions

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: psychosis, group therapy

Mehmet Emrah Karadere, Hitit University Corum Training and Research Hospital
Hüseyin Şehit Burhan, Psychiatry Clinic, Karaman State Hospital

Background: in our study, our aim was to conduct a preliminary study on examining the efficacy and applicability of acceptance comitment therapy (ACT) in psychotic patients in the community based mental health center. Method: we applied ACT-based group therapy for psychosis with 18 clients in 2 groups of the mental health institution. Each groups (10 and 8 people) participated in 6 group therapy sessions for 6 weeks. Socio-demographic Characteristics Form, Acceptance and Action Form-2, PSYRATS Psychotic Symptoms Assessment Scales, and Quality of Life Scale for Schizophrenic Patients were completed. The pre and post-therapy values of the patients were compared with the pair sample t-test. Results: We worked with data from 16 people 18 patients completed the procedure. 87.5% (14) of the patients were male, the mean age was 44.44 ± 10.02 and the mean education period was 9.25 ± 3.57. 58.2% (11) of the patients were single and 43.8% (7) were married The baseline and outcome measures of the patients were statistically different between the delusions (p <0.001), AAQ (p <0.005) and life characteristics (p <0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in hallucination scale (p = 0.126). Discussion: The presence of 16 patients from 18 patients in the sessions was thought to be acceptable and feasible by 6 weeks of ACT application in psychotic patients. In addition, decreases in the AAQ, delusion and quality of life scale suggest that 6-week ACT application is effective in psychotic patients.

44. A Linguistic Inquiry Approach to the Assessment of Psychological Flexibility

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Psychological Flexibility, assessment

Melissa Miller, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Emily Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Psychological flexibility seems to be an important dimension of the behavioral repertoire that involves the ability to learn and to engage in effective and personally significant behavior in the presence of unwanted private events. As it involves aspects of behavior-behavior relations between overt and covert events, however, psychological flexibility has proven difficult for the behavior analyst to directly observe. While some have suggested that qualitative self-report might eliminate bias caused by questionnaires, it does not generally lend itself to quantitative analysis at the individual or group level. Linguistic Analysis involves transforming qualitative data so that quantitative analysis is possible. This paper will present data from several attempts to create a linguistic analysis “dictionary” that will allow for direct observation and quantification of psychological flexibility. Results suggest that linguistic analysis may be a promising approach to assessing psychological flexibility and other complex aspects of the repertoire. Implications for the continued use of linguistic analysis to assess psychological flexibility and related constructs will be discussed.

45. Effect of a brief, RNT-focused ACT protocol in obesity

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Repetitive negative thinking

Miguel A. Acuña, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Pablo Vallejo-Medina, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Obesity is a growing health problem in the 21st century as recognized by the World Health Organization. This has led to design interdisciplinary efforts to generate interventions aimed at weight loss. However, the long-term results of these programs are limited, with the recovery of the lost weight being frequent. Acceptance and commitment (ACT) is based on the principles of accepting physical discomfort, without the need to get rid of them through the consumption of food, learning to notice that they are transitory, connecting with important values for the individual such as healthy habits. This research aims to analyze the effect of a three-session protocol based on ACT on weight loss in overweight people through a multiple baseline design across participants. Additionally, it will be analyzed the effect of the protocol on the promotion of healthy behaviors such as engaging in physical activities, as well as the acceptance of body image, experiential avoidance related to body weight and feeding, the suppression of thoughts and the increase in valued actions related to a healthy lifestyle.

46. Predictive factors of depression, anxiety and quality of life in family carers of people with dementia: The role of psychological flexibility

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Dementia family carers

Milena Contreras, M.Sc., University of East Anglia
Eneida Mioshi, Ph.D., University of East Anglia
Naoko Kishita, Ph.D., University of East Anglia

Background: Family carers of people with dementia often experience elevated levels of depression and anxiety as well as lower levels of quality of life (QoL). Care recipient’s neuropsychiatric symptoms, their level of independence in activities of daily living (ADL) and carer’s objective burden (hours devoted to caregiving) are considered to have an impact on such important carer outcomes. However, the role of psychological flexibility has not been widely studied yet. This study aimed to investigate the impact of key care recipient’s factors (neuropsychiatric symptoms and ADL) and carer factors (objective burden and psychological flexibility assessed by Acceptance and Action Questionnaire) on carer depression, anxiety and QoL. Methods: Forty family carers with a first-degree relationship with a person with dementia (Mean age=69.60, SD=13.2; 70% female) were recruited. Results: A separate multiple regression analysis was conducted with depression, anxiety and QoL as a dependent variable. Neuropsychiatric symptoms, ADL, objective burden, and psychological flexibility were entered to the model as independent variables. Psychological flexibility was the only significant predictor of carer depression (β=.52) and QoL (β=.40). Both psychological flexibility (β=.42) and neuropsychiatric symptoms (β=.32) significantly predicted variation in anxiety. Discussions: These findings suggest that psychological flexibility may be more important in improving depression, anxiety and QoL in family carers than other potential risk factors such as ADL and objective burden. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy may have a strong potential as effective treatment for this population. Family carers with elevated anxiety may also benefit from receiving the training for managing neuropsychiatric symptoms of dementia.

47. The efficacy of RNT-focused ACT in renal patients with emotional difficulties

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Repetitive negative thinking

Mónica J. Rozo, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Pablo Vallejo-Medina, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of emotional distress resulting from a wide range of situations, including chronic diseases. Chronic kidney disease has a high prevalence in Colombia and in high stages requires renal replacement therapy, hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis. These procedures usually cause multiple emotional alterations in these patients, thus decreasing their quality of life. The aim of the present study is to analyze the effect of ACT in renal patients on hemodialysis with emotional problems. For this purpose, a brief ACT protocol focused on repetitive negative thinking (RNT) specifically adapted to the characteristics and situation of these patients was designed. Subsequently, the effect of the protocol on emotional symptoms, rumination, valuable actions and quality of life was analyzed through a concurrent multiple-baseline design across 5 participants in renal replacement therapy for at least one year.

48. Pain is like a naughty pixie that gets in the way. Why should I have to stop doing things because it says no?
Pain SIG Sponsored
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Long-term health conditions and persistent pain

Natalie Bidad, Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Dr Lorraine Nanke, Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Foundation Trust

ACT is a principles-based approach which works with evidence-based processes in context to promote psychological flexibility. Much evidence supporting ACT-based group interventions analyses pre-post change in outcome measures following standardised intervention. This research strategy does not directly address whether the intervention was associated with change in evidence-based processes. Furthermore, as flexibility-related processes are proposed to underlie human well-being, they are likely to be influenced by the whole range of interactions with healthcare systems, including formal intervention and informal communication. The current study was designed as an exploration of patients’ experience of living with long-term health conditions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 10 patients who had completed either an ACT-based resilience or mindfulness group in an NHS outpatient setting. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Patients reported dynamic ongoing shifts in sense of agency, or the ability to do something to improve their health and well-being. Most reported increased acceptance of their condition, and willingness to experiment with different ways of engaging with their body, other people, and the healthcare system. Ambivalence in experiences of engagement with the healthcare system were reported; for some taking control over their health was associated with increased collaboration, whilst others disengaged from aspects of the healthcare system, depending on individuals’ perceptions of the workability and willingness to take the risk of acting differently. In conclusion, ACT is an agile therapeutic approach which can contribute towards meeting UK NICE guidelines for a personalised and integrative approach to the management of multi-morbidity and long-term health conditions.

49. ELIZA - A Small Protocol for Big Choices

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Brief Intervention

Nicola Maffini, M.D., Casa Gioia Research Centre
Rob Cattivelli, Psy.D., Ph.D., Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart

ELIZA is a short therapeutic protocol (3-4 sessions) that integrates ACT strategies (Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson, 2012), FACT (Strosahl, Robinson, & Gustavsson, 2012) and borrowed from Behavioral Economics (choice, value, discounting, nudging), in order to model a flexible and oriented style of pragmatic success. ELIZA specifically focuses on choice as the singular behavioral and existential unit. Despite being based on the development of the Matrix ACT (Polk & Schoendorff, 2014) over time it has taken on specific characteristics such as: a) being based on the "three logics of existence" (having, doing and being), b) being structured in recurrent cycles of discrimination, c) focusing on on the functional selection of the environment. ELIZA promotes discrimination processes between what is possible and what can't to be done and facilitates the development of a realistic synthesis between these two poles. ELIZA aims at radical and immediate results favoring empowerment (cycle of control), increasing motivation by reducing ambivalence (motivation cycle), and reducing avoidance (cost cycle). Structure, perspectives and promising data are illustrated.

50. Mindfulness in archery - Can archery be used in psychotherapy?

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Nina Schulze, Neuropsychiatric Center Hamburg Germany
Peter Tonn, Neuropsychiatric Center, Hamburg
Silja Reuter, Neuropsychiatric Center Hamburg, Germany

Archery is a sport that requires a high level of attention and concentration. In addition to competitive sports, archery also includes the area of intuitive archery, which also includes aspects of mindfulness and equanimity. Archery is already used in therapy in many psychiatric hospitals in Germany. However, there is little to no research in this area. In a study including archers and non-archers, we are currently collecting data to measure whether the level of mindfulness of archers is higher than that of non-archers. This study will be completed by May and I can present the results. So far, more than 300 archers took part in the study!

51. The Meta-Analytic Evidence of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: A Review

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Meta-Analysis, Review, ACT

Noemi Walder, B.Sc., University of Basel
Michael Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University, USU ACT Research Group
Michael Twohig, Ph.D., Utah State University, USU ACT Research Group
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Over 200 clinical trials have examined Acceptance and Commitment Therapy(ACT) to date. This has led to numerous meta-analysis and reviews across various disorders and in comparisons to numerous treatments. With this critical mass of studies, it is possible to reflect upon and critically examine the fundus of knowledge in order to guide further steps in ACT research. Consequently, this poster aims to summarize and review current published meta-analysis in ACT. Method: We conducted a literature search yielding 30 reviews and meta-analyses. After a screening process, 17 meta-analysis were included in the review. Results: Most meta-analyses showed that ACT is effective for a variety of psychological and physical disorders. Meta-analyses showed small effect sizes of ACT compared to active controls; medium effect sizes compared to WL, placebo and TAU. No differences were observed across diagnoses. Discussion: Findings will be considered for their adequateness based on the ACT theory of psychological flexibility.

53. Factors Impacting Completion of a Targeted Online Acceptance-Based Behavioural Treatment for Chronic Pain

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Chronic Pain

Pamela L. Holens, Ph.D., University of Manitoba
Kris Klassen, University of Winnipeg
Michelle Paluszek, University of Regina
Jeremiah Buhler, University of Manitoba
Brent Joyal, University of Manitoba

Chronic pain is a serious health issue in Canada, and its prevalence in military and police personnel is even greater than in the general population. Online psychological treatments have been growing in popularity as a means to meet the growing need to provide treatment to those suffering from disorders such as chronic pain. The purpose of this study was to determine characteristics of those more likely to complete an online chronic pain treatment program that was designed specifically for military and police personnel. The charts of 80 individuals with a military or police background who had participated in an 8-week online acceptance-based behavioural treatment for chronic pain were reviewed. Nearly 65% of those who started the online program were considered to have completed it. Seven independent variables were examined using hierarchical logistic regression to determine their impact on program completion. These variables included demographic variables as well as pre-treatment measures of pain-related concerns, depression, and posttraumatic stress symptoms. In the final model, greater age, degree of pain acceptance, and severity of depressive symptoms predicted those more likely to complete the program.

54. Values and Committed Action (Engagement) Exercises and Metaphors: A Review of ACT English Language Books

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Metaphors, Exercises, Worksheets, Books

Emanuele Rossi, Psy.D.; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy; Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy
Paola Lioce; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy
Natalia Glauser; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy
Francesco Mancini, M.D., Psy.D.; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy; Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy

The purpose of the present study is to offer a general overview of values and committed action processes on ACT books (1999-2018) in order to outline a clear and user-friendly profile of the use of values and committed action metaphors, exercises and worksheets within them. Values and committed action processes constitute one of the three pillars of psychological flexibility: engagement. The books were divided into two groups: (1) ACT Books for professionals and (2) ACT Books for clients. An easy-to-read summary table provides a quick overview of values and committed action metaphors, exercises and worksheets. This review was conducted with the purpose of offering a universally accessible, clear and intuitive cataloging tool of practical and experiential resources for ACT learners and practitioners. For each metaphor, exercise or worksheet the summary table also provides a brief description of how it is presented and a reference to external resources. This poster related to values and committed action is part of a more general pilot project that also involved other processes of psychological flexibility and could be further extended in the future.

55. Does identifying oneself in long, online surveys reduce careless responding: A partial replication

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Careless Responding, methods

Rachel Carlson, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Ryan Moses, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tori Lich, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tyler Burwell, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Maureen Flynn, Ph.D., Metropolitan State University of Denver

Sometimes participants do not answer items in online questionnaires accurately or consistently (Meade & Craig, 2012). Careless responding has been shown to misrepresent data and increase Type I and II errors (Credé, 2010; Holzman & Donnellan, 2017; Huang & Bowling, 2015; Maniaci & Rogge, 2014; McGrath, Mitchell, Kim, & Hough, 2010). As such, it is important to develop interventions that reduce careless responding. The current study is a partial replication of Meade and Craig’s research (2012), which found that participants who wrote their name on each page of an online survey answered more bogus items correctly and reported higher levels attention when completing the study. Participants in the current study consisted of 414 undergraduate students, who were randomly assigned to either an anonymous or self-identification condition. In the self-identification condition, participants were instructed to write their name at the end of each page of the online survey. Those in the anonymous condition just completed the online survey. Dependent variables included number of bogus items passed and self-reported effort and attention given to the survey. Results from a one-way MANOVA showed that there was not a significant difference between the anonymous and self-identification condition on self-reported attention or effort. Results from a chi-square distribution found no significant difference between conditions on passing all eight bogus items. There was small but significant difference between conditions on answering seven or eight attention bogus items correctly, with participants in the self-identification group answering more correctly. Further implications and limitations are then discussed.

56. Evaluating Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Public Stigma Towards Veterans

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Military Veterans

Robyn L. Gobin, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign

Despite the wide availability of evidence-based treatments for mental disorders, many Veterans with treatable mental disorders avoid seeking treatment due, in large part, to concerns about being stigmatized by family, co-workers, and community members. Although the stigma of mental illness is a significant barrier to mental health care among Veterans, few stigma-reduction interventions have been developed targeting the public stigma that is so detrimental to Veterans' health and well-being. Ninety community members who have regular interactions with Veterans are being recruited to participate in one of two workshop conditions: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) or a combined face-to-face contact and education intervention (C+E). All participants will complete pre- and post-workshop assessments in addition to 1-, 3-, and 6-month follow-up assessments. This presentation will describe an ongoing pilot clinical trial designed to compare how effectively the two conditions (ACT vs. C+E) reduce stigma towards military Veterans. Preliminary results from the ACT condition will be presented. Implementation challenges and successes will be discussed and implications of hypothesized findings will be addressed.

57. The Unified Model of Mindful Flexibility: A Multi-stage Process Model for Understanding Change in Treatment across the Mindfulness and ACT-based Interventions

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Ronald D. Rogge, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Jennifer S. Daks, University of Rochester
Jenna Macri, University of Rochester

OBJECTIVES: The study tested the Unified Model of Mindful Flexibility: a new model that organizes the 5 main dimensions of mindfulness and 12 main dimensions of psychological flexibility into a multistage, process-oriented framework. METHODS: A sample of 2,742 online respondents (68% female, 81% Caucasian, Mage = 42yo) completed a 30-minute online survey, and 1,905 have completed a 4-month follow-up. RESULTS: IRT analyses selected items for two new mindfulness subscales that, when added to the MPFI, created the Unified Measure of Mindful Flexibility (UMMF). A path model supported the proposed model suggesting that mindful/mindless lenses (describing thoughts/feelings, observing sensations, attentive awareness, inattention) predicted flexible/inflexible responses to uncomfortable thoughts and feelings (acceptance, defusion, self-as-context vs. experiential avoidance, fusion, self-as-content), which predicted life-enriching/diminishing behaviors (maintaining contact with values, committed action vs. losing touch with values, becoming trapped in inaction), which predicted both current life satisfaction and depressive symptoms and change in those outcomes over 4 months. CONCLUSIONS: The findings provide a conceptual framework for understanding the processes of change in ACT. Underscoring this, a clinical example is given of using the UMMF to track clinically meaningful change with an individual client using the MindFlex Assessment System (MindFlex.org): a free online clinical tool that combines the UMMF with well-validated measures of psychological distress and well-being in a short (15-20min) online survey for clients that generates normed profiles for therapists (shown with clinical example).

58. Decreasing careless responding: The effectiveness of an intervention targeting compassion

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Values, Compassion, Careless Responding

Ryan Moses, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Rachel Carlson, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tyler Burwell, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tori Lich, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Maureen Flynn, Ph.D., Metropolitan State University of Denver

Technological advances have increased the amount of data being collected using online surveys. While online data collection can be significantly faster and easier, it can also be accompanied by careless responding, which can impact the quality of data being collected (Clark, Gironda, & Young, 2003; Johnson, 2005). It is important we find ways to reduce careless responding to ensure more accurate data. The purpose of the current study was to examine whether an intervention that focused on linking a value (compassion towards strangers) to survey responding decreases careless responding. The study also aimed to investigate whether those who scored higher on a compassion towards strangers measure are more impacted by the values intervention. Approximately 581 undergraduate participants completed a series of questionnaires online, which contained attention check items (e.g., “If you are reading this item, select C”). Respondents were randomly assigned to a values group or a control condition. Those in the values condition watched a brief, 45-second video prior to completing the survey. Participants in the control condition completed the survey without watching a video. Results indicated there was not a significant difference in careless responding between participants in the values condition and those in the control group. Additionally, compassion towards strangers did not moderate the relationship between condition and careless responding. Implications and future directions will be discussed.

59. Acceptance and commitment therapy as a trans-diagnostic approach to treatment for psychological distress: A concurrent multiple baseline design across participants

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and commitment therapy

Samuel D. Spencer, M.A., University of Hawaii at Manoa
Akihiko Masuda, Ph.D., University of Hawaii at Manoa

Alleviating the impact of mental health concerns is a primary goal within clinical psychology, and especially important for individuals within ethnic and cultural minority groups, as these individuals often tend to underutilize psychological services and experience poorer behavioral health outcomes when compared to Caucasian-Americans. These disparities are also found within Asian/Native Hawaiian/other-Pacific Islander populations, suggesting that more research is needed to adapt and transport interventions for diverse populations. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is an approach that seeks to increase adaptive functioning and improve values-based living for afflicted individuals. This study examined the effectiveness of a ten-week course of ACT within a culturally-diverse sample in Honolulu, Hawai’i. Participants endorsed an elevated level of experiential avoidance as measured by the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II >26), an important transdiagnostic process underlying psychopathology. A concurrent multiple baseline design (MBD) across three participants was used to establish experimental control and track individual progress throughout the study. Daily self-report data on clinically-relevant behavioral excesses and deficits and weekly measures of ACT-specific process variables were tracked throughout the study to evaluate the effectiveness of treatment. Questionnaires measuring symptomology, quality of life, and other salient mechanisms of change were collected at pre-/mid-/post-treatment/3-month follow-up assessments. Data collection is currently ongoing, and the first and second participants in the MBD have both entered the treatment phase with preliminary data suggesting treatment efficacy. Through an in-depth analysis of participants’ progress throughout treatment, the current study aims to better understand ACT and evaluate its impact within a diverse Hawai’ian sample.

60. Individual CBT and ACT Group Therapy: A Pilot Study About Integration

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT, CBT, group therapy

Sara Di Biase, Psy.D., Associazione Culturale Studi Cognitivi Pandora, Lucca
Emanuele Rossi, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, APC-SPC; AISCC
Marco Saettoni, M.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, APC-SPC, Grosseto

Aims of this poster are to investigate: (a) the potential efficacy of combining individual CBT and ACT group therapy; (b) how the group therapy enhances defusion and acceptance; (c) how the group therapy influences individual therapy. Participants were administered the following measures: SCID-5-CV, AAQ-2, ASI, BDI-II, CFQ13, SF-36. At the end of the cycle (12 sessions delivered every other week), the therapists that conduct the individual therapies were asked to respond to a questionnaire about these topics: How does the group therapy influence the client’s opinion about the definition of therapeutic goals?; How does the group therapy influence the client’s opinion about the definition of therapeutic strategies? The results of this pilot study showed lower scores on clinical measures and higher scores on measures of acceptance, defusion, valued living and quality of life.

61. The role of early memories of warmth and safeness, depression and self-compassion in well-being in institutionalized adolescents

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Depression; Self-compassion; Children; Institutionalized adolescents; Well-being

Sara Santos, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra
Maria do Céu Salvador, Cognitive-Behavioral Center for Research and Intervention(CINEICC); University of Coimbra

External shame and self-criticism have been related to several indicators of psychological maladjustment. Self-compassion seems to be a protective factor in the emergence of psychopathology. This study aimed to explore, in a sample of institutionalized adolescents, the effect of early memories of warmth and safeness (EMWS) on depression and well-being. More specifically, if this relation with depression would be mediated by external shame and self-criticism, and if self-compassion would mediate, in the same model, the relationship between depression and well-being. The sample included 171 institutionalized adolescents (Mage=15.56; SD=1.49). Well-being, depression, EMWS, external shame, self-criticism and self-compassion were assessed. EMWS showed a direct effect on well-being, and an indirect effect through the mediating variables. The relationship between EMWS and depression was fully mediated by external shame and self-criticism together, and the relationship between depression and well-being was fully mediated by self-compassion. These results seems to show that the way in which the adolescents relates to themselves influences his psychological adjustment, emphasizing the relevance of compassion-focused therapies in preventive and therapeutic approaches with institutionalized adolescents.

62. Self-Compassion as a Moderator of the Relationship Between Cognitive Fusion and Anxiety in College Students

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anxiety

Shannon B. Underwood, B.S., University at Albany, SUNY
Eric Tifft, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Glenn A. Phillips, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Emily Padula, University at Albany, SUNY
John P. Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

Background: College students continue to report anxiety as a pervasive and inhibiting concern. In order to address to address this crisis, we must identify possible protective factors and points of intervention for these individuals. Cognitive fusion has been found to be a strong predictor of anxiety. Individuals high in cognitive fusion buy into their thoughts, feelings, and bodily sensations, rather than recognizing them as fleeting states integral to the human experience. A possible point of intervention for college students is increasing self-compassion, as self-compassion increasingly has been associated with adaptive psychological functioning. Method: A sample of college students (n=395; 69% female; Mage = 18.99, SDage = 2.36) completed a series of questionnaires as part of a larger study examining mindfulness in college students. Results and Discussion: Self-compassion was found to moderate the relation between cognitive fusion and anxiety. Individuals high in self-compassion reported significantly lower scores of anxiety, despite reporting high levels of cognitive fusion. Individuals low in self-compassion and high in cognitive fusion were found to report the highest levels of anxiety. These results highlight the protective role self-compassion can play for individuals who overidentify with their thoughts, feelings, and physical states. Implications for future research and treatment strategies will be discussed.

63. Case Presentation: ACT Matrix for a ASD

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ASD, ACT Matrix、IRAP

Shinji Tani, Ph.D., Ritsumeikan University

ACT Matrix is a well-known useful tool for conducting ACT and is expected to be a useful therapy or psycho-education for the ASD. This research showed a case report of participant with ASD using ACT Matrix. The participant is a university student diagnosed ASD at his childhood. He has difficulties of attention-focusing and social relationships and volunteered to join our project, ACT Matrix for ASD. Four sessions which each of them lasted 1.5 hour were conducted. FFMQ, AAQ-II, CFQ were used to assess the effect of ACT Matrix and the self-esteem IRAP was conducted before and after sessions. Matrix Diagram worksheet, a hook exercise, and Verbal Aikido exercise, etc were used to introduce ACT. Self-monitoring to his behaviors relating a toward move and noticing behavior was also used. The frequency of a toward move and noticing behavior was increased through a session. The results showed that the scores of three questionnaires changed a little after the session; AAQ-II (pre; 24, post 30), FFMQ total ( pre; 109, post; 113) and CFQ (pre; 43, post 39). IRAP score also changed between pre-assessment (total D-IRAP=0.51) and post (0.10). While IRAP score of the post session showed any bias was not found among trial types, others-positive type in pre-assessment showed a significant bias (p=.036) which means denial of that others are positive. We will discuss how to introduce ACT Matrix to Japanese ASDs and the way of evaluation of it.

64. Eastern Wisdom and Western Knowledge of Mindfulness

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Stephanie Lin, B.A., Eastern Michigan University
Jennifer A. Battles, M.S., Eastern Michigan University
Tamara Loverich, Ph.D.

Background: Research suggest that mindfulness-based interventions such as ACT and MBSR are effective for treating both psychological and physical suffering. While mindfulness practices hold roots in Eastern countries that practice Buddhism, many self-report measures were derived from Western operationalizations of mindfulness. As demand for culturally relevant evidence-based psychotherapies grows, more research is also needed to understand the unique ways in which ethnicity relates to conceptualizations of mindfulness and its measurement. Our hypothesis was that Asian Americans and White participants would perceive mindfulness differently, as seen in significant differences among item endorsements. Method: Community and student participants (N= 876) completed an online battery of questionnaires including the State Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale, Toronto Mindfulness Scale, and the Philadelphia Mindfulness Scale. Results: A series of independent t-tests were conducted comparing Asian American participants (n=108, Mage= 30.68, SD = 9.57; 35.8% Female) and White/European American participants (n= 506, Mage = 28.78, SD = 13.29; 61.9% Female) on all mindfulness measures. Asian American participants endorsed significantly lower trait awareness t(606) = -4.62, p<.001, d = .48 while also endorsing significantly more decentering t(606) = 3.577, p<.001, d = .37. No other significant differences were observed. Discussion: One’s awareness may not equate to mindfulness skills utilization and vice-versa. Additionally, important differences in how these two groups define and perceive the constructs of mindfulness may exist. Implications of these findings will be discussed as part of a larger program of study investigating the invariant measurement of mindfulness cross-culturally.

65. Cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance mediate the relationship from maladaptive perfectionism to depression and anxiety

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Perfectionism, Depression, Anxiety

Susannah C. Johnston, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh
Christopher Hardy, M.Sc.

Background: Perfectionism presents a risk factor for depression and anxiety disorders. Current therapeutic interventions typically target the content of the perfectionistic thinking, with varying results. Viewing this issue from a contextual behavioural science approach, it can be theorised that how the individual relates to their perfectionistic thoughts is more critical than their content. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may therefore present a suitable therapeutic approach, yet there is little empirical evidence demonstrating whether psychological flexibility interacts with the perfectionism-clinical disorder dynamic. This study aimed to provide evidence of two key processes, cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance, being mediating factors in this relationship. Methods: A sample of 129 university students (age: 19-25 years; female: 79%) completed an online battery of validated measures, including, the Child-Adolescent Perfectionism Scale (CAPS), Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire (CFQ), Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (BEAQ), and the Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS-21). Two subscale scores were extracted from the CAPS to represent maladaptive perfectionism (socially-prescribed perfectionism and critical self-oriented perfectionism). Results: Mediational analyses showed both cognitive fusion and experiential avoidance to at least partially mediate the relationship between the maladaptive presentations of perfectionism and both depression and anxiety. Cognitive fusion fully mediated the relationship between both types of maladaptive perfectionism and depression. Discussion: Findings suggest that therapy involving techniques to encourage cognitive defusion and acceptance/willingness may prove beneficial in reducing levels of depression and anxiety in perfectionistic individuals. The findings support the use of ACT as a therapeutic framework for this population.

66. Body Image Psychological Inflexibility and Aging Anxiety

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mental Health and Psychological Inflexibility

Synne Sandberg, European University of Madrid, Spain
Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain

Background: High levels of psychological inflexibility have been associated with increased psychological vulnerability. Inflexibility in body image is likely related to aging anxiety, particularly to the physical process of aging, as such a process often is equated with decreased physical attractiveness. However, studies examining the relationship between Body Image Inflexibility and Aging Anxiety are scarce at best. This cross-sectional and cross-cultural study looked into this relationship, also determining gender differences. Method: Body image inflexibility was assessed using the Body Image Psychological Inflexibility Scale (BIPIS) (Callaghan et al., 2015). Measures of Aging Anxiety was obtained using the Anxiety About Aging Scale (AAS) (Lasher & Faulkender, 1993). Results and discussion: Body image inflexibility and aging anxiety were strongly associated. This relationship was the strongest between body image flexibility and the factor of Physical Appearance of the AAS. In relation to gender, women were in general more affected by both body image inflexibility and aging anxiety. However, women that were married or in domestic partnerships were less affected. Moreover, older adults (55 years and up) were less preoccupied with appearance and showed more body image flexibility than younger adults. However, the same group was more preoccupied with fear of loss than were younger participants.

67. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Preceded by Attention Bias Modification on Residual Symptoms in Depression: A 12-month Follow-up

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Depression

Tom Østergaard, University of Oslo
Tobias Lundgren, Karolinska Institutet
Ingvar Rosendahl, Karolinska Institutet
Robert Zettle, Wichita State University
Rune Jonassen, University of Oslo
Nils Inge Landrø, University of Oslo
Vegard Øksendal Haaland, University of Oslo

Background and objectives: Depression is a highly recurrent disorder with limited treatment alternatives aimed at reducing risk of subsequent episodes. This study investigates the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) following Attention Bias Modification (ABM) on residual symptoms in depression in a 12-months follow-up. Methods: This multisite study consisted of two phases. In phase 1, participants with a history of depression, currently in remission (N = 244), were randomized to either receive 14 days of ABM or a control condition. In phase 2, only participants from the Sørlandet site next received an 8-week group-based ACT intervention. Self-reported and clinician-rated depression symptoms were assessed at baseline, immediately after phase 1 and at 1, 2, 6, and 12 months after the conclusion of phase 1. Results: At 12-months follow-up, participants who received ACT exhibited fewer self-reported and clinician-rated depressive symptoms. There were no significant differences between ACT groups preceded by ABM or a control condition. Conclusions: Group-based ACT successfully decreased residual symptoms in depression over 12 months, suggesting some promise in preventing relapse. ABM did not augment group-based ACT treatment.

68. Psychological flexibility moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and problematic marijuana use

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Marijuana use and depression

Tori Lich, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tyler Burwell, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Ryan Moses, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Rachel Carlson, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Maureen Flynn, Ph.D., Metropolitan State University of Denver

An increasing number of undergraduate students experience depressive symptoms. For example, Eisenberg, Gollust, Golberstein, and Hefner (2007) found that 13.8% of undergraduate students showed high levels of depression. Additionally, a study that surveyed over 500 university counseling center directors found that depression is a presenting concern among 34.5% of students (LeViness, Bershad, & Gorman, 2017). There is a relationship between depression and marijuana use (e.g., Crane et al., 2015; Hayatbakhsh et al., 2007). Furthermore, results from a study conducted by Dierker, Selya, Lanza, Li, and Rose (2018) showed that among marijuana users, those with depression were more likely to have marijuana use disorder symptoms and greater symptom severity than those without. Although there is a relationship between depression and problematic marijuana use, there must be moderators involved because not everyone with depressive symptoms engages in problematic marijuana use. One possible moderator may be psychological flexibility. The aim of the current study was to examine whether psychological flexibility moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and problematic marijuana use among college students. Approximately 961 undergraduates completed an assessment battery online. Of the 961, 402 reported using cannabis in the past 6 months and were used in the subsequent analyses. Results showed that problematic marijuana use was significantly, positively, and weakly correlated with both depressive symptoms and psychological inflexibility. Additionally, psychological flexibility moderated the relationship between depressive symptoms and problematic marijuana use. Implications and future directions will be discussed.

69. Psychological Flexibility and Valued Living Predict Depression, Anxiety, Stress, Trauma Symptoms, and Satisfaction with Life across Cultural Dimensions in College Students

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT Model

Troy DuFrene, California School of Professional Psychology/AIU
Lauren Griffin, University of Louisiana, Lafayette
Emily Sandoz, University of Louisiana, Lafayette

Studies have shown that psychological flexibility (PF) and valued living (VL) predict a wide range of mental health and related conditions. And in these studies, the AAQ-II and VQ are commonly used used measures of PF and VL. As a contextual therapy, ACT is theoretically well-suited to cross-cultural application. But the ACT model and its components require broader examination in culturally diverse samples. This exploratory study questioned whether a model predicting common psychopathologies and global satisfaction using PF and dimensions of VL would perform similarly among different cultural dimensions of a fairly large sample of college undergraduates. Results showed significant prediction with medium to medium-large effect sizes on common screeners for depression, anxiety, stress, and trauma, and on a global satisfaction with life measure. Effects were calculated for PF and VL interactions with sex, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Only sexual orientation had a small yet significant interaction with PF, and only for depression, anxiety, and stress. As we anticipated, predictive effects were consistent across sex, ethnicity, and sexual identity, suggesting that model is robust to differences in cultural dimensions. Further exploration with culturally diverse samples is recommended.

70. Integrating Motivational Interviewing with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for New Mothers of Infants Exposed to Prenatal Substance Use

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Substance Use

Yolanda Villarreal, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School
Mackenzie L. Spellman, M.A., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School
Jasmin P. Wong, M.H.Ed., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School
Michelle R. Klawans, M.P.H., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School
Thomas F. Northrup, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School
Angela L. Stotts, Ph.D., University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, McGovern Medical School

Prenatal substance use poses health risks to mothers and their infants, who often require NICU hospitalization. Mothers of NICU infants are motivated to engage in health-seeking behaviors; however, no intervention has capitalized on this to promote treatment. We propose an adapted MI+ACT intervention will be efficacious in linking this population with substance-use treatment and reproductive care. This study introduces an adapted MI+ACT intervention, via case description, from an ongoing longitudinal clinical trial. The intervention consists of three hospital-based sessions to promote NICU mothers’ motivation and psychological flexibility (PF), as measured by the Readiness Ruler (RR) and AAQ-II respectively. RR and PF scores are measured at baseline, intervention sessions, and follow-up. During baseline, the client reported a 1 on the RR, indicating a disinterest in treatment and reproductive care, and a PF score of 24. During session 1 the client stated using birth control was “killing a life.” The therapist combined MI and ACT processes across two sessions. The clients’ PF scores during treatment dropped 16 points. During session 2 the client reported a 10 on the RR, indicating high-interest in both outcomes. Before the third session the client was inpatient at a substance-use treatment facility and had an intrauterine device placed; both were facilitated by the counselor. This study presents an MI+ACT intervention for substance-using mothers of NICU infants. This case presentation addresses the gap in linking this population with treatment by highlighting the effectiveness of a combined MI+ACT intervention to capitalize on motivation and engage women in health-seeking behaviors.

71. Developing a brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Intervention in a Secondary School: A feasibility study

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Children

Emma Harris, Cardiff University
Victoria Samuel, Cardiff University
Chloe Constable, Children and Young People Service, 2GETHER NHS Foundation Trust

Background: The majority of mental health difficulties develop during childhood and adolescence, however mental health services in the UK struggle to meet demand. To help increase the mental well-being of young people, preventive mental health work in schools has been recommended. Aim: This study assessed the feasibility and acceptability of delivering a brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) intervention to secondary school students. Method: Ninety 12 to 13-year-old students were allocated to an ACT skills group, a Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) skills group or a control group (lessons as usual). There were three, one-hour workshops in each condition. Students completed questionnaires measuring mental health symptoms, well-being, quality of life, stress, psychological flexibility, avoidance, acceptance and mindfulness. Measures were completed at each workshop and at an eight-week follow-up. Focus groups with young people, interviews with school staff and questionnaire data from the workshop facilitators was also used to assess feasibility and acceptability of the workshops. Results: Questionnaire data indicated that at the eight-week follow-up students in the ACT group had the most favourable scores for the majority of measures, followed by the CBT group, with students in the control group having the least favourable scores. Qualitative findings found the workshops to be acceptable to staff and students and feasible to deliver within the school timetable. Discussion: Implications of findings for a randomised control trial assessing the efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy in a school setting are discussed.

72. Cultivating Compassionate Schools: Pilot study of a compassion focused intervention to foster teachers’ emotion regulation and wellbeing

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Compassion-based interventions

Marcela Matos, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Isabel Albuquerque, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Lara Palmeira, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Marina Cunha, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions(CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Margarida Pedroso Lima, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioural Interventions(CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Paul Gilbert, Ph.D., OBE, Centre for Compassion Research and Training, University of Derby

Background: Growing research has supported the efficacy of mindfulness and compassion-based interventions in diverse populations and contexts, particularly to the development of adaptive emotional regulation skills central to the promotion of mental health and wellbeing. Teachers present a high risk of professional stress, which negatively impacts their mental health and professional performance. In addition, there is a high prevalence of mental health problems in the school context, involving both teachers and students. Therefore it is crucial to promote adaptive cognitive and emotional processes that support teachers in dealing with the challenges of the school context and promote their mental wellbeing. This study aims at testing the effectiveness of the Compassionate Schools Program, a six module compassionate mind training (CMT) group intervention for teachers to improve wellbeing and mental health. Method: A pilot study was conducted in a sample of 41 teachers, employing a mixed-measures quantitative and qualitative design. Results: Regarding qualitative assessment, the CMT intervention was well received. Furthermore, results revealed that there were significant decreases in depression, stress, and fears of compassion to others, as well as significant increases in compassion to others, self-compassion, and compassionate motivations and actions after the CMT intervention. When self-criticism was controlled for, a decrease in burnout and an increase in satisfaction with teachers’ life were additionally found. Discussion: As a pilot study, our results demonstrate the possible benefits of CMT in education settings and suggest that the Compassionate Schools intervention is effective to promote teachers’ mental health, wellbeing and emotion regulation skills.

73. The role of social disadvantage in high school dropout: unequal futures, different processes of change

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Children, youth, school dropout prevention

Melissa Schellekens, Institute of Positive Psychology and Education ACU

Should all dropout prevention programs target the same processes of change, in the same way that all ACT interventions might target the process ¨experiential avoidance¨? For example, should dropout prevention programs seek to improve student confidence and exposure to educational materials, such as books and computers? Most interventions assume that the processes of change are equally influential in different subpopulations. In this research, a systematic review was conducted to examine the role of variables including socioeconomic status, self-confidence and ethnic group, in predicting high school dropout. We were interested in whether the link between self-confidence and high school dropout was moderated by the nature of the environment in which young people live, grow and learn. We found that the effect of self-confidence on dropout does appear to be moderated by the social and cultural contexts of young people. This research raises interesting questions for intervention research. Should interventions target a universal set of processes of change? Or should the active ingredients of an intervention be tailored to students´ socioeconomic status and cultural environments? For example, should confidence be an important target of change amongst advantaged but not disadvantaged youth? Future research is needed to answer these important questions.

74. Foreign language, dialogue and well-being: ACTing mindfully in higher education

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Well-being

Mirja Hämäläinen, M.A., Tampere University
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Background: Academic educators worldwide are increasingly aware of the high levels of stress and distress experienced by university students. An optional English course Dialogue: Constructive Talk at Work Tampere University will help students deal with their uncertainties in the global work market using English as a lingua franca. The course is based on David Bohm’s (1996) philosophy of dialogue, which promotes ethical thinking and being though such practices as suspending judgement, checking assumptions, inquiry, listening and voicing. Each session starts with a mindfulness session.' Methods: Students from four groups (n=70) participated in measurements of satisfaction with life, psychological flexibility, mindfulness skills and self-compassion before and after the dialogue course. SPSS and Mplus were used to analyse the quantitative data. Results: Dialogue: Constructive Talk at Work has potential to promote the well-being of university students in a higher education language pedagogy context. (Exact results are not yet available.) Discussion: Higher education language courses for working life purposes can be developed to support students’ well-being. Ethical dialogue and mindfulness provide a container for accepting awareness of being.

75. Depressive symptoms and grade point average among college students: An examination of psychological flexibility as a moderator in a largely Latino sample

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: depression

Tyler Burwell, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Tori Lich, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Rachel Carlson, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Ryan Moses, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Maureen Flynn, Ph.D., Metropolitan State University of Denver

College students with depressive symptoms have lower grade point averages (GPA) than those without (DeRoma, Leach, & Leverett, 2009; Eremsoy, Celimli, & Gencoz, 2005). According to a survey completed by over 500 university counseling center directors across the United States, depression is a presenting concern among 34.5% of students (LeViness, Bershad, & Gorman, 2017). The prevalence of depression is often higher than 50% among freshmen (Ruthig, Haynes, Stupnisky, & Perry, 2009). Although there is a relationship between depressive symptoms and GPA, it is important to identify possible moderators. The aim of the current study was to examine whether psychological flexibility moderates the relationship between depressive symptoms and GPA among college students. Approximately 332 participants completed a series of questionnaires via pencil and paper. Participants’ semester GPAs were obtained from the registrar. Results showed that psychological flexibility was significantly and negatively related to depressive symptoms. Psychological flexibility was not related to GPA in the current sample. Furthermore, both psychological flexibility and depressive symptoms independently predicted GPA but psychological flexibility did not moderate the relationship between depressive symptoms and GPA. Implications and future directions will be discussed.

76. Evolving A More Nurturing Capitalism

Primary Topic: Evolution
Subtopic: Cultural Evolution

Anthony Biglan, Oregon Research Institute

This poster provides a preview of my forthcoming book: A More Nurturing Capitalism: Evolving an Economic System Works for Everyone. Capitalism is an excellent system for promoting innovation and efficiency in products and services. However, as practiced in the United States, and increasingly around the world, capitalism has many deleterious consequences, including climate change; deaths due to tobacco use, guns, obesity, and drug overdose; high levels of poverty and economic inequality; and the erosion of prosocial values. Free-market ideology fails to acknowledge the great harm that market systems can cause. Furthermore, under the thrall of this narrative, people have come to accept the idea that unregulated markets benefit everyone as if it were a natural law. This has led to ineffective approaches to social, political, environmental, and economic change -- and to resignation and hopelessness. I employ evolutionary principles to show how we can create a new society that ensures the well-being of all of its members by changing the conditions under which capitalism operates. I describe the reforms needed in every sector of society and the social movement that will make those reforms a reality. I also show how the pursuit of such a social movement requires the psychological flexibility that the CBS movement has delineated.

77. Training reading as a derived relational response in dyslexic individuals

Primary Topic: Evolution
Subtopic: dyslexia

Martina Leuzzi, Università Kore di Enna
Giovambattista Presti, Università Kore di Enna

Background: Specific Learning Disorders (SDL) is an umbrella term for a range of frequently co-occurring difficulties, mainly reading-related (dyslexia) and math-related (dyscalculia). Dyslexia is characterized by difficulties in reading despite normal intelligence. Reading is usually conceptualized as a cognitive process of decoding symbols to get meaning. Intervention to enhance reading skills, mainly based on cognitive theories, are aimed to develop phonemic awareness, fluency, text comprehension and vocabulary. From a behavior analytic point of view misreading can be conceptualized as a weak stimulus control. Method: We present results of a conditional discrimination procedure based on frame of coordination used to train three individuals diagnosed with SDL, A. (11 years), E. (7 years) and M. (18 years) to match picture to printed words both in uppercase (AB) and lower case (AC). Ten triplets of words for E. and M. and 17 for A. were carefully chosen to replicate the errors the subjects made when reading. After testing for derivation of matching uppercase to lower case words and viceversa, reading emerged as derived responding. Pre-post reading levels were assessed with standardised achievement tests. Results: Children showed marked improvements and some scores, especially correctness, went back within the limits of the normal range for age. Discussion: Trainings based on frame of coordination has been shown effective in teaching reading. Preliminary data show that few hours of same training can help overcome some basic difficulties in dyslexic individual, with the advantage of not being averse because they are never required to read directly.

78. Preliminary validation of Argentinian version of the Psychological Inflexibility in Pain Scale (PIPS) in a chronic pain sample

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: psychometry

Maria J. Lami Hernandez, Universidad Catolica de Santiago del Estero
Victoria Zambolin, Universidad Católica de Santiago del Estero
Maria J. Carabajal
Lance McCraken, Uppsala University

The Psychological Flexibility model results as a useful theoretical tool that integrates knowledge in behavioural analysis and offer effective treatment approach. This construct through the Psychological Inflexibility in Pain Scale (PIPS) developed by Wicksell et al. (2010) makes possible to measure the processes of changes within ACT. There is not a study of the PIPS´s psychometrics proprieties neither in Latina American, nor in Argentina. The aim of this study is analysis construct validity and internal consistency of PIPS in an Argentinian sample of chronic pain patient. Materials and methods Participants: Seventy five women and 8 men recruited from rheumatology service of the regional hospital were evaluated. The inclusion criteria were 1- from 18 to 70 years; 2- diagnosis of rheumatic arthritis, osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia. The participants give their informed consent. Measures Socio-demographical information was evaluated in the interview. The self-report measures were: The PIPS evaluates through 20 items the disposition and willingness towards activities and the acceptance of pain. The items are rated in seven-point scale. We used the translation into Spanish from Rodero et al., 2013. Also we used the Pain catastrophizing scale (PCS), Pain Vigilance and Awareness Questionnaire (PVAQ) , Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) and Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS). Statistical analysis It is proposed to perform criterion validity of the PIPS-Spanish by calculating the correlations (Pearson´s r) between the total PIPS-Spanish score with the PCS, PVAQ, CPAQ, and the MAAS. The internal consistency of the questionnaire will be estimated using Cronbach’s alpha and item-total correlations.

79. Psychometric Properties of the Smoking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SEQ-12) in a Greek-Cypriot Sample of Young Adults
Greece-Cyprus ACBS Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Smoking

Marianna Zacharia, M.Sc., ACThealthy laboratory, University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., ACThealthy laboratory, University of Cyprus

The Smoking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (SEQ-12) constitutes a widely utilized measure that assesses the confidence of former and present smokers in their ability to refrain from smoking. Even though such measures have been validated worldwide, most of them have not been adapted for use among Greek-speaking populations. Additionally, well-validated measures that assess smoking self-efficacy across various groups and populations are needed to be able to investigate this construct and examine any changes in smoking self-efficacy as a result of psychotherapeutic interventions. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the SEQ-12 in a Greek-speaking population. The sample (N=105; 68 female, Mage=22.44) was derived from undergraduate and postgraduate students of various programs of study from the University of Cyprus. Initially, an exploratory factor analysis (EFA) was conducted. Results supported a single-factor solution based on Kaiser’s criterion (KMO=.88), explaining 76.04% of the total variance. The Eigenvalue of this factor was 9.13. This finding was consistent with the sudden change on the scree plot chart emerging following the first factor. Parallel Analysis was employed to verify the factor structure. Parallel Analysis also recommended a single-factor solution (only one factor with a Raw Data Eigenvalue=9.01 above the 95th Percentile Eigenvalue=1.34). The Greek Smoking Self-Efficacy Questionnaire (G-SEQ) exhibited excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=.97). Overall, the current study suggests that the G-SEQ shows good reliability for this population and indicates its appropriateness as a single factor measure. Directions for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

80. Psychometric Properties of the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND) in a Greek-Cypriot Sample of Young Adults

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Smoking

Spyridon Demosthenous, M.Sc., University of Cyprus
Marianna Zacharia, M.A., University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Background: The Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (FTND; Heatherton et al., 1991) is a widely utilized measure of Nicotine Dependence, which serves as an improved version of the initial Fagerstrom Tolerance Questionnaire. Well-validated measures that examine nicotine dependence across various groups and populations are essential for the assessment of this construct and investigate any changes in nicotine dependence as a result of psychological treatment. The purpose of this paper is to examine the factor structure and psychometric properties of the FTND in a Greek-speaking sample of young adults. Method: The sample (N=165; Mage= 18.73) was derived from high school and undergraduate students from the University of Cyprus. Initially, an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. Results: Results supported a single-factor solution based on Kaiser’s criterion (KMO=.88), explaining 64.19% of the total variance. The Eigenvalue of this factor was 3.85. This finding was consistent with the sudden change on the scree plot chart emerging after the first factor. Additionally, Parallel Analysis was conducted to verify the factor structure. Parallel Analysis also recommended a single-factor solution (only one factor with a Raw Data Eigenvalue=3.42 above the 95th Percentile Eigenvalue=.44). Consistent with the reported structure of the original English version, a single-factor solution seems to be suitable. The Greek Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence (G-FTND) showed good internal consistency (Cronbach’s α=.87). Discussion: Overall, the current study suggests that the G-FTND demonstrates good reliability for this population and indicates its appropriateness as a single factor measure. Directions for future research and clinical implications are discussed.

81. Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II: Measurement Invariance and Construct Validity among a non-clinical ethnically diverse sample

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Psychological Inflexibility, Adults

Virmarie Correa-Fernández, Ph.D., University of Houston
J. Robert Sandoval, M.S., University of Houston
Niloofar Tavakoli, M.Ed., University of Houston
Morgan McNeel, B.A., University of Houston
Amanda Broyles, M.Ed., University of Houston
Hanjoe Kim, Ph.D., University of Houston

Background: Psychological inflexibility has been associated with symptoms of mental illness as well as behavioral problems. A self-report survey measure, the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-II), has been proposed to assess psychological inflexibility, and its psychometric properties has been reported in the literature. However, empirical evidence for the measurement invariance and construct validity of the scale across ethnically diverse populations is scarce. Method: Using an ethnically diverse non-clinical sample (N=538), this study examined factorial invariance of psychological inflexibility across sex and ethnic/race groups (i.e., White, African American, Hispanic, and Asians). Also, construct validity was examined by looking at relationships between psychological inflexibility and emotional distress tolerance, measured by the Distress Tolerance Scale (DTS). Results: The fitting the model of configural invariance across the male and female groups indicated adequate model fit [ χ^2 (38) = 153.65 (p < .001), RMSEA = .107, SRMR = .039, CFI = .938, TLI = .932], as well as the model across the race/ethnicity groups [χ^2 (88) = 201.965 (p < .001), RMSEA = .101, SRMR = .053, CFI = .938, TLI = .941]. A strong negative correlation was found between the AAQ-II factor and the mean DTS total score (r = -0.533, p < .001), and individual subscales (all ps < .001). Discussion: The AAQ-II demonstrated measurement invariance across sex and race/ethnicity, and displayed good criterion validity with distress tolerance, a theoretically relevant construct. The AAQ-II is a valid measure of psychological inflexibility and can be used across different ethnic groups.

82. Managing Occupational Stress Across various work contexts in Uganda: Randomized group comparison of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Traditional Stress Management Employee Assistance Programs

Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Occupational Stress

Khamisi Musanje, Makerere University

This paper presents a research proposal for evaluating impact of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) on management of occupational stress across various work contexts in Uganda in comparison to Traditional Stress Management Employee Assistance Programs (SMEAPs). Participants will respond to the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12; Goldberg & William, 1998) to determine suitability of inclusion. Using a randomized control trial design, participants will be assigned to either experimental or control group before completing a Work Acceptance and Action questionnaire (WAAQ, Hayes, Strosahl, Wilson, 2004). The delivery of ACT will follow a six-session version by Flaxman, Bond and Livheim (2013) protocol, while the delivery of SMEAPs will follow the selected organizations’ procedures. After three months, participants in both groups will for the second time respond to the GHQ-12 and WAAQ to assess impact of interventions. At post assessment, the ACT group is expected to show reduced levels of stress at post intervention (basing on their responses to the GHQ-12). On contrary, the control group will show little or no change in the levels of stress at post assessment. This result will portray ACT to be a more superior intervention in managing occupational stress. Secondly, Participants who will score high on psychological flexibility at post intervention are expected to show reduced levels of stress regardless of which group they will be assigned to. This result will portray psychological flexibility as the mechanism for effecting change in the levels of stress experienced.

83. Mindfulness in context: A daily diary study of within- and between-person effects of trait mindfulness as a personal resource in the JD-R model

Primary Topic: Organizational behavior management
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Lucie Zernerova, City, University of London
Paul Flaxman, City, University of London

Background: This study investigated influence of trait mindfulness as a personal resource in context of the Job Demands–Resources (JD-R) model (Bakker & Demerouti, 2014; 2017), a well-established work-related stress and motivation model in occupational health literature. Mindfulness was proposed to buffer the effect of high-strain work episodes and job conditions on burnout and boost the effect of active job episodes and job conditions on work engagement. Method: A 5-day diary study with 1083 measurement occasions nested in 144 employees of various UK-based organisations. Multilevel modelling was used to disentangle both episodic (within-) and chronic (between-person) effects. Results: Trait mindfulness (FFMQ total) did not moderate within-person reactivity to stressful work episodes: regardless of trait mindfulness, high strain (high demand-low control) work episodes were associated with higher burnout and lower work engagement. However, trait mindfulness moderated the between-person effects. Specifically, mindfulness prevented burnout in employees exposed to high demand-low control working conditions. A more complex pattern of results emerged with respect to work engagement. Mindfulness boosted work engagement in low demand-high control working conditions but was negatively associated with work engagement in low demand-low control conditions. Discussion: Different patterns of results found for within- and between-person level of analysis. Cultivation of mindfulness may be useful for preventing employee burnout. However, it may not be able to buffer the impact of job stressors on work engagement. This is the first study to report both within- and between-person results for trait mindfulness as a moderating personal resource in a work-related stress model.

84. Analyzing resilience from a functional perspectiva

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Resilience

Mari Luz Vallejo Pérez, University of Almeria
Carmen Luciano
Beatriz Sebastián

Background: literature shows a wide variety of definitions of resilience. Most of the authors agree that it is a protective factor for psychopathology. (Rutter, 1987, Luthar, 2000, Bonanno, 2004). Recent studies of resilience are carried out from three approaches: those who consider it as a trait, as a result or as a process (Hu, Zhang, and Wang, 2015) It Seems that a conceptual clarification is needed in order to promote adaptative behavioral patterns in difficult situactions in life. This research aims to investigate the repertoire of resilience from a contextual perspective, as a pattern of psychological flexibility. Method: A sample of undergraduate students (N=30) with and without psychological problems participated in the study to respond several questionaires and an empirical task of change of contingencies too. As well as they respond to a task to evaluate their sensitivity to changing contingencies. Results and discussion: the study shows a positive correlation between the four measures, suggesting that all these behaviours belong to the same category of resilience, perhaps a functional class.

85. A brief Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) – based group program for unemployed individuals with mental health problems
German Speaking Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Unemployment and chronic mental illness

Marie Christine Dekoj, Ph.D., Private Practice, Bad Saulgau & Ulm
Lisa Gabriel, University of Ulm
Tobias Staiger, University of Ulm
Tamara Waldmann, University of Ulm
Thorsten Brosch, Kolping Werk Augsburg
Nicolas Ruesch, University of Ulm

Background: People with mental illness often choose not to use mental health services and not to seek help with jobsearch and other psychosocial problems. This has harmful consequences for individuals, their families and society. An improvement on measures of depression, general health, and quality of life has been shown in former studies. Aim: To evaluate the acceptability, feasibility and efficacy of a brief ACT-based group program for unemployed individuals with mental health problems. Program participants should learn to behave flexibly in different situations and decide to live a value-based life. This is expected to reduce barriers to help-seeking among unemployed people with mental health problems. Methods: A pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) with approximately 100 unemployed people with mental health problems was conducted. Interested individuals are screened via telephone. Inclusion criteria are being between 18 and 64 years of age, currently unemployed and psychological distress as indicated by a score ≥13 on Kessler’s K6 Psychological Distress Screening Scale. Participants are randomly allocated to the ACT intervention or a TAU control group. The ACT-based intervention consists of four sessions, covering ACT methods, help-seeking and disclosing mental health problems. Results: Despite no intervention effects on primary outcomes (job search self-efficacy, help-seeking), program participants showed significant improvements in depressive symptoms and recovery at T2. Trend-level positive effects were found for self-stigma, hopelessness and secrecy. Discussion: This peer-led group program could improve symptoms and recovery among unemployed participants with mental health problems. The reasons for no intervention effect on primary outcomes will be discussed.

86. Peerspicuity(TM): Prototyping a Verbal Behaviour Classifier to Make Sense of Online Peer Support

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Depression, Peer Support

Mat Rawsthorne CGMA, University of Nottingham

Background: Depression involves Theory of Mind deficits, rigid thinking, loss of non-judgmental awareness of present moment experience and other avoidant coping strategies. Online support by ‘experts by experience’ is promising innovation that may help close the mental health treatment gap, however, there are concerns about who it does and doesn’t work for and what are the mechanisms behind this. How does participation in Internet Support Groups (ISGs) allow a step back from the ‘closed response style’ so upset is not taken personally-permanently-pervasively and behaviour governed by perfectionist rules? ISGs can be characterised as a Social Learning environment in which shared experience and perspective-taking allows reappraisal and development of response-ability through sensitivity to different opportunities (via contextual and social cues) and updating behavioural repertoires to match altered contingencies. CBS proposes that deictic framing combined with other forms of increasingly complex response networks generates three different patterns of self-discrimination, and pragmatically conceptualises the self (and other) in terms of a) content (stories), b) a flow of experiences (process) or c) as awareness (context) itself. Method: Analysis of Big White Wall forum interactions to identify the relational frames connected with sense of self/other and psychological flexibility. Particular attention will be paid to social comparison, utilising Buunk’s Identification-Contrast Model to identify empathy and emotional contagion. 1. Create feature dictionaries of relational frames 2. Use natural language statements from clinical questionnaires and collaborative machine learning to bootstrap annotation and aid transparency 3. Extract psychological insight from dialogues to differentiate between non-therapeutic and therapeutic interactions

87. Pilot RCT of Group Based ACT on Well being following Primary Breast Cancer Intervention

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Cancer

May Chi, University of Southern Queensland
Nancey Hoare, University of Southern Queensland
Eliza Whiteside, University of Southern Queensland
Gaye Foot, St Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba
Genevieve Baratiny, Southern Queensland Rural Health (SQRH), The University of Queensland
Gavin Beccaria, University of Southern Queensland
Catherine Gardner, University of Southern Queensland

Handout

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of group-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on quality of life, fear of recurrence, and mood in women post primary breast cancer intervention. 24 women were randomly assigned to three groups, two of which received both therapy and education conditions, and a third group as a control group who received only the therapy condition. The results of 20 women who completed the interventions were analysed. Preliminary findings suggest generally good psychological health and quality of life in this group of regional and rural women who had accessed to private health care. Participation in therapy may decrease experiential avoidance and improve quality of life, whereas participation in education may increase quality of life but also increase experiential avoidance. There is a correlation between experiential avoidance and quality of life, and a correlation between experiential avoidance and fear of cancer recurrence, with some suggestion that this correlation becomes stronger when experiential avoidance approaches clinically relevant levels.

88. Combining Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Creative Expression Therapy (CET) to Empower Women and Transform their Lives

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Women/Young Professional Women, Creativity, Self-confidence, Self-esteem, Ignite Transformation

Meryem Hajji Laamouri, M.A., MerCi Life Change

Background: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy helps us interact differently with our thoughts and emotions, develop a psychological flexibility, connect with our values and take action towards what gives meaning to our lives. Yet, since ACT is mainly a verbally based therapy, it is sometimes very challenging to invite unpleasant emotions, to observe and accept them. Therefore, in my work with women, I integrated Creative Expression Therapy (CET) in ACT therapy practice to enhance women’s empowerment results and ignite transformation. Method: I am currently developing an ACT-CET program which I will be implementing in April and May 2019 with a sample group of 10 women. I will be presenting the program and sharing the results at the ACBS poster presentation session. Results: In 2018 I have worked with a small group of women using ACT to increase their self-confidence and empower them. Having difficulties to cope with their emotions, I integrated two sessions of CET using colors painting to help them feel safe to express their emotions and build trust. The results were amazing and the women were able to develop a psychological flexibility and interact positively with their emotions. Discussion: These preliminary results demonstrate that ACT is an efficient therapy to empower women. Yet, when combined with a Creative Expression Therapy activity, it becomes more powerful. Besides, results and transformation are remarkable. Therefore, the goal of the present work is to develop an ACT-CET program that can be used as a vehicle for women’s empowerment and transformation.

89. Dublin, We Have Contact? Analysis of Preventative and Community-Level Interventions in the Contextual Behavioral Sciences

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Preventative Health

Michelle Forman, University of Nevada, Reno
Patrick Smith, University of Nevada, Reno

The science-based practice model visualizes the levels, phases, and feedback channels for interaction with, and iteration of, science informed technologies intended for dissemination. At the base of the model are three concentric rings describing increasingly widespread applied levels of contact as the technology disperses from a client-clinician relationship to the community at large. While beneficial contact at the individual level is most likely to occur at the innermost ring (Awareness of Problem), the requirement to be aware of an issue constrains dissemination and is inherently reactive to any systemic problems at more general levels. Disseminating technology at the preventive health-level, as depicted by the science-based practice model second rings, or community-level, the outermost ring, are ways to target systemic issues proactively. This poster compiles and presents the current research on preventative health and community-level interventions with the goal of highlighting research trends and opportunities for future research.

90. Psychological inflexibility and alcohol consumption in a large sample of college students in Ecuador

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Psychological Flexibility and alcohol

Pablo Ruisoto, University of Salamanca, Spain
Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain
Víctor López, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
Belén Paladines, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja
Raúl Cacho, Public University of Navarra
Silvia Vaca, Universidad Técnica Particular de Loja

Background. Psychological inflexibility has been proposed as a transdiagnostic process in which behavior is rigidly guided by psychological reactions rather than direct contingencies or personal values, and it is involved in a wide range of psychological disorders. Objective. The goal of this study is to evaluate the psychometric properties and factor structure of an Ecuadorian adaptation of a Spanish translation of the AUDIT in a large sample of college students in Ecuador. Methods. A total of 7905 students, 46.26% males, and 53.75% females, from 11 universities of Ecuador were surveyed using gold standards questionnaires. Psychological inflexibility was assessed using the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II and harmful alcohol intake using the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT). Results. Both, psychological inflexibility and alcohol consumption were unevenly distributed among men and women. In addition, both, the AAQ II and the AUDIT showed good reliability, internal consistency and correlates with other health related measures, proving to be valid and reliable tools that can be used by researchers and clinicians to screen the risk of psychopathology and hazardous alcohol intake in college students in Ecuador.

91. Development of Japanese version of the Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Experiential avoidance Experiential avoidance, ACT

Ryuya Sakaguchi, Ritsumeikan University
Seguchi Atsushi, Ritsumeikan University
Takashi Mitamura, Ritsumeikan University

Experiential avoidance has been defined as an unwillingness to sustain contact with specific personal events such as distressing thoughts, emotions, and so on. Previously, the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ) and the Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ) were developed to assess a broad range of experiential avoidance contents such as behavioral avoidance, distress aversion, procrastination and so on. But these assessment tools had a few problems. For example, it may be impractical to use the AAQ and the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-Ⅱ (AAQ-Ⅱ) since it has lower discriminant validity and the MEAQ has 62 items. In this study the Japanese version of the Brief Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (BEAQ) was developed to measure people’s behavior about experiential avoidance. This scale was developed using back translation and then its reliability and validity were evaluated using a sample of 200 college and graduate students. Factor analysis revealed that the BEAQ consisted of 15 items and showed a one-factor structure and had sufficient internal consistency (α=.78). The correlations between the BEAQ and Behavioral Activation for Depression Scale-Short Form (BADS-SF), AAQ-II, and Kessler 10 (K10) showed adequate validity. These results indicate that the BEAQ can be used to measure people’s behavior about experiential avoidance. In addition, BEAQ can be utilized for research and clinical practice related to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT).

92. Fostering flexibility to face lifespan challenges - an preventive eHealth ACT-intervention

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: eHealth

Tim Batink, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands
Nele Jacobs, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands
Sanne Peeters, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands
Mayke Janssens, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands
Johan Lataster, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands
Jennifer Reijnders, Ph.D., Open University of the Netherlands

Background: During our lifespan we will face a lot of changes. Dealing with those changes can often be challenging, especially as we get older, and can lead to a substantial decline in subjective wellbeing. Developing psychological flexibility could be beneficial in dealing with the inevitable changes in life and can have a positive effect on wellbeing. An eHealth ACT-intervention was developed to foster flexibility in the general population. The aim of the study is to assess both feasibility and effectiveness of the eACT-intervention. Method: Middle aged and older adults (40-75) were recruited from the general population and were assigned to the experimental group (eACT) or the waiting-list condition. Both groups completed a pretest, a posttest and a follow-up survey (8 weeks after finishing the eACT-training) to assess short and long-term effectiveness with measures on wellbeing (e.g. MHC-SF) and psychological flexibility (e.g. AAQ-II). The eHealth ACT intervention includes 8 sessions. Every online session consists of a short introduction of a specific ACT-skill, followed by a variety of exercises supporting participants in their development of these new skills. Participants can work through the sessions at their own pace. Results & Discussion: The eHealth intervention will be described in more detail and the first results regarding user experience and feasibility of this eACT intervention will be presented at the congress, using qualitative and quantitative data . This eACT intervention may represent new opportunities to provide online psychological health services to a broad public, irrespective of their location.

93. Preliminary data on the effectiveness of In This Moment program: Investigation of its impact on Romanian high school students' stress management abilities

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Adolescents, Mindfulness, Stress-reduction

Timea Madár Barabási, M.A., Babes Bolyai University
Carmen Costea Bărluţiu, Ph.D., Babes Bolyai University, Cluj
Jenő-László Vargha, Ph.D., Babes Bolyai University, Cluj

Learning to be mindful – as supported by an impressive body of empirical evidence – develops our ability to more effectively manage stress. Based on Baer’s five facets mindfulness model, and on recent findings from neuroscience research, the In This Moment program, developed by Strosahl and Robinson (2015), proposes an effective intervention for managing stress. The first five steps of the program are designed to train the five components of mindfulness; four other steps help the trainees apply their mindfulness skills to important areas of their lives. Our aim was to investigate the effectiveness of the program, translated and adapted for Romanian high school students. 164 high school students (93 females, mean age 16.46) completed the program. Participants had weekly meetings with the trainer, who presented them the exercises of the forthcoming step; participants practiced then each step on their own, for one week. On the whole, the program entailed 9 weeks of practice. Our control group consisted of 217 high school students (112 females, mean age 16.01). AAQ-II, FFMQ, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, DASS-21, Test Anxiety Scale, Revised Cheek and Buss Shyness Scale, and Ghent Multidimensional Somatic Complaints Scale were administered before and after implementation of the program. A follow up assessment will also be performed. Significantly higher levels of psychological flexibility and satisfaction with life, and a slight improvement of their level of mindfulness were reported by participants after the intervention. Such significant differences were not found in the control sample at posttest.

94. Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) in Dementia Care Workers: 12 month follow-up

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Burnout

Xavier Montaner Casino, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona (UAB)

BACKGROUND: Dementia care workers (DCWs) are at high risk of suffering from burnout, which in turn can lead to a worsened quality of care. There is a need to create intervention programs aimed at providing DCWs with effective tools for managing the unpleasant emotions associated with the workplace. OBJECTIVES: To design and implement an intervention based on ACT for DCWs that reduces the levels of burnout and increases the work and life satisfaction of the workers. METHODS: 110 DCWs of the CSSV Hospital (Barcelona) were randomly assigned to Intervention group (IG) or waiting list (CG). - Scales: AAQ-II, SWLS, MBI, (STAI-R). - Intervention: An intervention based on ACT was carried out weekly (6 weeks) to work with each one of the hexaflex components. RESULTS: The EG decreased 4.34 (p <0.001) in the MBI and 3.4 (p <0.001) in the STAI. The EG also increased 4.36 (p <0.001) in the SWLS and 4.27 (p <0.001) in the MBI Realization scale. At the 3 and 12 month follow-up, changes observed in STAI, SWLS and MBI Realization scale remained significant. CONCLUSIONS: The Acceptance and Commitment Training not only reduced the levels of perceived emotional exhaustion associated with work, but also significantly increased the level of job and life satisfaction of the participants. An intervention of 6 weeks, allows to put into practice the knowledge acquired in the sessions. On the other hand, unlike 2 + 3 interventions, it allows its benefits to crystallize and to be maintained after 12 month of follow-up.

95. Encouraging young therapists to explore - Finding your own blueprint (REBT – ACT – CFT – integration)

Primary Topic: Professional Development
Subtopic: Self – exploration, integration of ACT&REBT

Dario Lipovac, M.A., Association for psychological assessment, support and counceling "Domino", Sarajevo

Many young, unexperienced therapists are having fears of not being effective in working with their clients. At the same time, they are trying to find their own professional identity and blueprint. Therefore, they choose to stick only with one therapeutic approach or therapy modality in what they have been trained in helping their clients, something that is completely normal and expected. Sometimes, they are not encouraged and being open to explore and combine different therapeutic modalities, which would bring them new perspectives, more tools, authenticity and more effectiveness in working with clients. On the other hand, it would be very helpful to their personal development as well. Main aim of this poster presentation is to encourage young or unexperienced therapists to explore different therapeutic modalities or approaches. I think this kind of psychological flexibility is important in finding our own authenticity. To do so, I will present my own way of working with clients and how I successfully integrate REBT with ACT and CFT through real case presentations. Being aware of the fact there are different opinions that are not praising combining REBT and ACT specifically, I think that being comfortable in doing more modalities gives us flexibility to adapt and make tailor-made conceptualization for every client. Moreover, I will share experiences of leading one of the first ACT peer-to-peer supervision groups in Bosnia and Herzegovina as well, since it is important for mutual support between fellow ACT practitioners who are learning to integrate ACT into their practice.

96. The Relationship Between Burnout and Experiential Avoidance, Self and Valued-living in Healthcare Professionals
Türkiye Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Professional Development
Subtopic: Healthcare Professionals,

Hasan Turan Karatepe, Assist Prof. M.D., Istanbul Medeniyet University

Backgrounds: Burnout syndrome occurs in all types of health care professionals and is especially common in individuals who works in a closer relation with patients. Being self-critical, engaging in unhelpful coping strategies, sleep deprivation, and a work-life imbalance were reported as risk factors for burnout in literature . Organizational factors associated with include increasing workload, lack of control over the work environment, insufficient rewards, and a general breakdown in the work community were the other main risk factors for burnout reported in many studies . In this study, we aimed to compare the effects of organizational factors and the processes related to psychological flexibility on burnout sendrome. Method: 226 healthcare professional volunteers who participated in the study were administered valued life questionnaire (VLQ), self-as-context scale (SACS), Action and Acceptance Questionnaire (AAQ-II) and Maslach Burnout Invantory(MBI). Results: MBI scores were found to be significantly lower in participants who have children than participants without children (p<0.03). In the correlation analysis, we found that MBI parameters decreased with increasing in age (p<0.05), and MBI scores increased with the number of patients per week (r=0.242, p<0.01) and number of monthly night-working duty (r=0.189 p<0.01). AAQ-II scores show positive correlation with the scores of MBI (r=0.456 p=0.00) SACS (r=-0.323, p=0.000) and VLQ scores –both Importance (r=-0.175 p<0.01) and Consistency (r=-0.210 p<0.01)—show negative correlation with MBI scores. Discussion: Our data shows that relationship between burnout and experiential avoidance, burnout and self-as-context is more strong than the relation between work environment factors and burnout.

97. How to act with narrative: A single case experimental design pilot study using a process-based psychotherapy informed by RFT

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Transdiagnostic, Functional, Process based

Daniel Wallsten, Karlstad University
Thomas Parling, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet
Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D., University of Ghent
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., University of Ghent
Colin Harte, University of Ghent

From a relational frame theory (RFT) perspective, the human capacity for arbitrarily applicable relational responding (AARR) allows individuals to not only navigate their physical and psychological worlds in complex ways, but also to form painful and inflexible narratives that inevitably leading to psychological suffering. Recently, RFT researchers proposed the hyper-dimensional multi-level (HDML) framework for analyzing AARR, with the ROE (relating, orienting and evoking) as the core process of all human psychological acts. The current study outlines four ongoing interventions that are conducted using a process-based approach to psychotherapy that is specifically guided by the HDML. Using a multiple-baseline single-case experimental design, in a primary healthcare care setting, the study aims to assess the acceptability, feasibility, and effectiveness of using this process-based approach using a number of standardized measures. Preliminary findings are discussed and the feasibility of developing a process-based treatment protocol is explored.

98. Evaluation of Relational Frame Skills in Normal Adults -Evaluation by small group using PEAK Relational Training System Pre Assessment (Japanese version)

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: PEAK

Fumiki Haneda, Startline Co., Ltd.

So far, Research Center at Startline Co., Ltd. has developed ACT-online and original ACT exercises in Japanese. And, while using them to prepare the implementation environment of ACT in Japan, we practice ACT for many people. On the other hand, in practicing ACT for people with developmental and mental disabilities, not only mental problems but also many more cognitive problems (lack of number concepts, time concepts, perspective taking skills.)were seen. We were aware of the need to assess and train on Relational Frame skills. Therefore, we have studied, analyzed and translated into Japanese about PEAK Relational Training System, which is a structured training system of Relational Frames. As a result, it is difficult to say that structured training of Relational Frames is carried out even in normal adults, so we try to perform statistical data with the assessment of the Relational Frame skills of normal adults. First , we translated the following five PEAK Relational Training System PreAssessment flip books and various forms into Japanese: 1)Direct Training Module and 2) Generalization Module, 3)Equivalence Module, 4)Expressive Subset and 5)Receptive Subset of Transformation Module. Next, for 1,2,4,5, we created PowerPoint that presents the stimulus of tasks, and an answer sheet that can be answered by choice selection and description, so that it can be implemented for small groups. And, at present, 1,2,4,5 is conducted for normal adults and the results are organized. In this poster presentation, we report on these research results.

99. Another step in analyzing hierarchical framing

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Hierarchical Framing

Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain
Carmen Luciano, University of Almeria
Enrique Gil, University of Almeria
Zaida Callejon Ruiz, University of Almeria

The published evidence concerning transformation of functions in accordance with the relational frame of hierarchy is still very scarce; Gil, Luciano, Ruiz and Valdivia (2011) Gil, Luciano, Ruiz, Valdivia (2014) and Slattery & Stewart (2014).The aim of this study is to advance in such a track to provide more precise learning procedures. Participants were given two types of experimental histories prior to testing transformation of function according to hierarchical framing. In one condition the relational hierarchical cues were trained while in the other case they were trained. Results show that participants reorganized stimuli according to the previous learning especially in an instructed condition. Further research is discussed.

100. Humor responses in different contexts

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Humor

Matheus Bebber, University of Almeria
Carmen Luciano

Background: Humor occurs in virtually any social situation. A suitable context is necessary: it might be an overall state which is a relatively secure or intimate (Ritche, 2018; Morreall 2009). The present study aims to manipulate the context of security and insecurity to evaluate whether some interactions, typically evaluated as jokes, generate humor responses. Method: 20 Spanish-speaking undergraduate students are randomly distributed in two groups that only differ in the order where the four jokes are presented. All them were exposed first to a pair of jokes in the one context condition and then to the other pair of jokes in the other condition. The experiment have four phases. In Phase I, participants fill out two tests (an standard intelligence test and a psychological flexibility tests). In Phase II, all participants are introduced in a distracting conditions that aims to establish a neutral emotional feeling before introducing the jokes. In Phase III, half of the participants respond to jokes 1 and 2 in the security condition and subsequently, they do the same with jokes 3 and 4 in the insecurity condition. The other half part of participants do the same except they respond to the jokes in an inverse order. In Phase IV, participants filled a humor questionnaire. Results are discussed in terms of impact of the four combinations between the different jokes and two contextual/establising operations looking for the analysis of replication effects across participants and looking for relational framings that might be involved in the process.

101. Virtual Reality acceptance and value-based training for social and public speaking skills of University students

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Social Anxiety

Simone Gorinelli, University of Jyväskylä
Päivi Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä
Ana Gallego, University of Jyväskylä
Markku Penttonen, University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä

Background: Relatively large number of University students experience substantial stress when performing in public and generally in social situations. Given that stress is a risk factor for general well-being, process-based interventions could be useful for university students. Virtual Reality (VR) and other technological solutions offer new and flexible ways to provide psychological training. Aim: This study’s purpose is to develop and investigate the effectiveness of Virtual Reality training based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and Relational Frame Theory (RFT) principles for social and public speaking anxiety. Method: using an experimental clinical design, University students are prompted to follow the VR training, which combines different types of RFT-based exercises, and apply their skills while immerse in a social VR exposure context. Outcome measures include social anxiety symptoms, well-being, processes measures and physiological responses (heart rate & electrodermal activity). Moreover, Ecological momentary assessment (EMA) is adopted to assess how behavior varies over time and across context, through a cell phone app to evaluate their current behaviour and mood in real life. Results: Our design and preliminary data will be presented. Conclusions: This study will offer an example of modern process-based interventions. Our finding will advance our knowledge on how to use VR as instrument to offer process-based training.

102. Does a religious context alter the way in which we “react” to faces? An IRAP analysis.

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: IRAP

Valeria Squatrito, Ph.D. Student, University of Enna "Kore"
Annalisa Oppo, Psy.D., Sigmund Freud University
Giovambattista Presti, M.D., Ph.D., Psy.D., University of Enna "Kore"

Prejudice, as a verbal behavioral pattern, is the result of processes of derivation and transformation of stimulus function. Three studies aimed to empirically investigate implicit relational responses to emotions in the context of the Catholic and Islamic symbols using the IRAP. Self-report questionnaires assessed psychological flexibility, cognitive fusion, empathy, values, authoritarianism. In the first study, we investigated the relationships between religious symbols and facial expressions of joy and fear to test the hypothesis that the facial expression depicting joy was more quickly associated with the symbol of the Catholic cross and the facial expression depicting fear was more quickly associated with the symbol of Islam. In the second study we have proposed the same procedure investigating facial expressions of joy and anger. In the third study we investigated the relationships between religious symbols, the expression of joy and a neutral expression to test the experimental model. In the first and in the second study participants were significantly faster to respond to the relation between joy to Catholics symbol than to the Islamic ones. In the third study participants were significantly faster to associate Catholics symbol with joy than neutral expression, but they were also significantly slower to associate Islamic symbol with joy than neutral expression. In summary, in our university sample results showed a positive picture in which no negative bias with regard to the Catholic and Islamic religions is observed. Despite the fact that in the Italian mass-media context Islam has often lately been associated with violence.

103. The influence of the Portland peer consultation group on practice, knowledge, skills and wellbeing in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy practitioners

Primary Topic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination
Subtopic: experiential learning, case conceptualisation, skills building, community building

David Gillanders, D.Clin.Psy., University of Edinburgh
Michael Sinclair, DCounsPsy, CPsychol, City Psychology Group
Joseph Oliver, Ph.D., CPsychol, University College London
Sandro Voi, M.Sc., NHS Hertfordshire

Supervision is fundamental to ensure good practice, by supporting practitioners and promoting their professional development. Whilst there is extensive research in 1:1 clinical supervision, there is a lack of studies investigating the effect of supervision using other formats. Recently, there are a growing number of studies highlighting the importance of experiential training to facilitate learning a specific therapy (Bennett-Levy, & Lee, 2014). The Portland peer consultation model (Thompson et al., 2015) is an approach to peer supervision developed to promote skill development and a sense of community. The spirit of the group is egalitarian, and as opposed to traditional verbal-dependent forms of supervision, the focus is on doing ACT rather than talking about ACT via participation in role-plays and peer feedback. Aims: The current study is an online survey that explores the difference between ACT practitioners who attend a Portland peer supervision group from those who don’t. Areas investigated are: ACT skills, ACT knowledge, self-care, sense of perceived community and wellbeing. Methods: The survey requires participants to complete six questionnaires, measuring: knowledge about ACT (ACT Knowledge Questionnaire-revised, adapted from Luoma & Vilardaga, 2013), psychological flexibility (Mindful Healthcare Scale, Kidney, 2017), inclusion in the community (Inclusion of Community in Self Scale, Mashek, Cannaday, & Tangney, 2007), self-evaluation of ACT skills (Acceptance and Commitment Skills Self Evaluation Scale; newly developed, being tested in this study), wellbeing (Short Warwick Edinburgh Well Being Scale, Stewart-Brown et al., 2009) and self-compassion (The Short version of the Self-Compassion Scale, Raes, Pommier, Neff, & Van Gucht, 2011).

104. FORCE: A proposal for assessment and clinical skills training therapists from a contextual model

Primary Topic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination
Subtopic: Clinical formulation, clinical competences

Juan Camilo Vargas-Nieto, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Claudia Liliana Valencia Granados, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

FORCE (Clinical formulation based on evidence by its acronym in Spanish) is a proposal of clinical formulation based on the contextual model developed by clinical psychologists Juan Camilo Vargas Nieto and Claudia Liliana Valencia Granados, as a support strategy for the training of psychologists who work in the clinical field. FORCE is a pragmatic clinical formulation that integrates functional analysis, maintenance hypothesis, patient values and therapeutic goals. It is useful both for clinical psychologists who are training in contextual models and for supervisors and teachers, so that facilitates the evaluation and training of specific clinical competences. The present proposal includes the description of the pilot study carried out during a year with 60 postgraduate students. the model was adjusted to the real needs of the context. Then, an evaluation was carried out by expert judges to determine the validity of FORCE content. Finally, a design of a protocol is proposed to evaluate the predictive validity of the model as well as to establish quantitative parameters on its reliability and usefulness in educational and clinical scenarios with psychologists who perform psychological interventions.

105. Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Training on Psychiatrists
Türkiye Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination
Subtopic: Psychiatrists

Kaasim Fatih Yavuz, M.D., Istanbul Medipol University
Sevinc Ulusoy, M.D., Istanbul Bakirkoy Training and Research Hospital for Psychiatry and Neurology
Ahmet Nalbant, M.D., Adiyaman University Training and Research Hospital

Background: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) training often includes experiential techniques and aims to increase the psychological flexibility levels of the therapist besides improving their ACT related intervention skills also. Improvement in the psychological flexibility of the therapists not only provides an improvement in therapy skills but also increases the meaning at work, reduces the burnout and stigmatization attitudes. Method: This study aimed to examine the effects of 4-day structured ACT training on psychological flexibility, burnout, and attitudes towards mental disorders among psychiatrists. Participants assessed with Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) and Mental Illness: Clinicians’ Attitudes Scale-v4 (MICA-v4) before training, at first and 3rd months after training. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to interpret the obtained data. Results: 25 of the 40 participants agreed to participate in the study. The mean age of the participants was 36.3 (+ -5.5) and 14 of them (60.9%) were female. One-way repeated measures ANOVA was conducted to compare scores on the AAQ-II, MBI, and MICA-v4 with Statistics. There were improvements on both scales with significant (p<0.05) and not significant (p>0.05) levels. Discussion: It is noteworthy that only a 4-day training would provide some progressive improvement for three months on psychological flexibility, burnout and stigmatization attitudes in participants. More studies need to be done for improving the effects of ACT trainings.

106. Bridging between ABA and ACT: Data and Direction

Primary Topic: Supervision, Training and Dissemination
Subtopic: Behavior Analysis and ACT

Natalie Savage, University of Bangor, UK-SBA
Gina Skourti, University of Kent, UK-SBA
Katie Parker, University of Swansea, UK-SBA
Karolina Gburczyk, UK-SBA

Background: The UK Society for Behaviour Analysis (UK-SBA) is constructed to develop and disseminate applied behaviour analysis within the UK. The Special Interest Group (SIG) for professionals who use Behaviour Analysis and are interested in ACT was established in October 2018. Method: An online survey questionnaire was shared. The aim of this questionnaire was to direct the SIG of how best to utilise the coming together of professionals with commonalities in interests and practices. Results: The themes of the questionnaire include; qualifications and professional practice (45% had a Master’s degree, 44% had a BCBA, 34% worked within early/intensive intervention and 46% worked within positive behaviour support), opinions of ACT within ABA (eg, professionals need sufficient training to competency and supervision), affiliated groups (50% were member of the ACBA and 43% were member of the UK-SBA), practice including ACT (60% implement ACT), populations worked with (61% work with individuals with ASD, LD and behaviours that challenge, 54% work with 5-19 year olds, 57% work with 19-65 year olds), trainings (55% have attended 1-2 day training events, 78% showed a preference for these events, 47% showed a preference for online training, 64% wanted more 1-2 day training, 58% wanted a UK based bootcamp event and 52% wanted more online training), supervision (53% have not received supervision and 77% want or would consider seeking supervision) and connecting with others (75% want to connect with others in their area). Discussion: This data identifies and informs direction for bringing the gap between ABA and ACT

107. The relationship between personality and psychological flexibility, self-compassion and ego-resiliency, regarding quality of life

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Psychological Flexibility, Self-Compassion, Ego-Resiliency, Personality, Quality of Life

Anna Pyszkowska, University of Silesia in Katowice

Background. Psychological flexibility, self-compassion and ego-resiliency are one of the most frequently used and developed internal resources during acceptance and commitment therapy. All of them enhance quality of life, adaptation and life satisfaction, but they are vastly varied in terms of psychological and functional mechanisms. The aim of this study was to establish the relationship between personality and psychological flexibility, self-compassion and ego-resiliency, regarding quality of life in a Polish sample. Method. 379 participants (50% female, mean age: 29,04) took part in a questionnaire survey. The following research tools were used: HEXACO Personality Inventory, Ego-Resiliency Scale, Self-Compassion Scale Short Form, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire–II, SWLS, LOT-R, Quality of Life Questionnaire. Results. Despite the fact that all three resources correlated with personality dimensions: emotionality, extraversion and agreeableness, it was established that they varied in terms of specific components. Personality established 42% of variance explained for self-compassion, 28% for ego-resiliency, and 20% for psychological flexibility. Regression and mediation analyses indicated that all three resources were relevant predictors of quality of life and life satisfaction, reducing the influence of neurotic aspects of personality. Discussion. The data gathered in this study indicated that, despite similar significance for quality of life, psychological flexibility, self-compassion and ego-resiliency have different personality background. It has important implications for the selection of therapeutic tools, where psychological flexibility, least conditioned by personality, seems to be the most accessible and learnable resource, regardless of the personality structure.

108. Comparing Mindfulness with Self-Compassion and Acceptance as Predictors of Middle-aged Females’ Health Status

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Mindfulness, Self-compassion, Acceptance, Menopausal Symptoms, Midlife

Kazuki Hashiguchi, Doshisha University
Sho Yoshikawa, Doshisha University
Kakuichi Hasebe, Doshisha University
Mitsuki Nakamura, Doshisha University
Muto Takashi, Doshisha University

Middle-aged females experience significantly lower levels of psychosomatic health than other members of the general population. Mindfulness has been shown as a modifiable predictor of psychological distress among middle-aged females. However, prior research has suggested that acceptance and self-compassion, which are mindfulness-related factors, may serve as better predictions than mindfulness. Therefore, we examined whether acceptance and self-compassion can significantly predict psychosomatic health of females after controlling the for influence of mindfulness. 200 middle-aged women completed self-reported measures of menopausal symptoms, depressive symptoms, somatic-related quality of life, mental-related quality of life, and well-being. Correlation analysis showed that mindfulness, self-compassion, and acceptance were also significantly associated with all variables of psychosomatic health. Hierarchical regression analysis revealed that after controlling for mindfulness, only acceptance significantly predicted menopausal and depressive symptoms. Additionally, after controlling for mindfulness, self-compassion and acceptance significantly predicted mental-related quality of life and well-being. Acceptance predicted mental-related quality of life more highly than self-compassion, whereas self-compassion predicted well-being. These findings suggest that acceptance is an important predictor of negative aspects of health and that self-compassion is an important predictor of positive aspects.

109. Stressful tasks, state levels of experiential avoidance and emotion regulation: How are they related?

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Experiential avoidance, behavior analogue research, emotion regulation

Kyra Bebus, B.S., Western Michigan University
Meaghan Lewis, M.S., Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Ph.D., Western Michigan University
Tabitha DiBacco, B.A., Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, B.S., Western Michigan University

Experiential avoidance (EA), an unwillingness to experience undesirable private events, is quickly becoming a critical transdiagnostic variable for behavioral scientists to consider because it is associated with many different forms of psychopathology. Due to the many limitations inherent in self-report methodology, the aim of the present study was to study the relationship between two behavior analogue tasks of EA in a laboratory setting. Performance on the cold pressor task (Zettle et al., 2012) and Trier Social Stress Test (TSST; Kirschbaum et al. 1993) was therefore assessed across four dimensions (threshold, tolerance, endurance, and intensity) among a convenience sample of undergraduates to assess their levels of EA. The State Measure of Experiential Avoidance (SMEA; Kashdan et al., 2014) and State-Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (S-DERS; Lavender, Tull, DiLillo, Messman-Moore, & Gratz, 2017) were given before and after each task to appraise levels of state EA and emotion regulation. The relationship between the four assessed dimensions of the two stressful tasks and state measures of EA and emotion regulation will be presented. Initial findings indicate that participants reported higher levels of state EA and state emotion dysregulation following exposure to the social stress task. Findings will be presented in relation to their clinical impact on the treatment of psychopathology from a dimensional framework.

Thursday, 27 June, 2019, 19:45-20:45 - Poster Session #2

1. Heart Rate Variability Predicts Mindfulness, Emotion Regulation Deficits, and Psychopathology

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Kelsey Pritchard, M.A., The University of Toledo
Hannah Herc, M.Sc., The University of Toledo
Peter Mezo, Ph.D., The University of Toledo

Background: Mindfulness and other emotion regulation (ER) constructs are implicated as transdiagnostic mechanisms of psychological flexibility in depression and anxiety. Physiological indices, such as heart rate variability (HRV), have also been associated with ER deficits and increased psychopathology. Increased HRV suggests more adaptability and flexible responding to stressors. Thus, the present study examined mindfulness, associated ER deficits, and psychophysiological mechanisms in the role of psychopathology. Methods: Ninety-three undergraduate students (Mean age = 19.99; 63% female) completed measures of mindfulness (Mindfulness Attention Awareness Scale), mood symptoms (Depression, Anxiety, & Stress Scale-21; DASS-21), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS), and heart rate variability (HRV) measured at baseline. Mediation models were employed using SPSS PROCESS. Results: Increased HRV was associated with increased mindfulness, improved ER capabilities, and reduced depressive, anxiety, and stress symptoms. The findings of our mediation models suggest that increased HRV predicts reduced ER dysregulation via greater mindfulness. Further, these biomarkers also predicted reduced depressive symptoms as mediated by mindfulness. Conclusion: These findings provide further evidence of the role of psychophysiological mechanisms in psychological flexibility and reduced symptoms. Clinical implications and future directions for research will also be discussed.

2. Relevant Correlates of Suicide Ideation and Hopelessness Among People Living With HIV/AIDS: Further Support for ACT?

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: HIV/AIDS, Suicide, ACT

Lauren B. Johnson, M.Ed., M.S., Drexel University
C. Virginia O' Hayer, Ph.D., Drexel University College of Medicine
Chelsi Nurse, B.S., Drexel University College of Medicine

Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) and suicide are two of the most serious global public health concerns. Approximately 37 million people worldwide are living with HIV/AIDS, while close to 800,000 people complete suicide each year globally. HIV/AIDS often creates significant psychological distress and suicide rates are elevated among people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA). The interrelation between these two issues is complex, but empirical investigation into specific factors that may contribute to suicidal behaviors among PLWHA is imperative. The present study sought to identify theoretically relevant correlates of suicide ideation and hopelessness among PLWHA. It was hypothesized that there would be an inverse association with medication adherence, while there would be a positive association with variables representing rumination, cognitive fusion, general shame, and experiential avoidance. Participants (n=110) who have been diagnosed with HIV/AIDS presented to Drexel University’s Center City Clinic for Behavioral Medicine for psychological treatment. Participants completed a demographics questionnaire along with six validated self-report measures. The findings demonstrated that both suicide ideation and hopelessness were each positively correlated with rumination, cognitive fusion, general shame, and experiential avoidance, while only suicide ideation was inversely correlated with medication adherence. These significant correlations are promising as several defining components (e.g., defusion, acceptance) of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), a transdiagnostic evidence-based intervention, target behaviors like rumination, cognitive fusion, shame, and avoidance. These findings suggest that more research is indicated, which may provide further support for the use of ACT among PLWHA who are at increased risk for suicide.

3. Self-Compassion Moderates Hopelessness in Predicting Suicide Ideation Among People Living With HIV/AIDS

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Suicide, Self-Compassion, HIV/AIDS

Lauren B. Johnson, M.Ed., M.S., Drexel University
C. Virginia O' Hayer, Ph.D., Drexel University College of Medicine
Chelsi Nurse, B.S., Drexel University College of Medicine

Suicide is increasingly recognized as a significant public health concern and it has been suggested that people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) experience increased rates of suicide. Hopelessness has been identified as a salient risk factor for suicide, while self-compassion has been cited as a meaningful protective factor for diverse psychopathology. More recently, there has been emerging evidence supporting the potential buffering effects of self-compassion with regards to suicidal behaviors, which makes additional research among PLWHA who experience elevated risk, particularly meaningful. The present study sought to examine the moderating effects of self-compassion between hopelessness and current suicide ideation. One-hundred participants who were previously diagnosed with HIV/AIDS presented for psychotherapy treatment in the Center City Clinic for Behavioral Medicine at Drexel University. Participants completed several validated self-report measures, including the Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form and the Beck Depression Inventory II. The findings supported the moderating role of self-compassion, demonstrating that when individuals reported low levels of self-compassion and high levels of hopelessness, they experienced significantly elevated rates of suicide ideation. Alternatively, individuals that reported high levels of self-compassion experienced similar rates of suicide ideation, regardless of their level of hopelessness. These findings highlight self-compassion as a potential protective factor against suicidal thoughts, particularly among PLWHA who are struggling with feelings of hopelessness. Additionally, these results encourage greater exploration into the construct self-compassion and may suggest the relevance of interventions like Mindful Self Compassion, Compassion Focused Therapy, and ACT in reducing suicidal behaviors among PLWHA and other populations at increased risk for suicide.

4. ACT for Migraine: Effect of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for High Frequency Episodic Migraine without Aura: A phase-II, multicentric, randomized, open-label study

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: ACT, migraine, chronic pain

Licia Grazzi, M.D., Headache and Neuroalgology Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Caroline Bernstein, J Graham Headache Center, Brigham & Women Faulkner Hospital
Alberto Raggi, Ph.D., Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Emanuela Sansone, Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Eleonora Grignani, Headache and Neuroalgology Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
M Searl, J Graham Headache Center, Brigham & Women Faulkner Hospital
Paul Rizzoli, M.D., J Graham Headache Center, Brigham & Women Faulkner Hospital

Background: Patients with High Frequency Episodic Migraine without Aura (9/14 attacks per month) are exposed to the risk of chronification and medication overuse. These patients need a multidisciplinary approach before than a chronic condition is induced. Recently, non-pharmacological approaches as Mindfulness, Acceptance Commitment Therapy (ACT), showed encouraging results for pain & migraine. The goal is the psychological flexibility by cultivating positive psychological capacities to improve mental & physical states, disability, and impact of pain conditions. The aim of our study is to assess the feasibility of a novel ACT model for High Frequency Episodic Migraine without Aura (IHS beta 2013 criteria) and its effectiveness respect to a standard treatment. Methods: Twenty-four patients with High Frequency Episodic Migraine without aura were included and randomized for the study. Two treatment conditions: 1) TAU (Treatment as Usual): pharmacological prophylaxis. 2) TAU + ACT. ACT consisted of six, 90 minutes, weekly sessions, and two booster sessions, one every 15 days involving psycho-education, discussions, experiential exercises and home assignments Results: results at the 6month follow-up showed decrease of days of headache /month in the ACTgroup (10±2 vs 7.2±4.5), not in the TAUgroup (9.2±3.4 vs 9.4±5.2), and of medications intake /month in the ACTgroup (9.2±2.8 vs 5.5±4.4) not in the TAUgroup (9.9±3.6 vs 8.2+±5.5). Discussion: Although preliminary, results show ACT as suitable for this category of patients. An integrated and flexible treatment combining different approaches seems more effective than drugs alone to alleviate pain.

5. Mindfulness meditation for migraine in pediatric population: A pilot study

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness, children, headache, pain

Licia Grazzi, M.D., Headache and Neuroalgology Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Emanuela Sansone, Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Eleonora Grignani, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Alberto Raggi, Ph.D., Neurology, Public Health and Disability Unit, Neurological Institute "C. Besta" IRCCS Foundation
Frank Andrasik, M.D., University of Memphis

Introduction: Chronic Migraine (CM) is a highly disabling condition characterized by at least 15 days with headache per month, impairing patients’ emotional, social, and work/school functioning. CM prevalence is around 2% among adolescents. In pediatric populations, the use of pharmacological prophylaxis should not be encouraged for side effects. Mindfulness demonstrated a clinical advantage in chronic pain in pediatric populations, but no clinical experience in juvenile migraine. Aims of this study were to examine the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a Mindfulness-based intervention in adolescents, aged 12-17, with CM. Methods: seven, 45 minutes weekly sessions of guided mindfulness-based meditation, were conducted. The group-based session aimed to teach and make direct practice with skills intended to enhance sustained nonjudgmental present moment awareness. The techniques include guided body scan, tension release, mindfulness meditation, breath-focused imagery, guided imagery and decentralization of thoughts. Participants were asked to practice at home for at least 10 min/day. The variables evaluated were: headache frequency/month, medication intake/month; catastrophizing attitude (Pain Catastrophizing Scale, PCS). Results: Twenty-two patients were enrolled. Ten patients completed all sessions and the 6month follow-up: the number of headache days/month decreased (16±9.3 vs 5±4.1), the medication intake/month (7±6.9 vs 2.8± 2.4 ) and the catastrophising attitude (PCS 29.3±6.4 vs 15.4±9.8). Discussion: Although the data are preliminary and the group of patients limited, the results seem to confirm the feasibility and acceptability of a Mindfulness intervention for chronic migraine in adolescents. No side effect was reported from patients.

6. Acceptance and Valued behavior change - a case study on a teambased ACT-model treating a young teen with persistant pain

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Persistent Pain, Children, Adolescents, ACT, Team

Malin Lanzinger, M.Sc., Department of Pediatric Pain, Skane Univerity Hospital
Ulrika Ermedahl Bydairk, Department of Pediatric Pain, Skane University Hospital

BACKGROUND: Persistent pain in children and adolescents is a common and growing problem. Treatment addressing persistent pain involving behavioural interventions such as CBT and ACT has in other studies proven to be successful. This case study describes a team-based ACT-intervention model carried out on a teen age girl with persistent pain. METHOD: A 13-year-old girl, “Emma”, was referred to the Department of Pediatric Pain, Skane University Hospital, Sweden. She had suffered from joint and muscle pain since early childhood. Pain affected her quality of life and function in valued areas such as school, friends, family and exercising. The multi-professional treatment the clinic carry stem from a biopsychosocial model for persistent pain. The clinic’s ACT-intervention model for treatment divides into three major parts: 1) Initial behavioral analysis, psycho- and pain education, values work and creative hopelessness. 2) ACT-focused interventions toward increased psychological flexibility and behavioral change in valued directions. 3) Relapse prevention. The team consisted of a psychologist and physiotherapist. A medical doctor was responsible for pain education RESULTS: Treatment was evaluated with assessments of pain intensity, pain acceptance, psychological flexibility and ability to act toward values. Assessments showed improvement at end of treatment. Improvements remained at 3- and 12-months follow-up. DISCUSSION: The results indicate this ACT-intervention model and team work to be a successful way of helping a young person with persistent pain to live a valued life. The authors find a joint case-conceptualization and synchronized team interventions to be of importance.

7. Psychological flexibility’s impact on altered grey matter density and resting state functional connectivity among headache sufferers vs. matched controls
Greece-Cyprus Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Headache, Psychological Flexibility, MRI study

Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Vasilis S. Vasiliou, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Savvas Papacostas, M.D., Institute of Neurology and Genetics
Yiolanta Christou, Institute of Neurology and Genetics
Marios Constantinou, Center for Cognitive Behavior Psychology & University of Nicosia
Andrew T. Gloster, University of Basel
Nikos Konstantinou, Cyprus University of Technology

Background: Imaging studies demonstrated localized anatomical and functional brain changes in headache sufferers. Use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allows the exploration of brain activation in resting state connectivity alterations and how these relate to headaches. How behavioral variables and individual difference factors relate to anatomical and functional differences in headache patients is yet unknown. This study investigated differences in grey matter density and resting-state functional connectivity, and their interaction with individual difference variables (e.g., psychological inflexibility) previously found to contribute to pain suffering and psychopathology. Method: Participants (38 headache patients: M diagnosis years=18.09, SD=10.71 and 24 healthy age-and-gender-matched controls; 46 females, Mage=46.37, SD=13.73) completed measures and underwent brain MRI scanning. Voxel-based morphometry (VBM) analyses from segmented T1-weighted anatomical MR images were used to investigate differences in grey matter density. Also used were traditional seed-based and voxel-to-voxel analyses on functional MRI data to investigate functional connectivity during rest. Group differences were assessed and their associations with psychological flexibility measures investigated. Results: The two groups significantly differed in grey matter density and functional connectivity in several subcortical, frontal and temporal brain areas and differences were associated with the degree of psychological flexibility in pain. Some of the differences (e.g. in subcortical areas such as the amygdala) in structural brain changes and impaired functional connectivity between the groups were evident only when psychological flexibility was accounted for. Discussion: The way in which psychological flexibility interacts with brain regions can provide insight into understanding the neural correlates of the head-pain experience.

8. Impact of Acceptance and Body Compassion in Endometrial Cancer Patients

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness, Experiential Avoidance, Body Compassion, Cancer

Stefanie L. Denu, Psy.D., Xavier University
Christine M. Dacey, Ph.D., ABPP, Xavier University
Abbie O. Beacham, Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver
Renee Zucchero, Ph.D., Xavier University

Background: This study explored the predictive role of body-related components, such as body compassion and BMI, and components of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) model, such as mindfulness and experiential avoidance, on the experience of pain and quality of life in endometrial cancer survivors. Method: Surveys were sent to members of a national online support group for endometrial cancer patients who had completed treatment. Measures included the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire – Short Form (FFMQ-SF), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), Body Compassion Scale (BCS), Brief Pain Inventory – Short Form (BPI-SF), Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy – Endometrial Cancer (FACT-En), and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS). The study included 82 total women participants. Results: ACT components and body-related components, as a set, predicted pain interference and quality of life but not pain severity. Experiential avoidance was determined to be an independent predictor of quality of life. Negative affect, used as a covariate, independently predicted unique variance in pain severity, pain interference, and quality of life. Age, also a covariate, was an independent predictor of pain interference and quality of life. Lastly, obese endometrial cancer survivors endorsed higher experiential avoidance, lower mindfulness, and lower body compassion compared to non-obese endometrial cancer survivors. Discussion: Body-related and ACT components, taken together, may be predictive of pain interference and quality of life, while experiential avoidance may contribute uniquely to quality of life, rendering it a key target of future intervention for endometrial cancer survivors post-treatment.

9. Psychometric properties of the Portuguese versions of the Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ-8) and the Psychological Inflexibility in Pain Scale (PIPS)

Primary Topic: Behavioral medicine
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Vera Almeida, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
José Rocha, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Ricardo Teixeira, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Susana Ferreira, Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Sofia Rosas, Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Maria Paço, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Paula Chaves, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
Teresa Pinho, Ph.D., Instituto de Investigação e Formação Avançada em Ciências e Tecnologias da Saúde (IINFACTS)
José Pereira Monteiro, Ph.D., CGPP/IBMC/UP

Background: Chronic pain is a medical condition that affects a large number of people with a high impact in quality of life and psychological morbidity. Acceptance and commitment therapy has been investigated and used in several medical conditions including chronic pain with good empirical support (1). The aim of this study consists in analyzing the psychometric properties of two instruments: the CPAQ and the PIPS in a Portuguese sample of patients with chronic pain. Method: A sample of 79 voluntary participants (64.1% women), mean age of 44.0 years (SD=15.9) was assessed using a demographic and clinical pain description tool, the Portuguese versions of CPAQ and PIPS, based on a multiphase translation process. Both are Likert scales, CPAQ evaluates dimensions of «Activity Engagement» and «Pain Willingness» with 8 items, and PIPS evaluates dimensions of «Avoidance» and «Cognitive Fusion» with 12 items. Results: The reliability studies provide internal consistency Cronbach alpha of .945 for CPAQ and .937 for PIPS. The exploratory factor analysis solutions for both scales are consistent with original version results. Also, we clarified the discriminant value of both scales from different pain conditions and non-clinical pain. Discussion: These preliminary findings suggest that the Portuguese translations of CPAQ-8 and PIPS have good psychometric properties. These two versions are valid and adequate and may be used to explore the pain acceptance and the psychological in/flexibility in chronic pain patients.

10. Humour styles and mindfulness facets: A pilot study in patients with fibromyalgia

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Adrian Perez-Aranda, Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu
Natalia Angarita-Osorio, Basic Psychology Unit, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Albert Feliu-Soler, Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu
Xavier Borràs, Basic Psychology Unit, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Eva Dallarés-Villar, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona
Laura Andrés-Rodríguez, Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu
Juan V. Luciano, Group of Psychological Research in Fibromyalgia & Chronic Pain (AGORA), Institut de Recerca Sant Joan de Déu

Background: Fibromyalgia (FM) is a prevalent syndrome characterized by chronic pain, fatigue, stiffness, psychological distress, and cognitive disturbances. The role of coping strategies in conditions such as FM is crucial, and humor has been described as an effective strategy for emotion regulation. Humor styles have presented interesting associations with variables related to coping, such as self-efficacy, neuroticism, and mindfulness traits, which in turn have presented moderating effects on some clinical outcomes in cognitive-behavioral therapies and mindfulness-based interventions (MBIs). Considering the evidence for humor as a powerful strategy for emotion regulation, the present pilot study aims to examine the possible predictive effect of humor styles in the clinical changes after an MBI for FM. Method: The sample comprised 35 patients who were part of the EUDAIMON study. The Revised Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores indicated that the sample presented a moderate level of severity. Results: Linear regression analyses showed that “affiliative humor” and the humor style ratio (positive humor styles divided by negatives) had a predictive effect on perceived clinical changes in areas such as “physical activity”, “work activity”, “mood”, and “pain”. Significant correlations between humor styles and clinical severity, and between some facets of mindfulness and humor styles, particularly “self-enhancing humor”, were observed. Discussion: These preliminary findings consider, for the first time, the possible predictive role of humor styles in the response to MBIs and enhance existing evidence of their link with mindfulness. The implications and limitations of these results are discussed.

11. The relationship between avoidance of disease and self-care behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: type 2 diabetes

Aiko Ohya, Doshisha University
Hisashi Makino, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
Mayu Tochiya, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
Yoko Ohata, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
Ryo Koezuka, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
Kiminori Hosoda, National Cerebral and Cardiovascular Center
Takashi Muto, Doshisha University

This study examined the relationship between avoidance of disease and self-care behavior in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and any differences in the self-care behavior based on the pattern of psychological flexibility. A hierarchical cluster analysis was performed with 124 patients with T2DM. Furthermore, an ANOVA was performed to examine if there is a significant difference in self-care variables based on the degree of avoidance or clusters. Patients with high avoidance of diabetes had more DM-distress, external eating behavior, and emotional eating behavior than did those with low avoidance of diabetes. A total of 124 patients with T2DM were classified into 3 clusters (C1–C3). C1 consisted of high cognitive fusion, low mindfulness, and high continuing behavior (CB). C2 consisted of standard CF and mindfulness and low CB. C3 consisted of low CF, high mindfulness, and slightly high CB. Patients in C1 did more exercises than did those in C2. On the other hand, patients in C1 had more DM-distress and emotional eating behavior than did those in C3. The characteristics of self-care behavior were in accordance with the balance of psychological flexibility. Accordingly, interventions should also be developed.

12. The “DIXIT” game cards and their role in valuing: An exploratory protocol
ACT Italia
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT, Experiential Exercise, Values Exercises, Values Clarification, Adolescents, Adults

Alessandra Chiarelli, IESCUM, ACT Italia, ASCCO
Margherita Gurrieri, IESCUM, ACT Italia
Giovambattista Presti, KORE University, IESCUM, ACT Italia
Francesca Pergolizzi, IESCUM, ACT Italia, ASCCO
Paolo Moderato, IESCUM, ACT Italia, ASCCO

Valuing is a fundamental process of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) protocol to help clients to choose and behave in a valued pattern. In doing so the therapist helps the client to develop a meaningful life in spite of difficulties and sorrow that can emerge (Hayes & Harris, 2009). In the therapeutic ACT setting valuing is promoted through metaphors, experiential exercise and clinical conversation. Sets of cards have been found to useful in promoting the conversation with the client expecially with younger people (Hayes, 2012). In those sets evocative pictures are usually paired with questions that can help the client to explore his values with respect to many life domains. We present a protocol of how "DIXIT" cards can also be used to promote value based conversation and significatively impact on a client’s behavioral pattern. "DIXIT" is a card-based board game created by Jean-Louis Roubira, the cards reproduce pictures without words. The aim of the game is that players select cards illustrated with dreamlike images that match a title suggested by the "storyteller", and attempt to guess which card the "storyteller" selected. Our hypothesis was that the absence of verbal labels that prompt client valuing verbal behavior might be more useful to bypass obstacles to choices generated by a pliancing repertoire. The use of these cards may allow people to contact their values in more free and spontaneous ways and expand conversation about values. Implications for refining a value based conversational-exercise and future research will be discussed.

13. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in an Acute Care Hospital: A case report
ACT italia
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT)

Alessia Medioli Ph.D., ASCCO, ACT Italia, Fondazione Richedei
Giuseppina Majani, Ph.D., ASCCO, ACT italia
Luigina Scaglia, Fondazione Richiedei

Background: In acute care clinical conditions may change very rapidly. The psychological support should be flexible in order to follow the clinical changes. The present study aims at demonstrating the usefulness of ACT in helping a patient throughout the different stages of his illness. Method: R. is a 74 years old patient hospitalized for cachexia and dehydration. He was worried about an oncologic relapse (after 1 year since surgery for pharyngeal cancer) and the consequent impairment in daily life. R. was mutacic and slightly dysarthric. The MMSE was 30/30, GDS 3/15, Hamilton Scale 5/68. The diagnostic procedures showed a total dysphagia due to surgery, that made it necessary to try to place a asogastric tube or a Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG), which resulted actually not feasible and forced us to place a Peripheral Inserted Central Catheter (PICC). Almost daily psychological ACT sessions made it possible to shift from the fear of dying of cancer to the acceptance of dysphagia and finally of PICC, by focusing on concepts of flexibility, changing targets and choosing committed actions within R.’s values framework, and building acceptance according to the changing needs. Results: The R.’s perspective change, above described, is showed in ACT Hexaflex and Matrix obtained before and after the psychological sessions. Discussion: The ACT approach showed to be very useful in the medical practice, since its agile applicability suits the patients’ needs and help clinicians in offering targeted support.

14. Does Mindfulness Matter? The Role of Mindfulness on Emotion Dysregulation in Individuals with GAD in Two Independent Samples

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: GAD; Mindfulness

Alex Buhk, M.A., University of Toledo
Heather Schultz, M.A., University of Toledo

Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) is a prevalent affective disorder (Hofmann et al., 2010) that is highly comorbid with unipolar mood disorders (Mennin et al., 2008), and is associated with emotion dysregulation (Mennin et al., 2009), emotional and behavioral avoidance (Mennin et al., 2009), and chronic anxiety/worry symptoms (Wittchen, 2002). While Cognitive Behavioral Therapies are common treatments for GAD, recent research suggests that mindfulness-based interventions could be efficacious in treating anxiety, depression, and stress, all characteristics of GAD (Khoury et al., 2013). The current study tested the explanatory power of mindfulness on the relation between GAD status using a strict clinical cutoff (GAD, No-GAD) and emotion dysregulation in two large independent samples (n1 = 499; n2 = 500). Participants completed the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GADQ; Newman et al., 2002), Difficulties in Emotion Regulation Scale (DERS; Gratz & Roemer, 2004), and the Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory (FMI; Walach et al., 2006). The current study employed mediation analyses (Preacher & Hayes, 2008). The results revealed a partial mediation in both samples, suggesting that GAD is significantly related to difficulties in emotion regulation, and that mindfulness has an important role in this relationship. These findings provide support for the role of mindfulness in GAD, as influencing one’s ability to effectively regulate emotion. Given the role of mindfulness in this relationship, incorporating mindfulness-based strategies in the treatment of GAD might be efficacious. Treatment and research implications of these findings will be discussed.

15. Do You Want to Talk About It? The Role of Social Interaction Anxiety on Reluctance Felt While Discussing Emotional Events in Individuals with GAD

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: GAD; Social Anxiety

Alex Buhk, M.A., University of Toledo
Amy Capparelli, M.A., University of Toledo
Jason Levine, Ph.D., University of Toledo

While research has shown that Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) has high prevalence rates (Hofmann et al., 2010), relatively poor treatment outcomes (Borkovec et al., 2002), high comorbidity (Wittchen et al., 1994), and strong associations with worry (Wittchen, 2002), and emotion dysregulation (Mennin et al., 2009), far less is known about the source of threat in, and how individuals with GAD respond to emotional and social situations. Though minimal research has examined social-contextual factors in GAD, social concerns are rated as the most common worry topic among individuals with GAD (Borkovec, 1994). Individuals with GAD have also been linked to experiencing dysfunctional social cognition and maladaptive interpersonal behaviors (Erickson & Newman, 2007). The current study tested the explanatory power of interpersonal anxiety on the relations between GAD status using a strict clinical cutoff (GAD, No-GAD) and participant reluctance when discussing emotional events with an interviewer. 151 participants completed the Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire-IV (GADQ; Newman et al., 2002), and the Social Interaction Anxiety Scale (SIAS; Mattick & Clarke, 1998). Participants were interviewed and asked to describe an emotional life event in great detail. Participants then rated how reluctant they felt discussing the emotional event (reluctance). The current study employed mediation analysis (Preacher & Hayes, 2008). The results revealed an indirect effect suggesting that the effects of GAD status on reluctance are mediated by SIAS. This model suggests that reluctance is maintained by the way individuals with GAD interact in social situations. Treatment and research implications of these findings will be discussed.

16. A Biopsychosocial Review of Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: GAD

Alex Buhk, M.A., University of Toledo

A complete understanding of Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD) will require the examination of several levels of analysis, including biological, psychological, and social-contextual factors. Research has shown that GAD has high prevalence rates (Hofmann et al., 2010), relatively poor treatment outcomes (Borkovec et al., 2002), high comorbidity (Wittchen et al., 1994), and strong associations with negative affectivity (Mennin et al., 2008), worry (Wittchen, 2002), and emotion dysregulation (Mennin et al., 2009). Despite being one of the most common anxiety disorders (Wittchen, 2002), GAD’s psychophysiology is still largely overlooked and poorly understood. There is limited research among patient samples regarding GAD and cardiac vagal activity (Friedman, 2007), and lab studies yield inconsistent results (Fisher & Newman, 2013; Levine et al., 2016). As such, the psychophysiological profile of GAD remains inconsistent and unclear. More importantly, there has been a non-consideration of social-contextual factors within the GAD literature. As these factors have been minimally examined, we do not understand how individuals with GAD respond or think in social situations. As social concerns are among the most worried topics for individuals with GAD (Borkovec, 1994), it seems essential to further examine these factors. While indirect evidence suggests that GAD is correlated with dysfunctional social cognition and maladaptive interpersonal behaviors (Erickson & Newman, 2007), these factors need to be examined in a controlled, laboratory-based setting among various levels of analysis. Taken together, it is essential for researchers to examine the biopsychosocial factors among individuals with GAD. Until then, our conceptualization of GAD remains incomplete.

17. Preliminary Correlates of Generalized Pliance in Adolescents Attending School in Ireland

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Adolescents' Generalized Pliance

Alison Stapleton, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

The Generalized Pliance Questionnaire for Children (GPQ-C) was recently validated in a sample of Colombian children aged 8-13 (M = 9.57, SD = 1.1), with generalized pliance linked to psychological inflexibility and worry (Salazar et al., 2018). The present study administered the GPQ-C to a sample (n = 54) of female adolescents aged 15-17 (M = 15.43, SD = .536) attending school in Ireland to explore the relationships between generalized pliance, psychological inflexibility and affect. The GPQ-C was moderately correlated with avoidance and fusion, r = .553, p < .001, and negative affect, rs = .312, p = .022, but not positive affect, r = -.246, p = .073. Findings are compared to those of Salazar et al. (2018) and a need to assess the criterion validity of the GPQ-C against a behavioral task is highlighted.

18. Does parental psychological flexibility play a role in the relationship between anxiety/depression symptoms, parenting stress and parenting styles?

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parenting context - Parent-child relationships

Ana Fonseca, Ph.D., University of Coimbra
Helena Moreira, Ph.D., University of Coimbra
Catarina Silva, M.Sc., University of Coimbra
Maria Cristina Canavarro, Ph.D., University of Coimbra

Background:Higher levels of anxiety/depression symptoms may translate into higher parenting stress, which in turn was negatively associated with authoritative parenting, and positively associated with maladaptive parenting styles (authoritarian and permissive), negatively impacting the child’s outcomes. This study aimed to explore if parental psychological flexibility may play a role in the relationship between anxiety/depression symptoms, parenting stress and parenting styles. Methods:The sample comprised 250 mothers of children between 2 and 12 years old, recruited online and in-person, who answered to self-report questionnaires to assess anxiety/depression symptoms, parenting stress, parenting psychological flexibility, general psychological flexibility, and parenting styles. Results: The path model presented a very good fit to data [χ2(37) = 68.54, p < .001; CFI = .97; SRMR = .046; RMSEA = .059, p = .243, 90% CI = 0.036/0.080]. A sequential indirect effect was found, in which higher levels of anxiety or depression symptoms were associated with higher parenting stress, which in turn resulted in lower parental psychological flexibility who was translated into lower use of an authoritative parenting style and with a higher use of authoritarian and permissive styles of parenting. Discussion: Our results are innovative by highlighting the important role of parental psychological flexibility on parenting behaviors. Parental psychological flexibility can be seen as a self-regulatory skill in the parent-child context, as it influences the parent’s ability to regulate their emotions and behaviors in a way that promotes a sensitive response to the child’s needs and good parenting practices, even in the presence of stressful demands.

19. The Portuguese version of the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire for Substance Abuse: Psychometric characteristics

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Psychological inflexibility, Substance abuse, Exploratory factor analysis, Psychometric properties

Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC) -UC
Frederico Sequeira, M.Sc., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga
Margarida Couto, Ph.D., Private Practice
Marina Cunha, Ph.D., Instituto Superior Miguel Torga; Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC) -UC

Background: Psychological inflexibility (PI) is a relevant mechanism for the onset and maintenance of psychopathology. The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire for Substance Abuse (AAQ-SA) was developed and proved to be a valid and reliable measure for the assessment of PI specifically in substance abuse problems. The current study aimed to achieve a Portuguese version of the AAQ-SA, the AAQ-SA-PT, and investigate its psychometric characteristics. Method: A sample of 90 (71 men and 19 women) pursuing opioid replacement therapy completed the following self-report instruments: AAQ-SA-PT, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), and Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scales 21 (DASS – 21). Results: AAQ-SA-PT items analyses indicated that items 3, 13, and 15 showed item-total correlations < .40 and their removal would also improve reliability. These items were removed and a principal component analysis (PCA) was conducted. PCA results showed a one-factor structure accounting for 59.20% of the explained variance. Factor loadings ranged from .44 to .90. A Cronbach's Alpha's of .93 was found. Concerning the AAQ-SA-PT association with other measures, positive correlations with the AAQ-II (r = .91; p = <.001), depressive symptoms (r =. 64; p <. 001), anxiety symptoms (r = .29; p <.001) and stress symptoms (r = .43; p < .001) were found. Discussion: The AAQ-SA-PT showed a single component structure, high internal consistency, and adequate convergent and discriminant validity. The AAQ-SA seems to be a reliable and valid measure of EA in people facing substance abuse problems.

20. Examining the underlying Psychological Inflexibility/Psychological Flexibility model components by using network analysis
Greek & Cypriot ACBS Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT model evaluation

Andria Christodoulou, M.A., University of Cyprus
Michalis P. Michaelides, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Background: There is a growing interest in adopting innovative approaches to examine the Psychological Inflexibility/Psychological Flexibility (PI/PF) model and related components of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Traditional approaches are useful for examining a model’s general structure, however they cannot evaluate interactions among its components. Network analysis might be a solution since it allows the examination of a psychological construct as a system of interconnected variables. The current study aimed to 1) construct the PI/PF component network and explore connections between the components; and 2) identify the most important components within the network. Method: 87 individuals with chronic pain, who participated in a larger study examining the effectiveness of an ACT intervention, constituted the study’s sample. Participants completed a battery of ACT measures assessing the different ACT components. Data were used to examine the model within a network analysis approach. A network of the six ACT components was computed. Results: The resulting network showed strong connections among certain ACT components. The strongest positive connection was between Mindfulness and Values-Clarification and the strongest negative connection was between Acceptance and Fusion. The components with the highest centrality indices were Acceptance and Mindfulness. Discussion: Findings showed that the components of Acceptance and Mindfulness hold key roles in the model, since they were more strongly and closely connected with the rest of the components. This indicates that a possible change on these two components might easily activate or cause quicker changes on all connected components.

21. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Interventions to Improve Wellbeing and Reduce Burnout in Healthcare Professionals: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Healthcare professionals

Arianna Prudenzi, University of Leeds
Christopher D. Graham, Queen's University Belfast
Faye Clancy, University of Leeds
Deborah Hill, University of Leeds
Ruairi O’ Driscoll, University of Leeds
Fiona Day, Fiona Day Consulting LTD
Daryl B. O' Connor, University of Leeds

Background: Several recent trials have assessed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for improving outcomes in healthcare professionals. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to collate evidence from these trials to investigate the overall efficacy and effect size of ACT for improving well-being and reducing work-related stress in healthcare professionals. Method: A comprehensive literature search (Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, Psych Info) following PRISMA guidelines, identified 20 studies that met the study eligibility criteria. Meta-analyses on primary (wellbeing and work-related stress combined) and secondary (mindfulness, values, cognitive fusion, experiential avoidance combined) outcomes were performed. Results: Although study quality was generally low, results from primary outcomes analyses indicated that ACT outperformed pooled control conditions with a small to moderate effect size (g = 0.48) at all time-points (post-intervention and follow-up combined), at post-intervention (g = 0.40) and at follow-up (g = 0.51). Results from subgroup analyses showed that ACT was superior to inactive and active controls but was not significantly more effective than comparison treatments. ACT interventions also showed slightly better post-intervention psychological flexibility relative to controls (g=.22). Conclusions: ACT interventions that aimed to increase wellbeing and reduce work-related stress in healthcare professionals were found to be more effective than active and inactive control conditions. However, higher quality studies are required and existing evidence suggests that ACT is no more effective than established treatments.

22. Acceptance-based exposure and behavioral measurement: A case study of an elderly woman with obsessive compulsive disorder

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Behavioral Measurements

Atsushi Seguchi, M.A., Ritsumeikan University

Background: Recently, researchers have identified the importance of using behavioral measurements as dependent variables in the field of Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS). However, there are few reports implementing behavioral measurements as outcomes. This study reports observations from a case study using acceptance-based exposure for a woman in her early 70s who could not enter a supermarket or touch goods because she experienced obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) related anxiety in the form of spreading candida from her hand. The study verified the effectiveness of the intervention by using behavioral measurements. Method: Client: Woman in her early 70s who experienced OCD related anxiety. Target Behavior: To enter supermarkets and touch goods with her bare hands. Behavioral Measurement: The frequency of entering supermarkets and the number of goods which was touched by her bare hands. Experimental Design: AB design. Intervention: Acceptance-based exposure to a stimulus which induced anxiety for spreading candida from her hand, coupled with a metaphor of square box about her feeling. Results: The client’s frequency of entering supermarkets, and the number of goods touched by her bare hands increased. She was able to go shopping alone. Discussion: The use of behavioral measurements allowed researchers to precisely measure and confirm the change of the client’s behaviors as a result of the acceptance-based intervention.

23. Brief ACT Protocol: Analysing a Child's Creativity

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: CHILDREN

Beatriz Harana, Ph.D. Student, University of Almeria
Beatriz Sebastián, Ph.D. Student
Mari Luz Vallejo, Ph.D. Student

Background: Several researchers have shown interest in the study of the main variables that determine the effectiveness and efficacy of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes, Strosahl & Wilson, 1999). In addition, some authors have achieved the development of new protocols for psychological intervention based on scientific evidence. However, the evidence available up to date of the implementation of ACT in children is modest, there is still a need to improve the methodology. On the other hand, no studies of ACT interventions in children and their impact on creativity in the Spanish population have been shown. The main aim of this case study is to develop an ACT protocol based in the three key therapeutic strategies (Törneke, Luciano, Barnes-Holmes, & Bond, 2016) and analyse its impact on the creativity and life of the child. Method: This case study consists of a design N=1. The ACT protocol was structured in 10 session (90-minute sessions each) based on the three key therapeutic strategies (Törneke, Luciano, Barnes-Holmes, & Bond, 2016): creative hopelessness, defusion, valued action. The instruments used as a pre- and post-intervention measure were: Cognitive Fusion Questionaire for Young (CFQ-Y), Diagrama Bull’s-Eye, Children Depression Inventory (CDI), Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS) and Torrance Creative Thinking Test (TTCT). Result: The efficacy of the treatment in other clinical cases as well as its limitations are discussed. These results are in line with the single case studies previously performed under Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in children.

25. The role of values in understanding the impact of health status on quality of life

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Values

Brandon Sanford, M.S., University of Nevada, Reno
Cory Stanton, M.S., University of Nevada, Reno
Jonathan Singer, M.A., University of Nevada, Reno

Background: Values attainment is often cited as the ultimate goal of ACT interventions contributing to improvements in quality of life for patients (Wilson & Murrell, 2004). Advances in the approach to values measurement have enabled us to study functional processes as opposed to domains (Smout, Davies, Burns, & Christie, 2014). The current project examines the impact of values attainment and obstruction on the relationship between mental and physical health problems on quality of life. Methods: We recruited a sample of undergraduate college students as part of a larger measurement validation project. Participants completed the following measures at two time points one month apart: the Short-Form 36 (SF-36; Jenkinson, Coulter, & Wright, 1993), the Valuing Questionnaire (VQ; Smout, Davies, Burns, & Christie, 2014), and the Clinical Research Inventory, a novel quality of life measure currently under development. Statistics: This poster will present a moderator analysis testing the impact of overall health on quality of life moderated by values. We will use a regression-based approach to estimate an interaction term to represent the moderation effect. We predict that progress and obstruction in values will significantly moderate how physical and mental health impact participants’ quality of life. Discussion: The implications of this findings will be reviewed with an emphasis on the role of targeting barriers vs. clarification of values in behavioral interventions across both mental and physical health.

26. The impact of early memories of warmth and safeness on social anxiety: the mediating role of self-criticism and fears of compassion

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Social Anxiety; Self-criticism; fears of compassion; early memories of warmth and safeness

Brígida Caiado, University of Coimbra
Maria do Céu Salvador, Faculty of Psychology and Educ. Sciences; Cognitive-Behavioral Center for Research and Intervention (CINEICC); University of Coimbra

Background: Early memories of warmth and safeness(EMWS) have been negatively associated with self-criticism and fears of compassion(FC). Early critical or negligent experiences (with parents and peers) and self-criticism have been positively associated with social anxiety(SA). Nevertheless, no studies established a relationship between EMWS, FC, and SA. This study explored the mediating role of self-criticism and FC in the relationship of EMWS (with parents and peers) with SA. Method: Sample: 766 Portuguese university students (63.8% females; Mage = 20,46; SD = 3,717). Instruments: Self-report questionnaires measuring EMWS with parents and peers, self-criticism, FC and SA. Results: EMWS with peers had a greater predictive effect on SA than EMWS with parents. FC for others had no association with SA. FC for the self and FC from others was associated with SA, but only the latter significantly mediated the relation between EMWS and SA. FC from others and self-criticism fully mediated the relationship between EMWS with parents and SA but partially mediated the relationship with EMWS with peers. Discussion: EMWS with peers was a best predictor of SA than EMWS with parents. Self-criticism was an important mediator in the relationship of EMWS with parents and peers with SA. The only fear of compassion that mediated this relation was FC from others. FC for the self lost its predictor effect, suggesting that FC from others may precede and originate FC for the self. These results emphasizes the importance of focusing SA interventions on promoting self-compassion, reducing self-criticism and FC, specifically FC from others.

27. Experiential Avoidance and Parent Engagement: How Parent Engagement Factors Contribute to Child Responsiveness in an Intensive Outpatient Program

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anxiety and Mood Disorders

Bronwyn Lehman, Ph.D., Children's Hospital Colorado
Clio Pitula, Ph.D., Children's Hospital Colorado

Background: Parental engagement in psychological interventions (i.e., behavioral and attitudinal processes) has been identified as an important predictor of treatment outcomes (e.g., Fjermestad, et al., 2009; Haine-Schlagel & Walks, 2015; Staudt, 2007). However, this engagement may be hindered by parental experiential avoidance (EA). Experiential avoidance is conceptualized by Cheron, Ehrenreich and Pincus (2009) as parent action derived from child emotional arousal designed to control the child’s experience. Experiential avoidance often manifests as parental distress in witnessing their child’s difficult emotional experiences, potentially leading to ineffective responses to the child (Cheron et al., 2009). It is believed that higher EA impacts engagement and predicts poorer treatment outcomes; the aim of the current study. Method: Parental engagement will be evaluated in an intensive outpatient program. Participants (expected N = 15) will be patients aged 13 to 18 years with a mood and/or anxiety disorder and their parent. Experiential avoidance (PAAQ, Cheron et al., 2009) and mood/anxiety symptoms (RCADS-25, Chorpita, Ebesutani, & Spence, 2015) will be assessed in weeks 1 and 6 of treatment, and engagement will be assessed in week 6 from a measure adapted from Hall et al. (2001). Results:At the time of submission, data collection is underway and will be complete prior to the presentation. Preliminary data supports the face validity of the engagement measure. The investigators hypothesize that results will demonstrate that lower EA predicts higher parental engagement and improvement in mood and anxiety scores. Discussion: Results are expected to contribute to understanding of parental engagement factors and may influence intervention components.

28. The effectiveness of FACT (Focussed Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) in primary care: An RCT

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Focussed acceptance and commitment therapy

Bruce Arroll MBChB, Ph.D., University of Auckland
Helena Frischtak M.D., University of Auckland
Vicki Mount, MBChB, University of Auckland
Fred Sundram, University of Auckland
Susan Fletcher, University of Melbourne
Douglas Kingsford, Inland Health District, British Columbia
Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., University of Washington

Aims: Is a focussed acceptance and commitment therapy intervention more effective than control for patients with distress in primary care at one week follow up. Methods: Ethics and registered with ANZCTR Location: Greenstone clinic; patients recruited from waiting room; if interested goes to private room. if PHQ 8 ≥ 2 and eligible if can understand info sheet. Consented and randomisation through remote computer. The intervention is a contextual interview (work/love/play) for both groups. The FACT group then gets up to 3 tasks to do with a behavioural likelihood of doing task score. Outcomes blinded by either participant emails in questionnaire or BA phones patient at one week. Results: 57 participants recruited with 28 in the intervention group and 29 in the control. The female/male ratio 38/19; Maori participants 10/28 in the intervention group and 10/29 in the control group; average age intervention group 50.3 years and control group 44.2 years. Baseline: PHQ-8 11 (FACT) vs 11.72 (control) Outcomes one week after intervention FACT Control PHQ-8 7.4 10.1* Emoqol100 67 70** % ≤ 6 on PHQ 8 14/28 (50%) 6/29 (21%)*** *p<0.02 **p>0.05 ***Numbers Needed To Treat = 3.4 Conclusion: The results suggest that the intervention is effective at one week at least for this interviewer and this population of patients with an effect size of 29%. The recruiting rate of 2 participants per half day will be helpful in future research grant applications. This is the first study to examine effectiveness of FACT in any population.

29. The Emoqol 100, an ultra ultra-brief case-finding tool for assessment of mood: a pragmatic diagnostic accuracy audit

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: low mood

Bruce Arroll MBChB, Ph.D., University of Auckland
Connor Mulcahy, University of Aberdeen
Vicki Mount MBChB, University of Auckland

Objective: To assess the diagnostic accuracy for low mood of a single verbally administered question on emotional quality of life (Emoqol 100). Methods: Retrospective audit of consecutive consultations. Participants: Eligible patients who had both a PHQ-9 inventory assessment and an Emoqol 100 recorded at the same consultation. The index test is the verbally asked Emoqol 100 which is the patient’s emotional quality of life now, with 100 being perfect emotional health and 0 being worst imaginable. Results: 102 patients were seen during the study period of which 76 met the eligibility criteria and there were 215 test results for them. For a cut point of <50 on the Emoqol 100 and the PHQ-9 ≥ 12 the sensitivity was 53% (95% CI 45-61) and the specificity was 92% (95% CI 86-98). Discussion: This is the first study of the Emoqol 100 which has a high specificity meaning a mood issue probably exists when the score is low. The test will be very useful for busy clinicians as it takes less than 15 seconds to verbally administer.

30. Psychological flexibility, body appreciation, and social appearance anxiety in Turkish young adults

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: social appearance anxiety, body acceptance, eating disorders

Burcak Kapar, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Joanna Dudek, Ph.D., SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Background: Social appearance anxiety is a shared risk factor for the development of two common disorders namely: social anxiety disorders and eating disorders (Levinson et al., 2011). The study aimed to examine the relationship between psychological flexibility, body appreciation, body mass index (BMI) and the level of social appearance anxiety in Turkey. Method: A sample of 1903 respondents which consisted of 966 females (50.8 %) and 937 males (49.2 %) were included in the current study. Participants who were between the ages of 18 years old and 40 years old were recruited via social media to complete an online survey. We measured the participant’s level of social appearance anxiety, psychological flexibility, and body appreciation. Results: The higher psychological flexibility and body appreciation were related to the lower level of social appearance anxiety. Higher BMI was associated with higher social appearance anxiety. Regression analyses showed that psychological flexibility, body appreciation, and BMI explained 43.5% of the variance of social appearance anxiety. Discussion: These findings highlight the relationships between psychological flexibility, body appreciation, and social appearance anxiety. Extending the research on social appearance anxiety and BMI, the present study indicates that individuals with higher BMI might be more prone to develop appearance-related social anxiety due to weight stigma (Sanlier et al., 2017). Further research is needed to examine whether increasing psychological flexibility and enhancing body appreciation can lead to a decrease in social appearance anxiety and therefore minimize adult’s risk of developing appearance-related distress and eating disorders.

31. Posttraumatic Growth and Suicide in Combat Veterans: The Impact of Mental Health Stigma and Interpersonal Needs

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Posttraumatic growth; PTSD; stigma; suicide; interpersonal needs

Cara Blevins, M.A., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Richard G. Tedeschi, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Amy B. Canevello, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Christine Elnitsky, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte
Elizabeth Malone, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Background: Over the past 20 years, suicide rates within the US military have increased at unprecedented rates. According to Joiner’s (2005) Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS), perceived burdensomeness and thwarted belongingness are direct risk factors for suicide, which may be exacerbated by self-stigma. Emerging research suggests that posttraumatic growth (PTG) may contribute to post-combat suicide resiliency; however, little is known about the mechanisms underlying its protective influence. Therefore, in an effort to identify intervention targets, the present study sought to test a model of specific mechanisms of suicide risk and resiliency in post-combat military personnel. Methods: Participants included 215 combat veterans of OEF/OIF. Statistical tests of simple mediation models utilizing bootstrapping techniques and analyses in AMOS were used to test the hypothesized model. Results: Self-stigma was positively related to thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and PTG. Thwarted belongingness was related to perceived burdensomeness, and perceived burdensomeness was related to suicide risk. PTG was negatively related to thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, and overall suicide risk. Discussion: Results suggest that self-stigma may exacerbate suicide risk by increasing a sense of thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Results also suggest that PTG may directly and indirectly protect against suicide risk by offsetting the risk conveyed through thwarted belongingness and perceived burdensomeness. Thus, when conducting research with combat veterans at risk for suicide, it may be beneficial to consider interactive rather than isolated factors, with an emphasis on potential explanatory mechanisms. Further, PTG, belongingness, and burdensomeness may be important variables to consider in suicide prevention efforts.

32. Protocol based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for overweight women

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Overweight women

Carla Carolina Rodrigues de Melo, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Ana Teresa Stival Coelho, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Laura Saddi, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Laís Melo Giglio, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Nayara Lima, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Ana Cláudia Rodrigues, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Sônia Maria Mello Neves, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás
Vivian Costa Resende Cunha, Pontifical Catholic University of Goiás

This protocol, based on the book “The Diet Trap” by Lillis, Dahl and Weineland (2016), proposes a group intervention for overweight women who have struggled with weight loss and dieting. The 1st session proposes understanding the effects of control and restriction. The 2nd and 3rd sessions aim to learn about saboteur thoughts and their interference on identifying values. The 4th session seeks acceptance of aversive events. The 5th and 6th sessions focus on the damaging effects of motivation through self-aversion and on promoting self-understanding with a compassionate posture. The 7th session focuses on the relationship with their inner thoughts. The 8th and 9th session encourage healthy life choices. The 10th and 11th sessions aim to understand the values and choose actions for a harmonious life, and the 12th session reviews all the skills learned thus far. The results will be evaluated through participants’ accounts, data obtained from the activities, scores in questionnaires and scales applied before and after intervention, as well as weight measurement.

33. Efficacy of RNT-focused ACT in Bulimia Nervosa

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Repetitive negative thinking

Carlos M. Isaza, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Juan C. Vargas, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Eating disorders are a global problem whose prevalence has been increased and being one of the main causes of disease in young women. A multifactorial etiology has been recognized in which the sociocultural variables impose an ideal figure model associated with success, beauty and youth. Bulimia Nervosa (BN) has an important prevalence and psychotherapy has been a useful tool in its treatment, mainly Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, which became the first choice for its intervention due to the empirical evidence obtained. However, there is still a great margin to improve the clinical efficacy of psychological interventions for BN. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has been very well received in the management of various problems because it is a transdiagnostic treatment, although few studies have been conducted in eating disorders. The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of a brief ACT protocol focused on dismantling patterns of repetitive negative thinking in people suffering from BN. Five women suffering from BN were recruited and a multiple-baseline design across participants was implemented.

34. Psychological Flexibility, Rejection Sensitivity and Loneliness

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mental Health and Psychological Inflexibility

Cathrine Saebo, European University of Madrid, Spain
Lidia Budziszewska, European University of Madrid, Spain

Background: High levels of Experiential Avoidance (EA) is often associated with poorer psychological well-being. The purpose of this study is to determine how EA increases an individual´s vulnerability to maladaptive outcomes, such as Rejection Sensitivity (RS) and loneliness. However, as studies looking into the mediational processes are scarce, more cross-sectional and cross-cultural studies are needed to understand the relationship better. The purpose of this study is to investigate the relationship between individuals´ experiential avoidance (EA), rejection sensitivity (RS), and loneliness levels. Method: EA or Psychological inflexibility was assessed using the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire II (AAQ-II) (Bond et al., 2011). Measures of RS was assessed using the Rejection Sensitivity Questionnaire- Adult version (ARSQ; Downey & Feldman, 1996). Measures of one’s subjective feelings of loneliness as well as feelings of social isolation were assessed using the revised UCLA Loneliness Scale (RULS; Russell, Peplau, & Cutrona, 1980). Results and discussion: According to the results, it was revealed that EA and RS were strongly associated with loneliness. Those results can indicate that RS is a significant predictor of peoples´ feelings of loneliness, likewise, of peoples´ tendency to cope with the possibility of rejection by engaging in EA. In relation to gender, females reported higher RS than males. However, we could not find any significant gender differences regarding EA nor loneliness.

35. Acceptance and Defusion (Openness) Exercises and Metaphors: A Review of ACT English Language Books

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Metaphors, Exercises, Worksheets, Books

Emanuele Rossi, Psy.D.; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy; Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy
Chiara Del Brutto; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy
Daniele Ginex; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy
Francesco Mancini, M.D., Psy.D.; Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva S.r.l., Rome, Italy; Università degli Studi Guglielmo Marconi, Rome, Italy

In this study, the aim is offering a comprehensive overview of acceptance and defusion processes on ACT books (1999-2018) with the purpose to outline an understandable and user-friendly profile of the use of acceptance and defusion metaphors, exercises and worksheets within them. Acceptance and defusion processes represent one of the three pillars of psychological flexibility: openness. In order to realize the profile, books were divided into two main groups: (1) ACT Books for professionals and (2) ACT Books for clients. We have created an easy-to-read summary table which provides an essential overview of acceptance and defusion metaphors, exercises and worksheets. This review was conducted with the aim of offering a universally accessible, clear and intuitive cataloging tool of practical and experiential resources for ACT learners and practitioners. Furthermore, the summary table provides a brief description of how every metaphor, exercise or worksheet is presented and a reference to external resources. This poster related to acceptance and defusion is part of a more general pilot project that also entailed other processes of psychological flexibility and could be further extended in the future.

36. The effects of perspective-taking and writing supportive message to others on the state self-compassion

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: self-compassion, perspective-taking

Chisato Tani, Ritsumeikan University
Shinji Tani, Ritsumeikan University

Writing a supportive message to others contributes to enhance the self-compassion (Chisima et al., 2017). From Relational Frame Theory (RFT), writing a supportive message to others activates perspective-taking and, then that might contribute to enhance state self-compassion. The current study investigated the effects of perspective taking skill and writing supportive message on the state self-compassion. Japanese undergraduate students (n=50) participated in this study. The participants read an essay written by a student who had recently broken heart. After that, the participants were randomly assigned to one of the three conditions. In the perspective-taking condition (n=17), the participants performed a task that was designed to active perspective-taking for the student, and they wrote a supportive message to the student. In the message condition (n=17), the participants only wrote a supportive message to the student. In the control condition (n=16), the participants wrote about his shoes. The measurement of the state self-compassion questionnaire was used to assess the effects of the experiment. The results of an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) showed that no difference was found on the state self-compassion score between groups at post-test. In all groups, means of state self-compassion score at post-test were higher than pre-test. These results suggest that state self-compassion is greatly affected by “reading an essay written by the person who had broken heart” in Japanese students.

37. Negative Affect and Binge Eating: The buffering effect of body image-related psychological flexibility

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Disordered eating

Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Margarida Barreto, M.S., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Sara Oliveira, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra

Objective: The scientific literature supports the association between negative affect and difficulties in regulating eating behaviour, such as binge eating. According to theoretical models, binge eating may be conceptualized as a strategy to escape or reduce some unwanted or aversive states. In fact, some individuals may engage in binge eating when they experience negative affect and distressing situations and are unable to embrace adaptive emotion regulation strategies to cope with them. This study tests the moderator effect of body image psychological flexibility on the relationships between negative affect and binge eating severity. Method: Participants were 403 adults (119 males and 284 females) from the general population, aged between 18 and 55 years old, who completed self-report measures. Results: Negative affect was positively correlated to binge eating severity. Results indicated that the moderation model explained 38.5% of binge eating behaviours and demonstrated that body image-related psychological flexibility had a moderator effect on the association between negative affect and binge eating. Conclusion: The present study indicate that body image flexibility may buffers the tendency to engage in binge eating in the context of aversive and unwanted emotional experiences and may promote self-regulation of eating behaviour. These findings seem to have relevant clinical and research implications.

38. Understanding the mediational role of body appreciation on the relationship between awareness and acceptance competencies and disordered eating

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: body appreciation and disordered eating

Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Maria Coimbra, Master Student, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Sara Oliveira, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra

Background: Cardaciotto and colleagues (2008) conceptualized mindfulness as the present-moment awareness of one’s internal and external experiences (rather than preoccupation with past or future events) in an acceptive, open and nonjudgmental mindset. Previous literature corroborates that higher mindfulness abilities are associated with lower levels of psychopathological outcomes. Nevertheless, information about how present-moment awareness and acceptance operate in eating psychopathology is still scarce. Body appreciation, defined as a posture of respect and acceptance toward one's body despite the recognition of its flaws and imperfections, is negatively associated with several indicators of body image and eating-related difficulties. The present study analysed the impact of awareness and acceptance skills on body appreciation, and on the engagement in disordered eating. Method: A path model was tested in which body appreciation was hypothesized as a mediator on the relationship between awareness and acceptance competencies and disordered eating, controlling BMI’s effect, in a sample comprised of 308 women from the general population, aged between 18 and 35 years old. Results: The tested model accounted for 47% of the variance of disordered eating and revealed a very good fit. Results showed that acceptance and awareness skills presented significant indirect impact on eating psychopathology carried through body appreciation. Discussion: These findings suggest that mindfulness abilities may potentiate the promotion of positive body image which have a protective effect on the engagement in disordered eating. Present findings emphasise the importance of promoting mindful competencies in preventive programmes focused on body image and eating behaviours.

39. Caregivers of Alzheimer’s Patients: A 12-Session ACT Protocol

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Alzheimer, Caregivers

Claudia Perdighe, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC
Antonella D’Innocenzo, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC
Paolo Rosamilla, Psy.D, Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC
Emanuele Cassetta, M.D., Ospedale Fatebenefratelli di Roma
Bruno De Sanctis, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC
Emanuele Rossi, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC
Andrea Gragnani, Psy.D., Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva, SPC

The study evaluated a 12-session protocol based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) aimed at reducing the emotional distress of relatives acting as caregivers of Alzheimer's patients. The work is the result of a collaboration between Scuola di Psicoterapia Cognitiva (SPC) and Fatebenefratelli Hospital in Rome. The protocol had two goals: to increase the acceptance of the disease and the negative outcomes it generates; to increase the commitment to plan and live the daily life in line with goals and values still achievable. Managing an Alzheimer's patient is a highly stressful event for carers, especially when the caregiver is a family member: the progression of the disease represents new and continuous emergencies to be managed for the caregivers, increasing the risk of developing emotional and physical disorders, and compromising the quality of life. The intervention included 10 individual therapy sessions and 2 follow-up sessions. Of the first 10 clients treated, only 8 have completed treatment. Clients completed a battery of tests before and after treatment and follow-up. Results indicate a good response to treatment, lower scores in depression and anxiety measures and an increase in the scores of scales that measure willingness of internal experience and commitment to their values.

40. A mindfulness, acceptance and self-compassion based intervention for eating disorders: Presentation of a clinical trial

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Eating disorders, contextual-behavioral approaches

Cristiana Marques, M.Sc., CINEICC, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra
Ana Telma Pereira, Ph.D., Institute of Psychological Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Coimbra
Miguel Castelo-Branco, Coimbra Institute for Biomedical Imaging and Translational Research (CIBIT), ICNAS, University of Coimbra
Paula Castilho, CINEICC, Faculty of Psychology and Educational Sciences, University of Coimbra

Background: Individuals with eating disorder (ED) present difficulties in emotion regulation, engaging in maladaptive strategies (e.g.self-criticism, rumination, avoidance, suppression), to deal with negative internal experiences that arises from body image disturbance, feelings of incompetence, and/or weight concerns. Contextual-behavioral approaches, such as mindfulness, acceptance, and compassion, seem to demonstrate promising results on cognitive processes and eating psychopathology. Despite based on different theoretical models, we hypothesize that particular components of these approaches will address specific difficulties presented by individuals with ED. Therefore, the aim of this project is to develop, implement and assess efficacy of a mindfulness, acceptance- and self-compassion-based intervention for ED. Method: Participants will be selected in hospital centres considering inclusion criteria (female aged 16-30, and ED diagnose) and exclusion criteria (cognitive impairment, and serious medical condition). After the assessment, participants will be randomly assigned to intervention (12-session weekly group intervention) or control groups (which may enroll the intervention after their participation as controls). The content of the sessions will comprise psychoeducation, mindfulness, acceptance and self-compassion skills, with several formal and informal practices within and between sessions and homework assignments. Results: Participants will be assessed with psychological measures (before and after the intervention, and after 3 and 6 months), and fMRI, heart rate variability, and galvanic skin response (before and after the intervention). Discussion: This study may represent an important advance in research because it will test the efficacy of a psychological intervention for ED, based on integration of mindfulness, acceptance and compassion-based approaches, validated through psychological assessment and neuroimaging.

41. Validation of the Greek version of the Commitment Action Questionnaire (CAQ)

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Chronic Pain

Dafne Morroni, University of Cyprus
Vasilis S. Vasiliou, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

Background: The Committed Action Questionnaire (CAQ) is a 24-item measure of one of the components encompassed in the psychological flexibility model. Committed action can be defined as goal-directed, flexible perseverance. The present study aims to validate this instrument in Greek and evaluate its psychometric properties and factor structure. Method: The total sample consisted of 102 (Mage = 53.79, 80.40% female) Greek-speaking chronic pain patients. Reliability-related analyses were conducted, including item correlation and corrected item-total correlation analyses and followed by Exploratory Factor Analysis. Results: The internal consistency reliability of the scale was considered good, Cronbach’s alpha=.79. Three items appeared poorly correlated with the rest of the scale and eliminating them improved the internal consistency to α=.80. Items excluded were not the same as in the original study indicating differences between the English and Greek measures. Principal Component Analysis conducted on the 24 items with oblique rotation suggested 4-factors explaining 51.1% of the variance. This finding also differed from the original study where a 2-factor scale was presented. Discussion: The validity of the Greek-CAQ, and especially its correspondence to the original version will be discussed.

42. Beyond Symptom Reduction: Changes in Mindfulness, Meaning, Acceptance, and Positive Emotions in Treatment at Higher Levels of Care
Rocky Mountain Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Higher Levels of Care

Dan V. Blalock, Ph.D., Duke University School of Medicine
Bonnie Brennan, M.A., LPC, CEDS, Eating Recovery Center
Angela Derrick, Ph.D., CEDS, Eating Recovery Center
Susan McClanahan, Ph.D., CEDS, Eating Recovery Center

Background: Historically, treatment planning in higher level of care settings targeted symptom reduction and skill acquisition. Mental health is now defined more broadly and includes the ability to skillfully recognize and manage a broader range of emotions – both accepting and regulating negative emotions, as well as cultivating positive emotions. This study examined which specific traditional and positive psychology constructs significantly improve over the typical course of higher level of care treatment. Method: N=30 adult patients enrolled in a mood and anxiety partial hospitalization program in a major American city. Participants completed a series of self-report measures at intake and discharge. including the Beck Depression Inventory-II (BDI-II), the Anxiety Reactivity and Perseveration Scale (ARPS), the DBT Ways of Coping Checklist (DBT-WCCL), the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) and Seligman’s PERMA Model (PERMA). Results: Traditional symptom reduction was achieved (BDI-II change =-13.49, p<.001; ARPS Probability change =-11.42, p<.001; ARPS Perseveration change =-13.00, p<.001). Coping skills improved (DBT-WCCL Dysfunctional Coping Skills change =-4.11, p<.01; DBT-WCCL Skills Use change =14.89, p<.001). Mindfulness and Acceptance-based changes were mixed (Nonreactivity to Inner Experience change= -2.38, p<.001; all other subscales p>.25). PERMA-based changes were mixed (Accomplishment change =2.76, p<.001; Meaning change =1.65, p<.01; Positive Emotion change =1.94, p<.001; all other subscales p>.10). Discussion: While higher levels of care are geared toward symptom reduction and skill acquisition, mindfulness and acceptance-based constructs may not be fully cultivated within the limited time frame of intensive treatment. Future studies should examine post-treatment changes in mindfulness and acceptance-based processes.

43. The Epidemiology of Fears in Cyprus and the Potential Role of Psychological Flexibility in Improving Quality of Life
Greek-Cyprus ACBS Chapter Sponsored
Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Fear

Danae Papageorgiou, M.Sc., University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Maria Orphanidou, M.Sc., University of Cyprus

Background: Research indicates that 14.6% of individuals suffer from fear and anxiety disorders affecting quality of life (Rogier et al.,1988). Such data enables targeted mental health initiatives that have real impact; yet in many countries epidemiological data remains non-existent. The current study aimed to provide epidemiological data regarding different types of fears (e.g., social phobia, specific phobias) within the Cypriot population and investigate the role of individual difference factors. Specifically, it explored whether psychological flexibility moderated the impact of fears on quality of life. Method: A representative sample of 412 participants (Mage=42.14, SD=.64) completed measures including: Fear Survey Schedule–III (FSS-III), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire and World Health Organization Quality of Life Instrument. Results: Mean fear score was 118.56 out of 320 (higher scores indicating more fears), with females reporting significantly higher fear levels than males (t(317)=-6.409, p<.001). Some fears were more common than reported in other countries (e.g., 10.2% endorsed plane phobia). Moderation analysis indicated no significant interaction (b<.001, t=-.4016, p=.69), suggesting that psychological flexibility does not buffer the impact of fears on quality of life. Subsequent hierarchical regression showed that fear levels significantly predicted quality of life (R=.15, F(1,280)=24.476, p<.001). Psychological flexibility had a large, positive, direct effect on quality of life over and above fear levels (ΔR² = .42, F(1,279)=67.071, p<.001). Discussion: Findings discuss the importance of cultural contexts on fear and highlight the impact of psychological flexibility on quality of life. Mental health initiatives targeting fears need to take it into account when planning prevention/intervention programs.

44. Conceptual analysis of cognitive defusion and the process of clinical change in ACT

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Daniel Afonso Assaz, University of São Paulo
Claudia Kami Bastos Oshiro, University of São Paulo

Cognitive defusion is a central concept within Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). As a middle-level term, cognitive defusion can be useful in improving ACT’s dissemination and practice. However, its pragmatic value can be lost in the absence of conceptual clarity and a strong link with basic behavioral processes. In order to contribute to such efforts, this presentation offers a literature review on how cognitive defusion is usually conceptualized, distinguishing between the procedures, outcomes and processes involved while emphasizing the latter aspect. Then, this conceptualization is critically examined regarding logical consistency and empirical evidence, culminating in a theoretical proposal in which cognitive defusion is understood as an outcome, that can be achieved through different behavioral processes, underlying the different procedures used by ACT therapists to promote cognitive defusion: changes in stimulus control, differential reinforcement and contextual discrimination. After reading the poster, the audience is expected to be able to critically evaluate the pragmatic value of the term "cognitive defusion" and create functional hypotheses regarding the behavioral processes responsible for clinical change in the promotion of cognitive defusion.

45. Efficacy of a brief RNT-focused ACT protocol in panic disorder

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Repetitive negative thinking

Derly J. Toquica-Orjuela, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Ángela M. Henao, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Panic disorder, characterized by a persistent concern about the presentation of frequent panic attacks and their possible consequences, contributes to the development and implementation of avoidance strategies that cause a clinically significant limitation in people's lives. Clinical investigations show different treatment alternatives, with exposure therapy being the one with the greatest evidence of efficacy in this disorder. However, as this is a therapy with low acceptance by consultants and professionals, the need for new therapies arises. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) without Exposure in people who meet the diagnostic criteria for Panic Disorder (N = 5). This study uses a multiple randomized non-concurrent baseline design among participants. An ACT protocol of five sessions will be implemented, which aims to promote the acceptance of internal experiences and participation in values-based activities. The emotional symptomatology, worry and rumination and activities related to values will be evaluated, through different evaluation instruments. From the information gathered and analyzed, it is expected to be able to argue the existing evidence for ACT and, in more detail, its efficacy in panic disorder.

46. Randomised Controlled Trial Comparing ACT and MBSR-informed group interventions for anxiety in a London University setting: exploring outcomes and processes of change

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Anxiety, Mindfulness

Dr Fran Smith, City, University of London
Jessica Jones-Nielsen, City, University of London
Julianna Challenor, City, University of London
Trudi Edginton, City, University of London
Martina Gerada, City, University of London
Kornillia Gvissi, City and Hackney Mind

Background- Given the need for brief group interventions to help university students cope with mental health problems, the main aim of the study is to test the effectiveness of a brief ACT intervention in comparison with an MBSR- informed group intervention. Comparison studies have illustrated that ACT treatment produces outcomes comparable to CBT interventions but possibly through alternative processes of change. However less research has focussed on the comparisons of change processes within mindfulness-based third wave therapies. Method- A randomised wait-list-controlled trial is being run in a psychology department research clinic at a London University providing two, four-week group interventions (one ACT and one MBSR-informed) to students presenting with mild to moderate anxiety. Pre and post measures of anxiety, depression, psychological flexibility, mindfulness, self-compassion, letter-number sequencing and trail making will be collected. Groups will be audio-recorded for qualitative analysis and long-term follow up outcomes will be collected. Practice logs will be analysed to examine the relationship between formal and informal practice and how these relate to outcomes. Both the AAQ-II (Bond et al., 2011) and CompACT (Francis et al., 2016) are employed to measure psychological flexibility in order to deepen understanding of the reliability and validity of these measures in relation to the core ACT processes. Results- Data is currently being collected and preliminary results will be presented in the poster in June 2019. It is hypothesized that participants in both intervention groups will demonstrate increases in acceptance and mindfulness from pre- to post-intervention. Discussion-

47. How Meditation is Used Matters!: Evaluating Purpose Behind Meditation and Its Impact on a Range of Psychosocial Outcomes

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindfulness and Meditation

Eric Tifft, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Emily J. Padula, University at Albany, SUNY
Shannon B. Underwood, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Glenn A. Phillips, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
John P. Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

Background: Practices that foster present-moment awareness, including mindfulness meditation, are simple, relatively easy to disseminate (e.g., via social media and smartphone apps), and associated with numerous positive psychosocial outcomes (Bamber & Schneider, 2016; Eberth & Sedlemeier, 2012). Traditionally, mindfulness meditations emphasize non-judgmental awareness and an openness to experience just as it is. Yet, mindfulness could potentially be misused as a means to control unpleasant psychological events and emotional experiences. To date, no studies have evaluated whether how one uses mindfulness meditation (i.e., traditionally as intended vs. as a means to control) matters in terms of its impact on a range of psychosocial outcomes. The central aim of the present study is to do just that. Methods: Undergraduates (N =395) completed a large psychosocial assessment battery. Of these, 19% (n = 75; 65% female; Mage = 19.63, SDage = 4.02) reported regularly practicing some form of meditation. Of the meditators, 59% reported using meditation as a strategy to control their emotional experience and 41% reported practicing meditation consistent with its original intended purpose. Results and Discussion: Results suggest that those who practice meditation as a control strategy rate anger, anxiety, unpleasant thoughts, and stress as more problematic in their lives than those who practice meditation consistent with its original intended purpose. Implications of these findings will be discussed in the context of psychotherapy practice (including ACT) and broadly in terms of dissemination to the general public.

48. How You Meditate Impacts Psychological Flexibility: Evaluating the Rationale of Meditation and its Relation to ACT Processes and Worry

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Meditation, ACT

Eric Tifft, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Shannon B. Underwood, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Emily J. Padula, University at Albany, SUNY
Glenn A. Phillips, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
John P. Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

Mindfulness and other meditative practices have become increasingly incorporated into psychotherapy. Western society appears to be amidst a mindfulness zeitgeist; numerous publications, podcasts, and smartphone apps promote mindfulness meditation and its benefits. By approaching mindfulness meditation to relieve stress and anxiety, one may deviate from the traditional approach of meditation to cultivate a nonjudgmental, open acceptance of experience. Using meditation to control one’s emotions could have paradoxical effects, leading to psychological inflexibility. To date, no such study has examined the rationale behind meditation use and its relation to ACT processes and psychosocial outcomes. In this study, participants (n=75) reported the rationale underlying their meditation practice. Fifty-nine percent reported meditating to control their emotional experience; 41% reported using meditation with its traditional intentions of nonjudgmental acceptance. In a series of linear regression models, meditation rationale predicted scores on cognitive fusion, mindfulness, self-compassion, negative emotions, and worry. Results suggest that those who utilize meditation as a control strategy reported higher cognitive fusion, negative emotions, and worry, and lower mindfulness and self-compassion. Frequency of meditation was found to moderate the relation between meditation rationale and experiential avoidance. Those who reported meditation as a control strategy indicated lower levels of EA the less frequently they meditate, and higher levels of EA the more frequently they meditate. The opposite pattern was found in those who reported using meditation with traditional intentions. Implications of these findings will be discussed in the context of psychotherapy practice and broadly in terms of dissemination to the general public.

49. Efficacy of a brief, RNT-focused ACT protocol in Fibromyalgia

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Repetitive negative thinking

Estefany López-Palomo, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Juan C. Vargas, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco J. Ruiz, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Fibromyalgia (FM) is a medical condition characterized by chronic musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, sleep disturbances and psychological difficulties. Repetitive negative thinking (RNT), such as worry and rumination, can significantly affect the quality of life and symptomatology of FM patients because they increase muscle tension. The present study proposes the application of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) focused on RNT as a treatment for FM. To analyze the effect of this intervention approach, a protocol of four individual sessions was applied to 5 women between the ages of 35 and 60 who have a medical condition of FM. The experimental design was a randomized multiple-baseline design across participants. There will be a follow-up of 3 months. The dependent variables are emotional symptomatology, worry, health perception, subjective measures of pain, quality of sleep, pain intensity and interference, drug consumption, valued actions and cognitive fusion.

50. The Effectiveness of the Student Compass - Program Among International Students at the University of Jyväskylä

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Wellbeing University Students

Francesca Brandolin, University of Jyväskylä
Simone Gorinelli, University of Jyväskylä
Panajiota Räsänen, University of Jyväskylä
Päivi Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä

Background: Approximately 20-30% of students report depression symptomsand a large numberof those suffering from mental health problems do not seek professional help (Cooke et al., 2006; Eisenberg et al., 2007). In particular, international students do not often have access to support services during their master and doctoral studies or an exchange year abroad. Therefore, the Department of Psychology, University of Jyväskylä, has provided a wellbeing program, Student Compass, to the international students in need for psychological support. The aim of the program is to enhance psychological wellbeing and decrease stress and anxiety symptoms. Method: International students (n= 46) were involved in 5-week group-format program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) approach, with discussions and experiential exercises related to the processes of ACT: Values, Commitment, Mindfulness, Defusion, Acceptance. Outcome measures pre and post intervention included: AFQY, FFMQ, Perceived stress scale, GAD-7, PH9, scales for Wellbeing (Warwick Wellbeing Scale) and Values (VLQ and ELS). Results: Preliminary results show enhanced psychological flexibility and wellbeing, as well as a decrease in anxiety and perceived stress. Discussion: The results suggest that a 5-week ACT-basedprogramin groupformat can be an effective in enhancing the well-being of internationalstudents.The implications and limitations of the findings are discussed.

51. New perspectives in applied clinical research: moving from protocols to processes in the approach to eating disorders and obesity treatment

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Eating Disorder, Process-Based Intervention

Giorgia Varallo, M.D., Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Rob Cattivelli, Psy.D., Ph.D., Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Anna Guerrini Usubini, M.D., Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Nicola Maffini, M.D., Casa Gioia Research Centre
Gianluca Castelnuovo, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart
Enrico Molinari, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart

Traditional, "orthodox" CBT is actually the most widespread form of psychotherapy with reference both to clinical and research area. However, something begins to move in the context of the applied clinical research. World leading experts in the field are currently focusing their attention on the underlying processes of psychological intervention protocols included under the Cognitive Behavioral Therapy treatment umbrella. A new approach seems to emerge, which finds his roots in transdiagnostic psychological processes, and highlights common factors instead of disorder specific ones and focuses the attention on different dimensions, processes and results than reduction in symptoms. The interest in process-based intervention is rapidly rising, converging both from studies aimed to change transdiagnostic factors with a Unified Protocol applied to different disorders, and, to the other hand with the behavioral tradition, more focused on individualize treatment for underlying psychological processes. The actual challenge for both researchers and clinicians is now working with process based intervention to identify the core processes, moderators and mediators of change, and to develop modular interventions that promote functionally important pathways of changing. Modular treatment should represent a massive improvement in particular in the field of Eating Disorders, with overlapping factors but also specific processes converge. Historical foundation, present preliminary results and future directions are assessed.

52. Growing a garden in the middle of the sea: Applying the ACT matrix to behavioral parent training

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parent Training, Matrix

Giulia Mazzei, IESCUM
Elena Malaspina, IESCUM, Milan
Pietro De Martin, IESCUM, Milan
Marta Schweiger, IESCUM, Milan
Giovambattista Presti, Università Kore, Enna

The poster presents an ACT-oriented behavioral parent training for parents of children with externalizing disorders. In 2017 and 2018, IESCUM in partnership with Fondazione IRCCS Ca’ Granda Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico designed and delivered parent training and child training interventions in an outpatient child and adolescent mental health service, in Milan, Italy. 56 parents of children with externalizing problems (ODD, ADHD and other disorders) took part in 12 different groups conducted by 3 ACT psychotherapists. The intervention aims to improve awareness, psychological flexibility and the use of effective behavior change strategies in parenting. The program is made of 12 sessions and is based on Parent Management Training (Kadzin, 2005) and the six steps of ACT Matrix (Polk et al., 2016). Most of the participants completed a set of questionnaires pre and post intervention: Parenting Scale, 6-PAQ, a child social skill checklist and a satisfaction survey. Results show some significant changes in psychological flexibility and in parenting behaviors. Qualitative data suggested that applying the ACT Matrix to parent training has a positive effect on participants’ compliance and satisfaction.

53. Acceptance-ICD Study: Effects of psychological flexibility in patients undergoing Implantable Cardiac Defibrillator

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ICD implantation, cardiac dieseas acceptance, cardiac health

Giuseppe Deledda, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy
Sara Poli, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Giovanna Fantoni, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Matteo Giansante, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Eleonora Geccherle, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Giulio Molon, Department of Cardiology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Enrico Barbieri, Department of Cardiology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy

AIM: The proven efficacy of the implantable cardiac defibrillator (ICD) in the long-term treatment of ventricular arrhythmias, represents a surprising result for clinical research. A considerable part of patients report poor acceptance of the device, a low perceived quality of life, stress and anxiety and depressive symptoms in the pre- and post-intervention (incidence of anxious symptoms between 24% and 87%, of depressive symptoms between the 24% and 33%, ). This study is proposed to all patients suffering from ventricular arrhythmias awaiting implantation of the cardiac defibrillator afferent to the Cardiology Unit of IRCCS Sacro Cuore Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar Italy, in the period of one year, to evaluate the effect of psychological flexibility in the adaptation process. METHODS: PARTICIPANTS 33 patients (mean age = 63.36; sd=15.48), 23 male, 10 female. 75.8% is married, 57.6% retired and 42.4% have an high school degree. 57.6% have from 0 to 3 age of disease. MATERIALS: Hamilton Rating Scale (HAM-A) Survey of patient health-short form (SF-36) The Cardiovascular Disease Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (CVD-AAQ) The Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire (CPAQ) RESULTS: Prelinary Data show a significant correlation between flexibility (CVD-AAQ) and vitality (SF36) (f(1,20) = 6,39, p=0.02) and level of health (f(1,20) = 5,43, p=0.03). CVD-AAQ (M=16; SD=7.08); Vitality (M=15.03; SD= 4.22); Health (M=16.45; SD= 4.7) CONCLUSIONS: This study shows as bigger levels of flexibility correlate with more vitality and more Health at SF36. Psychological flexibility can be a new construct to explain adaptation to cardiac deseas .

54. VR-DEM Pilot study: A protocol of a cognitive defusion Virtual Reality procedure, applied to neurological patients with migraine

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Virtual Reality, defusion, Migraine, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Giuseppe Deledda, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy
Sara Poli, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Matteo Giansante, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Eleonora Geccherle, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Fabio Marchioretto, Department of Neurology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Daniele Lombardo, Behavior Labs start up of Catania
Giovambattista (Nanni) Presti, University Kore, Enna, Italy

AIM: The migraine disorder affected the state of health, the condition of well-being and the level of quality of life perceived by the patient. This study explore feasibility of the protocol of a programmed VR-based cognitive defusion exercises, in line with the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), able to generate effects in the process of altering the function of discomfort and credibility associated with some thoughts in patients with migraine. METHODS: They will be included in the study ten consecutive patients belonging to the Neurology Unit of the IRCCS "Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria" Hospital of Negrar (VR), Italy. According to the Masuda protocol, the conditions of defusion and distraction have been alternated. The software reproduced the words on a three-dimensional object suspended in virtual space and offering the subject the possibility of changing shape, size, color and gravity. The procedure was accompanied by a 5-minute guided meditation. The measure used was: Visual Analog Scale (VAS), assessing the discomfort and the credit given to one's own thoughts, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ2), Mindfulness Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS). For the analysis of the secondary objects, a descriptive statistical analysis will be carried out; correlations / associations will also be performed on these data. For statistical analysis, the STATA program (v12.o) and SPSS 20.0 will be used. CONCLUSIONS: The purpose of this study is to verifying the feasibility and the effect of a VR-based cognitive defusion exercises, in order to included in a wider protocol ACT model consistent.

55. VR-DRT Pilot study: A protocol of a cognitive defusion Virtual Reality procedure, applied to cancer patients with anxious and/or claustrophobic symptomatology subjected to radiotherapy

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Virtual Reality, defusion, Cancer, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, Radiotherapy

Giuseppe Deledda, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy
Matteo Giansante, Psy.D., Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Eleonora Geccherle, Psy D, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Sara Poli, Psy.D., Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Filippo Alongi, Department of Radiation Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Daniele Lombardo, Behavior Labs of Catania, Italy
Giovambattista (Nanni) Presti, University Kore, Enna, Italy

AIM: Radiotherapy can be perceived an highly adverse context, especially by patients with anxiety and claustrophobia, who can in some cases avoid treatment with heavy clinical repercussions. This study explore feasibility of a programmed VR-based cognitive defusion exercises protocol, in line with the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), able to generate effects in the process of altering the function of discomfort and credibility associated with some thoughts in patients with cancer subjected to radiotherapy. METHODS: They will be included in the study ten consecutive cancer patients belonging to the Department of Radiation Oncology of IRCCS Sacro Cuore-Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar, Italy. According to the Masuda protocol, the conditions of defusion and distraction have been alternated. The software reproduced the words on a three-dimensional object suspended in virtual space and offering the subject the possibility of changing shape, size, color and gravity. The procedure was accompanied by a 5-minute guided meditation. The measure used was: Visual Analog Scale (VAS), assessing the discomfort and the credit given to one's own thoughts, Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ2), Mindfulness Attention and Awareness Scale (MAAS). For the analysis of the secondary objects, a descriptive statistical analysis will be carried out; correlations / associations will also be performed on these data. For statistical analysis, the STATA program (v12.o) and SPSS 20.0 will be used. CONCLUSIONS: The purpose of this study is to verifying the feasibility and the effect of a VR-based cognitive defusion exercises, in order to included in a wider protocol ACT model consistent.

56. Observational study on relationship between the type of breast surgery and body image flexibility

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: body image flexibility, breast cancer, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Giuseppe Deledda, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital, Negrar (VR), Italy
Sara Poli, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Matteo Giansante, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Martina Righetti, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Eleonora Geccherle, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Giovanna Fantoni, Service Clinical Psychology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy
Stefania Gori, Department of Oncology, IRCCS Sacro Cuore - Don Calabria Hospital - Negrar (VR), Italy

AIM: Recent evidence emphasized the role of body image inflexibility: “the lack of the capacity to experience the ongoing perceptions, sensations, feelings, thoughts, and beliefs associated with one's body fully and intentionally while pursuing chosen values”. The aim of the study is to investigate the relationship between the type of breast surgery and body image acceptance, in a sample of breast cancer patients undergoing surgery of mastectomy or quadrantectomy. METHODS: Observational study. All patients coming to the hospital from August 2013 to August 2015, were invited to complete questionnaires on psychological flexibility (AAQ-2, BIAAQ) and distress perceived (Stress Termometer). RESULTS: 72 breast cancer patients completed the study (age: M=53,85; SD±9.39). The data showed an insignificant difference between the type of breast surgery performed by the patients in the sample and the BIAAQ questionnaire score (z = -0.348 p≥0.727). In particular, in the group of patients undergoing conservative surgery, an average score on the BIAAQ questionnaire emerged of 58.75 (SD ± 14.74), while in the group of patients undergoing mastectomy surgery, an average BIAAQ questionnaire score of 60.09 (SD ± 15.92). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggest that in cancer patients treated for breast cancer, they report similar values of acceptance of the body image regardless of the type of surgery to which they were subjected. The fact that they have undergone a conservative surgical intervention (quadrantectomy) rather than a mastectomy-type surgery seems to have no influence on their capacity and degree of acceptance of the body image.

57. Mindful Parenting is Associated with Adolescents’ Emotion (Dys)regulation Through Adolescents’ Psychological Inflexibility and Self-Compassion

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Mindful parenting and Adolescence

Helena Moreira, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention, University of Coimbra
Berta Rodrigues Maia, Faculty of Philosophy and Social Sciences, Braga Regional Centre, The Catholic University of Portugal

Background: The main aim of the present study is to investigate the mediating role of adolescents’ self-compassion and psychological (in)flexibility in the association between mothers’ mindful parenting and adolescents’ emotion regulation difficulties. We also aim to examine the moderating role of adolescents’ gender in the mediation model. Method: A total of 375 adolescents (aged between 12 and 19 years) and their mothers participated in the study. Mothers completed a measure of mindful parenting, and adolescents completed measures of self-compassion, psychological inflexibility and emotion regulation. Mediation and moderated mediation models were tested to explore the indirect effect of mindful parenting on adolescents’ emotion regulation through self-compassion and psychological (in)flexibility as well as the moderating role of adolescents’ gender. Results: The mindful parenting dimensions of compassion for the child and nonjudgmental acceptance of parental functioning were indirectly associated with adolescents’ emotion regulation through adolescents’ self-compassion, whereas the mindful parenting dimension of listening with full attention was indirectly associated with adolescents’ emotion regulation through adolescents’ psychological inflexibility. Some of the associations in the mediation model were only significant for adolescent girls and their mothers. Discussion: Mothers’ ability to adopt a mindful approach in parenting seems to play an important role in the adaptive emotion regulation of their children, specifically through its effect on adolescents’ self-compassion and psychological flexibility. Mothers' mindful parental practices have a different effect on boys and girls and appear to play a more prominent role in promoting girls’ self-compassion and emotional regulation.

58. Psychological Inflexibility in Adolescence: Exploring its Role on Adolescents’ Well-Being and the Mediating Role of Attachment to Peers and Parents

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Adolescence

Helena Moreira, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Maria João Gouveia, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention, University of Coimbra
Maria Cristina Canavarro, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention, University of Coimbra

Background: Psychological inflexibility has been considered to be at the core of most human suffering. Enhancing psychological flexibility (PF) and promoting value-based living are important pathways to emotional wellbeing in different stages of life. There is preliminary evidence that one possible mechanism through which PF exerts its positive effect on mental health is through attachment security. However, this hypothesis has only been explored among adults. In fact, research on the role of PF in the wellbeing of adolescents is scarce. Therefore, the goal of this study is to investigate whether adolescents’ psychological (in)flexibility is associated with their psychological well-being and whether this association is mediated by their perception of security in the relationship with their parents and peers. Method: A total of 931 Portuguese adolescents (10-19 years) completed measures of psychological inflexibility, attachment to peers and parents, and psychological well-being. A mediation model was tested to investigate the indirect effect of psychological inflexibility on well-being through attachment to parents and attachment to peers. Results: Higher levels of psychological inflexibility were associated with lower levels of psychological well-being and this association was mediated by attachment to peers and attachment to parents. Discussion: Experiencing higher levels of psychological inflexibility seems to undermine the perceived security that adolescents experience in their close relationships, which, in turn, seems to lead to a lower level of psychological well-being. These results suggest that promoting PF in adolescence may have beneficial effects not only on the mental health of adolescents but also on their interpersonal relationships.

59. The Mediating Role of Maternal Psychological Flexibility in the Association Between Psychopathology Symptoms and Mindful Parenting

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Parenting

Helena Moreira, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention, University of Coimbra
Maria Cristina Canavarro, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention, University of Coimbra

Background: there is ample evidence that maternal psychopathology has a strong negative impact on parenting behaviours, including the ability to adopt a mindful approach in parenting. However, the psychological mechanisms that may explain this association have been little investigated. In this study we explore the mediating role of psychological flexibility (PF) in this association in a sample of mothers of children and adolescents from the general community. Although high PF has been associated with several indicators of psychological adjustment, its role on mindful parenting has never been investigated. Method: a total of 383 mothers of children/adolescents (8-19 years) were recruited in two Portuguese school units and completed measures of PF (AAQ2), anxiety/depression symptoms (HADS) and mindful parenting (IMP). A mediation model was tested to explore the mediating role of PF on the association between psychopathology and mindful parenting. Results: higher levels of anxiety and depression were both indirectly associated with lower levels of mindful parenting through PF. This association was independent of the child’s age. Discussion: being able to contact the present moment more fully and to change/persist in values-based behaviours seems to play a key role in mothers’ ability to bring mindful awareness to parenting. In addition, PF seem to be influenced by mothers’ levels of anxiety/depression symptoms and to explain why these symptoms can lead to lower mindful parenting. These results suggest that mindful parenting interventions could benefit from including ACT-based techniques to increase the levels of mothers’ PF and, consequently, promote mindful parenting.

60. Expanding the scope and effectiveness of care for people with persistent pain: Research into process and outcomes from integrated ACT and physical therapy

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Persistent pain management

Hilary Abbey, D.Prof.(Ost.), University College of Osteopathy
Lorraine Nanke, Ph.D., Surrey and Borders Partnership NHS Trust

Background: Persistent pain is a complex problem. Guidelines recommend manual therapy combined with psychological care. Few osteopaths have psychological training or access to multidisciplinary pain management programs. Three studies explored ways of expanding osteopaths’ scope of care using ACT principles. Study 1: Mixed methods observation study of pain groups for patients receiving osteopathic treatment (n=15), led by an ACT psychologist and osteopath. 3 month outcomes showed positive changes in responses to pain. Course format limited ability to work directly with bodily experience (e.g. experiential avoidance) as it arose for individuals in group activities. Study 2: Qualitative study of process in a 6 week course integrating ACT and osteopathy for individuals (n=4). Audio-recordings analysed using Linguistic Ethnography, showed positive changes in body/self awareness and willingness to stay active. Key factors that influenced one osteopath’s ability to use ACT and shift between acceptance and change-based interventions guided further research. Study 3: A 3 year cohort study of the Osteopathy, Mindfulness and Acceptance Program for persistent pain (OsteoMAP). Questionnaire outcomes at 6 months (n=79) demonstrated improvements in acceptance (AAQ-IIR), quality of life (EQ-5D), mindfulness (FMI) and pain coping (BQ). OsteoMAP courses were acceptable to patients (n~250) and feasible for delivery by osteopaths with limited ACT training (n~100). Future plans: Develop research to assess outcomes from individual OsteoMAP courses compared to pain management groups. Explore how integrating ACT and touch-based therapies affect interoceptive awareness and responses to pain. Develop training courses to help physical therapists integrate ACT interventions into their day-to-day clinical practices.

61. Treating multiple comorbidities simultaneously using multiple third-wave cognitive behavioral treatments: A preliminary analysis of an individualized comprehensive outpatient program for complex patients

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Treatment of Complex Patients

Huda Abu-Suwa, M.S., Nova Southeastern University
Lori Eickleberry, Ph.D., ABPP, Institute for Life Renovation, LLC

Background: A new individualized outpatient treatment program was created for complex patients who present with multiple comorbidities. Preliminary outcomes were evaluated. The outpatient program consisted of integrated care with different individual third-wave CBT therapies among multiple providers, treating multiple diagnoses simultaneously. Patients were also placed into other services as deemed appropriate, which may have included a variety of groups, family therapy, individual yoga, art therapy, medication, and work with a dietitian. Method: Participants consisted of 16 individuals who successfully completed the program (mean age= 31.56, SD=11.21; female=15; Caucasian=9). Participants were administered the STAI, BDI, QOLI, and FFMQ on a weekly basis. Paired-samples t-tests were used to compare scores at initial assessment and after completing one month of treatment. Results: Results indicated significant decreases in Beck depression Inventory (BDI) scores (t=4.96, p<.001), and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) state (t=4.90, p<.001) and trait scores (t=5.70, p<.001). Significant increases were found in quality of life measured by the Quality of Life Inventory (QOLI) overall t-scores (t=-6.10, p<.001) and skills measured by the Five Factor Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) observe (t=-3.22, p=.006), describe (t=-3.01, p=.009), act with awareness (t=-3.05, p=.008), nonjudge (t=-3.39, p=.004), and nonreact (t=-2.69, p=.02) scores were also found. Discussion: The outpatient program demonstrated an ability to decrease anxiety and depressive symptomatology, as well as increase mindfulness skills and quality of life in complex cases. These preliminary results provide a promising outlook for this individualized and integrated outpatient program. Future research is needed to validate results and determine long-term outcomes of the program.

62. Mind & Life project: A group intervention program on the physical and emotional well-being of overweight and obese individuals

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Obesity

Idoia Iturbe, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Iratxe Urkia, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Enrique Echeburúa, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Eva Pereda, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)
Edurne Maiz, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU)

Background: The prevalence of overweight and obesity nearly tripled since 1975 and nowadays, excess weight is considered a worldwide public health problem. Usual treatments for weight control include dietetic restriction and physical activity instructions which even if they produce a significant weight loss in the short term, they are ineffective in the long term. Several psychological factors related to weight-gain reflect weight-related experiential avoidance patterns, which are associated with not to be willing to contact with weight and food related difficult inner experiences and attempts to control those experiences. Objectives: This study aims to assess the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and mindfulness based Mind&Life program in the physical and psychological wellbeing of adults with overweight or obesity. Method: A randomized clinical trial of 5 months of duration controlled by a control group. Participants will be 110 adults with overweight and obesity and will be randomly assigned to either of two conditions: (a) Control group will receive the treatment as usual (TAU) consisting on dietetic and physical activity recommendations, and (b) Experimental group will receive the same TAU plus Mind&Life psychological group-intervention. Measurements will be evaluated at baseline prior to randomization, at post-intervention, at seven-month post-intervention follow-up and at two-year post-intervention follow-up. Discussion: Findings are expected to support the implementation of this intervention program in the treatment of obesity together with usual treatments, so as to provide an integrated treatment that will help improving the quality of life of individuals and maintaining the results in the long term.

63. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes:Psychological flexibility is associated with glycemic control and wellbeing of the adolescents

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Adolescence, type 1 diabetes

Iina Alho, Lic.A, Central Finland Health Care District
Raimo Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Background: Psychological flexibility has been assumed to be a factor leading to increased wellbeing in several studies in different populations, and we were interested in examining the role of psychological flexibility in wellbeing and glycemic control among adolescents with type 1 diabetes whose glycemic control is above the recommendations. Method: Adolescents (n=56, aged 12-16 years) completed Children and Adolescents Mindfulness Measure (CAMM), Diabetes Acceptance and Action Scale for Children and Adolescents (DAAS), Depression Scale (RBDI) and Health-Related Quality of life Scale (KINDL-R). HbA1c-values were collected from the medical records. The correlations between the variables were calculated and regression analysis was used to get more detailed information. Results: Higher level of psychological flexibility was connected to better glycemic control (CAMM: r=-0.31*, p<0.05, DAAS: r=-0.41**, p<0.01), better quality of life (CAMM: r= 0.61**, p<0.01, DAAS: r= 0.66**, p<0.01) and lower level of depressive (CAMM: r=-0.54**, p<0.01, DAAS: r=-0.62**, p<0.01) and anxiety symptoms (CAMM: r=-0.40**, p<0.01, DAAS: r=-0.34**, p<0.01). The higher the psychological flexibility skills, the better the glycemic control, quality of life and mood of the adolescent. Regression analysis showed that general mindfulness and acceptance skills (CAMM) explained 10% and diabetes-related acceptance (DAAS) explained 19% of variation of HbA1c. Discussion: Psychological flexibility seems to have a significant role in the wellbeing of adolescents with type 1 diabetes. It is reasonable to consider that interventions aiming at enhancing psychological flexibility would be useful for wellbeing of the adolescents as well as for increasing their adaptation and motivation for the treatment of diabetes.

64. The role of psychological flexibility in the relationship between post traumatic stress disorder symptom severity and health functioning

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: PTSD, Mindfulness, health functioning

Im Fong Chan, Murray State University
Michael Bordieri, Murray State University

A large body of research has shown that post-traumatic stress disorder following traumatic events often leads to decreased health functioning and increased functional impairment (Bonanno, Brewin, Kaniasty, & Greca, 2010; Norris, Friedman, Watson, Byrne, Diaz, & Kaniasty, 2002). Emerging findings suggest that psychological flexibility, a willingness to be in contact with distressing feelings and thoughts in the service of valued livings appears to play a significant role in mitigating core symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, such as avoidance and negative cognition (Bonanno, Brewin, Kaniasty, & Greca, 2010; Moser, Hajcak, Simons, & Foa, 2007; Thompson & Waltz, 2010). However, previous research has not fully examined the role of psychological flexibility plays in the relationship between the severity of post-traumatic stress disorder and functional impairment. The aim of the current study was to explore how psychological flexibility affects the strength of the relationship between symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorders and functional impairment. It was hypothesized that psychological flexibility would moderate the relationship between severity of post-traumatic stress disorder and health functioning, such that the strength of the relationship between PTSD symptoms and health functioning was reduced among individuals with higher psychological flexibility. Results from 103 college students partially support this hypothesis, with psychology inflexibility conditionally predicting greater global disability as measured by the World Health Organization Disability Assessment Schedule 2.0. However, support for a moderated relationship was not found. These findings emphasize the importance of psychological flexibility as a protective factor to psychological well-being and health functioning following exposure to traumatic events.

65. Predicting vulnerability to posttraumatic stress disorder using hierarchical linear modeling

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: PTSD, Mindfulness, self-compassion

Im Fong Chan, Murray State University
Michael Bordieri, Murray State University

Considerable evidence has established risk factors which increase vulnerability to post-traumatic stress disorder (Bonanno, Brewin, Kaniasty, & Greca, 2010; Foa, Ehlers, Clark, Tolin, & Orsillo, 1999; Irish, Fischer, Fallon, Spoonster, Sledjeski, & Delahanty, 2011). Females are at higher risk than males of developing post-traumatic stress disorder following exposure to traumatic events, despite the number of traumatic events experienced by females are higher than males. Also, psychological flexibility has been linked to reduced PTSD symptoms (Bonanno, Brewin, Kaniasty, & Greca, 2010; Moser,Vujanovic, Niles, Pietrefesa, Schmertz, & Potter, 2013). Additionally, reductions in negative cognition about oneself (self-criticism) was associated with reductions in PTSD symptoms (Foa, Ehlers, Clark, Tolin, & Orsillo, 1999; Foa & Rauch, 2004). Empirical research has shown lower self-criticism has been linked to greater self-compassion (Moser, Hajcak, Simons, & Foa, 2007). However, the hierarchical relationship of PTSD on gender, number of traumatic events, psychological flexibility, and self-compassion has not been fully examined in previous research. The aim of the current study was to examine the predictive effect of these variables on PTSD and evaluate if self-compassion improves prediction of PTSD beyond that provided by gender, the number of traumatic events, and psychological flexibility. Results from 103 college students did not support the incremental validity of self-compassion in predicting PTSD symptom severity. Obtained findings did support the incremental validity of psychological flexibility, suggesting that this process may be a key protective factor for PTSD symptom expression. Theoretical implications of the current findings to self-compassion and acceptance-based therapies are discussed.

66. Assessing progress in Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) with older adults: A literature review of existing measures

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Older adults

Jacqui Gurevitch, Psy.D., VA Boston Healthcare System
M. Lindsey Jacobs, Ph.D., VA Boston Healthcare System
Patricia Bamonti, Ph.D., VA Boston Healthcare System

Background: Late adulthood is often characterized by significant changes in health status and social/occupational roles (e.g., caregiving, retirement), and those who struggle to adapt may develop problems such as anxiety, depression, and loneliness. As an intervention aimed at increasing flexibility and connection to values, ACT is well-suited to help older adults (OAs) face the challenges of aging. Empirical support for ACT with OAs is growing, but it is unclear whether measures of ACT concepts and processes have been validated with OAs. We conducted a literature review to identify existing ACT measures and determine which have been validated with OAs. Method: PubMed, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO were searched for combinations of ACT-related terms (e.g., “cognitive fusion”) and terms denoting measurement (e.g., “questionnaire”). Mindfulness measures have been reviewed elsewhere and were excluded from this search. Irrelevant and duplicate results were excluded, and adaptations and short-form versions of the same measure were consolidated to create a final list of measures. Results: 127 articles were included describing 37 unique ACT-relevant measures. Constructs measured included psychological flexibility (n=14), acceptance (n=6), cognitive fusion (n=5), values/committed action (n=8), self-as-context (n=2), and other (n=2). While four measures were developed for children or youth, no measures were created specifically for OAs. Only two studies included a sample of participants (in both cases, caregivers) whose mean age was greater than 60. Discussion: Validated outcome measures are needed for OAs engaged in ACT so that we can accurately study the effects of this treatment in this rapidly growing segment of the population.

67. Personal distress and empathic concern in relation to perspective taking in individuals with grandiose or vulnerable narcissism

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Narcissism, Narcissistic personality disorder, Empathy, Perspective taking

Jan Topczewski, Institute of Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Aleksandra Skonieczna, Institute of Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Anna Duszyk, University of Warsaw
Kamila Jankowiak-Siuda, Institute of Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Background: Different types of affective empathy are triggered when imagining what others may feel (other-perspective) vs. imagining what we would feel in their situation (self-perspective). Self-perspective increases personal distress (PD) as well as empathic concern (EC) towards oneself, while other-perspective triggers EC towards others. The study was aimed at verifying whether perspective-taking (self- vs. other-) changes the level of EC and PD in individuals with grandiose or vulnerable narcissism. Method: Three groups participated in the study: (1) individuals with high level of grandiose narcissism (N = 21), (2) individuals with high level of vulnerable narcissism (N = 21) and (3) individuals with low levels of both types of narcissism (N = 18). Study 1 measured self-reported empathy level of EC and PD (IRI) as well as self-compassion (SCS). In study 2, participants watched short videos depicting pain reactions, either from self- or other-perspective. After each of the scenes, participants assessed the level of PD and the level of EC on the GRS scale. Results: Individuals with vulnerable narcissism experienced higher level of PD than other groups. In study 2, in other-perspective condition, individuals with vulnerable narcissism reported the highest EC for pain in comparison to other groups. In addition, individuals with vulnerable narcissism reported higher EC in other-perspective condition vs. self-perspective condition. Discussion: Taking the other’s perspective increases the level of EC in individuals with vulnerable narcissism. Because EC leads to prosocial behavior, training in perspective taking could increase prosocial behavior in individuals with vulnerable narcissism.

68. Willingness to suffer with others: Relationship between experiential avoidance, perspective taking and empathy of pain

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: empathy, empathic concern, perspective taking, pain

Jan Topczewski, Institute of Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Anna Duszyk, University of Warsaw
Kamila Jankowiak-Siuda, Institute of Cognitive and Behavioural Neuroscience, SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Background: Empathy can be conceptualized either as a trait (dispositional empathy) or as a response in particular situation (situational empathy). According to The Flexible Connectedness Model, experiential avoidance plays crucial role in healthy social functioning, allowing people to develop interpersonal closeness in spite of difficult experiences that accompany empathizing with others. No research, however, investigated the relationship between experiential avoidance (EA), perspective taking and empathy in the context of pain. Our aim was to fill this gap. Method: 42 individuals with high experiential avoidance (H-EA) and 42 individuals with low experiential avoidance (L-EA) (as measured by AAQ-II) had their dispositional cognitive and affective empathy assessed with IRI. Situational empathy was measured using movies evoking empathic reactions to physical pain and three scales measuring perceived pain intensity (cognitive empathy), personal distress (self-focused affective empathy) and empathic concern (other-focused affective empathy). We used specific instruction to elicit perspective taking (self/other). MANOVA and repeated measures ANOVA were performed. Perspective taking was a within-subjects factor and experiential avoidance was a between-subjects factor. Results: L-EA group reported lower level of personal distress (dispositional and situational) than H-EA group. Moreover, results showed that taking perspective of other evokes greater empathic concern than taking perspective of self. No interaction between EA and perspective taking was found. Discussion: Capitalizing on previous research showing that empathic concern, personal distress, EA and perspective taking are related to prosocial behavior, this study further highlights usefulness of ACT and perspective taking training in clinical and social contexts.

69. Tracking Changes in Mindful-Flexibility across ACT Treatment to Understand Treatment Gains: Three Mixed-Method Case Studies Using the MindFlex Assessment System

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: ACT Process Mechanisms

Jenna Macri, University of Rochester
Ronald D. Rogge, University of Rochester

OBJECTIVES: The study piloted the MindFlex Assessment System (MindFlex.org), an online assessment tool that facilitates the administration, scoring, norming, and interpretation of cutting-edge assessment tools in the ACT and Mindfulness literatures. MindFlex assessments are conceptually based on the Unified Model of Mindful Flexibility: a new model that organizes the 5 main dimensions of mindfulness and 12 main dimensions of psychological flexibility into a multistage, process-oriented framework. METHODS: Therapists completed a short (5-10min) online survey enrolling themselves into the project and then enrolled their clients. Clients then completed 15-20min MindFlex assessments at baseline and after 2 months of treatment. The therapists were provided with normed profiles for each client assessment completed, providing quantitative insights into baseline functioning and clinically meaningful change. Three clients will be presented in this poster to represent the experiences of clients and therapists using this system. RESULTS: The poster will then draw parallels between the clinicians’ experiences of the clients in treatment (case conceptualizations, qualitative impressions of change) and the quantitative findings from the MindFlex profiles. Specifically, changes in mindful/mindless lenses (e.g., describing thoughts/feelings, attentive awareness, inattention) will be linked to corresponding changes in flexible/inflexible responses (acceptance, defusion, self-as-context vs. experiential avoidance, fusion, self-as-content), which will be linked to changes in life-enriching/diminishing behaviors (contact-with-values, committed action vs. losing touch with values, inaction), and to corresponding changes in outcomes (depressive symptoms, anxiety, wellbeing). CONCLUSIONS: The findings support a conceptual framework for understanding the processes of change in ACT as assessed with the MindFlex Assessment System.

70. Evaluation of an ACT-based Mobile App for Problematic Pornography Viewing

Primary Topic: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Subtopic: Problematic Pornography Viewing

Jennifer L. Barney, M.S., Utah State University
Andria Soderquist, Utah State University
Tanner Ashcraft, Utah State University
Eric Lee, M.A., Utah State University
Michael P. Twohig, Ph.D., Utah State University
Michael E. Levin, Utah State University

Pornography viewing (PV) is a common behavior, with some studies indicating that approximately 75% of men and 41% of women have intentionally viewed erotic images online in their lifetime. In some instances, PV can become problematic in terms of difficulty controlling the behavior resulting negative consequences, which has been likened to pathological concepts including addiction, compulsions, and hypersexual behavior. PV has been associated with negative psychosocial outcomes including psychological distress, isolation, decreased quality of life, poorer sexual functioning, occupational concerns, spiritual/religious concerns, and impaired intimate relationships. One promising treatment for problematic PV to date has been acceptance and commitment therapy. To increase the accessibility to such treatment, the current study examined the efficacy of an ACT mobile app adapted for PV - “ACT-Daily for PV”, designed to intermittently check in with users about their current psychological functioning and ACT skills practice. 68 participants self-identifying as struggling with and seeking help for problematic PV were randomly assigned to either use the ACT-Daily app for 6-weeks, or to a 6-week waitlist condition. All participants completed weekly self-monitoring assessments in addition to more intensive assessment batteries at baseline, post-treatment, and 1-month follow-up. Data collection is expected to be completed in May 2019 and results on the app’s efficacy increasing psychological flexibility as well as changes in PV, hypersexual behavior, and pornography craving, will be reported.

71. Applications of Mindfulness in an Urban Elementary After-School Program

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Children, Mindfulness

Adrienne Garro, Ph.D., Kean University
Dominique Reminick, M.A., Kean University
Yael Osman, Kean University
Bracha Katz, Kean University
Cristin Pontillo, Kean University
Danielle Fishbein, Kean University
Vanessa Vega, Kean University

Background: The application of mindfulness practices in US schools has steadily increased over the past 15 years (Semple, Droutman, & Reid, 2017). Studies have found positive effects of mindfulness on students' social-emotional functioning, including social competence and emotional well-being (Schonert-Reichl & Lawlor, 2010; Viafora, Mathiesen and Unsworth, 2015). Despite the widespread use of mindfulness in schools, there is little information regarding its implementation in after-school programs. The purpose of this poster is to provide information from a pilot study examining the effectiveness and feasibility of a mindfulness-based intervention in an after-school program that aims to increase students’ emotion awareness and emotion management. Method: Participants include eighteen fourth-grade students in an urban after-school program. The majority of the students are bilingual and Latinx. The intervention includes breathing exercises, yoga, present moment awareness activities, and activities to identify emotions. Students are completing the Emotion Awareness Questionnaire (EAQ) (Rieffe, Oosterveld, Miers, Meerum Terwogt, & Ly, 2008) and the Children’s Emotion Management Scales (CEMS) (Zeman, Shipman, and Penza-Clyve, 2001). To examine potential intervention effects, these measures were completed at baseline in January, at mid-point in April, and will be completed at the end of June. Results: We will be using a mixed measures pre-post design to examine potential changes in emotion awareness and management based upon EAQ and CEMS scores. Discussion: This pilot study provides preliminary data regarding the effects of an after-school-based mindfulness intervention. We will also describe the strengths and challenges of our project and implications for future research and practice.

72. Exploring Acceptance and Commitment Processes as Predictors of Subjective Wellbeing in Student Practitioners

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Alexandra Stenhoff, University of Liverpool
Ross White, University of Liverpool
Linda Steadman, University of Liverpool
James Reilly, University of Liverpool

Background: Medical, other healthcare and veterinary students collectively referred to here as student practitioners (SPs) represent a sub-group of students who frequently report high levels of psychological distress,as well as decreased levels of wellbeing during training. The current study aimed to explore factors, and mediating processes (i.e. psychological inflexibility) that may predict subjective wellbeing (SWB) in SPs. Method: A total of 274 SPs studying the following degree courses at a UK University took part in the study: medicine, physiotherapy, nursing, veterinary sciences, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, orthoptics, radiotherapy, radiography, dentistry and clinical psychology. A cross-sectional design was utilised. Participants completed a series of online, self-report questionnaires (measuring psychological inflexibility, values-based action, self-criticism, maladaptive perfectionism, SWB and distress). Results: Four out of every ten SPs who participated in the study met clinical caseness for psychological distress, and less than half the sample reported experiencing the highest level of SWB (‘flourishing’). Psychological inflexibility (AAQ-II) was found to be the strongest predictor of levels of subjective wellbeing, followed by values-based action. Psychological flexibility was found to mediate the relationship between maladaptive perfectionism and SWB. Conclusions: The findings of this study lend support for further exploration of contextual behavioural science approaches (e.g. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy) as a potential framework for helping to improve SWB and reduce distress in SPs. Further research is merited in order to explore the utility of these approaches, and how they might be best integrated into university curricula.

73. Correlation between experiential avoidance related to perfectionism, anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation in Mexican university students

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Experiential avoidance, emocional distress, perfectionism

Angélica Aragón Rodríguez, Masters Candidate, Mexico's National University (UNAM)
Angélica Riveros Rosas, Ph.D., Mexico's National University (UNAM)

University students experience heavy academic demands from their scholar environment and fear of failing frequently leads to increased efforts seeking high achievement but may also lead to rigid and perfectionist strategies or goals. In terms of perfectionism, minimal failures can be experienced with high anxiety and depressive symptoms compounded by negative self-evaluation. This evaluation can even relate to thoughts of dying, which may in turn, reflect attempts to escape or avoid discomfort. Under these conditions university students may neglect other key areas of their life, such as health, family, friends, and even abandoning their academic goals. The present study aimed at exploring correlations between experiential avoidance related to perfectionism, anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation in Mexican university students. Participants were 558 professional-career students from Mexico's National University (UNAM), 313 women and 245 men aged 17 to 29 years (M=20.28; DE=1.93). This cross-correlational study started with a non-probabilistic by convenience sampling procedure. Measurement included the AAQ-II-Yuc (experiential avoidance), APS-R-MX (perfectionism), and IMADIS (anxiety, depression and suicidal ideation) scales, and data were analyzed through Pearson correlation. Results revealed positive and moderate correlations between experiential avoidance with perfectionism (r=0.441, p=0.001); with anxiety (r=0.628, p=0.001); with depression (r=0.723, p=0.001), and with suicidal ideation (r=0.647, p=0.001). Results also showed that emotional distress affecting university students can be more important than overall perfectionism. Key words: experiential avoidance, perfectionism, anxiety, depression, university students.

74. The Use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Techniques to Augment Traditional Behavioral Skills Training for Educators Implementing Behavior Specivic Praise Statements in the Classroom Setting

Primary Topic: Educational settings
Subtopic: Staff training

Clelia Sigaud, M.S., BCBA, University of Southern Maine
Jamie Pratt, Psy.D., BCBA-D, University of Southern Maine

Research indicates that multi-tiered systems of student support, such as Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (PBIS), contribute to increases in adaptive behavior and improved outcomes for students and school communities. The use of behavior specific praise statements at the universal level is an example of an accessible, high impact practice. However, many schools are unable to provide the level of training and support necessary for teachers to experience ongoing performance feedback and accountability regarding their use of behavior specific praise. In this study, the author aims to expand the research on strategies to promote implementation fidelity of high rates of behavior specific praise statements in the public elementary classroom setting. The use of values-clarification work within an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) framework as an augment to traditional behavioral skills training (BST) modalities will be explored to increase rates of behavior specific praise statements by educators in the classroom context. It is hypothesized that the ACT intervention will increase the efficacy of traditional BST by increasing the use of behavior specific praise statements in the absence of ongoing performance feedback. Multiple-baseline design across participants, along with individually-administered BST and ACT sessions, will be used to assist in answering the research question. This project is a dissertation study and is currently in the final stages of the IRB process. Results are therefore unavailable as yet. The study will be completed by the end of the academic year (early June).

75. Symbotypes as Cultural Memes: Cultural Resilience and Survival as Latent and Expressed Individual History

Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Cultural Analysis

Christopher Hebein, University of Nevada
David Sloan Wilson Binghamton University/p>

The individual organism is selected by the interaction between several inheritance systems. Jablonka and Lamb (2005) outline these systems as genetic, epigenetic, behavioral and symbolic. While the time-span of dynamic influence varies between each system, their effects on the behavior of the individual is comprehensive. This presentation introduces the concept of symbotype in detail as it relates to the symbolic system of selection. Individual human behaviors are controlled either by direct behavior contingencies or indirect contingencies through verbal behavior. Cultural systems, as a larger unit of analysis in a multi-tier hierarchy of selection, select individual behavior within groups in context. Symbotypes are an important connecting and parsimonious concept between Relational Frame Theory, Behavior Systems Analysis and Evolutionary Science. Symbotypes represent the expression of cultural symbolic content, in context, or latent possession of cultural symbolic content, out of context, by individuals. This presentation describes the symbotypic framework using examples for analyzing aspects of diversity, resilience, and the selection and survival of cultural practices by individuals within groups.

76. How do athletes experience shame? The validation of a new measure of external and internal shame

Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Clinical Psychology in Sport

Sara Oliveira, M.S., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Maria Coimbra, Master Student, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra

Background: Shame is central to the understanding of human functioning. A novel measure of External and Internal Shame was developed by Ferreira and colleagues (2019) to assess the specific dimensions of external and internal shame, as well as a global sense of shame experience. The context of sport seems to be a conductive environment to the experience of shame, due to its competitive and public nature of demonstrating successes and failures. Given the lack of validated instruments of shame in sport, EISS_athletes was developed to assess the experience of the self as seen and judged negatively, by teammates (external shame) and by the self (internal shame) in the context of sport. Method: This study aimed to test EISS_athletes’ factor structure through Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA), and examining its psychometric properties in a sample of 247 Portuguese adult athletes (111 males and 136 females), who practice different team sports. Results: CFA’s results revealed good local and global adjustments, and indicated that EISS_athletes replicates the two-factor structure identified in the original EISS. EISS_athletes presented adequate internal reliability, good convergent validity and was associated with related constructs (self-criticism, self-reassurance, stress, anxiety, depression, and psychological quality of life). Discussion: EISS_athletes is a valid and reliable measure that allows for a comprehensive assessment of external and internal shame in athletes. This measure may significantly contribute for a greater understanding of how athletes experience shame and for the understanding of the role that this negative emotion has on athletes’ well-being and quality of life.

77. Does the psychological flexibility model provide a framework for potentially increasing acceptance in parents whose children identify as transgender and gender diverse?

Primary Topic: Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines
Subtopic: Transgender and Gender Diversity

Tim Cartwright, M.Sc., University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, Ph.D., University of Chester
Gemma Evans, Ph.D., D.Clin.Psy., University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, Ph.D., University of Chester

Background: Studies have found that transgender people tend to report high levels of psychological distress, with some suggesting that a lack of parental support may be a risk factor. Qualitative studies have explored parents’ difficulties experienced when their child comes out as gender diverse, which may impact their ability to accept their child’s gender identity. Although numerous interventions have been developed to support parents in accepting their gender diverse children, none have been robustly empirically tested. We therefore examined the plausibility of using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy/Training (ACT) as an intervention, by measuring the relationship between ACT processes and parents’ acceptance of their gender diverse children. Method: Through an online cross-sectional survey, we recruited 98 parents of gender diverse children from across the United States, Europe, and Australia. A novel psychometric was developed to measure Parental Acceptance of Gender Diversity In Children (PAGICS). Parents completed the PAGICS as well as measures of general parental acceptance, transphobia, psychological flexibility, and psychological wellbeing. Results: The PAGICS demonstrated excellent internal consistency (α = .97) and reasonable concurrent validity with general parental acceptance, transphobia, and psychological wellbeing. Spearman’s correlation analysis showed a weak relationship between PAGICS and psychological flexibility (AAQII, r=.159, p=ns; CompACT, r=.324, p<.01). Discussion: We found mixed support for using the psychological flexibility framework to increase parental acceptance, although effect sizes are still modest. A larger sample size and a more sensitive psychometric that measures parental acceptance would be needed for future studies to ascertain the appropriateness of ACT within this population.

78. An Exploratory Study on Strategies Used by Managers Who have Dyslexia in the Expression of Leadership

Primary Topic: Leadership
Subtopic: ACT

Erika Lefebvre, M.Ed. CPsych, University of Sherbrooke
Sophie Menard, Ph.D., Ottawa University

This qualitative exploratory study aims to deepen the understanding of the strategies used by managers who have dyslexia in the expression of their leadership and to determine the types of accommodations required to enable them to progress as leaders at the same pace as their peers who do not have dyslexia. The word stigma is often associated with mental health and, according to the Mental Health Commission of Canada has a greater impact on the lives of people with mental illness than the illness itself. Dyslexia is an invisible disability and recent research in Canada has shown that compared to those who do not have dyslexia, twice as many adults who have dyslexia report experiencing episodes of distress, depression, anxiety disorders, suicidal thoughts, or need to consult with mental health professionals. Among adults diagnosed with dyslexia in childhood, 85% choose not to disclose their condition to their employer because of stigma. While much research has been done on the impact of dyslexia in the workplace, very little has focused on the link between dyslexia and leadership. The results of this research may assist those working with managers who have dyslexia in creating supportive environments that will optimise their leadership development. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with five managers in Canadian Public Service who have dyslexia. Qualitative content analysis was used to identify the strategies used in the expression of leadership. Links will be made to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy as a potential facilitator of leadership development for this group.

79. Is parental psychological flexibility a (uni)dimensional construct? A bifactor analysis of the Portuguese version of the Parental Acceptance Questionnaire (6-PAQ)

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Parental Psychological Flexibility

Ana Fonseca, Ph.D., University of Coimbra
Helena Moreira, Ph.D., University of Coimbra
Maria Cristina Canavarro, Ph.D., University of Coimbra

Background:The Parental Acceptance Questionnaire (6-PAQ) is a self-report questionnaire developed to measure the six core processes of psychological (in)flexibility applied to the parenting context. This study aimed to examine the (uni)dimensionality of the 6-PAQ in a sample of Portuguese parents of children within the community using a bifactor model that can test the separate contribution of the dimensions and of the general score. The reliability and convergent validity of the 6-PAQ were also examined. Methods: A sample of 334 mothers of children (1-11 years) recruited online and in person completed the assessment protocol, including the 6-PAQ and related measures (general psychological flexibility, mindful parenting, parenting stress and parenting styles). Results: The bifactor model showed a better fit to the data compared with the correlated model. The index of the degree of unidimensionality (.595) and the OmegaH index supported the strength of the general factor of parental psychological inflexibility, which accounted for 85.7% of the reliable variance in the total score. Reliability indices showed high reliability for the general factor (.89), and the 6-PAQ total score was significantly correlated with related measures. Discussion: Although the 6-PAQ contains items assessing the six core-processes defined within the ACT model, the results of this study were globally supportive of the unidimensionality of the Portuguese version of the 6-PAQ scale, and thus of computing its total score. The 6-PAQ scale showed adequate reliability and convergent validity, supporting its use in both clinical and research contexts.

80. Measuring psychological flexibility regarding smoking cessation: Psychometric testing in people with schizophrenia who smoke

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Smoker

Doris YP Leung, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Winnie FT Lau, B.A., Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Alice Y Loke, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Yim-wah Mak, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Background: The high rates of tobacco use in the schizophrenia population are widely recognized; and it was reported that they have greater difficulties in smoking cessation. Acceptance and commitment therapy has been applied to help them to quit. Measuring psychological flexibility regarding smoking cessation is important for process evaluation. Method: The AAQII-SC was developed by making the experience and feeling with reference to smoking and cessation. Interviewer-administered surveys were carried out with a convenience sample of 272 people with schizophrenia who smoke from 49 mental health rehabilitation setting in the community. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was conducted to examine the factorial structure and Cronbach alpha values were calculated for the AAQII-SC. Results: The mean age of the respondents was 48.7 years (SD=11.3), 88.2% were male, their mean daily cigarette consumption is 12.3 (SD=8.4), and mean year of smoking was 27.7 (SD=12.9). Confirmatory factor analysis revealed that the original one-factor model with an addition of a correlation between Items 5 and 7 provides a good fit to the data (SRMR = 0.062; CFI = 0.956, RMSEA=0.065). Cronbach’s alpha of the scale was 0.763. Discussion: The findings provide support for the psychometric properties of AAQ-II with an adaption to smoking and cessation in a sample of people with schizophrenia who smoke. The scale provides a useful tool to assess psychological flexibility regarding smoking cessation in this particular population.

81. A New Behavioural Measure of Present Moment Awareness: A multi-study examination

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: mindfulness; assessment; present moment

Ivan Nyklíček, Tilburg University

Background: Contact with the present moment is one of the hexaflex factors and a central facet of mindfulness. Self-report instruments of momentary awareness have been criticised. Therefore, the aim was to examine a new behavioural measure of present moment awareness based on free verbal expression. Methods: In Study 1, 35 experienced meditators and 47 matched control participants performed the task and completed self-report instruments; in Study 2, 53 students performed the task two times, and in Study 3, 62 participants of a 8-week MBSR intervention performed the task before and after the intervention. Indices of Interoceptive, Exteroceptive, and Affective Awareness were obtained. Results: Inter-rater and test-retest correlations were satisfactory. Scores correlated with emotional self-awareness and introspective interest, but not with self-reported mindfulness or mood. Compared to controls, meditators scored higher on all awareness variables. The awareness scores did not change with MBSR participation. Discussion: The test seems to assess momentary awareness, which is not captured by self-report questionnaires. It seems to correlate with psychological traits and intensive longer term practice rather than with participation in a standard mindfulness intervention.

82. Psychometric Properties of a Short Form of the Five Facet of Midfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ-SF) Among a Sample of French-Canadian Adolescents

Primary Topic: Measurement and assessment
Subtopic: Mindfulness, Adolescents

José Angel Mendoza Herrera, Ph.D. Student, Université de Sherbrooke
Marie Claire Lepage, Université de Sherbrooke
Patrick Gosselin, Université de Sherbrooke

Background. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ) assesses different aspects of mindfulness: observing, describing, acting with awareness, and stances of non-judgment and of non-reactivity towards experience (Baer & al., 2006). The FFMQ has demonstrated excellent psychometric qualities with adult samples, and has been validated in French (Heeren & al., 2011) and in a short form (Bohlmeijer & al., 2011). Although several studies have observed negative relationships between mindfulness levels and psychological difficulties among adolescents (Royuela-Colomer et Calvete, 2016; Taylor et Millear, 2016), few attention has been paid to cross-cultural validation with this population. Objectives. This study aimed to examine the psychometric properties of the FFMQ-SF among a sample of French-Canadian adolescents. This instrument could reduce administrative burden, therefore improving assessment feasibility. Methods. French versions of the FFMQ-SF (24 items) and the Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire – Youth (AFQ-Y) (Greco, Lambert et Baer, 2008) were administered in a high school setting in the province of Québec (N = 152; 55,9% men, mean age=13,74). Results. Exploratory factorial analyses support the FFMQ-SF five factor structure, explaining 48% of the variance. Also, correlations between the FFMQ-SF (and subscales) and the AFQ-Y support its convergent validity. Internal consistency estimates were good for the entire scale (Cronbach’s alpha=0.82) and acceptable for all the subscales (Cronbach’s alpha>0.70). Finally, item-total correlations showed good quality for each item (> .40). Conclusions. The French version of the FFMQ-SF showed good psychometric properties, corroborating its value to assess mindfulness processes among adolescents. Further research may evaluate its test-retest reliability.

83. Evaluating a Brief ACT intervention to Improve Direct Care Staff Performance During Crisis Intervention Encounters

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Residential Facilities

Ashley Shayter, M.S., BCBA, CBIS, Northern Michigan University
Jacob Daar, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Northern Michigan University
Mark Dixon, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Southern Illinois University

Direct care staff (DSPs) are often tasked with responding to difficult and oftentimes dangerous problem behaviors. While efforts to identify safe and effective procedures for addressing these has produced a number of proactive and function-based strategies, default technologies such as restraint may often be required to reduce risk of harm. However, staff who use these types of technologies tend to suffer from greater levels of anxiety, desensitization, and negatively interact with consumers. Additionally, staff are less likely to engage in recommended protocols, or accurately respond to incidents. Although clear correlations between burnout, poor interactions, and job stressors exist, there are currently few empirically-based programs designed to train appropriate coping responses. The present study examined the efficacy of a brief Acceptance and Commitment Training intervention combined with realistic role-play scenarios in improving DSP performance during crisis intervention encounters. Results indicated that four of six participants improved their performance following training, with a booster session further increasing performance. Implications of this study suggest that ACT may be a beneficial intervention to increase staff performance during crises.

84. Culturally adapting ACT for Latinos with co-occurring DUD/HIV in Puerto Rico

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Drug Use Disorders and HIV

Coralee Pérez-Pedrogo, Ph.D., University of Puerto Rico Medical Sciences Campus
Sugeily Rivera-Suazo, M.S.W., University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus
Carmen E. Albizu-García, M.D., University of Puerto Rico, Medical Sciences Campus

Engaging people with co-occurring drug use disorders (DUD) and HIV in evidenced-based treatment (EBT) for drug addiction is of high public health significance. By 2016, injectable drugs were the cause of transmission for 43% of accumulated cases of HIV among adults and adolescents in Puerto Rico (PR). Self-stigma has been identified as a barrier to treatment access and adherence for both conditions with increased risk of morbidity and mortality. Evidence supports the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for the treatment of self-stigma. However, the cultural adaptation and dissemination of EBTs among Latinos with DUD/HIV is scarce despite extensive research that demonstrates the positive effects of these interventions. The purpose of this study is threefold: (a) justify the importance of cultural adaptation research as a key strategy to develop efficacious interventions, (b) describe the initial steps of a study aimed to culturally adapt an EBT informed by ACT principles, and (c) discuss implications for advancing cultural adaptation treatment practice and research, based on the initial feasibility and acceptability findings of an intervention delivered to reduce self-stigma among Latinos with DUD/HIV living in PR. Research findings will illustrate the initial feasibility and acceptability associated with the dissemination of an EBT informed by ACT principles. The study is relevant because limited attention has been granted to interventions delivered to reduce self-stigma among populations with co-occuring DUD/HIV, specifically Spanish-speaking Latinos that are not included in efficacy studies.

85. ACT PAVES the Way - Preparation, Activation of Values, and Examination of Strengths: A Proposed Protocol for Treatment of Combat Stress Reactions

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Stress

Jourdin Navarro, M.A., Midwestern University, Glendale
Angela Breitmeyer, Psy.D., Midwestern University, Glendale
Jessica Powell, Psy.D., Midwestern University, Glendale

Background: Since September 2001, over 2.77 million United States service members (SMs) have served on 5.4 million deployments to various combat operation zones (Wenger, O’Connell, & Cottrell, 2018). There have been nearly 60,000 casualties since 2001, and countless others have experienced invisible wounds of war (Defense Casualty Analysis System, 2018). SMs deployed to a theater of operations are at greater risk of exposure to combat-related stressors. There is emerging evidence to support the use of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in the treatment of combat-related stress reactions (Seligman & Fowler, 2011; Vujanovic, Niles, Pietrefesa, Schmertz, & Potter, 2011; Wood, Britt, Wright, Thomas, & Bliese, 2012); however, an applicable treatment protocol for use in theater does not currently exist. Method: A review of the literature was conducted to assess the need for developing an ACT-based program for SMs experiencing combat-related stress. The proposed protocol utilizes ACT-based principles and interventions in a three-phase approach to accommodate the operational tempo in theater. Results: The number of treatment-focused DoD programs available to SMs deployed in support of combat operations are limited in availability and scope. The implementation of the proposed protocol will potentially result in a within-subject decrease in combat stress-related symptomology while increasing psychological flexibility and posttraumatic growth. Conclusion: The proposed protocol is designed to reduce rates of operational stress and provide SMs with psychological skills to promote psychological flexibility following exposure to combat-related stressors. This protocol is the first to utilize the integration of values-based interventions within the context of military culture.

86. More than words: The experiential versus didactic delivery of ACT metaphors

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: Metaphors

Juwayriyah Nayyar, B. A., University College Dublin
Emily Lewis, B. A., University College Dublin
Martin O'Connor, M.Sc., University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Background: A number of studies have systematically assessed the clinical impact of metaphors in psychotherapy, and have shown them to increase memorability of therapeutic information and psychological flexibility. The present study aims to compare the effects of delivering acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) metaphors physically versus didactically. Method: 82 participants will randomly receive either physically or didactically delivered ACT metaphors and will complete a delayed recall task and self-report measures to assess efficacy in communicating ACT concepts. Participants will receive three functionally distinct metaphors, each targeting a different psychological flexibility process: acceptance (Chinese Handcuffs Metaphor), self-as-context (Chessboard Metaphor), and values (Compass Metaphor). Results: Two-way ANOVA tests will be used to assess differences and interactions between groups. Based on previous research, it is hypothesised that participants in the physical metaphor condition will demonstrate greater recall and comprehension of the therapeutic content as well as higher scores on the measures of helpfulness and ACT processes than those in the didactic metaphor condition. Discussion: These findings will have several implications for the use of metaphor in clinical practice.

87. Testing the efficacy of parent training on the delivery of a perspective taking intervention for children diagnosed with autism spectrum conditions

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: ASD, Perspective-taking

Luke Mather, University College Dublin
Zahra Moradi Shahrbabak, Ph.D, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Central to effective social interacting is the capacity to take the perspective of another. Relational Frame Theory (RFT) posits that this skill emerges due to a history of reinforcement for relating the deictic relations of I-you, here-there, and now-then. While there is a voluminous body of research supporting the efficacy of this account in training perspective taking skills in typically developing children, the literature concerning its efficaciousness with children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) remains sparse. The current study aims to use a multiple-baseline design to assess the effectiveness of a parent-led perspective taking intervention for children diagnosed with ASD. Training will consist of parents using the natural environment to train competency in each of the deictic frames. Participants will be three children diagnosed with ASD. Improvements in perspective taking ability will be measured through performance on theory of mind tasks, deictic relating tasks, and the results of the Vineland Adaptive Behaviour Scale at baseline, post-intervention and 3 week follow-up. It is hypothesised that the intervention will improve perspective taking skills in each participant.

88. The effect of value work and visual feedback to academic performances

Primary Topic: Performance-enhancing interventions
Subtopic: academic performance

Tomu Ohtsuki, Ph.D., Waseda University
Kana Yoshida, Waseda University
Kenichiro Ishizu, Ph.D., University of Toyama
Yoshiyuki Shimoda, Ph.D., Saga University

The present study explored the effect of value work and visual feedback to increase academic performance by single-case multiple baseline design. 3 university students (P1, P2, and P3) who would take the Test of English for International Communication (TOEIC) participated in this study. In intervention 1, they engaged in value work which aimed to clarify their values related to English learning and to plan committed actions. During intervention 2, they were provided visual feedbacks of their learning performances, such as learning time, number of words, learning efficiency, and scores of English words tests. Results showed that P1 and P2 increased number of words significantly which were measured during intervention and follow up phases as compared to baseline. P1 showed better learning efficacy during intervention and follow up phases as compared to baseline. P2 showed better scores of English words tests during intervention and follow up phases as compared to baseline. Other behavioral measures were not changed significantly. These results indicate that interventions of value work based on ACT and visual feedback based on behavior analytic approach are partially effective in increasing academic performance.

89. The Relationship Between Health Values Directed Behavior and Health Related Behavior

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Health

Alison Stapleton, University College Dublin
Martin O'Connor, University College Dublin
Emmet Feerick, University College Dublin
John Kerr, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Research suggests having a sense of meaning in life is related to better physical health. The present study examined the relationship between health values directed behavior and engagement in specific health behaviors, namely physical activity, dietary quality, sleep quality, alcohol consumption, and cigarette smoking. Participants were 111 members of the general population aged 18 to 49 (M = 21.41, SD = 3.721) who attended a single assessment session to complete a values clarification task, the Values Wheel measure of values directedness, and questionnaire measures of engagement in health behaviors. Findings indicated that neither dietary quality nor alcohol consumption were related to values directedness, suggesting these behaviors were not functionally congruent with participants’ health values. Greater levels of physical activity were associated with greater commitment to valued action. Lower sleep disturbance was associated with greater commitment to valued action and greater health values directedness. The present findings highlight a need to emphasize the importance of health behaviors and suggest that interventions aiming to improve physical activity and sleep quality may benefit from a focus on values.

90. The practice of mindfulness: An intervention with high school students in the period of university entrance exams

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Mindfulness. High School. Mental Health.

Ana Vera Niquerito-Bozza, Ph.D., Faculdades Integradas de Jahu (FIJ) and privacy practice
Paulo Cesar Bozza Junior, Private Practice
REGINA CÉLIA APARECIDA SANCHES, Private Practice
Gustavo José Martinho, Private Practice
Luciana Soares, Private Practice

Background: The mindfulness practice in high school students during the university entrance exams, a period in which adolescents have to deal with challenging situations, changes and uncertainties. Objective: verify the effectiveness of mindfulness practices in pre-college students. Method: the sample consisted of 22 students in high school. The following qualitative method were used for verification of the results from pre and post mindfulness intervention: Inventory of stress symptoms for adults of Lipp; Beck's inventory of anxiety; Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II and Brazilian version of the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire. Results: The results obtained after the intervention showed that the intervention reached the expected goal, for each analyzed variable. An improvement was noted in the routine of the adolescents: Stress symptoms decreased by 14%; the most acute phase of anxiety was extinguished and facilitated a cognitive flexibility to the public by the fact that the practice generated a process of awareness and action. Discussion: The result obtained was positive for the initial expectations of the research, which proved that the practice of mindfulness brings benefits to the mental health of the individual, because the technique facilitates to bring the person’s mind to the present moment, changing their approach to events, thoughts and feelings in a more non-judgmental way. The practice brings a perspective of not only emotional stability, but it develops the possibility of observing the present moment motivating the individual to be directed to valued actions and having greater mental health.

91. Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for promoting mental well-being among new graduate nurses: study protocol for a pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT)

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: mental wellbeing, nurses

Ching Yee Lam, MPhil, MN, Ph.D. Candidate, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, The Open University of Hong Kong
Yim Wah Mak, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Sau Fong Leung, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Background: Stressful working life in clinical setting is a challenge experience for new graduate nurses (NGN), in particular, during transitional period. Transition program have been adopted for supporting NGN from novice to competent, yet, few studies have evaluated programs of promoting mental well-being in NGN. Because ACT advocates value-based living, it has been proposed to be an appropriate mental health promotion intervention. This study reports a protocol for a pilot RCT of a group-based face-to-face ACT intervention for promoting mental well-being in NGN. Methods: A randomized, two-group design to examine the feasibility, acceptability and potential efficacy of a four face-to-face ACT intervention sessions vs. control, with assessment on baseline, 6 weeks and 3 months follow-up for enhancement of mental well-being and perceived stress as primary outcomes. Data analysis will be descriptive and include an evaluation of eligibility, recruitment, and retention rates. A process evaluation will be conducted to identify potential resources needed to undertake a definitive study. Discussion: The findings would be useful for estimating effect size for a full powered trial for promoting mental well-being among Chinese NGN. \\

92. Mindful Eating – Conscious Living™: An acceptability study of an 8-week mindfulness programme focused on food and eating

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Mindfulness

Christine Ramsey-Wade, Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England
Emma Halliwell, Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England
Heidi Willaimson, Centre for Appearance Research, University of the West of England
Melissa Atkinson, University of Bath

Mindful Eating – Conscious Living™ (ME-CL) is a mindfulness-based intervention originating in the US which aims to reduce anxiety around food and eating. While the programme is being delivered widely, it has never been tested under research conditions. This study represents the first stage of a larger trial, testing the acceptability or descriptive feasibility of the programme with a UK sample. Following ethical approval, three focus groups (n = 12) were held with adult women in the UK with an interest in mindfulness and/or (un)healthy eating. Participants were asked to read an overview of the ME-CL programme and session plans from two classes before the group. During the groups, they were asked for their views on the appropriateness and clarity of the language used, the novelty and relevance of the programme, and whether any changes were needed. The focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed, to be analysed thematically in light of the research aims. Analysis is ongoing, and will be reported in more detail in the conference poster. Initial results indicate that, while some minor changes may be needed to accommodate differences in language, no major changes were felt to be required. However, the data does suggest some useful points of consideration for mindful eating teachers in the UK. Subclinical disordered eating, or dis-ease around food and eating, is widespread. ME-CL shows initial promise to address this, but further research is needed to test its efficacy and feasibility.

93. Enjoy translating TED talks from the ACBS world!

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: TED talks, ACBS

Emanuele Rossi, Psy.D., APC - SPC, AISCC

TED talks are powerful talks of brief duration which have the function of spreading ideas. In the last few years they increased their efficacy and today we can hear talks about almost all topics translated in more than 100 languages. At the same time the international community of TEDx organizes events at a local level elevating them to a global level. AMARA is the official award winning system that TED uses for translation and transcription. Amara is a subtitle editor designed to be easy to use and understand in order to transcript and translate video and make it more globally accessible. Recently the ACBS community is making extensive use of TED Talks and AMARA system, sharing around the world its mission to alleviate human suffering and advance in human well-being. This poster illustrates how to enjoy TED and AMARA communities. You will learn how to sign up and start the translation process and then move forward with the subtitling and the sharing. There are few clear rules to follow in order to accomplish the mission and spread the ideas in an effective way. By enjoying the community of volunteers and translators you will contribute to spread word of ACBS TED talks worldwide.

94. Nonpathologizing the effects of serious injuries among Filipino combatants: An intervention program using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Trauma

Gabriel Sebastian Lizada, Ateneo de Davao University

Military personnel who are continuously deployed in the field are more prone to develop potentially traumatic events which may lead to certain mental health conditions such as significant distress, violence and PTSD. The most common way of treating PTSD using the medical model – a model that assumes that events and symptoms have a causal relationship. Following the medical model in treating PTSD and trauma will more likely focus on symptom reduction.(McLean & Follette, 2016), As a result, they are often quick to pathologize combat-related trauma and treat it as a mental illness. However, military personnel who survive potentially traumatic event report high levels of distress, but not meet the criteria for PTSD. Military personnel under chronic stress tend to develop complex posttraumatic stress disorder (C-PTSD) - a diagnosis for survivors of prolonged trauma, capturing the symptoms that do not meet the criteria for PTSD (Resick et al., 2012). In the Philippines setting, once a combatant (soldier) is seriously injured (physical or psychological) they must undergo a psychiatric assessment (PA) before being fit deemed fit for duty. In their PA, they are assessed physically, emotionally and psychologically before returning to active duty. If they are deemed unfit for the job because of their mental health, then they will be discharged from duty. This study aims to use the ACT model as a form of therapy to soldiers who have been seriously injured in the line of duty who are showing significant distress but not meet the criteria for PTSD.

95. Mind your Food Challenge: Reducing emotional eating in college students through components of Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT)

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Emotional eating

Gabriela Chia, IE University and IEU Wellbeing Center
Leticia Martinez

Background and objectives: Treatments for emotional eating have been based on the dietary restraint model of binge eating, such as cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT). Although this therapy is the most common treatment used for emotional eating, its effectiveness is questionable. Therefore, the interest in improving treatment for binging is growing. This paper aims to evaluate the impact of Acceptance and Commitment therapy (ACT) on emotional eating in college students. Method: 30 undergraduate students took part of a 1-day workshop on reducing emotional eating, based on three main components of ACT (cognitive defusion, experiential avoidance and awareness). Before the workshop cognitive fusion from the students was measured with the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire (CFQ), experiential avoidance was measured with Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQII) and their eating habits were measured with both, the Emotional Eating Scale (EES) and Dutch Eating Behaviour Questionnaire (DEBQ). One week after the workshop students were assessed again for a follow up. Results: A reduction in emotional eating was shown one week after the participants took part in the workshop. More specifically, participants showed an improvement in diffusion from thoughts and reduced experiential avoidance, which consequently lowered their engagement in emotional eating. Conclusions and discussion: One of the limitations of this exploratory study is that no control group was used. Hence, a randomised control trial could be carried out in the future for comparison and consequently obtain more specific results. This study, however can contribute for an improvement in clinical practice with people who suffer from emotional eating.

96. “#KindGirlsInACTion”: A School-based Group Programme for Adolescents

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: School-based Intervention

Joana Marta-Simões, Ph.D Student, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Ana Laura Mendes, Ph.D. Student, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra
Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioural Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra

Background: #KindGirlsInACTion is a school-based quality of life promotion and eating disorders prevention Programme for adolescent girls, which includes Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) components. This programme aims at promoting girls’ compassion, acceptance and values-based committed action, with intended impact in the exhibition of self-care behaviors, positive body image attitudes and affiliative peer relationships and, consequently, in body and eating-related behaviors and overall levels of health-related quality of life. ACT and CFT have been separately applied in adolescents, in the form of school-based interventions, with success. Moreover, the combination of both therapies has been proved as successful in interventions with different aims. Methods: #KindGirlsInACTion is a school-based group programme designed for girls between 12 and 18, attending middle or secondary schools. It comprises 12-14 weekly sessions of 45 minutes each. Results: It is expected that, comparing to a control group, adolescents who attended the programme will present, and maintain over time, higher acceptance, values-driven behaviors, and mindfulness skills, which are hypothesized to impact positively in body image attitudes, self-care behaviors, affiliative skills and peer relationships, and in eating behaviors and quality of life levels. Discussion: We believe that the innovative combination of two empirically validated therapies, in a programme which is mostly experiential and cultivates compassion, acceptance, valued action and mindfulness skills, will contribute for the prevention of body and eating-related psychopathology and for the promotion of female adolescents’ well-being.

97. A mobile game for improving psychological flexibility skills in elementary school children

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Children

Katariina Keinonen, Ph.D. Student, University of Jyväskylä
Anna-Lotta Lappalainen, M.S., Solent NHS Trust
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Raimo Lappalainen, University of Jyväskylä

Background: Children with aggressive behavioural patterns have been found to have deficiencies in problem solving strategies and empathy skills while interacting with others. Classroom-level interventions are needed for prevention of psychological problems among children. To our knowledge there are few studies investigating the impact of mobile games as a tool in delivering ACT/RFT -based interventions at schools. The project was set to develop a mobile game for anti-bullying. Method: The game was based on principles of Relational Frame Theory (RFT). The game was designed for 10-13 years-old children. The gameplay aims to increase children’s psychological flexibility skills using dialogues and problem-solving approach. It teaches skills related to perspective taking, values, emotion and thought management through gamification. Results: The user-experiences and acceptability of the game have been positive. The paper will report preliminary acceptability and effectiveness results in classroom settings using an RCT design. Discussion: Using a mobile game to deliver psychological interventions for children in the school context can be an interesting alternative for increasing psychological well-being among children.

98. Acceptance-based or mindfulness-based interventions for parents: A systematic review of the effects on psychological or mental well-being

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: parents

Kyle, Ka Leung Lam, M.Sc., Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Yim Wah MAK, Ph.D., Hong Kong Polytechnic University

AIM: To review the effectiveness of acceptance-based or mindfulness-based interventions for improving psychological well-being and promoting mental well-being among parents of children METHODS: Studies were identified by searching five electronic databases to 1 March 2019 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) RESULTS: Ten RCTs were included. Parents of the identified studies were healthy except one study included parents with history of depression, while studies included with broad range of clinical problems among their children such as autism spectrum disorder, developmental delays, and attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (n=8). 3 studies used acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and the others used various types of mindfulness-based interventions such as mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) and mindfulness-based stress reduction (MSBR). There is no clear definition on “psychological well-being” and “mental well-being” from all studies as they included different outcome measures. Both types of intervention showed improved psychological well-being. Participants who received ACT reported significant improvement in psychological flexibility CONCLUSIONS: ACT and mindfulness-based interventions can improve psychological well-being of participants. It was also found that the selected articles mainly focus on healthy parents with sick children, only one article reported the effects of interventions on healthy parent-child dyads. In addition, no study included healthy parent-child dyads with children aged 2-6 as their participants

99. Grazing behaviours: Exploring the impact of body image-related shame and self-compassion

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Eating behaviours

Lara Palmeira, Oporto Global University, Portugal
Diana Sousa, Oporto Global University, Portugal
Cristiana Marques, Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive Behavioral Intervention (CINEICC), University of Coimbra

Grazing - a pattern of repeated episodes of consumption of small amounts of food throughout the day in an unplanned manner - remains unexplored. In addition, growing evidence emphasizes the central role of body image shame in the adoption of maladaptive eating behaviours, particularly in binge eating. On the other hand, self-compassion, defined as the ability to have an attitude of acceptance and tolerance toward oneself, has been consistently associated with well-being and lower levels of eating psychopathology. This study aims to evaluate the impact of body image shame (both internal and external) and self-compassion in grazing behaviours. This is still an ongoing study. Currently, the sample encloses 25 women and 9 men from the community, with a mean age of 26.50 years (SD = 10.38), 11.72 years of schooling (SD = 2.76) and a mean BMI of 24.5 (SD = 5.08), mostly singles (73.5%). Results showed that BMI was positively related to body-image shame. In turn, body-image shame was positively associated with grazing. Conversely, grazing was negatively associated with self-compassion. Moreover, results from multiple regression analysis revealed that the model accounted for 34.8% of grazing behaviours. Self-compassion abilities was the best predictor (β = -.442, t = -2.892, p < .01), followed by internal body-image shame (β = .376, t = 2.461, p < .05). Overall, although still preliminary, results unveil the importance of developing a warmer and more compassionate attitude towards one’s body image and eating behaviours, promoting people’s health.

100. Turkish Version of Generalized Pliance Questionnaire: Preliminary Analysis of Psychometric Properties

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Rule Governed Behavior

Ahmet Nalbant, M.D., Adiyaman University Research and Training Hospital Department of Psychiatry
Zulal Celik, M.D., Bakirkoy Research and Training Hospital for Mental Health and Neurological Diseases, Istanbul, Turkey
K. Fatih Yavuz, M.D., Istanbul Medipol University

BACKGROUND: The ability of humans to generate and apply rules has both advantages and disadvantages. People can learn without any direct experience, respond abstract consequences and follow goals by benefiting from advantages of rules. Rules also have some disadvantages such as it is shown that rule governed behavior is associated with decreased awareness to contextual changes. Pliance, as a kind of rule following, means that consequences that reinforce this rule following is generated by the rule giver. Recently, Ruiz et al. developed Generalized Pliance Questionnaire (GPQ) to evaluate generalized pliance. More recently, Connor et al. translated GPQ to English and showed that it has good psychometric properties. In this study, we evaluated Turkish version of GPQ and discussed its psychometric properties. METHOD: The study sample consisted of 165 healthy volunteers. For the assessment, A socio-demographic data form, The Social Functioning Scale (SFS), Personality Belief Questionnaire (PBQ) and Turkish Version of Generalized Pliance Questionnaire (TGPQ) were used. Internal consistency and split-half analyses were performed to evaluate the reliability. Also, a principal component analysis was conducted to assess the validity. RESULTS: According to the results, TGPQ has a Cronbach’s alpha value of .93 and it showed good internal consistency. Results showed that TPQ has one component and it also showed significant correlation with PBQ and SFS. DISCUSSION: Turkish form of the GPQ is a reliable and valid tool for assessment of generalized pliance .

101. An Analysis of Empathy from a Functional Contextual Approach

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Empathy

Beatriz Harana, Ph.D. Student, Universidad de Almeria
Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., University of Almeria
Matheus Bebber, Ph.D. Student, University of Almeria
Beatriz Sebastián, Ph.D. Student, University of Almeria
Mari Luz Vallejo, Ph.D. Student, University of Almeria

Background: The most traditional mainstream of psychology has provided a multitude of explanations, theories and definitions about empathy. However, there has not been an agreement on what the empathic repertoire is and how it develops (Davis, 1996). From a functional contextual perspective, there have been some studies that have tried to address empathy. Nevertheless, no study has been conducted in order to isolate what an empathic interaction consists of. Conversely, one of the things that has also not been analysed is whether psychological flexibility is somehow related to empathy. In this line, the main objective of this study is to measure and analyse what an empathic interaction consists of and how this correlates with psychological flexibility and traditional empathy measures. Method: To this end, this study included the participation of undergraduate students (N=30). The participant carried out the Empathic Interaction Task (EIT), specifically designed for this study. Then, they completed two traditional empathy tests and two psychological flexibility questionnaires. Results: These results is discussed in terms of the confluence of responding between the different measures.

102. Implicit and explicit attitudes towards type 2 diabetes versus typical health

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: IRAP

Charlotte Dack, University of Bath
Samantha Garay, Cardiff University

Background: Type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) affects 3.3 million people in the UK alone. Effective self-management is essential to avoid diabetes-related complications. However, negative attitudes surrounding T2DM may be a barrier to this. This study aimed to investigate explicit and implicit attitudes towards T2DM versus typical health. Method: In total, 30 participants, all of whom had no diagnosis of T2DM completed an Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) designed to assess implicit relational responding towards T2DM versus typical health. Participants also completed a range of explicit measures including a feeling thermometer for both T2DM and typical health. Results: Explicit measures indicated a negative T2DM bias, with T2DM rated significantly more negatively and less warmly than typical health. The IRAP measure demonstrated a significant positive bias on all trial types (T2DM-positive-True; typical health-negative-False; typical health-positive-True) except for T2DM-negative-False. The differences found between implicit and explicit responses will be discussed.

103. ABA training for an ASD child and Behavioral Parent Training (BPT)+ACT Matrix parenting for his parent

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: ABA, ASD, children, BPT, ACT

Chisako Ukita, Ritsumeikan University
Chisato Tani, Ritsumeikan University
Shinji Tani, Ritsumeikan University

An ASD child has a variety of difficulties, such as compulsive behaviors, narrow thinking and hypersensitivity. Therefore, parents of him often feel difficulty to raise a child. It leads to the aversive parenting and increases the risk of abuse.This study showed that the case reseach which were provided ABA training for an ASD child (5 years old) and Behavioral Parenting Training (BPT) +ACT Matrix parenting for his parents. The parents often used the aversive control to their child (ex. hit him, scolded him emotionally and threaten him, etc.). Total eight sessions (about 1. 5h each) were provided for the child and parents. The child and parents were received training session separately. ABA training which targeted to the basic academic skills ( learning basic concepts) and relational framings were introduced to him. BPT +ACT Matrix parenting were implemented to his parents. The results showed that he learned the basic concepts (right-left discrimination and mathematics) and combinatorial frame. The mental health condition measured by GHQ60 got better than before the session (Pretest 19, Posttest 7 for Father; Pretest 36, Posttest 9 for Mother). Psychological Inflexibility (by AAQ-II) increased a little after the BPT session (Pretest 21, Posttest 28 for Father; Pretest 26, Posttest 25 for Mother) but decreased after introducing Matrix. The decrease of aversive control also observed. We conclude BPT+ACT Matrix parenting is useful and helpful methods for parents having children of ASD.

104. Teaching a Child with Autism Spectrum Disorder to Pay: Applying Relational Frame Theory

Primary Topic: Relational Frame Theory
Subtopic: Derived relational responding

Daiki Furuya, M.A., Meisei University
Shinobu Ogasawara, M.A., Meisei University
Koji Takeuchi, Meisei University

Background: In RFT, reactions that occur without direct learning are called a derived relational responding. The current study was conducted with one child diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder. When presented with a one-digit number, this child choose the same number objects; however, in case of three-digit numbers, the child could not pay the corresponding coin value. This study aimed to verify if a child could pay a corresponding three-digit coin value without being taught the number system directly. Method: The participant was a 5-year-old with an IQ of 85. This study used the Teaching-Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (T-IRAP) to learn the relationship between the 3-digit numbers and Japanese coins. T-IRAP is a computer task. A 3-digit number that comprised 1 or 0 was presented on the top of the monitor screen. At the center, a picture of 3 types of Japanese coins (100 yen, 10 yen, 1 yen) was presented. The bottom left and right showed the options “same” and “different.” If the 3-digit number corresponded with the coin value, “same” was the correct answer; if they did not correspond, “different” is the correct answer. To investigate if the correct number of coins had been provided to correspond with the number, payment tests were conducted before and after T-IRAP. Result: The result of payment test was 0% before T-IRAP, 100% after it, and 100% two weeks later. Discussion: It is considered that a derived relational responding occurred without directly learning by matching between position of 3-digit numbers and corresponding coins.

105. Psychological flexibility, emotional regulation, and well-being in various life situations
ACBS Polska
Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Psychological flexibility

Lidia Baran, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Magdalena Hyla, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Irena Pilch, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Magdalena Bolek-Kochanowska, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Maciej Bożek, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Wiola Friedrich, Ph.D., University of Silesia in Katowice
Jagoda Sikora, M.A., University of Silesia in Katowice

Ability to act in a flexible manner is an important indicator of health (Kashdan, 2010). Research shows that high psychological flexibility is associated with lower emotional exhaustion (Biron, Veldhoven, 2012) due to applying emotional regulation techniques related to high emotional well-being (Brockman et al., 2016). However, it seems that this relation may be influenced by the character of the situations in which regulation occurs (Haines et al., 2016). The aim of the project was to analyze relations between psychological flexibility and suppression, reappraisal, situational self-esteem and positivity in various contexts. Participants completed AAQ-II, then assessed other variables six times a day for a week. Using experience sampling method we collected 20,708 surveys from 688 participants. We expected psychological flexibility to be positively related to well-being, negatively to emotional regulation and to moderate relation between emotional regulation and well-being. We address the role of context by comparing those relations in situations when participants were alone and with others. We analyzed the data using multilevel models and conducted hierarchical modeling. The results of our research can be used to plan therapeutic interventions and client psychoeducation.

106. Temperamental basis for psychological flexibility, committed action and life satisfaction level

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: temperament, psychological flexibility, life satisfaction

Maria Cyniak-Cieciura, Ph.D., SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Joanna Dudek, Ph.D., SWPS University of Social Sciences and Humanities

Initial research on the role of temperament traits in the development of psychopathology and work efficiency proved their moderating role in functioning in different stimulation conditions. The next research may focus on the relation of temperament to factors leading to better mental and somatic health. These kind of approach is limited, therefore the aim of this research was to verify the relations of temperament to psychological flexibility and its processes and life satisfaction level. The research was conducted in February 2019 on 107 students (87 F and 20 M) in the age of 17-50 (M=33.12, SD=8.71), who filled out a battery of questionnaires: a revised version of Formal Characteristic of Behaviour – Temperament Inventory FCB-TI(R), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire AAQ, Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire CFQ, Committed Action Questionnaire CAQ, Freiburg Mindfulness Inventory FMI, Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire MEAQ and Satisfaction With Life Scale SWLS. The results show that temperamental traits defining ones’ possibilities of stimulation processing: emotional reactivity, endurance and perseverance are significantly correlated with psychological flexibility, its processes and life satisfaction. Life satisfaction was also significantly related to psychological flexibility and all its processes. Regression analyses results revealed that the relation between temperament traits and both life satisfaction and committed action is at least partly mediated by psychological flexibility. The final structural models will be presented. The results suggest that people who developed psychiatric or somatic disorders which were proved to be related to lower possibilities of stimulation processing may lack skills responsible for more flexible reaction to stressful events.

107. Distress Aversion Moderates the Relationship between State Emotion Regulation Difficulties and Negative Affect Intensity

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: Experiential avoidance

Meaghan Lewis, Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Kyra Bebus, Western Michigan University
Tabitha DiBacco, Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, B.S., Western Michigan University
Audrey Conrad, Western Michigan University
Callum Smith, Western Michigan University

Emotional or experiential avoidance appears to play a key role in the pathway between psychological distress and comorbid sequelae. However, less is understood regarding the form and function of strategies that increase the likelihood of emotion regulation difficulties. Distress aversion, conceptualized as a form of experiential avoidance, appears to explain the link between psychological distress and the propensity to engage in non-suicidal self-injurious behavior (Nielsen, Sayal, & Townsend, 2017). Similarly, avoidance strategies (i.e., behavioral avoidance, distraction and suppression) are associated with problematic behaviors (Kingston, Clarke, & Remington, 2010). Still, the relationship between trait experiential avoidance strategies and specific state emotion regulation/affective states is less understood. Thus, the goal of the present study was to further elucidate this relationship in a convenience sample (N = 160) who completed several analogue tasks of emotional and physiological discomfort. Distress aversion interacted with specific emotion regulation difficulties to predict the intensity of negative affect in the moment post tasks that evoked physiological and emotional discomfort. State experiential avoidance post analogue tasks explained the direct effect of baseline experiential avoidance and emotion regulation on negative affect intensity. State emotion regulation was more strongly linked with tasks of emotional discomfort. Suggestions for refining conceptualizations of experiential avoidance as state and trait to improve contemporary behavior therapies methods and outcomes will be discussed.

108. Mindfulness Facets Mediate the Relation of Anxiety and Non-Suicidal Self-Injury: A Conditional Process Analysis Across Levels of Borderline Personality Disorder Symptomology

Primary Topic: Theoretical and philosophical foundations
Subtopic: NSSI

Rachel C. Bock, B.S., University of South Dakota
Emily K. Kalantar, B.A., University of South Dakota
Christopher R. Berghoff, Ph.D., University of South Dakota
Kim L. Gratz, Ph.D., University of Toledo
Matthew T. Tull, Ph.D., University of Toledo

Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) is associated with high borderline personality disorder (BPD) and anxiety symptomology, yet research suggests BPD does not moderate the relation of anxiety and NSSI (Bentley et al., 2015). This finding is surprising given the centrality of NSSI to BPD. To date, no research has evaluated the variance mindfulness may account for in these relations, though several revealing correlations have been identified. For example, NSSI and anxiety symptoms are related to low non-judging, nonreacting, and acting with awareness. BPD features are inversely related to present-moment awareness. Furthermore, acting with awareness mediates the relation of stress and NSSI, which is similar in nature to that of anxiety and NSSI. Collectively, this research suggests mindfulness may be an informative process to explore in the anxiety-BPD-NSSI relation. The present study evaluated these relations using conditional process analysis. College students (N=396; Female=74.7%, White=62.4%, Mage=20.24, Range=17-42) completed measures of anxiety and BPD symptoms, mindfulness, and NSSI. Results indicated non-judging and nonreactivity significantly mediated the relation of anxiety symptomology and NSSI history (ps < .05). Moreover, these relations depended on level of BPD symptomology (ps <.05). Probability of NSSI was especially high in the context of high BPD symptoms and low nonreactivity, whereas high non-judging was related to lower NSSI probability in the context of low to moderate BPD symptoms only. Mindfulness will be discussed as a process that may enhance understanding of NSSI behavior and support therapeutic change for those struggling with NSSI in the context of anxiety and BPD.

109. Different values of smokers and non-smokers

Primary Topic: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions
Subtopic: Smoking Cessation

Lena Nugent, Neuropsychiatric Center Hamburg
Nina Schulze, Neuropsychiatric Center Hamburg
Peter Tonn, Neuropsychiatric Center Hamburg

Background: Smoking leads to a significant health burden for both the smoking individual and passive smokers, in addition to the massive economic burden on the health care system. While previous approaches in smoking cessation are effective, there is still a high percentage of smokers in the german population. Therefore, further steps to aid smoking cessation are necessary. Method: We have developed a new form of smoking cessation based on personal values, attitudes and goals. Before we begin this program, we want to investigate if there are differences in values between smokers and non-smokers. Therefor we investigate the values of smokers and non-smokers, using an adapted version of the personal values questionnaire and the fagerstroem test for nicotine abuse. Results: In this presentation we show the results of the study, which is currently ongoing.

ACBS staff

WC17 Program Updates/ Addendum

WC17 Program Updates/ Addendum

Last updated 22 June, 2019

 

Tuesday, 25 June

Room Change

Prosocial: Using CBS to improve relations within and between groups will now be held in room Q158 (on the 1st floor of the Business School)


Wednesday, 26 June

Room Change

Prosocial: Using CBS to improve relations within and between groups will now be held in room Q158 (on the 1st floor of the Business School)


Thursday, June 27

Room Change 

All sessions that were scheduled for Q220, will instead be held in QG22 (on the ground floor of the Business School)


Friday, June 28

Room Change

All sessions that were scheduled for Q220, will instead be held in QG22 (on the ground floor of the Business School)

Session Change

59. Measuring mindfulness
Invited (10:35-12:05)
Ruth Baer, Ph.D., University of Kentucky and University of Oxford

This presentation has been cancelled, and the following session will be replacing it:

59. Addressing Problematic Perfectionism from a Contextual Behavioural Approach: Forging links between research, practice, and lived experience
Panel (10:35-12:05)

Components: Conceptual analysis
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Theoretical and philosophical foundations,Perfectionism
Target Audience: Beginner

Location: Q122
Chair: Susannah C. Johnston, Ph.D., University of Edinburgh
Jennifer Kemp, M.Psych.(Clinical), Precious Minds
Lanaya L. Ethington, Ph.D., University of Iowa
David Gillanders, DClinPsy, University of Edinburgh
Lisa W. Coyne, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School

Perfectionists strive towards high standards and may experience concern over whether these standards will be achieved. In some cases, the standards and concerns become excessive, leading to poor life outcomes. For example, perfectionism is considered a transdiagnostic risk and maintenance factor for numerous psychological disorders and can also act as a barrier to successful recovery from clinical illness. Given the evidenced rise of perfectionism in recent decades, it is important for clinicians and researchers to forge collaborative relationships in the bid to address the more problematic features of perfectionism. Difficulties arise, however, in aligning conceptual, clinical, and lived experience perspectives of perfectionism. Disagreement remains about common and unique features of perfectionism in different populations, how these may influence life outcomes, and how best to address problematic features in a therapeutic setting. Might a contextual behavioural science approach aid our understanding and treatment of problematic perfectionism? This panel brings together clinicians and researchers from across the globe with interest and experience in this topic to discuss these issues and more.

Educational Objectives:

1. Describe key differences and commonalities between researcher, practitioner, and lived experience perspectives of perfectionism.
2. Evaluate the use of a CBS approach to understanding problematic perfectionism.
3. Contribute to an emerging dialogue between research and practice in an important transdiagnostic area.

 

Session Change
65. An ACT Approach to Emotional Dysregulation: Nuts and Bolts of Flexible Exposure
Workshop (13:20-16:40) 
Patricia E. Zurita Ona, Psy.D., East Bay Behavior Therapy Center
Russ Harris, Private Practice

This presentation has been cancelled, and the following session will be replacing it:

65. Self-as-context Made Simple
Workshop (13:20-16:40)
Russ Harris, Private Practice
Location: The Theatre (Helix-Ground Floor)

Components: Experiential exercises, Didactic presentation, Role play
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests
Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced 

A highly experiential workshop which demonstrates in simple, clear, non-technical language many different ways to talk about and facilitate the experience of self-as-context – from lengthy interventions such as the classic ‘observer Exercise’ to extremely brief ones. It brings together metaphors and experiential exercises from ACT pioneers Steve Hayes, Kirk Strosahl and Kelly Wilson, as well as my own innovations. By the end of this workshop, attendees will have repeatedly experienced the psychological space of self-as-context, and will have a variety of tools to facilitate this process in therapy. They will also get an opportunity to practice some of these techniques on each other.

Educational Objectives

1. Communicate to the ‘average person’ about self-as-context – in a jargon-free manner
2. Explain the ‘psychological space’ of self-as-context
3. Utilize a variety of techniques for rapidly facilitating this experience in therapy

 

Busing Schedule Update 
Busing will now return from Nassau Street at 21:15, 21:30, 21:45 and 22:00.


Saturday, June 29

Room Change

All sessions that were scheduled for Q220, will instead be held in QG22 (on the ground floor of the Business School).


Sunday, June 30

Room Change

All sessions that were scheduled for Q220, will instead be held in QG22 (on the ground floor of the Business School).

Anonymous (not verified)

WC17 Symposium Detail

WC17 Symposium Detail

Thursday, 27 June
Friday, 28 June
Saturday, 29 June
Sunday, 30 June

Thursday, 27 June

14. Encountering More Mystery than is Comfortable: Spirituality, Religion, Mysticism, and Mental Health Through a CBS Lens
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Didactic presentation, Case presentation
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Theoretical and philosophical foundations, spirituality, religion, psychedelics
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q122

Chair: Jason Luoma, Ph.D., Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research, & Training Center, Oregon Health Sciences University
Discussant: Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Spirituality and religion are important aspects of human experience. Furthermore, research shows that religious attendance and spiritual beliefs can contribute to positive mental health. However, these topics have received relatively little theoretical and empirical attention from a CBS perspective. This symposium seeks to advance a CBS understanding of religious, spiritual, and mystical experience through three methods. The first paper presents a case study of the treatment of moral injury using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, in which spiritual concerns played a central part. A second paper reviews data from clinical trials on psychedelic therapy showing that mystical states predict positive outcomes and attempts to understand these findings through the lens of CBS. A third paper presents data from a sample of US veterans, showing that religious and spiritual variables were related to positive outcomes, as well as examining relationships with variables related to psychological flexibility. In each paper, CBS theory will be utilized to understand the findings, with an eye to advancing understanding and research in this area of inquiry.

• Reengaging in Spirituality with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Moral Injury (ACT-MI): A Case Study
Lauren M. Borges, Ph.D., Rocky Mountain MIRECC, University of Colorado School of Medicine

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy has promising implications for breaking free from moral injury-related suffering (Farnsworth et al., 2017; Nieuwsma et al., 2015). A case study will be presented about ACT-MI in a telehealth format for a Service Member struggling to reengage with spirituality after violating his moral values. Through treatment he redefined his spirituality via “sharing myself with others.” In addition to demonstrating a marked increase in values-consistent behavior (Valued Living Questionnaire composite score from 17.9 to 57-points) following ACT-MI, social functioning, experiential avoidance, and cognitive fusion improved. Qualitative data also support the acceptability of ACT-MI in a telehealth format. On the Narrative Evaluation of Intervention Interview, he shared, “this has really helped me to reconnect with a sense of purpose and meaning and spirituality within my life.” Whereas at the beginning of treatment he identified spirituality as unimportant, at the end of treatment he expressed, “I want my life to have purpose and meaning. I want to connect to my values of family and spirituality. To be there for them and for me.”

• How the Experience of Mystical States in Psychedelic Assisted Therapy Can Inform Research into Processes of Change: A CBS and Affective Science Perspective
Jason Luoma, Ph.D., Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research, & Training Center, Oregon Health Sciences University

Modern clinical trials examining the psychedelics in the treatment of mental health problems has demonstrated surprisingly robust effects. Central to these outcomes is the inducement of mystical states through the moderate-to-high doses typically administered. In these studies, the occurrence of a mystical state during psychedelic dosing sessions strongly predicts positive outcomes. In other words, those patients who experience a mystical state usually have very positive outcomes whereas those who do not experience a mystical state typically show little benefit. In contrast to most of the theorizing on mechanisms of action of psychedelics, which emphasizes decontextualized brain states, this paper will take a contextual view on how a profound single experience can result in transformational changes in behavior. The paper begins with a review of modern trials on the effects of psychedelics on mental health, specifically with a focus on studies showing that the inducement of mystical states strongly predicts mental health outcomes. It then proceeds to outline how contextual behavioral and affective science can account for the observed effects and inform future treatment development.

• Differential Examination of Religious and Spiritual Self-Identification in Relation to Resilience and Mental Health Outcomes: Implications for ACT
Jason A. Nieuwsma, Ph.D., Duke University, VA Mid Atlantic MIRECC

Amid the decline of traditional religiosity in Western, industrialized nations, spirituality has emerged as a more subjective, individualized construct with which many people increasingly identify (Chaves, 2017; Saucier & Skrzypińska, 2006). Using a sample of 315 post-9/11 veterans, we examined how self-identification as religious and/or spiritual interacted with outcomes on measures of resilience (CD-RISC; identified in prior research as a proxy for psychological flexibility; Elliott et al., 2017), depression (BDI-II), alcohol abuse (AUDIT), PTSD (DTS), and moral injury (MIQ-M). Compared to those who identified as neither spiritual nor religious, those who identified as both had higher resilience scores (p<.001) and lower scores on measures of depression (p<.05), alcohol abuse (p<.01), and moral injury (p<.01). Those identifying as spiritual but not religious generally scored between these two groups, with patterns on measures of resilience and moral injury suggestive of a potential adaptive function for spirituality in the absence of religiosity for this group. This presentation will conclude with implications for using ACT to target psychological flexibility processes as interpreted through the lens of religion and/or spirituality.

Educational Objectives:
1. Demonstrate how ACT can be used in relation to issues of religion or spirituality. 2. Describe how psychological flexibility is related to psychedelic experience. 3. Describe how spirituality is linked to valuing as a behavior.

 

15. ACT and serious mental illness: Theory and Intervention
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Psychosis and Bipolar Affective Disorder
Target Audience: Beginner
Location: Q158

Chair: Eric Morris, Ph.D., La Trobe University
Discussant: Joseph Oliver, Ph.D., University College London, Contextual Consulting

The role of psychological flexibility has been shown to be important in the development and maintenance of serious mental illness. Evidence is emerging of the effectiveness of ACT-based interventions for such problems. This symposium considers the theoretical and practical implementation of ACT to symptoms that are characteristic of individuals with serious and enduring mental illness. Paper 1 considers the role of psychological flexibility in understanding schizotypy—a continuum of psychotic-like experiences which extends from nonclinical presentations to schizophrenia and related disorders. Paper 2 focuses specifically on paranoia-a common, distressing, and persistent experience characterised by the belief that another will cause one harm. Here, we examine the application of values-based interventions for reducing non-clinical paranoia. Finally, Paper 3 presents innovative data on the application of group ACT for individuals with Bipolar Affective Disorder who experience psychotic symptoms. This presentation will provide insight into developing and implementing the group-based intervention, as well as presenting data from a randomised control trial.

• The Relationship Between Schizotypy and Well-being: The Mediating Role of Psychological Flexibility
Emily Tuckey, La Trobe University
Eric Morris, La Trobe University
John Farhall, La Trobe University

Psychological flexibility refers to a unified model of interrelated mindfulness, acceptance, values-based and behaviour change processes which are considered to enhance human functioning and well-being. Inversely, processes of psychological inflexibility have been linked to psychopathology and poor quality of life, including a link to the well-being outcomes associated with psychosis. The current study sought to extend these findings to investigate whether psychological flexibility and inflexibility may predict the well-being of individuals with features of schizotypy—a continuum of psychotic-like experiences which extends from nonclinical presentations to schizophrenia and related disorders. The study employed a mediation design to explore whether psychological inflexibility mediated the relationship between schizotypy and well-being. Participants from a nonclinical Australian sample (N = 143) completed a series of online questionnaires related to schizotypal traits, psychological flexibility and inflexibility and mental well-being. Overall, the results found support that the relationship between schizotypy and well-being was mediated through psychological inflexibility. These findings have implications for clinical treatment options for individuals with schizotypal traits who present with distress.

• Immediate and short term effects of values-based interventions on paranoia
Jessica Kingston, Royal Holloway
Nicole Evans, Royal Holloway
Rebecca Carpenter, Royal Holloway
Lyn Ellett, Royal Holloway

Paranoia is a common, distressing, and persistent experience that can negatively impact on health, wellbeing, and functioning. This study examined the immediate and short term (2-weeks) effects of two values-based interventions, versus a non-values control, on paranoia, as well as the moderating effect of self-esteem. 171 non-clinical adults were randomised to a value and goals task (VAG: clarifying and reflecting on core values and setting value-based goals), a values task (VA: clarifying and reflecting on core values without setting value-based goals), or a non-affirmation control task (NAC). VAG was uniquely associated with significant reductions in paranoia both immediately following the intervention (d=.27) and again at a two-week follow-up (d=.26). This effect was moderated by trait self-esteem. The findings suggest that focusing on a deeply held value and setting goals in line with that value reduced paranoia. This intervention may be most beneficial for individuals with low self-esteem.

• ACT for Bipolar Affective Disorder: The Balancing ACT project
Emma O’Donoghue, DClinPsy, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust

Bipolar disorder is a chronic and disabling psychiatric condition that places a heavy burden on sufferers, families and society. Many service users with bipolar also experience prominent psychotic symptoms and relapses characterised by repeated manic psychotic episodes and grandiosity. Such presentations require specific adaptations to standard bipolar disorder interventions in order to address their psychosis, alongside mood regulation, with a particular emphasis on impulsivity, irritability, disinhibition and elation. The Balancing ACT study aimed to evaluate an innovative group intervention combining Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and psychoeducation approaches with individuals experiencing bipolar disorder and/or symptoms within community psychosis services. This presentation will introduce the Balancing ACT project, and discuss the practical application and findings from the study Balancing ACT RCT.

Educational Objectives:
1. To compare the theoretical interface between ACT and symptoms of psychosis and bipolar affective disorder. 2. To dicuss the practical implementation of ACT-based interventions for individuals experiencing Bipolar Affective Disorder and/or paranoia. 3. To demonstrate knowledge of evidence-base for ACT and serious mental illness.

 

16. RFT analyses of rule-governed behavior and interventions to promote psychological flexibility
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Rule-governed behavior, learning difficulties, gifted children
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q217

Chair: Iduar Dereix-Calonge, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Discussant: Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., Universidad de Almería

Experimental analyses of functional classes of rule-governed behavior (RGB) have experienced some difficulties and there is scarce empirical evidence on this topic. A recent research avenue has been opened by designing self-report measures of RGB such as the Generalized Pliance Questionnaire (GPQ; Ruiz, Suárez-Falcón, Barbero-Rubio, & Flórez, in press). The current symposium presents two studies that try to empirically link the literature on RGB with that of executive functions. This link was established by analyzing the correlations between self-reports of functional classes of RGB and executive function tests. The third study presented in this symposium shows a more clinically oriented study with gifted children with school maladjustment. Participants in this study were applied a brief, ACT protocol focused on reducing repetitive negative thinking with regard to school tasks and to promote generalized tracking.

• Generalized pliance and learning difficulties: An empirical investigation
Daniela M. Salazar, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
María B. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Previous research has found that a measure of generalized pliance, the Generalized Pliance Questionnaire (GPQ), shows strong positive correlations with tests of insensitivity to contingencies such as the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST) (O’Connor, Byrne, Ruiz, & McHugh, in press). Also, recent research has adapted the GPQ to be used in children (GPQ-C; Salazar, Ruiz, Flórez, & Suárez-Falcón, 2018). The current research analyzes the association of the GPQ-C with WCST and learning difficulties. A total of 38 children aged 7-10 years participated. Half of the participants were assessed as presenting a learning difficulty in language or mathematics. The other half of the participants were children with an average performance at school. All participants responded to the GPQ-C and the WCST. The results showed that participants with learning difficulties showed statistically significant higher scores in the GPQ-C (displaying greater generalized pliance) and insensitivity to contingencies. The scores on the GPQ-C and WCST showed a strong positive correlations. Results are discussed emphasizing the role of the transitions from pliance to tracking in school performance in children.

• Functional classes of rule-governed behavior and executive functions
María B. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Luna Bedoya-Valderrama, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Andrés Peña-Vargas, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Jorge E. Ávila, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Juan F. Gómez, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Vanessa Calle, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

Recent research has found that measures of functional classes of rule-governed behavior (RGB) significantly correlates with some executive function tests. For instance, O’Connor, Byrne, Ruiz, and McHugh (in press) found that scores on generalized pliance in adults showed strong positive correlation with measures of cognitive inflexibility such as Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST). Also, Salazar, García-Martín, and Ruiz (in preparation) found that a measure of generalized pliance for children discriminated between children with learning difficulties and children with average performance at school. This study also obtained strong positive correlation between the measure of generalized pliance and the WCST. This study aimed to analyze in a more systematic way the relationships between executive function tests and self-reported measures of functional classes of RGB. One-hundred and four participants responded to a battery of executive functions and to measures of generalized pliance, generalized self-pliance, and generalized tracking. Preliminary analyses show significant positive correlations between measures of pliance and cognitive inflexibility, and significant positive correlations between tracking scores and performances in behavioral inhibition.

• Effect of a brief RNT-focused ACT protocol in improving school adjustment of exceptionally gifted children
Yury A. Larrea, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
María B. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

An exceptionally gifted child stand out in general intelligence, easily learns contents of any domain, and demonstrate behavior more sophisticated than his/her reference group. However, a good number of exceptionally gifted children presents school maladjustment due to experiencing school tasks as low-demanding and boring. This usually leads to emotional difficulties and scholar failure. The current study describes the effect of a brief ACT intervention focused on disrupting rumination and procrastination, and increase valued actions in exceptionally gifted children. A multiple-baseline design across participants was used with 5 children experiencing significant levels of school maladjustment. All children were identified as exceptionally gifted by means of intelligence quotient and learning potential tests. The results showed significant reductions of children’s rumination and procrastination, and improvements of engagement in valued behaviors according to nonparametric tests for single-case experimental designs.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss the relationships between functional classes of rule-governed behavior and executive functions. 2. Identify the relevance of transitioning from a rule-governed behavior characterized by pliance to tracking. 3. List strategies to promote school adjustment in gifted children. 

 

17. Behavioral Measures of Experiential Avoidance: Context, Measurement, and Emotion Regulation Strategies as Predictors of Performance on Two Analogue Tasks
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines, Experiential avoidance, behavior analogue research, emotion regulation
Target Audience: Intermediate
Location: Q218

Chair: Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Discussant: Robert Whelan, Ph.D., Trinity College Dublin

Experiential avoidance (EA), the unwillingness to experience aversive private events, is considered a core pathogenic process in the development and maintenance of human suffering. While acceptance and mindfulness-based psychotherapies appear to undermine EA, less is understood regarding contextual factors that evoke experientially avoidant responding. The present symposium will present data from a convenience sample (N = 160) of participants who completed the cold pressor task (see Zettle et al., 2012) and a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST) to investigate behavioral, physiological, and emotional factors associated with EA. The first presentation will report findings on individual differences in contextual variables associated with self-reported EA across both tasks. The second presentation centers around the relationship between heart rate variability and socially desirable responding with avoidance strategies and context. The latter talk will focus on the unique contributions of interpersonal sensitivity to state emotion dysregulation and performance on these analogue tasks. Implications of these studies will be used to further understand and advance contextual behavioral science in each of these domains.

• An Investigation of the Role of Context in Predicting State and Trait Experiential Avoidance
Meaghan Lewis, Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Tabitha DiBacco, Western Michigan University
Kyra Bebus, Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, Western Michigan University

The purpose of the present study was to compare two seemingly disparate contexts in predicting experiential avoidance (EA) in the moment (state) and trait EA. Performance on the cold pressor task, which involved immersion of participants’ left hands in ice water, was measured along four operationalized dimensions of EA as originally described by Zettle and colleagues (2012). To compare EA related to physical discomfort with tasks that evoke social discomfort, these domains were further investigated using a modified version of the Trier Social Stress Task (TSST). While self-reported state and trait EA were associated with each task independently, EA as measured by the cold pressor task was not predictive of EA as measured by the TSST. This suggests that while EA may represent a functional response class across some contexts, certain strategies to manage emotion in the moment may be idiographic and sensitive to context. Individual differences in established measures of trait EA as predictors of state EA and emotion dysregulation will be discussed with implications for further conceptualization, measurement, and treatment of EA.

• Measurement Matters: Testing the Relationship between Experiential Avoidance and Physiological Variables in the Moment
Tabitha DiBacco, Western Michigan University
Meaghan Lewis, Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Kyra Bebus, Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, Western Michigan University

Experiential avoidance (EA) is one of several transdiagnostic variables that may have a role in the etiology and maintenance of various forms of psychopathology. As with many private events, EA is often quantified with self-report measures such as the Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-II) and Multidimensional Experiential Avoidance Questionnaire (MEAQ). As self-report measures have limitations in validity, there is a need to further evaluate construct validity as well as behavioral and physiological measures (Lewis & Naugle, 2017; Rochefort, Baldwin, & Chmielewski, 2017). A small body of research has examined physiological measures along with EA with mixed findings and all studies utilized the AAQ (Sloan, 2004; Cochrane, Barnes-Holmes, Stewart, & Luciano, 2007; Salters-Pedneault, Gentes, & Roemer, 2007). The present study utilized heart rate data along with state and trait measures of EA to assist in mapping this physiological measure onto EA. Initial findings indicate increased heart rate variability is inversely associated with EA on the TSST. The role of state emotion regulation and socially desirable responding as moderators of these findings will be discussed.

• Interpersonal Sensitivity and Social Stress: The Role of State Experiential Avoidance
Kyra Bebus, Western Michigan University
Meaghan Lewis, Western Michigan University
Amy Naugle, Western Michigan University
Tabitha DiBacco, Western Michigan University
Allie Mann, Western Michigan University

From a functional contextual perspective, experiential avoidance (EA) can be conceptualized as a functional response class accounting for comorbidity across diverse forms of psychopathology (Thompson & Waltz, 2010; Cribb, Moulds, & Carter, 2006; Newman, & Llera, 2011; Kashdan et al., 2014; Zettle et al., 2012). While several research teams are beginning to evaluate behavioral and physiological measures associated with EA, more research is needed to understand the unique role of EA in socially uncomfortable tasks. Thus, the aims of the present study were to contrast analogue tasks in a laboratory setting with self-report measures of state and trait anxiety, negative affect intensity, and fear of negative evaluations. Participants who reported higher levels of trait interpersonal sensitivity demonstrated stronger negative affect intensity, state EA, and state emotion dysregulation following exposure to a social stress task. Interventions that target EA may be improved through more thorough assessment of interpersonal sensitivity. Clinical implications of these findings will be discussed in terms of the impact of treating symptoms using a dimensional approach to conceptualization.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the relationship between state/trait experiential avoidance and context. 2. Assess alternative methods to the measurement of experiential avoidance outside of self-report. 3. Critique the contributions of interpersonal variables and physiological contributions to psychological distress, emotion regulation, and experiential avoidance.

 

18. Using contextual behavioural science to predict and influence resilience in those with high negative affect
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Resilience, Depression, Suicide, ACT, Values, Ultra-brief
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q220

Chair: Nick Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Discussant: Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

Resilience enables people to adapt to adversities. Contextual Behavioral Science (CBS), particularly Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), offers a framework from which to develop and test interventions that encourage valued action, and build resilience to uncontrollable contextual factors and negative internal events; this symposium presents three papers testing these ideas. Paper one presents cross-sectional data from two studies, including the first time-point of a longitudinal study. These studies explore the relevance of CBS-based constructs (e.g., psychological flexibility) as protective and risk factors for suicidality (e.g., suicide ideation, self-harm, suicide attempts) in the general population. Paper two presents a double-blind randomised active-controlled study testing a novel values clarification exercise, “anti-values”. This makes use of negativity biases, commonly seen in clinical populations, to encourage valued action, goal-generation, and resilience against negative affect (including hopelessness) across time. The final paper presents a randomised-controlled study testing the use of an ultra-brief ACT/coaching intervention to boost resilience to aversive social interactions.

• Are Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-related processes protective against suicidality cross-sectionally?
Rosina Pendrous, University of Chester
Kevin D. Hochard, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

Suicide is a leading cause of death. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is potentially useful for those with suicidal thoughts to (re-)find meaning, however, few studies have explored whether ACT-related constructs are protective against suicidality cross-sectionally and over-time. In the first study, student participants (N=271) completed ACT process measures, defeat and entrapment, burdensomeness and belongingness, depression, anxiety and stress, and suicidal ideation, to assess cross-sectional relations. A second study using a cross-lagged design with three-time points is under-way to replicate and extend these findings longitudinally with members of the general population (target N=500). Cross-sectionally, suicidal ideation correlated with two measures of psychological flexibility (r=.50 and .63; p<.01), behavioral awareness (r=.38; p<.01), openness to experience (r=.47; p<.01), and valued action (r=.38; p<.01). Recruitment is ongoing for the longitudinal study. We aim to present preliminary cross-sectional data from both studies. The results from the first study tentatively suggest that ACT processes may be relevant to suicidality and contemporary theories of suicide yet need replicating. Overall, this research could inform treatment and preventative interventions.

• Integrating approach and avoidance to achieve valued living: developing and piloting anti-values clarification exercises across time
Kevin D. Hochard, University of Chester
Shane McLoughlin, University of Chester
Rosina Pendrous, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Francesca Todd, University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

Value clarification exercises (VCE) are common across third-wave behavioural therapies to aid goal generation and encourage valued action. Those with higher levels of negative emotion have difficulty problem-solving, future-thinking, and may be less able to specify and elaborate their values prior to setting achievable goals. These abilities are, however, crucial to success in conventional VCEs. We aimed to test a novel VCE (“anti-values”) suitable for those with negativity biases commonly seen in clinical populations. A double-blind randomized active-controlled experiment obtained baseline measures of personality, hopelessness, depression, anxiety (state and trait), stress, mood, and psychological flexibility. Participants completed either the anti-values VCE, a conventional VCE, or a goal-setting task. Post-intervention (and four-week follow-up), participants completed state measures of mood, anxiety, hopelessness, and valued action. Data collection is ongoing (currently N=30). Baseline and follow-up data will be presented (expected N=60). Preliminary analysis indicated that all conditions are equivalent to goal-generation. Our results tentatively indicate anti-values to be a useful alternative VCE for clinicians working with individuals who express high negative affect and hopelessness.

• Social Resilience: Ultra-brief Acceptance and Commitment Coaching
Kevin D. Hochard, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Sam Ashcroft, University of Chester

Social support and positive interactions are protective from psychopathologies, yet day-to-day interactions are seldom solely positive. The present study tests the efficacy of ultra-brief ACT coaching to increase resilience to negative social interactions. An RCT of ultra-brief (1hr) non-expert delivered ACT was compared to a CBT analogue, and placebo control (relaxation and information). Participants (n=60) were assessed on perceived burdensomeness, belonging, and 3 scenarios measuring anxiety, motivation and likelihood to engage in social situations. Participants then played Cyberball, an ostracising task, before recompleting aforementioned measures. Physiological measures indicate Cyberball to have been a stressful experience. Yet, a significant interaction (Group×Time) effect was observed (η2par=.147, p<.05) for likelihood to engage. Post-hoc tests indicated ACT increased motivation (d=.580, p<.05) and likelihood to engage (d=.757, p<.01) in the social scenarios. Ultra-brief ACT coaching interventions delivered by non-expert coaches appear promising in increasing participant’s likelihood to continue engaging in social interactions after a stressful social experience. Tentatively, gains in committed action are suggested to increase propensity in at-risk individuals’ to seek social support.

Educational Objectives:
1. Explain how ACT-based processes relate to contemporary predictors of suicidality. 2. Demonstrate the utility of a novel values clarification exercise that harnesses negativity biases to encourage valued behaviour. 3. Demonstrate the utility of an ultra-brief non-expert delivered intervention in fostering resilience.

 

23. Adapting and applying ACT to meet the needs of Older Adults: Aging in Context SIG Sponsored
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Literature review, Original data, Didactic presentation
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Professional Development, Ageing, older adults, group interventions, values, assessment
Target Audience: Intermediate
Location: The Studio

Chair: Clive Ferenbach, DClinPsy, National Health Service (NHS) Lanarkshire
Discussant: Susan McCurry, Ph.D., University of Washington

In the context of an ageing population, there is an escalating need to develop effective evidence based psychological treatments for older adults (OA). Various aspects of ACT, including its trandiagnostic applicability and evidence base in chronic health conditions, make it an intuitively appealing intervention for this population. Accordingly, the approach is gathering increasing interest from researchers and clinicians. This symposium will provide an overview of ACT’s applicability with OA and the current evidence base - and discuss how assessment, treatment, and formal measurement (particularly values) may be adapted to meet the needs of this population. Consideration will also be given to how ACT can be applied beyond individually delivered therapy, both by training the mental health workforce, and delivering group interventions.

• Aging Changes Things: Adapting ACT to Meet the Needs of an Aging Population
Pamela Steadman-Wood, Ph.D., ABPP, U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, Providence VA Medical Center & Alpert Medical School of Brown University

The population of adults over the age of 65 is increasing around the world. Once an underserved population, older adult psychotherapy referrals are on the rise. As such, there is a need to strengthen the mental health workforce and training to serve this population. ACT is an effective intervention for older adults experiencing a range of psychological issues. The trans-diagnostic approach normalizes experiences common to aging and may be advantageous given the diversity of issues encountered. However, using ACT effectively with older adults can require making accommodations to compensate for aging related changes. Individuals treating older adults may benefit from learning the nuances of using ACT in this population. This paper will provide an overview of the rationale and research on ACT for older adults and discuss assessment and treatment adaptation considerations shown to be useful in adapting ACT for the unique of this population.

• A mixed methods feasibility study of group-based acceptance and commitment therapy with older people with mental health difficulties.
Clive Ferenbach, DClinPsy, National Health Service (NHS) Lanarkshire
Elizabeth Dewey, DClinPsy, National Health Service (NHS) Lanarkshire
Hamish McLeod, Ph.D., CPsychol, University of Glasgow

Traditional CBT has demonstrated mixed findings for older people with mental health difficulties. Due to the types of difficulties associated with old age, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) could be a viable alternative treatment. This feasibility study used mixed methods to explore the acceptability and feasibility of delivering ACT groups to older people in an outpatient setting. 14 participants were recruited, nine of these completed the group and eight were interviewed. Results suggested that 12 weeks after the last session, completers’ anxiety and cognitive fusion scores significantly decreased. Interviews suggested that ACT was acceptable to participants. Conclusions: ACT is both a feasible and acceptable transdiagnostic intervention for older people in an outpatient setting. Preliminary quantitative analysis suggested the intervention reduced anxiety and cognitive fusion; however, this should be measured in future intervention studies with higher participant numbers (further data is currently being gathered by this research group). Qualitative analysis suggested older people appreciated the focus on visual materials (including metaphors), and the intervention seemed to increase their perspective taking and self-efficacy.

• Values Across the Lifespan Questionnaire (VALQUEST): Development of a New Values Assessment Tool for Use with Older Adults
Casey C. Catlin, Ph.D., Boston VA Research Institute, Inc.

Values are a core process of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) and are especially important in work with older adults, who must adapt to inevitable changes and losses. The Values Across the Lifespan Questionnaire (VALQUEST) was developed to explore a more concrete yet flexible approach for values assessment to meet the needs of older adults. The VALQUEST covers three relevant life domains, allowing respondents to choose specific values from a provided list of exemplars, rate its importance, the motivation behind it (from an intrinsic or extrinsic perspective), and values-consistent behavior. The VALQUEST was administered to 488 adults (253 over age 55) along with other self-report measures. Factor analysis yielded a three-factor structure. The VALQUEST showed significant correlations with the Valued Living Questionnaire (VLQ: Wilson, Sandoz, Kitchens, & Roberts, 2010) and measures of psychological flexibility, committed action, depression, life satisfaction, ageism, and future time perspective, consistent with hypotheses. The VALQUEST also shows promise as a measure that could be modified to fit the needs of future research with specific populations or time series designs.

Educational Objectives:
1. Apply the research and clinical practice of ACT for older adults into existing practice. 2. To discuss how ACT can be adapted for delivery to older adults in group based interventions, and of qualitative and quantitative outcomes gathered from this approach. 3. Learners will administer and score a new values assessment tool for older adults.

 

29. Contacting values to produce change that matters
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, values, Compassion, Careless Responding
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q122

Chair: Ryan Moses, Metropolitan State University of Denver
Discussant: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) therapists teach clients to engage in values-based action despite the presence of difficult internal experiences. Although values is a core process in ACT, empirical literature demonstrating the isolated impact of values on behavior is limited. The purpose of the symposium is to discuss two values studies and a theoretical conceptualization of the intrinsic nature of values. In the first presentation, a study evaluating the impact of a values writing intervention on goal completion and mood will be discussed. The second presentation will discuss a study examining the efficacy of a values protocol on fear and avoidance responding. The symposium will close with a discussion about the contingencies of meaning.

• The efficacy of values writing and positive affirmations interventions on behavioral change in the context of relationships
Maureen Flynn, Ph.D., Metropolitan State University of Denver
Michael Bordieri, Ph.D., Murray State University

The aim of the study was to compare the efficacy of two brief interventions on mood and goal completion. Participants (n = 245) were randomly assigned to either the values writing or positive affirmations condition. As predicted, we found that participants in the values condition reported no difference in mood at post-intervention or 3-day follow-up and no difference in self-esteem at post-intervention or 3-day follow-up. Contrary to our predictions, participants in the values condition did not report higher challenge of self-selected goal at post or higher goal completion at 3-day follow up. Our hypothesized moderation models involving both trait self-esteem and psychological inflexibility were not supported; however, both trait self-esteem and psychological inflexibility displayed significant conditional effects on study outcomes. The implications of these findings on future research and clinical applications will be discussed, with particular attention given to our observed failure to replicate previous analogue studies involving positive affirmation (Wood. Perunovic, & Lee, 2009) and values writing (e.g., Crocker, Nijya, & Master, 2007).

• Analyzing the impact of a significant-valued-based protocol on experimentally induced fear and avoidance responding
L. Jorge Ruiz-Sánchez, M.A., University of Almería
Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., Universidad de Almería

Defusion and values-based protocols are built of interactions that involve responding from the hierarchical I-perspective by integrating rules-specifying aversive/appetitive consequences. Say another way, responding under the overarching motivative functions, as higher order establishing operations, while integrating rules driven emotive functions present at the moment. The aim of the present study was to isolate the impact of a non-significant valued task versus a significant-high order valued task on fear and avoidance responding. Firstly, 30 participants underwent an aversively conditioned task where non-avoidance was followed by shocks and noises, whereas a black screen followed avoidance responding. Next, participants randomly received one of three protocols: (a), deictic/hierarchical framing the aversive shock functions in hierarchy with the perspective of I while linking this perspective to a non-significant-higher valued task; (b), as (a) plus adding a significant-higher order valued task. And (c), a control protocol did not include any active component. Lastly, participants repeated the experimental task. Results show that framing the aversive shock functions from the hierarchical-I perspective and linking this perspective to high-order functions, alters avoidance responding.

• Contingencies of meaning: Values and the evolution of behavior theory
Kelly G. Wilson, Ph.D., University of Mississippi

Values are ways of speaking about human motivation. Victor Frankl describes a critical moment in a Nazi death camp. Though he could offer little hope of survival, he discovered a profound sense of liberation in remaining in the camp. Although Frankl had the opportunity to leave, he stayed and allowed being a doctor to be enough—likely forfeiting his life. How are we to understand reinforcers powerful enough, not only to keep Frankl in the camp, but to afford a sense of liberation, meaning, and purpose? In this talk, I will focus on the intrinsic nature of reinforcement within a CBS analysis of values. I will describe a technical analysis of “contingencies of meaning” that will clarify the source of reinforcement in valued action. A behavioral theory that cannot describe and investigate the contingencies surrounding the most profound human action falls short of the aims of ACBS. Because the analysis will explicate an extraordinarily source of reinforcement, it also lays a foundation for analysis of the opposite—an analysis of despair, moral injury, and hopelessness.

Educational Objectives:
1. Attendees will be able to describe the efficacy of values writing and positive affirmation interventions on goal completion and mood. 2. Attendees will be able to describe the efficacy of responding under the overarching motivative functions while integrating aversive functions and their implication for the treatment of anxiety disorders. 3. Attendees will be able to recite a definition of “contingencies of meaning.”

 

30. Advances in ACT for behavioral medicine and substance-related disorders
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data
Categories: Behavioral medicine, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Heart disease, Smoking, smoking cessation, schizophrenia, Health, Obesity, ACT and Addiction of Methamphetamine
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Martin O'Connor, M.Sc., University College Dublin

A growing body of evidence supports ACT as a promising treatment approach for health problems and addictive behaviors. This six-paper symposium focuses on recent advances in ACT for behavioral medicine and substance-related disorders. Paper 1 evaluates the efficacy of an ACT intervention in improving modifiable risk factors in people with coronary heart disease. Paper 2 investigates the contribution of an ACT-based smartphone app to ACT group treatment for smoking cessation. Paper 3 reports on the efficacy of an individual, face-to-face ACT intervention for smoking cessation in people with schizophrenia. Paper 4 focuses on fostering a healthy lifestyle with ACT and wearable technology. Paper 5 evaluates the efficacy of an ACT intervention in reducing substance use and impulsive behaviors in people with methamphetamine dependence. Paper 6 investigates the efficacy of a resilience group intervention based on ACT for people with multiple sclerosis.

• The ACTonHEART study: a two-arm RCT of a brief multi-discliplinary ACT programme for improving modifiable risk factors in people with Coronary Heart Disease.
Chiara A. M. Spatola, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan
Emanuele A.M. Cappella, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan
Roberto Cattivelli, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Milan

The ACTonHEART study is the first RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of an ACT-based intervention protocol focused on promoting a change in lifestyle and reducing psychological stress of cardiac patients. 92 patients were enrolled and randomized, following an unbalanced randomization ratio of 2:1, to the ACTonHEART group (N= 59) and the control group (N= 33). The ACTonHEART protocol consists in 3 sessions, integrating educational topics on heart-healthy behaviours with acceptance and mindfulness skills. Participants were assessed at baseline (t0), at the end of the rehabilitation period (t1), and at a six-month follow-up (t2). A partially-nested design with three levels was used. Well-being significantly improved from t1 to t2 (β= 3.16, p< .001) regardless of the treatment condition (β= -0.01, p=0.996). The BMI levels decreased only in the ACTonHEART group. The time x treatment interaction showed a trend towards significance (β= 0.40, p= 0.08). Even for psychological inflexibility, a greater decrease over time in the ACTonHEART group was observed . The results of this first pilot study may inform the future implementations of the ACTonHEART program.

• Randomized controlled trial of a smartphone application as an adjunct to acceptance and commitment therapy for smoking cessation.
Martin O'Connor, M.Sc., University College Dublin
Robert Whelan, Ph.D., Trinity College Dublin
Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center & University of Washington
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Background: There is a major public health need for innovative and efficacious behavioral and cognitive interventions for smoking cessation. This randomized controlled trial evaluated the efficacy of an acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) smartphone application in augmenting ACT group treatment for smoking cessation. Method: One hundred fifty adults smoking 10 or more cigarettes per day were randomly assigned to six weekly group sessions of behavioral support, ACT or ACT combined with the smartphone application. Measures of smoking status and ACT processes were obtained at baseline, post-treatment and six-month follow-up. Results: Biochemically verified quit rates in the combined, ACT and behavioral support groups were 36%, 20% and 24% at post-treatment, as compared with 24%, 24% and 20% at follow-up. The combined group reported significantly greater smoking reduction, acceptance and present-moment awareness than the behavioral support group at post-treatment, but not at follow-up. Conclusions: The combined intervention was found to be acceptable and efficacious in promoting smoking reduction, acceptance and present-moment awareness at post-treatment. Smoking cessation outcomes were comparable across the combined, ACT and behavioral support groups.

• Individual, Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in smoking cessation for people with schizophrenia: a randomized controlled trial
Yim-wah Mak, Ph.D., The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Alice Yuen Loke, Ph.D., The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Doris YP LEUNG, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University

Background: Smoking remains the major health threats among people with schizophrenia. Effective non-pharmacological intervention for smoking cessation for this group is lacking. Objective and methods: We conducted a randomized controlled trial comparing a 10 weekly individual, face-to-face Acceptance and Commitment Therapy versus social support, as adjunct to printed self-help quitting materials as usual in enhancing smoking cessation for people with schizophrenia living in the community. Assessments were performed at baseline before the start of the intervention, at post-intervention (3-month), 6-month and 12-month after initial session of intervention. Results: One hundred and thirty adults with schizophrenia were recruited from 49 mental health rehabilitation settings in the community. No evidence of statistically significant differences between the ACT and social support groups were observed for the smoking cessation outcomes. Participants of the ACT group reported a significant in reduction of smoking related experiential avoidance and general experiential avoidance when compared with the social support control group. Participants of the ACT group were also more willing to experience negative thoughts and feelings related to quitting smoking.

• Merging ACT and wearable technology: the ACTonHEALTH feasibility study. Fostering healthful lifestyle with ACT and wearable technology to promote psychological flexibility and modular behavioral change
Rob Cattivelli, Ph.D., PsyD, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan
Giorgia Varallo, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan
Anna Guerrini Usubini, Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan
Nicola Maffini, Casagioia Research Centre
Gianluca Castelnuovo, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan
Enrico Molinari, Istituto Auxologico Italiano; Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Milan

Obesity is increasing steadily and becoming globally epidemic. Recent reports assess about 60% of the adult population as overweight in western countries with a increasing social and economic impacts, while most of the rehabilitation programs, do not produce long-lasting results. From a behavioral perspective can describe the phenomena with the lack of sources of reinforcement related to healthful habits in a daily life context. A feasibility first clinical study combining single-subject studies and group design will be conducted to compare the effect of the current standard in obesity treatment to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) enhanced by wearable technology. The goal of this project, is to develop an effective intervention, efficient and sustainable, which even after the end of the intensive rehabilitation treatment can provide adequate contingencies of reinforcement in the natural environment, integrating systematic measurements, continuous feedback, and individualized, values-based objectives. Modular implementation of ACT with wearable technology are a promising field, enhancing deep understanding of psychological and behavioral processes implicated in health, and helping to create more efficient interventions. Preliminary results are discussed.

• Single-blinded, mixed methods, randomized controlled trial on a resilience training for people with MS
Ambra Mara Giovannetti, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C Besta, Milan, Italy; University of Queensland
Rui Quintas, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C Besta, Milan
Irene Tramacere, Ph.D., Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C Besta, Milan
Andrea Giordano, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C Besta, Milan
Alessandra Solari, MD, Fondazione IRCCS Istituto Neurologico C Besta, Milan
Kenneth Pakenham, University of Queensland

Aim: To evaluate the efficacy of a resilience group intervention based on ACT (READY) in a sample of people with multiple sclerosis. Methods: Single-blind randomized controlled trial (RCT) and nested qualitative study. Measures of quality of life, mood, resilience, psychological flexibility and its protective factors were collected at baseline, after seven, 12, and 24 weeks. The interviews were run within 3 months of finishing the Italian READY for MS groups. Results: Four intervention groups were conducted (20 READY for MS; 19 relaxation). Thirty participants were interviewed. Repeated measures analyses revealed significant “time effect” (p < 0.02) for almost each variables assessed, but no “time X randomization effect” (p > 0,20). The thematic analysis delineated four main topics: attitudes towards the participation; participants’ opinion about READY; READY impact and determinants; differences and commonalities between READY and relaxation. Conclusion: READY for MS was not more efficacious than relaxation in terms of quantitative data, while qualitative data supported some trend differences detected at quantitative level. A multicentre RCT with a longer follow-up and wider sample size is needed.

• The efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) on the severity of addiction and impulsivity in Methamphetamine users
Tahereh Seghatoleslam, Ph.D., University of Malaya, Centre of Addiction Sciences (UMCAS) Malaysia; Tehran University of Medical Sciences, PPRC Iran
Sajad Bahrami, Payame noor University Tehran
Hussain Habil, MD, University of Mahsa
Mohammad Reza Mohamadi, MD, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Psychiatry and Psychology Research Center (PPRC)
Rusdi Rashid, MD, University of Malaya, Centre of Addiction Sciences

The present applied, an experimental, pretest-posttest, controlled study was conducted on the effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) in reducing substance use and impulsive behaviors in methamphetamine-dependent people. The statistical population consisted of individuals presenting substance abuse treatment centers in Tehran, Iran who used Methamphetamine. Thirty individuals were selected from this population and randomly assigned to the intervention and control groups. The intervention group received ACT training while the control group received no therapies. The Addiction Severity Index (ASI) and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task (BART) were used for data collection in this study. The data obtained from these questionnaires were analyzed using the ANOVA and ANCOVA. The results showed that the ACT-based intervention had a significant positive effect on impulsive behaviors and the severity of addiction and its components, Given the clinical outcomes of the theory of ACT and the results of the statistical analysis, it can be concluded that ACT is effective in reducing impulsive behaviors in substance abusers.

Educational Objectives:
1. Critically evaluate the efficacy of ACT interventions for health problems and addictive behaviors. 2. Discuss the role of psychological flexibility processes in alleviating a variety of problems. 3. Describe recent advances in ACT for behavioral medicine and substance-related disorders.

 

31. Application of Modern Technology in Ambulatory Assessments in Clinical and Basic Research: ACTing with Technology SIG Sponsored
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Laboratory Research, Technology and Digital Innovation
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q217

Chair: Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel
Discussant: JoAnne Dahl, Uppsala University, Sweden

New Technologies empower researchers to gather data during participants’ lives. Two examples for such technologies are Smartphones and Wearables. Both can be given to a participant to carry/wear throughout the day. They allow the measurement of psychological and physiological variables in real-time in a natural environment, hereby increasing ecological validity and enabling an insight into processes that happen outside of the researcher’s presence. In this symposium three papers will be present how this technology can be used in clinical and laboratory research. The first two presentations use Experience Sampling Method (ESM), gathering baseline data from transdiagnostic in- and out-patients to assess psychological variables and ACT-specific processes. The first paper examines engagement and avoidance of social interactions as well as committed action. The second describes sleep, anticipatory stress, and psychological flexibility and examines how these variables interact. The third paper compares physiological variables assessed with a wearable and a stationary device in an experimental pain induction paradigm in order to establish the feasibility of wearables as a means to collect data in real-time.

• Committed action and the quality and avoidance of social interactions
Jeanette Villanueva, University of Basel
Andrea H. Meyer, University of Basel
Marcia T. B. Rinner, University of Basel
Victoria J. Firsching, University of Basel
Charles M. Benoy, University of Basel
Sandra Brogli, University of Basel
Klaus Bader, University of Basel
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Social functioning has been related to committed action (McCracken, 2013). However, how specific aspects of social interactions (SIs) are related to committed action remains an open question, especially in psychological disorders with problematic SIs as part of the clinical picture (e.g. in Major Depressive Disorder or Social Phobia, American Psychiatric Association, 2000; Baddeley, Pennebaker, & Beevers, 2013), suggesting a discrepancy between our values and our behavior. We investigated a sample of transdiagnostic in- and outpatients and examined how patients’ level of committed action was related to the quality and avoidance of SIs. Using Event Sampling Methodology, patients’ everyday social behavior was sampled six times per day during a one-week intensive longitudinal examination in their self-chosen environment. Preliminary results indicate an association between committed action and the quality and avoidance of SIs. Models will further examine how consistently patients act (in terms of what is important to them) from one time point to the next, and how this impacts the quality and avoidance of their SIs. Finally, we’ll investigate whether this differs for in- and outpatients.

• Interaction of Sleep Quality with Anticipatory Stress and Psychological Flexibility in a Clinical Sample - Preliminary Results
Victoria J. Firsching, University of Basel
Jeanette Villanueva, University of Basel
Marcia T. B. Rinner, University of Basel
Andrea H. Meyer, University of Basel
Charles M. Benoy, University of Basel
Sandra Brogli, University of Basel
Klaus Bader, University of Basel
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Low sleep quality affects patients both in in- and out-patient settings. Improving sleep may support the ability to handle anticipatory stress and can be thought of as a secondary goal of therapy. Experience Sampling Method (ESM) was collected from n=72 in-patients and n=37 out-patients in a transdiagnostic clinical trial with a wide range of diagnoses. Baseline data is analyzed to evaluate the sleep quality, anticipatory stress and psychological flexibility. Data was gathered with smartphones, six times a day over one week. Sleep, anticipatory stress, and psychological flexibility was assessed 1568 times (completion rate of 68.24%). 48.62% of participants were female and mean age was 34.61(13.24 SD). A multi-level model using sleep as dependent variable, and anticipatory stress, and psychological flexibility will be tested. It is hypothesized that the influence of anticipatory stress on sleep is moderated by the level of psychological flexibility. The results aim at improving the understanding of sleep disturbances of patients upon entering treatment. By using ESM data, this research shows the variance of sleep, stress, and psychological flexibility over one week.

• A comparison of wearable and stationary equipment in an experiment of pain induction
Pinelopi Konstantinou, University of Cyprus
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Andria Trigeorgi, University of Cyprus
Chryssis Georgiou, University of Cyprus

There is a rise in the market with wearable devices that capture psychophysiological signals. However, the use of such devices has not yet infiltrated into experimental and clinical research. Reasons may include the lack of studies demonstrating the validity, reliability and sensitivity of these, in assessing psychophysiological indices. This study aimed to compare for the first time, psychophysiological data (SCR, HR, HRV) captured with a wearable device (Microsoft band) to those of a stationary device (Biopac MP150), in an experimental pain induction paradigm. The sample consisted of 43 students from the University of Cyprus (MeanAge=21.37), which participated in the Cold Pressor Task. Results showed that the indices of mean HR and HRV were very similar between stationary and wearable devices. However, no significant correlations were found for mean SCR. Implications include the establishment of a new way of collecting and analyzing psychophysiological data and in real-time. This in turn will help researchers to examine physiologically effective (e.g. acceptance) vs. ineffective (e.g. suppression) coping techniques of undesirable emotions continuously, in a less costly and time-saving way.

Educational Objectives:
1. Analyze how committed action impacts the quality and avoidance of social interaction. 2. Assess how sleep quality is linked to anticipatory stress and how psychological flexibility can impact it. 3. Utilize wearable devices to collect and analyze psychophysiological data in a laboratory setting and in real-time.

 

32. Contrasting perspectives on IRAP research: New applications, alternatives, and validity problems
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Experiential exercises
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Relational Frame Theory, IRAP, perspective-taking, empathy, Implicit measures (i.e., similar measures to the IRAP)
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q218

Chair: Ian Hussey, Ph.D., Ghent University

The IRAP represents a significant investment of resources by the RFT community over the past 15 years. This symposium considers 1) new developments in IRAP research, 2) alternative measures that also attempt to capture relational responding, and 3) presents a critical examination of the IRAP literature to date. First, two talks discuss recent methodological evolutions in IRAP methodology to study perspective taking, including applications within the study of empathy and false-beliefs. Next, existing alternatives measures of relational responding are described, and suggestions are made for greater methodological variety in future research. Finally, across three talks, evidence is presented that suggests, worryingly, that the majority of published IRAP research has reached false conclusions, and why. Across talks, recommendations are made for whether and how the IRAP and its alternatives could, should, and should not be used in the future to achieve researchers’ goals.

• Preliminary use of the IRAP for the assessment of emotional perspective-taking
Álvaro Rodriguez, University of Jaén
Mónica Hernández-López, Ph.D., University of Jaén
Miguel Rodríguez Valverde, Ph.D., University of Jaén
Juan Carlos Lopez Lopez, Ph.D., University of Jaen

Abstract. In order to advance in the understanding of empathy from a functional-contextual perspective, the current study used an implicit relational assessment procedure (IRAP) for the assessment of emotional perspective-taking. Undergraduate students (N=30) completed a perspective-taking (PT) scale, a PT task (deictic relational task, DRT) and a spatial PT-IRAP (based on the study Barbero-Rubio, López-López, Luciano, & Eisenbeck, 2016). Subsequently, participants underwent a mood induction procedure. Half of the participants underwent the induction of a happy mood, and the other half underwent the induction of a sad mood before completing a second IRAP task. This IRAP was designed to evaluate verbal relations between one’s own (the participant’s name) or other’s perspective (a different participant’s name) and different emotional terms that were either consistent or inconsistent with the experimentally induced mood. Data collection is in progress. It is expected that participants will be faster in relating their own perspective as in coordination with emotional terms that are consistent with their experimentally induced mood.

• Exploring perspective-taking in a false-belief IRAP using pictures of self and other
Deirdre Kavanagh, Ph.D. candidate, Ghent University
Nele Matthyssen, Thomas More Hogeschool, Antwerp
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University
Ciara McEnteggart, Ph.D., Ghent University
Roberta Vastano, Ph.D., University of Miami

A growing body of IRAP research has focused on assessing verbal relations pertaining to the self and perspective-taking using various self-related stimuli. Experiment one sought to determine the feasibility of using matched pictures of self and of others across two IRAPs (N = 32). The results of the IRAPs were broadly consistent with common-sense expectations. Given these positive findings, experiment two sought to examine the impact of a brief vignette on performances on an IRAP containing self/other pictures and belief related statements (N= 60). Participants first completed a familiarisation IRAP, followed by one of two vignettes, one of which described a false-belief scenario and the other a control scenario. The results of the IRAPs were broadly consistent with the vignettes. That is, participants confirmed more readily than they denied that they had a true belief about the contents of a box and that the other had a false belief about the contents of a box. The specific limitations of the control condition and considerations for future research are discussed.

• New measures of verbal relational repertoires
Jamie Cummins, M.Sc., Ghent University
Jan De Houwer, Ph.D., Ghent University

Investigating the verbal histories of individuals is of critical importance to researchers within contextual behavioural science, in terms of both experimental investigation and clinical application. ‘Implicit measures’ are commonly employed for this purpose, both within cognitive and behavioural fields of research. By far the most frequently-used implicit measure of verbal histories within CBS is the IRAP, which has one key advantage over a number of its contemporaries: the ability to specify relations between experimental stimuli. From an RFT perspective, this relational component is critical if measures are to be successful in capturing verbal histories. Recently, the increased predominance of propositional theorising within cognitive psychology has led to the development of a variety of alternative implicit measures which can also capture relational information. These measures each possess unique features and advantages and may be better-suited to measuring verbal events than extant measurement approaches in certain contexts. This talk will discuss research findings from a number of these measures, which can broaden the scope of how CBS researchers investigate the verbal worlds of human beings.

• The IRAP is not sensitive to the domains it seeks to assess
Ian Hussey, Ph.D., Ghent University
Jamie Cummins, Ghent University
Chad Drake, Ph.D., University of Southern Illinois at Carbondale

The IRAP has been used in over 100 published studies by both applied and basic researchers. While researchers' goals can vary, for the IRAP to be useful, its results must be sensitive to the stimuli used within it. Put simply, differences in average performance should emerge between IRAPs designed to assess different domains (e.g., race, religion, body image, death). To test this, we conducted a (re)analysis of published and unpublished IRAP data across a large number of participants (N > 500) and a variety of domains (k = 7). Bayesian analysis demonstrated that equivalent effects were found across all domains. The domain being assessed accounted for a very small proportion of variance in IRAP effects (r2 < 0.05), whereas the majority of variance was instead attributable to a generic trial-type effect (r2 = 0.74). In short, variation in the IRAP effect seems to be driven predominantly by a generic response pattern that has little to do with the domain being tested, and which is even produced when nonsense words are used in the task.

• Common IRAP analytic strategies have a false positive rate approaching 100%
Ian Hussey, Ph.D., Ghent University
Jamie Cummins, Ghent University

This talk considers the implications of the generic trial type effect reported in the previous talk. First, we will discuss the most frequently used analytic strategies applied to IRAP data, as revealed by the systematic review in the third talk. We then outline why this generic response pattern within the IRAP invalidates the conclusions reached using many - but not all - of these common strategies. Second, results of a series of computational simulation studies will be discussed. These examine how the combination of (a) the generic trial-type effect and (b) the modal research practices for the analysis of IRAP data serve to inflate the false-positive rate. Results demonstrate that the false-positive rate due to the generic trial-type effect approaches 100%. Even when those problematic analyses are set aside, other commonly employed strategies highlighted by a systematic review serve to inflate the false positive rate to >40% - far above the 5% implied by an alpha value of 0.05. Results suggest that many commonly applied analytic strategies for IRAP data produce spurious conclusions.

• Most published IRAP research findings are false, and bias meta-analyses
Ian Hussey, Ph.D., Ghent University
Jamie Cummins, Ghent University
Chad Drake, Ph.D., University of Southern Illinois at Carbondale

Results from a systematic review demonstrate that the conclusions based on these problematic analytic strategies are ubiquitous in the IRAP literature (present in 82% of papers). Evidence of hidden researcher-degrees-of-freedom, low sample sizes, and a lack of sample size justifications was also observed (median n per cell = 16). These factors serve to inflate false-positive and false-negative rates, severely limiting the diagnostic value of any given p value in the literature. This has inevitable implications for meta-analyses: we updated one commonly cited meta-analysis of predictive validity (Vahey, Nicholson, & Barnes-Holmes, 2015) by excluding conclusions derived from problematic analytic strategies. This greatly reduced the meta-analytic effect size. In addition, whereas the original meta-analysis argued that there was no evidence of bias, we observed evidence of such bias in the original studies and the meta-analysis itself via the omission of a large number of results, further inflating the results. Together, results suggest that the majority of published IRAP research has reached false conclusions that the IRAP's predictive validity is greatly overestimated, and is based on biased studies.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe two approaches to using the IRAP to assess perspective taking. 2. Describe two alternatives to the IRAP for the assessment of automatic relational responding. 3. Evaluate the evidence for the false positive rate in the published IRAP literature.

 

37. Health Behaviors in Context: Leveraging Technology for Contextually Sensitive Assessment and Intervention
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, digital health, technology, functional contextual assessment
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: QG15

Chair: Jennifer Villatte, Ph.D., University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, USA
Discussant: Megan Oser, Ph.D., Mahana Therapeutics

A contextual behavioral science (CBS) approach to health behaviors has the potential to revolutionize treatment and enhance the quality and longevity of people’s lives. In this symposium, we will discuss the use of mobile technologies to identify, predict, and influence contextual variables relevant to health behaviors. Studies presented use diverse mobile technologies including smartphone multimedia applications and biobehavioral sensors for assessment, intervention and tracking change. We will present findings from our studies, discuss issues related to collecting and analyzing these data, and discuss opportunities presented by new technologies as well as difficulties that may arise and possible ways to overcome them.

• Putting the Context into Our Assessments
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Most of the knowledge we have about therapy and theory stems from questionnaires. This type of information is important, but incomplete. Event Sampling Methods (ESM), which signal participants to record information close to the time it occurs in participants’ every-day lives, provide rich data that can augment current theories. One of the main advantages of ESM methods is that they increase ecological validity. ESM thus helps shed light on the interaction between a participants’ self-chosen natural context and their subjective and objective responses to these choices. With technological advances it is equally possible to collect parameters of participants' behaviour that are out of their awareness (e.g., passive assessment). In this talk, I will present information from ESM studies that highlight the potential of this methodology in both patients and the general population.

• Using Machine Learning to Classify and Predict Avoidance vs. Acceptance in Individuals with Health Risk Behaviors
Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Andria Trigiorgi, University of Cyprus
Chryssis Georgiou, University of Cyprus
Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

Avoidance is a basic evolutionarily important dimension of human behavior as seen by fight/flight response. Approach is another basic dimension involved in learning and survival and in nearly all positive reinforcing behavior. Avoidance and approach behaviors in addition to being observable, they are associated with distinct physiological/neurological response patterns and have been implicated in the development of psychopathologic conditions. To date, they tend to be assessed mostly via self-report, thus it remains an open question whether they can be detected and differentiated at a physiological level. We aimed to examine psychophysiological signals in individuals classified as high in experiential acceptance vs. avoidance, utilizing machine-learning algorithms to aid in the delineation and real-time prediction of these behaviors. Two different samples of participants (Total N=156; smokers and high-risk for eating disorders) and a total of 10 supervised algorithms were used to compare the predictive ability of physiological signals (skin conductance, heart rate, heart rate variability) in classifying acceptance vs. avoidance presentations. Results will help improve our understanding of pathology, well-being, and improve treatments.

• Maladaptive Eating and Weight Control: Identifying and Creating Contexts for Change
Rhonda M. Merwin, Duke University School of Medicine

Individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are at greater risk for the development of maladaptive eating and weight control, including the life-threatening behavior of withholding insulin to lose weight. Conventional treatments for anorexia and bulimia nervosa have proved largely unhelpful for individuals with T1D, highlighting the importance of the context in which these behaviors are emerging and maintained, i.e., a chronic illness that influences the experience of the body and its signals, and the importance of maintaining control. Binge eating and withholding insulin are also behaviors that occur in a momentary situational context. I will present 2 studies that use a mobile app time-synced with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) to identify relevant contextual variables for maladaptive eating and weight control among individuals with T1D and intervene in real time (R01DK089329, R21DK106603, Merwin et al., 2015; 2018; Moskovich et al., 2019). I will also present emerging data from studies using CGM and heart rate sensors to understand the context in which individuals report particular internal experiences (e.g., hunger, anxiety) and engage in emotional suppression vs. willingness.

• Understanding Contingencies of Psychological Flexibility and Health
Jennifer Villatte, Ph.D., University of Washington
Michelle Hasan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Justin L'Hommedieu, University of Southern California, Los Angeles
Shrikanth Narayanan, University of Southern California, Los Angeles

Psychological flexibility is a primary determinant of health that can be operationalized both as a relatively stable trait and as a dynamic, context-dependent behavioral process. Yet most investigations of psychological flexibility use trait-like measures that are unable to capture behavioral variations and the contexts in which they occur. Innovations in behavioral signal processing and machine learning provide new methods for assessing the contingencies of psychological flexibility. This study sought to characterize how psychological flexibility varies across contexts and how these variations influence health. We conducted a 10-week multimodal assessment of 200 hospital workers, including baseline psychometric surveys, daily experience sampling, and continuous sensor-based monitoring of biobehavioral signals, smartphone usage, physical and social environment. We will present findings characterizing the dynamic relationships among psychological flexibility, health determinants (stress, pain, fatigue, emotional and social functioning), health behaviors (sleep, physical activity, tobacco and alcohol use), and the contexts which influence them (e.g., activities, pleasant/unpleasant psychological events, social interactions, time/day, location). We will also discuss challenges and opportunities in leveraging technologies for contextual behavioral assessment and adaptive intervention.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe 2 methods for assessing health behavior in context. 2. Identify 1 challenge and 1 advantage in using technology to assess health behaviors. 3. Assess strengths and limitations of the research methods presented here.

 

38. ACT-based interventions in the cancer and palliative care setting
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Behavioral medicine, Cancer and palliative care
Target Audience: Intermediate
Location: Q119

Chair: Nick Hulbert-Williams, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Discussant: Lesley Howells, Maggie's Centres

Psychological distress and poor quality of life are commonly reported in people affected by cancer. This includes those who have received a diagnosis, their families and caregivers, and healthcare professionals working in this setting. Though there is a good deal of published data from questionnaire studies on the applicability of the ACT model in the oncology and palliative care setting, intervention-based research is sparse. In this symposium we present findings from four intervention studies that demonstrate the breadth of applicability of ACT in this setting. This includes two single-subject research designs: one delivering ACT to people with advanced cancer who are transitioning into specialist palliative care, and another to support effective stress management in cancer nurses. Though these both demonstrate acceptability of intervention content, outcome data is limited, raising both methodological and feasibility questions. The two remaining studies report the longitudinal benefits of an ACT-based residential programme for adolescents impacted by cancer, and a description of modifications made to TRUCE, a manualised intervention for adolescents and young adults who have a parent with cancer.

• The Place of Enablement, Empowerment, and Relationships (PEER) Program for Adolescents Impacted by Cancer
Fiona McDonald, CanTeen Australia, The University of Sydney
Pandora Patterson, CanTeen Australia, The University of Sydney
Helen Bibby, CanTeen Australia
Elizabeth Kelly-Dalgety, CanTeen Australia
Aileen Luo, CanTeen Australia

Personal and familial cancer impacts young people’s lives and few interventions exist to provide support and coping skills to this vulnerable group. Therapeutic residential programs are a promising approach in the delivery of effective interventions for this age group and so a 4-day residential program, the PEER Program, was developed based on ACT with the aims of enhancing the resilience and wellbeing. PEER was evaluated at 3-time-points (pre:T0, post:T1, 2 month follow-up:T2). Within one year across six programs, 191 adolescents (11-18 years; 68% female, Mage = 14.5 years, SD=1.6) attended PEER, 148 completed T0 and T1, and 102 completed T2. Participants’ quality of life improved significantly after participating in PEER (t=2.84, p=.005). Participants with high levels of distress (t=2.82, p=.006) high psychological inflexibility (t=2.39, p=.019) or low levels of mindfulness (t=-2.23, p=.028) at baseline experienced greater benefits from the program. Changes in self-kindness mediated changes in quality of life (β=0.19, 95% CI:0.04, 0.38) and distress (β=-0.41, 95% CI:-0.92, -0.03). These initial results demonstrate the benefits of an ACT based program for adolescents impacted by cancer.

• A single-subject research design to test the initial effectiveness and acceptability of ACTION: An Acceptance and Commitment Training Intervention for Oncology Nurses.
William Kent, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Kevin D. Hochard, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester

Oncology nurses are at high risk of experiencing chronic stress, including burnout and compassion fatigue. Evidence-based stress-management interventions are essential to promote coping, wellbeing, and optimal patient care. This study tested the initial effectiveness and acceptability of an ACT-based stress-management intervention for oncology nurses (ACTION). ACTION is group-delivered across three weekly 90-minute sessions, and was evaluated using a non-concurrent multiple-baseline single-case experimental design (n=8). Participants completed self-report assessments of daily perceived stress and psychological flexibility over a six-week period, including weekly assessment of other well-being outcomes. Follow-up qualitative interviews explored intervention acceptability. Participants displayed unstable baseline stress scores. Post-intervention, stress remained variable, though slightly less variable than at baseline. Tau-U calculations indicate no significant intervention effects on perceived stress (Tau-U=.01, p=.88). ANOVAs report no significant differences in any of our well-being outcomes from baseline to follow-up. Qualitative data indicated that participants perceived ACTION to be beneficial for promoting stress-management skills, and provided advice for further development (e.g. one-to-one coaching). This study offers insightful data on the effectiveness and acceptability of ACTION for oncology nurse stress-management.

• Modifying Truce - a program for young people with a parent with cancer - for online delivery
Pandora Patterson, CanTeen Australia, The University of Sydney
Fiona McDonald, CanTeen Australia, The University of Sydney
Joseph Ciarrochi, Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University
Louise Hayes, Ph.D., The University of Melbourne & Orygen Youth Mental Health
Tracey Danielle, Western Sydney University Penrith
Stephanie Konings, CanTeen Australia
Adam Wright, The Resilience Centre
Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester

An ACT-based manualised 7-session in-person group program called Truce for adolescent and young adults (AYAs) who have a parent with cancer was developed and delivered to 80 AYAs. The program was well received by AYAs (mean session interest = 8.2/10). Truce was effective in reducing cancer related unmet needs compared with a control group (F = 5.2, p = .02) and there are promising preliminary outcome results focusing on core ACT processes such as psychological flexibility and mindfulness which are maintained at follow-up. To broaden the reach of this promising intervention, it was modified for online delivery. Examples of modification include: technical requirements, adapting practical exercises and materials (e.g. pre-recorded mindfulness activities), and also consideration of group size. AYAs were highly satisfied with the modified online version of the program, however attendance rates were slightly lower than the in-person program. Initial results suggest that Truce online is both feasible and acceptable, providing young people greater accessibility to this much needed program.

• Brief Engagement and Acceptance Coaching in Community and Hospice Settings (the BEACHeS Study): development and pilot-testing an evidence-based intervention to enhance wellbeing at transition into palliative care
Nicholas J. Hulbert-Williams, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Sabrina Norwood, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
David Gillanders, Psy.D., University of Edinburgh
Anne Finucane, Marie Curie, UK
Juliet Spiller, Marie Curie, UK
Jenny Strachan, Marie Curie, UK
Josh Kreft, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science
Brooke Swash, Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Sue Millington, Patient Representative

Terminal illness diagnosis and transition into palliative care can cause fear, and result in distress and decreased quality of life. ACT is a promising but under-researched intervention for supporting terminally-ill patients. We developed and are pilot-testing a brief ACT-based intervention to improve quality of life and psychological acceptance for this group. A multiple-baseline, single-case, non-controlled design is used. To date, seven participants have been recruited. Each receives five sessions with an ACT- trained facilitator. Quality of life, distress, and ACT-process changes are self-reported, weekly. Psychological flexibility and overall health are measured daily. Four participants have dropped out of the study. One participant who has completed the study demonstrated measurement floor and ceiling effects, but small increases in psychological acceptance. Two participants currently receiving the intervention are demonstrating tentative quality of life and psychological flexibility increases, in addition to some level of distress reduction. This study will complete by May 2019. Findings to date suggest that ACT may be beneficial for patients transitioning to palliative care, but high drop-out and measurement issues raise feasibility questions.

Educational Objectives:
1. Assess how and why ACT may need modifying for people affected by cancer in different ways (e.g. patients, family members, healthcare professionals). 2. Discuss the use of single-subject research designs in ‘Phase I’ health-service intervention development. 3. Compile some of the challenges of using ACT for populations who are traditionally more difficult to engage in research.

 

42. I-Measure. When a functional approach to language counts.
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, measures
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna, Italy
Discussant: David Gillanders, Psy.D., University of Edinburgh

Research on psychological self-report assessment instruments encompasses the adaptation of concepts and methods developed in one cultural setting to another language community. The adaptation of an instrument to a different language is not a mere literal translation from the original instrument to the target language. Moreover, original instruments should not be carelessly translated into other languages and assumed to have the same measurement properties across different languages and cultures. A central concern of any translation process is to yield a linguistic and cultural equivalent of the original. These methodological and theoretical challenges are amplified for ACT measures, which is grounded in a specific theory of language and cognition. The adaptation of a measures is a complex process that imply the inclusion of idiomatic expressions, the consideration of words that may have several valid translations. This symposium presents three papers whose shared rationale focuses not merely on obtaining a new translated instrument based on semantic equivalence, rather on the functional equivalence of these new instruments to its original versions.

• Intimacy-related behaviors and psychological flexibility. Psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Intimacy Scale .
Katia Manduchi, FAP Italia
Annalisa Oppo, Sigmund Freud University, Milano
Domenica Pannace, FAP Italia
Francesca Gini, FAP Italia
Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna, Italy

Literature suggests that intimacy-related behaviors show promising implications for the development of interpersonal repertoire that emerges during therapy; thus it is noteworthy targetting and assessing this repertoire throughout therapy with robust and well-constructed measures. The Functional Analytic Psychotherapy Intimacy Scale (Leonard et al., 2014 ) is a 14-item measure with three subscales (Hidden Thoughts and Feelings, Expression of Positive Feelings, and Honesty and Genuineness) developed to assess intimacy-related behaviors consistent with FAP. The aim of this study is to adapt the FAPIS to the Italian context. The FAPIS was administered to three different samples including students, psychologists and psychotherapists. Preliminary results, including factorial structure (subscales account for about 70% of the variance), and internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha >= .80 for the three subscales) perfectly matched the original version of the instrument. Furthermore, consideration regarding intimacy-related behaviors, psychological flexibiliy and cognitive fusion will be analyzed and discussed. This study provide a preliminary support to the Italian version of FAPIS which seems to be a psychometrically and clinically useful measure to assess FAP processes.

• Exploratory validation study of the Italian Version of the 6-PAQ
Melina Di Blasi, Università Kore, Enna
Paola Dordoni, IRCSS Istituto dei Tumori Milano
Francesca Mongelli, Università Kore, Enna
Paolo Moderato, IULM, Milano
Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna

The purpose of this study was to validate the Parental Acceptance Questionnaire (6-PAQ), a scale developed by Green et al (2015) to measure ACT processes linked to psychological flexibility among parents. Items translation and fluency were rated by a team of senior ACT therapist and researchers and the resulting Italian version was back translated and rated. The scale was administered to 222 parents of children between 3 and 12 yrs along with the Parenting Stress Index and the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire for divergent and convergent validity. The Italian version pf the instrument possessed an exceptional overall fit to the data RMSEA 0.049. EFA analysis showed that items load two factors that we can name psychological flexibility and psychological inflexibility.with items related to psychological flexibility saturating more on factor 2. These results provide preliminary support for the 6-PAQ is a reliable measure to assess parental psychological flexibility, and further studies and analysis are necessary to explore its psychometric properties.

• Adaptation and psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Self Exeperiences Questionnaire (SEQ-I)
Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna
Concetta Messina, KORE University, Enna
Annalisa Oppo, Sigmund Freud University, Milano

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) includes “self” as one of the six processes at the core of Psychological Flexibility. It conceptualizes the sense of self as a result of three intertwining perspectives based on human language: self as content, self as process, and self as context. To our knowledge, the sole self-report measure developed to assess the multi-faceted features of the self from a Contextual Behavioral Science perspective was proposed by Lin Yu et al (2016) in the context of Chronic Pain. The Self Experiences Questionnaire (SEQ) is a 15-item instrument with two-dimensional scales (Self as distinction, Self as observer). The aim of the paper is twofold. Firstly, to provide initial psychometric properties of the Italian version of the SEQ; secondly, to extend this measure to other clinical and to the general populations. The 15-item original English version of the SEQ was translated into Italian and then back-translated into English in order to reach semantic equivalence and the SEQ was administered to a convenient sample with other self reported measures. Preliminary data will be presented.

• Mindfulness Skills and Psychological inflexibility: two useful tools for a clinical assessment for adolescents with internalizing disorders.
Annalisa Oppo, Sigmund Freud University, Milano
Arianna Ristallo, IESCUM, Milano
Marta Schweiger, IESCUM, Milano
Paolo Moderato, IESCUM, Milano
Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna

Child and Adolescent Mindfulness Measure (CAMM) and Avoidance and Fusion Questionnaire for Youth (AFQ-Y) are specifically developed for children and adolescents and their items are built to assess specific processes: Mindfulness Skills and Psychological Flexibility. This study aims to identify cut-offs that optimize sensitivity and specificity to detect adolescents with internalizing disorders. Furthermore, to identify homogeneous groups of adolecents with specific behavioral repertoires two Classification Tree Analyses (CTA) were performed. Participants (N=1336), aged between 11 and 18, were enrolled. The cut-offs identified are 24 for the CAMM, and 11 for the AFQ-Y. The CTA showed that low mindfulness skills and psychological inflexibility share a specific feature: namely the presence of depressive symptoms. However, social withdrawal seems to be associated only with low mindfulness skills, while somatic symptoms seems to be associated only with psychological inflexibility. The potential uses of the CAMM and AFQ-Y in research and clinical practice are drawn.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe common obstacles in conducting validation study toreach functional and semantic equivalence. 2. Describe the features of intimacy, flexibility and self from a CBS perspective. 3. Plan an assessment with awareness.

 

43. Clinical Applications of RFT: Assessment and Formulation using Deictic Frames: A Case Series Analysis.
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Didactic presentation, Case presentation,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Relational Frame Theory, Case studies
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q217

Chair: Joseph Oliver, Ph.D., University College London, Contextual Consulting
Discussant: Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

The use of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) to inform interventions has steadily grown in recent years. This has been especially so in relation to deictic or self-related issues, whether in early child development or in adults with complex problems, such as low self-esteem, pervasive mood problems, psychosis and interpersonal problems. The lens of RFT helps with building precision in functional analysis, by identifying relevant relational responding across key networks. Doing this has the potential to develop interventions that have greater impact and are more efficient. However, this task is often complex and requires substantial familiarity with RFT. This symposium aims to help bridge the gap between theoretical understanding and clinical application by presenting two pieces of client work from different ends of the developmental spectrum. These two cases will be presented by experienced clinicians, who will give insight into how the functional analyses were arrived upon, and how the work was informed. The symposium will focus particularly on the practicalities of using RFT to inform clinical work, to give the audience practical suggestions.

• Using ACT and RFT with complex pain and identity issues
Richard Bennett, University of Birmingham, Think Psychology

Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is a poorly understood condition in which a person experiences persistent severe and debilitating pain. The presentation is long-lasting, and in most cases, the affected person will experience pain for many years. There is no reliable remedy for CRPS, and a combination of educational, physical, medical and psychological interventions are generally offered in the service of helping to manage the symptoms (National Health Service, 2016). This paper describes the use of Acceptance & Commitment Therapy (ACT) with a woman diagnosed with CRPS relating to her foot. She turned to psychological therapy after many years in the unsuccessful pursuit of pain relief. In particular, the paper will focus on the clinical application of Relational Frame Theory (RFT) to the therapy, describing advantages in precision in assessment and intervention that RFT has brought in addition to ACT. There will be a particular focus on deictic relations and the notion of self-as-context.

• Autism, self harm and perspective taking in a 16 year old – an ACT intervention informed by RFT
Freddy Jackson Brown, Avon and Wiltshire NHS Trust

Young people with autism are at increased risk of experiencing mental health difficulties and engaging in self-harm. Key features of this population are language fusion, limited perspective taking abilities (deictics) and social anxiety and isolation. In the UK this population are also at higher risk of home or school breakdown leading to residential and hospital placements. This paper describes an intervention informed by Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and the clinical application of Relational Frame Theory with a 16 years young person with a diagnosis of autism. The person engaged in high levels of experiential avoidance and in intermittent episodes of severe self-harm that led to a 6 week hospital admission. The paper covers the period of his discharge and his rehabilitation into a college setting over a 12 month period. It will focus on concepts of values, willingness, relational network coherence, deictic functioning and hierarchical relations.

• Drawing together: using an RFT lens to identify functionally similar, clinically relevant themes
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University
Duncan Gillard, Ph.D., Bristol City Council

The third paper in this symposium seeks to draw out the main functional themes from the previous two case studies using an account based on RFT. Rather than focusing on the topographical differences between the cases, this part of the symposium will examine the functional overlaps in these distinct cases.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss how RFT can enhance ACT functional analyses and clinical interventions. 2. Describe core RFT principles and deictic relational frames as they apply developmentally. 3. Utilize knowledge of deictic framing in functional analyses.

 

44. Using Contextual Behavioural Science for Global Impact: Recent and Upcoming Innovations in Global Mental Health
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Educational settings, Professional Development, global mental health, armed conflict, refugees, education, social emotional learning
Target Audience: Intermediate,
Location: Q218

Chair: Felicity Brown, Ph.D., War Child Holland
Discussant: Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno

We are experiencing unprecedented levels of forced displacement globally- with over 65 million displaced people, including 22 million refugees. Exposure to armed conflict and displacement significantly increases the risk for a range of mental health difficulties, including depression, anxiety, traumatic stress, substance abuse, and behaviour problems. Yet, unfortunately, the majority of these individuals lack access to adequate care. It is estimated that 85% of the global refugee population are based in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), where health systems are often under-resourced to cope with this extra burden. A major barrier to addressing this global treatment gap is the lack of availability of specialists in such settings, therefore recent innovations have focused on ‘task-shifting’, whereby non-specialists are trained to deliver treatments, while specialists provide training, supervision, and more intensive treatment for higher-needs cases. Innovative implementation strategies, such as via education settings, are also needed. This symposium will detail findings and next steps from three such innovations, implemented in Uganda, Rwanda, Colombia, and Europe, with World Health Organization, Peter C Alderman Foundation, and War Child Holland.

• The Effectiveness of an ACT-Based Guided Self-Help Intervention for South Sudanese Refugee Women in Uganda
Felicity L Brown, Ph.D., War Child Holland
Wietse A Tol, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Kenneth Carswell, DClinPsy, World Health Organization

Globally, emotional distress is common and a leading cause of health-related burden and lost productivity. Individuals in humanitarian crises are at greater risk for distress, yet tremendous care gaps exist. The research and implementation agenda of the WHO Mental Health and Psychosocial Support in Emergencies programme focuses on systematically developing, culturally-adapting, and evaluating low-intensity psychological interventions that can be delivered by non-specialists and require few resources to reach larger numbers of individuals. This presentation will report the findings of a cluster randomized controlled trial of an ACT-based guided self-help intervention conducted with South Sudanese refugee women in northern Uganda (SH+). The intervention is delivered in 5 workshops, using scripted audio recordings to deliver key content; ensuring fidelity and reducing training needs. Villages (n=14) were randomly assigned to receive either SH+ or enhanced usual care, and a total of 724 women participated. Results indicated significant improvements in the primary outcome of psychological distress from baseline to 3 month follow up, and significant improvements on a range of secondary outcomes. Implications and future directions will be discussed.

• Next steps with evaluating SH+ for refugees: Updates from clinical trials being conducted in Europe/Turkey and Uganda
Ross White, Ph.D., University of Liverpool
Wietse Tol, Ph.D., Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Mark van Ommeren, Ph.D., World Health Organization
Corrado Barbui, Ph.D., University of Verona

Following on from initial positive research findings, this paper discusses additional activity being undertaken to further evaluate the ACT-based ‘Self-Help Plus’ (SH+). Work is currently underway in Uganda to determine the efficacy of SH+ for improving the mental health of male South Sudanese refugees in Uganda. Specifically, this project aims to adapt SH+ to maximize the engagement of male South Sudanese refugees, and assess the impact of SH+ on males’ psychological distress, various secondary outcomes (including alcohol misuse, anger, perpetration of violence against females), and economic outcomes. Activities include: a rapid ethnographic adaptation process, a pilot cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT), process evaluation, and a definitive cRCT (target N = 1125). In addition, this paper reports on the progress of the RE-DEFINE project (http://re-defineproject.eu) which consists of two RCTs evaluating SH+ as an approach for preventing mental disorders in refugees and asylum seekers in the EU (target N = 600) and Turkey (target N = 600). The RE-DEFINE project has facilitated the adaptation of SH+ for speakers of the Arabic, Urdu and Dari languages.

• The theory and development process of a holistic teacher professional development intervention to improve teachers social emotional competencies, wellbeing and classroom management
April Coetzee, War Child Holland

The introduction of the Sustainable-Development Goals has seen a shift in focus from basic access to education globally, towards building quality education where children master not only academic skills, but also vital social and emotional skills. There are many factors that contribute to quality education, but a key element is having sufficient number of trained teachers who have the knowledge, skills and attitudes to create an enabling environment within the classroom. Personal Journeys is a new, innovative, scalable solution, building the necessary capacity in teachers through in-class coaching. The intervention focuses on three key areas for teachers; building skills in classroom management, developing personal social an emotional competencies and taking a mindfulness and acceptance approach to address the wellbeing of teachers. This presentation will outline the theory of change behind the intervention, the comprehensive development process, and plans for rigorous evaluation and well as exploring the place the study has in addressing dearth of scientific evidence for what works in the promotion of quality education and wellbeing in emergencies.

Educational Objectives:
1. Explain the need for task-shifting approaches in global mental health. 2. Describe the challenges and opportunities associated with large-scale evaluations of ACT-based guided self-help interventions. 3. Discuss the theory behind the assumption that social emotional learning, teacher wellbeing and classroom management can contribute to an enabling environment for child wellbeing.

Friday, 28 June

53. Compassion-based interventions to promote psychological and physical wellbeing/health: Examples in different settings and populations
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Educational settings, Compassion-based interventions
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: The Studio

Chair: Marcela Matos, University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Discussant: Laura Silberstein-Tirch, Psy.D., The Center for CFT, NYC

There is an increasing interest in compassion in the realm of contextual-behavioral science. Compassion involves the motivation to care, capacity for sympathy, tolerate unpleasant emotions, empathic understanding and non-judging; and can be directed at the self, at others, or received from them. Growing research suggests that compassion is positively associated with a range of wellbeing and mental health indicators, and compassion-based interventions have been found to be effective in reducing psychopathology and improving emotional and behavioral regulation. This symposium sets out to explore the healing and protective impact of compassion-based interventions on psychological and physical wellbeing/health in different settings and populations. This symposium explores: i) the psychological and physiological impact of a compassion focused intervention on teachers’ wellbeing in an educational setting; ii) the efficacy of a compassion-based intervention to reduce binge eating; iii) the pilot study of acceptability and efficacy of the MIND programme for cancer patients; iv) the efficacy of an ACT group intervention for chronic pain that integrates explicit self-compassion exercises (COMP.ACT).

• Nurturing Compassionate Schools: The psychological and physiological impact of a compassion focused intervention to promote teachers’ wellbeing
Marcela Matos, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Isabel Albuquerque, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Marina Cunha, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Margarida Pedroso Lima, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Ana Galhardo, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Lara Palmeira, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Frances Maratos, Ph.D., University of Derby, College of Health and Social Care Research Centre, UK
Paul Gilbert, Ph.D., OBE, Centre for Compassion Research and Training, University of Derby, College of Health and Social Care Research Centre

Compassion-based interventions have been found effective in developing adaptive emotional regulation skills and promoting mental health. Teachers present a high risk of professional stress, which negatively impacts their wellbeing and professional performance. Mental health problems are highly prevalent in the school context, affecting both teachers and students. Therefore it is crucial to promote psychological flexibility and emotional regulation that support teachers in coping with the challenges of the school context and promote their wellbeing. This study aims at testing the efficacy of the Compassionate Schools Program (CSP), a six-module compassionate mind training group intervention for teachers, and examining mediator processes of change. A randomized controlled study was conducted in a sample of 150 portuguese teachers. At pre and post intervention, participants completed measures of psychological (e.g.,burnout,psychopathology,positive affect) and physiological (i.e.,heart-rate variability) outcomes, and processes of change (e.g.,compassion,psychological flexibility,mindfulness). Results regarding the impact of the CSP on indicators of psychological and physiological wellbeing and the mediator processes of change will be presented. Implications for community-based interventions in educational settings will be discussed.

• Compassion in weight management interventions: Examples from a compassion-based intervention in a commercial weight management intervention and the NoHoW trial
Cristiana Duarte, Ph.D., University of Leeds
James Stubbs, Ph.D., University of Leeds
Carol Stalker, Ph.D., College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby
Francisca Catarino, PsyD, College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby
Sarah Scott, Ph.D., University of Leeds
Graham Horgan, Ph.D., Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health at The University of Aberdeen
Paul Gilbert, Ph.D. OBE, College of Life and Natural Sciences, University of Derby
Berit Heitmann, Ph.D., Frederiksberg Hospital, The Parker Institute

This presentation will report data from two studies where components of compassion-based interventions were included in weight management interventions. A study with a two-arm, non-randomized parallel design examined whether adding compassion-focused online video exercises into a commercial weight-management programme helped individuals control their eating behaviours compared to the regular programme. The intervention significantly reduced binge eating symptomatology between 3-12 months. At 3-months the intervention had effects on psychological adjustment and self-evaluation. There were no intervention effects on weight. Mediation analyses in the intervention group indicated that changes in body image and weight-related shame, self-criticism, and self-compassion, mediated the effects of the intervention in decreases in binge eating symptomatology; reductions in binge eating were associated with weight loss over time. This presentation will also explore preliminary data of the NoHoW weight loss maintenance trial, which uses a 2x2RCT design to test the effects of a digital intervention that targets:(i)self-regulation and motivation, and (ii)contextual-behavioural science-based emotion regulation. Findings may elucidate the refinement of digital approaches and tools for longer term control of eating behavior and weight management.

• The MIND programme for cancer patients: A acceptance, mindfulness, and compassion-based intervention to promote well-being
Inês A. Trindade, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra
Cláudia Ferreira, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra
José Pinto-Gouveia, MD, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra

Given the complementarity of mindfulness, compassion, and ACT-based approaches, and the considerable need to develop and test psychotherapeutic interventions for cancer patients, the MIND Programme for cancer patients was developed and manualized. The programme combines empirically-based mindfulness practices, and CFT and ACT components in one integrative intervention specifically adapted to cancer patients that overall aims to increase quality of life and prevent subsequent distress. The intervention intends to develop emotion regulation abilities based on acceptance, committed action, mindfulness, and self-compassion. Self-care and forgiveness modules were also included in the programme. An outline of the eight weekly group sessions of this intervention will be presented, as well as the individual assessment of each session by participants. The preliminary test of efficacy of the intervention in a sample of women with breast cancer, with a matched waitlist control group, will also be presented. Findings suggested that the MIND programme improves mental health, social functioning and adjustment to the disease, and support the integration of mindfulness, acceptance, and compassion-based therapies. Further implications and conclusions will be discussed.

• Accepting with compassion in chronic pain: testing the effect of explicit self-compassion exercises on the efficacy of an ACT group intervention (COMP.ACT)
Sérgio A. Carvalho, MSc, CINEICC, University of Coimbra
José Pinto-Gouveia, MD, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra
David Gillanders, Psy.D., University of Edinburgh
Paula Castilho, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra

The current study aims to test, in a pilot study, the efficacy of an ACT group intervention for CP that integrates explicit self-compassion exercises (COMP.ACT–8 sessions), and compare it with an ACT intervention (8 sessions) and with a control (TAU). We expect that adding explicit self-compassion exercises will increase the efficacy of an ACT intervention, and expect both conditions (COMP.ACT and ACT) to be significantly more effective than TAU. This will be tested in a sample of N = 30 CP patients recruited in a pain clinic, who will be randomly assigned into the three conditions. The efficacy will be tested by comparing results from pre- to post-intervention of the three groups in several self-report measures (pain intensity, disability, quality of life, patient global impression of change, depressive and anxiety symptoms, mindfulness, acceptance, and self-compassion). Results will be discussed accordingly. This study will shed new light on an ongoing discussion regarding the benefits of adding self-compassion exercises to an acceptance-based intervention, contributing to a better understanding of the role of potentially overlapping psychological processes.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe novel compassion-based interventions with different formats (group and digital-based) targeting both clinical and non-clinical populations (teachers, women with binge eating disorder, patients with cancer, and chronic pain). 2. Discuss the impact of these interventions on well-being psychological and/or physiological outcomes. 3. Discuss the implications in clinical and educational settings of cultivating compassion in the targeted populations to promote adaptive psychological functioning and well-being.

 

55. Delivering acceptance and mindfulness online for university student mental health: New findings on efficacy and implementation strategies
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Literature review, Original data, Didactic presentation
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Educational settings, Online interventions (websites, mobile apps), University students
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: QG15

Chair: Michael Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University
Discussant: Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center & University of Washington

Online acceptance and mindfulness-based interventions offer significant promise in improving university students’ access to mental health services, reducing barriers such as provider availability, stigma, and time. Recent trials indicate online ACT and related mindfulness-based approaches are effective at improving university student mental health. However, implementation challenges have also been identified related to user engagement, reaching students, and resource costs. In this symposium, Dr. Crissa Levin will present results from a multi-site RCT evaluating an adjunctive online ACT website for college counselors to use with their clients, including lessons learned implementing adjunctive ACT programs within counseling centers. Panajiota Räsänen will describe findings from novel analytic methods used to evaluate text interactions between university students and coaches in the context of a RCT comparing coaching methods in a blended in-person and online ACT program. Elizabeth Hicks will present findings from a pilot RCT evaluating the Stop, Breathe, and Think mobile app for university students on the waitlist to start therapy. Dr. Jonathan Bricker will then discuss these studies and associated broader topics that they raise.

• Implementing online ACT guided self-help in college counseling centers: Results from a multi-site randomized control trial
Crissa Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University & Contextual Change LLC
Michael Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University & Contextual Change LLC
Jacqueline Pistorello, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno
Steven C. Hayes, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno
John Seeley, Ph.D., University of Oregon
Elizabeth Hicks, Utah State University

Mental health problems are prevalent among university students and college counseling centers are struggling to meet demands for services (Gallagher, 2014). Integrating online self-help into counseling services could increase the number of students receiving treatment and opportunities for additional services, while reducing resource costs on in-person providers. In a pilot trial, we found a prototype online ACT program (called ACT on College Life; ACT-CL) used in four college counseling centers was feasible to implement and improved student psychological inflexibility and mental health (Levin et al., 2015). This talk will present results from a recently completed multi-site RCT across 7 college counseling centers with the final ACT-CL program. A sample of 38 counselors were randomized to use ACT-CL or a psychoeducation control website (PCW) with eligible student clients (n = 185). Results on mental health and psychological inflexibility between students using ACT-CL versus PCW will be reported. We will also review findings on program usage and satisfaction by both counselors and students as well as lessons learned with regards to implementing ACT-CL in college counseling centers.

• Evaluation of a Mindfulness App for College Student Mental Health
Elizabeth Tish Hicks, B.A., Utah State University
Jennifer Krafft, M.S., Utah State University
Michael Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University

As the demand for college counseling services has steadily increased, so have college counseling center (CCC) waiting lists. Mobile mental health apps have the potential to offer support for students’ mental health while they are waiting to receive CCC services. The current study specifically evaluated the feasibility and clinical utility of offering a popular mindfulness app, Stop, Breathe & Think, as an interim intervention for students on a CCC waitlist. 22 students were randomly assigned to the active or waitlist condition for four weeks and completed baseline, mid, and post assessments. While a larger sample is needed for between group comparisons, among the students in the app condition, usability ratings were high, all students reported using the app, and students generally reported being satisfied with the app and that it was helpful while on the waitlist, though it would not replace the need for therapy. Implications of the study will be discussed in relation to implementation, feasibility, and clinical utility of utilizing mobile apps for clients on waiting lists.

• Coaches’ written online feedback to reduce psychological distress in an ACT-based program for university students: results from an RCT study that employed A.I. text analysis
Panajiota Räsänen, University of Jyvaskyla
Asko Tolvanen, University of Jyvaskyla
Riku Nyrhinen, University of Jyvaskyla
Raimo Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

There is limited research examining the active components contributing to the effectiveness of Internet interventions. One substantial component in guided interventions is the feedback given to the clients. We explored the role of online written feedback on clients’ outcomes. ACT trained psychology students, offered support as coaches (N=48) to university students, randomly assigned to two groups that both participated in 3 face-to-face sessions and an online 5-module ACT-based program. Group A (iACTA, N=62) received personalized, individually-tailored written feedback and group B (iACTB, N=61) received semi-structured written feedback with minimal personalization options. Participants’ texts as well coaches’ feedback were analyzed with artificial intelligence tools. Participants in both groups had significant gains in psychological well-being, psychological flexibility and mindfulness skills. Perceived stress and symptoms of depression were significantly reduced. The length of the coaches’ feedback did not have an effect on treatment outcomes. In both groups, feedback that was rich, diverse, directly targeting the participant’s reflections was associated in significant reduction of stress and depression. Differences were larger for the semi-structured group (iACTB) for stress outcomes.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss challenges and opportunities with incorporating online ACT into treatment settings. 2. Describe the feasibility and clinical utility of recommending mobile mental health apps to clients on waiting lists for therapy services. 3. Be able to identify and discuss important active components in designing and implementing blended online ACT-interventions.

 

60. Investigating fear and avoidance behavior: the merging of Contextual Behavioural Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience.
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Functional contextual neuroscience and pharmacology, Relational Frame Theory, IRAP, EEG, fear, approach/ avoidance, ADHD
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Deirdre Kavanagh, Ghent University
Discussant: Michel Quak, Ghent University - department of experimental clinical and health psychology

This symposium will discuss findings from both contextual behavioral psychology and cognitive neuroscience on fear and approach/avoidance behavior. The goal is to explore how concepts and methods from cognitive neuroscience can be used to further the depth of clinically relevant research in Relational Frame Theory (RFT) and behavior analysis. The first talk will focus on research aimed to establish fear and avoidance functions for arbitrary stimuli through combinatorial entailment using a training version of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). The second talk will discuss the neurophysiological mechanisms of approach and avoidance behavior involved in implicit relational responding using a modified IRAP. The final talk will give an overview of the neurophysiological mechanisms underlying fear. Together, these talks hope to shed light on the potential of combining traditional functional analyses of behavior with concepts and methods from cognitive neuroscience in order to advance RFT.

• Training and Testing for the Transformation of Fear and Avoidance Functions via combinatorial entailment using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP).
Aileen Leech, Ghent University - Department of experimental clinical and health psychology
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

Experiment 1 of the current research aimed to establish “fearful” and “pleasant” functions for arbitrary stimuli through combinatorial entailment using a training version of the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP). The critical tests for the transformation of functions involved exposure to two separate Test-IRAPs (one for fear and one for avoidance/approach), but both failed to yield any evidence for the transformation of functions. The findings of Experiment 1 contrast with the clear evidence of a transformation of functions via mutually entailed relations that was reported by Leech et al., (2018). Experiment 2, attempted to replicate and extend the findings of Leech et al, (2018) through combinatorial entailment by manipulating one or more of the dimensions within the MDML (i.e., levels of derivation). Results indicate that levels of derivation and an opportunity to respond to the derived relations play an important role in the transformation of fear and avoidance functions via combinatorial entailment within the IRAP context.

• Modifying the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) for use with psychophysiological measures: an EEG test case.
Michel Quak, Ghent University
Aileen Leech, Ghent University
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

The Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure (IRAP) has been widely used to test the strength of ‘implicit’ relational responses in individuals. Previous studies that used electroencephalography (EEG) to examine the neurological mechanisms supporting relational responding have been inconclusive. We devised the sequential IRAP (S-IRAP) to use with EEG recording. Behavioural pilot studies indicated that the S-IRAP and traditional IRAP yield comparable outcomes. For the EEG study we tested 30 participants with the S-IRAP. Besides reducing the number of artefacts found in EEG data, the S-IRAP also allows us to investigate the neural activity at the moment of label and target presentation in isolation. Preliminary results indicate posterior neural activity show higher amplitudes for positive stimuli compared to negative. Some posterior electrode sites show an interesting interaction where amplitudes are higher for negative stimuli when participants are required to respond positively towards negative pictures. During target presentation we also find differential activity dependent on the type of label, target, and context presented. The S-IRAP will prove useful in examining underlying neural mechanisms of relational responding.

• Neural mechanisms and the role of inattention and memory in the relationship between ADHD and anxiety.
Robert Whelan, Ph.D., Trinity College Dublin
Dervla Gallen, Trinity College Dublin
Marc Patrick Bennet, Medical Research Council- Cognition and Brain Science Unit, University of Cambridge

Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder that has been consistently associated with an over-representation of comorbid anxiety disorders. Anxiety disorders can be further understood through maladaptive fear learning processes, such as fear generalisation. The current study aimed to determine if inattention and memory (i) mediated the relationship between ADHD and anxiety, and thus, (ii) lead to an over-generalisation of fear in individuals with ADHD. Participants with ADHD (n=33) and neuro-typical controls (n=44) were recruited for the study. Inattention and memory deficits and anxiety ratings were measured by the CAARS and STAI-T, respectively. Preliminary analyses indicated higher levels of anxiety, inattention and memory deficits in the ADHD group. Results revealed that inattention and memory partially mediated the relationship between ADHD and anxiety. Neither group differed with respect to fear acquisition. Supplementary EEG analyses indicated increased generalisation in the ADHD group. However, inattention and memory deficits did not appear to mediate this relationship. Heightened generalisation suggests there are clinical implications of inattention and memory deficits, resulting in the pathogenesis of anxiety disorders in ADHD.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the role of levels of derivation in the transformation of derived fear and avoidance functions on the IRAP. 2. Implement the modified IRAP for neurophysiological measurements and consider cognitive process in clinical research. 3. Utilize neurophysiological data to support findings in implicit relational responding.

 

61. Flexibility in the Workplace: Innovations in Research
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Literature review, Original data
Categories: Organizational behavior management, Wellbeing of healthcare workers; workplace coaching; organisational effectiveness and wellbeing
Target Audience: Beginner
Location: Q217

Chair: Frank W. Bond, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
Discussant: Sonja V. Batten, Ph.D., Booz Allen Hamilton

This symposium presents four new studies examining flexibility in the workplace. First, Dr Lamb will present the results of a systematic review that looked at associations between individual psychological constructs (e.g. personality, psychological flexibility, self-esteem, emotional intelligence) and wellbeing (e.g. burnout, stress, engagement, satisfaction) in mental health workers. Then, Dr Villatte will present a multimodal, longitudinal study that aimed to understand factors that influence psychological flexibility in healthcare workforce, using a combination of psychometrics, experience sampling, and biobehavioural and environmental sensors. Thirdly, Dr Skews will present data comparing two alternative theories of change in workplace coaching, looking at the relationship between psychological flexibility and coaching outcomes, and the quality of relationship in achieving coaching outcomes. Fourthly, Dr Gascoyne will present research that developed and validated a measure of organisational flexibility, a functional equivalent of psychological flexibility, for predicting and influencing both individual and organisational effectiveness and wellbeing (e.g. mental health, job satisfaction, organisational performance). Finally, Dr Sonja Batten will summarise the studies and explore how they relate to the wider CBS literature.

• Individual psychological characteristics associated with wellbeing at work in mental health staff: a systematic review
Danielle Lamb, Ph.D., University College, London

Background: The wellbeing of mental health workers is linked to absenteeism, staff turnover, productivity, and service-user outcomes. Individual workers are often exposed to similar organisational and job-related stressors, but experience different wellbeing outcomes. This indicates that individual-level factors may protect against, or exacerbate, occupational stress. This systematic review aimed to explore associations between individual psychological characteristics and wellbeing outcomes in mental health staff, in order to improve job design and support for these important workers. Method: A systematic search was conducted using eight databases. Methods adhered to PRISMA guidelines. Due to the heterogeneity of the studies returned, a narrative synthesis was planned. Results: 8,891 records were returned, and 44 studies included. Higher levels of mindfulness and psychological flexibility showed the most consistent associations with better wellbeing (r=-0.42 to r=-0.55). Implications: Research implications: 1) improve conceptual clarity around the constructs used in individual differences research; 2) improve understanding of mechanisms driving the relationships between individual characteristics and wellbeing outcomes. Practical implications: provision of contextual behavioural interventions/training such as ACT, in a preventative or remedial capacity. research.

• Intensive Longitudinal Assessment of Psychological Flexibility in Healthcare Workers
Jennifer Villatte, Ph.D., University of Washington
Justin L'Hommedieu, M.A., University of Southern California
Michelle Hasan, Ph.D., University of Southern California
Shrikanth Narayanan, Ph.D., University of Southern California

Previous research has established key relationships among psychological flexibility, workplace behaviors, and work-related individual differences, but little is known about momentary variations in psychological flexibility and its influence on healthcare workers. The purpose of this study was to better understand the dynamic relationships among psychological flexibility, work-relevant individual characteristics, and job performance in the healthcare workforce. We observed 200 hospital clinicians for 10 weeks using intensive, multimodal, longitudinal assessment. Assessments included baseline psychometric surveys of individual differences (psychological flexibility, intelligence, personality, affect, anxiety, stress, health, wellness) and work-related variables (work engagement, job performance, organizational citizenship behavior, counterproductive work behavior). We also used daily experience sampling to assess these constructs over time and across contexts. We will present results of multilevel modeling of between- and within-subject variability in psychological flexibility and its direct and indirect effects on work behavior, relative to individual differences. Implications for workplace interventions and future research will be discussed.

• Evaluating alternative processes of change in ACT-informed workplace coaching
Rachael Skews, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
Jo Lloyd, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Background: Processes of change in workplace coaching interventions can be hypothesised using different theories of change; however little empirical evidence exists testing and comparing these different explanations. This study aims to test the indirect effects of two theoretically derived processes through which change has been hypothesised to occur in workplace coaching. Method: Using data from the intervention arm of an RCT study of ACT-informed coaching, a within-subjects repeated-measures analysis compared the indirect effects of psychological flexibility (derived from the ACT Model) and working alliance (derived from the Contextual Model) on coaching outcomes. Study participants are senior managers in the UK Civil Service, who received three sessions of ACT coaching (N = 65). Results: Intervention analyses show increases in general mental health, generalised self-efficacy, goal-directed thinking, goal attainment, psychological flexibility, and working alliance. Mediation analyses indicate increases in psychological flexibility mediated increases in generalised self-efficacy goal-directed thinking, and goal attainment. No significant mediation effects of working alliance are shown. Discussion: The implications of these results will be discussed, as well as directions for future research.

• A Scale to Measure Organisational Flexibility
Anneli Gascoyne, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
Jo Lloyd, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
Frank W. Bond, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Background: Ph.D. research to develop and validate an organisational flexibility scale (OFS), reflecting Bond’s (2015) model of organisational flexibility, as a functional equivalent to psychological flexibility, for predicting and influencing individual and organisational effectiveness and wellbeing. Method: An individual-level sample (n = 303) was used for exploratory factor analysis (EFA). An organisational-level sample (n = 331, organisations = 31) was used for multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA), correlations and regressions to test factor structure, reliability and validity. Results: EFA indicated a reliable, multilevel, single-factor, seven-item scale. MCFA supported the structure, at both individual and organisational levels. Validity was supported by the OFS’s: 1) relationships with psychological flexibility and organisational learning; 2) ability to predict mental health, work motivation, job satisfaction and organisational performance; and 3) ability to do so over and above psychological flexibility and organisational learning. Implications: The OFS aims to fill the gap in organisational-level measures of flexibility, providing a reliable and valid measure, with potential utility in organisational and research settings.

Educational Objectives:
1. Plan research studies investigating the use of ACT interventions in the workplace. 2. Describe processes of change in ACT-based workplace interventions, and evaluate them based on empirical evidence. 3. Use measures of psychological and organisational flexibility in future research protocols.

 

62. An in-depth look at psychological flexibility using the CompACT
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Assessment, Psychometrics, Psychological Flexibility
Target Audience: Intermediate
Location: Q218

Co-Chairs: Kaylie Green, B.A. & Andi M. Schmidt, M.Sc., Pacific University
Discussant: Jason Luoma, Ph.D., Portland Psychotherapy Clinic, Research, & Training Center, Oregon Health Sciences University

Psychological flexibility involves mindfully engaging in behaviors that are in alignment with one’s chosen values. It is a key element of third-wave psychotherapies, and can enhance resilience and present-moment awareness. Higher levels of psychological flexibility may increase adaptability to demanding situations, improve perspective-taking, and decrease experiential avoidance. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, research presented in this symposium examines psychological flexibility as measured by the Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (CompACT) and Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-II). Presentations in this symposium will (1) show support for a three-factor CompACT structure using a confirmatory factor analysis, (2) assess the unique variance accounted for by the CompACT relative to the Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire in predicting stress, anxiety, and depression outcomes, (3) examine the fidelity of the CompACT and AAQ-II in the measurement of ACT targets using cognitive interviewing, and (4) present the development and validation of an abbreviated, eight-item short form of the CompACT. Reaching a greater empirical understanding of psychological flexibility psychometrics will be critical to the measurement of contextual and behavioral processes.

• A confirmatory factor analysis and validation of the Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy process (CompACT)
Joshua Kaplan, M.S., Pacific University
Ashley Eddy, B.A., Pacific University
Candice Hoke Kennedy, Pacific University
Jenna Flowers, M.S., Pacific University
Michael S. Christopher, Ph.D., Pacific University

Research shows psychological flexibility mitigates negative outcomes, and interest in its measurement has emerged. The Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (CompACT; Francis, Dawson, & Golijani-Moghaddam, 2016) was developed to address shortcomings of existing measures. In the initial validation study, the authors found acceptable psychometric properties. The goals of this study were to re-evaluate the CompACT factor structure using confirmatory factor analysis and to assess its psychometric properties in a sample of adults (n=601) representative of the U.S. population. Results suggest a modified three-factor solution provides an adequate fit to the data, SBχ²(167) = 227.58, p < .01, GFI = .90, CFI = .95, RMSEA = .07. The CompACT also demonstrated good internal consistency (α = .86) and expected correlations with constructs such as thought suppression (r = -.58) and psychological resilience (r = .59). Despite these positive outcomes, two of the three factors were not significantly correlated, and one factor had poor internal consistency. Implications for clinical and research use of the CompACT will be discussed.

• The incremental validity of psychological flexibility in the prediction of psychopathology symptoms
Andi M. Schmidt, MSc, Pacific University
Joshua Kaplan, M.S., Pacific University
Kaylie Green, B.A., Pacific University
Jenna Flowers, M.S., Pacific University
Eli Dapolonia, M.A., M.S., Pacific University
Michael S. Christopher, Ph.D., Pacific University

Dispositional mindfulness has substantial empirical support as a mitigating factor against the development of psychopathology. Psychological flexibility, a distinct, though related, construct also has strong support as a protective factor against psychopathology. The present study examined the incremental validity of psychological flexibility (Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy [CompACT]) relative to mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire short-form [FFMQ-SF]) in predicting symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress among a nonclinical sample of U.S. adults (N = 601). Main effects indicated higher levels of psychological flexibility and mindfulness were independently negatively predictive of symptom severity. Hierarchical regression analyses demonstrated that the CompACT significantly predicted depression (β = -.40, p < .001), anxiety (β = -.39, p < .001), and stress (β = -.48, p < .001) beyond the variance accounted for by the FFMQ-SF. When both CompACT and FFMQ-SF were entered in the same hierarchical regression block, both constructs significantly predicted outcomes, supporting previous findings that psychological flexibility and mindfulness function independently in the prediction of psychological outcomes. Clinical applications and research implications will be discussed.

• Examining ACT process measures with cognitive interviewing
Jessica Wright, MSc., University of Nottingham
David Dawson, DClinPsy, University of Lincoln
Nima Moghaddam, Ph.D., DClinPsy, University of Lincoln

Cognitive interviewing is an established applied qualitative method for examining and improving the face and content validity of psychological measures. Utilizing concurrent or retrospective interview techniques, the method examines how individuals interpret, understand and respond to psychometric items, to determine whether they target expected domains and processes. We aimed to examine respondents’ verbal responses to items within the CompACT and AAQ-II (given their use in clinical research and practice) in order to determine whether/how these responses correspond with ACT targets. Twenty-six ACT-naïve individuals completed both measures and cognitive interviews. Responses to 22 CompACT items corresponded with its putative three-factor conceptualization of psychological flexibility; mapping for one item was unclear. Responses to six AAQ-II items corresponded with concepts of experiential avoidance and committed action; mapping for one item was unclear. Low frequency problems (e.g., unclear wording) were found with items on both measures, and both appeared to target intended (but varied) ACT constructs. Findings seemingly support the CompACT as a conceptually broader measure of psychological flexibility, while the AAQ-II appears more targeted on experiential avoidance-related domains.

• Developing and testing a brief measure of psychological flexibility: The CompACT-8
Lucy Morris, M.Sc., University of Nottingham
Nima Moghaddam, Ph.D., DClinPsy, University of Lincoln
David Dawson, DClinPsy, University of Lincoln

The Comprehensive assessment of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy processes (CompACT) was developed to overcome some of the limitations of existing ACT process measures and to provide a fuller assessment of psychological flexibility. However, at 23 items, the CompACT is relatively lengthy and is therefore not ideally suited to all potential use-cases. In this presentation, we describe the development of a short-form version of the CompACT that is more apt for use when low-burden, frequent, and/or repeated measurement of psychological flexibility is required. We will outline the process of deriving the short-form, including the psychometric, theoretical, and qualitative steps taken, and present new validation data (N= 579) for this abbreviated, 8-item version of the CompACT (the CompACT-8). These data indicate that the CompACT-8 is psychometrically robust, with good internal reliability, concurrent and convergent validity, and good model fit with the previously-defined three-factor structure of the original CompACT. The additional use-cases of the new abbreviated measure will be discussed.

Educational Objectives:
1. Assess and select contextually-valid measures of psychological flexibility. 2. Analyze the CompACT to identify distinct construct factors of psychological flexibility. 3. Discuss revisions to traditional measures of psychological flexibility to enhance utility in clinical assessment.

 

63. Can You Help Me Do This Myself? Problem Solving, Autism, Insomnia, and Competitive Rock-Climbing Using ABA, RFT, and ACT Interventions
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Autism, Problem Solving, RFT, ACT, ABA, Insomnia, Rock Climbing
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q220

Chair: Thomas Szabo, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Florida Institute of Technology

This symposium includes philosophy, conceptual analysis, and applied empirical findings using single case design methods. We bring together Radical Behaviorist and Functional Contextualist philosophy, Skinnerian and RFT conceptualizations of problem-solving, and ACT and RFT interventions for individuals with autism having difficulties with sleep and competitive athletic performance. First, Lilly Flores-Fiumara presents an analysis of problem solving from a radical behaviorist and RFT perspective. Next, Tom Szabo presents findings from a study using an RFT approach to teaching problem-solving to young children in a rock climb gym and examining generalization of problem-solving repertoires to different contexts. Subsequently, Tom Szabo presents research comparing a novel iteration of ACT called Watch Me Try to direct contingency management to improve athletic performance of young adults with autism. Finally, Eric Morris discusses insomnia treatment for adults with autism using ACT.

• Problem Solving from a Radical Behaviorist and Relational Frame Theory Perspective
Lilly Alejandra Flores-Fiumara, University of West Florida
Heidi Eilers, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Eric Carlson, The Chicago School of Professional Psychology

In order to set the occasion for a coherent and consistent examination of problem solving, underlying assumptions rooted in radical behaviorism and functional contextualism will be discussed. This foundation set the boundaries for developing a unit of analysis, i.e., defining a “problem," revealing the context, pinpointing the behavior of interest, and exploring mediating responses and sources of control. The activity of solving a problem will be further reviewed from a Relational Frame Theory perspective. An understanding of how relations are derived among events, objects, and their features to generate novel stimulus functions welcomes a pragmatic verbal analysis. Lastly, the utility of a verbal pragmatic analysis for approaching effective solutions for problems and implications for future researchers and practitioners will be discussed.

• Generalized problem solving: From vocal to sub-vocal self-prompting in trained and novel contexts
Thomas Szabo, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Florida Institute of Technology

Skinner’s analysis of problem-solving and RFT provide robust predictions to test. We investigated whether young children with poor eye-hand coordination could be taught to use self-prompting strategies to solve movement problems on a 3 m tall climbing wall using directional, numerical, and oppositional framing. Two boys (6 and 7 years of age) were taught to vocalize problem-solving strategies related to movement and, when the context shifted from learning to competition, to diminish the magnitude of their responses so that others would not benefit from the supplemental stimuli they used to probe and prompt themselves. Consistent with Skinner’s analysis of problem solving, participants in this study responded in the context of an establishing operation by manipulating variables until a response resulted in reducing the aversive condition. Training resulted not only in improved physical skills but also in the acquisition of a verbal repertoire with respect to directional, numerical, and oppositional relational cues that generalized to novel contexts and novel behaviors. Results are discussed in terms of verbal behavior and relational framing approaches to problem-solving instruction.

• Watch me try: An acceptance and commitment training approach to improving athletic performance of young adults with ASD
Thomas Szabo, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Florida Institute of Technology

Few studies have examined the effects of contextual behavior science interventions for adult athletes with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Those few, reviewed herein, show preliminary empirical support for treating behavioral deficits exhibited by young adults with ASD engaged in competitive sports. In the current study, we evaluated a novel iteration of Acceptance and Commitment Training called Watch Me Try and compared it to direct contingency management to facilitate athletic performance of young adults with ASD using a concurrent multiple baseline across participants design. The title and language used in establishing the intervention were geared specifically to the social development of the participants. All three athletes improved their attendance and performance during these interventions. One improved with direct contingency management alone; the other two required the Watch Me Try approach to bolster their performance.

• An evaluation of an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy group program for people on the autism spectrum with insomnia
Eric Morris, Ph.D., La Trobe University
Kathleen Denny, La Trobe University
Lauren Lawson, La Trobe University
Amanda Richdale, La Trobe University

Insomnia is a common problem for autistic adults, and is associated with comorbid anxiety, depression, and challenges in occupational functioning. This paper will describe the results of a pilot investigation of an ACT group program designed to help adults on the autism spectrum experiencing insomnia. While there is a small body of evidence supporting parent training and CBT for anxiety in autistic children and adolescents, empirically-supported psychological interventions are lacking for adults. Anecdotal evidence suggests that autistic adults do not like CBT techniques such as cognitive restructuring (which may be difficult due to intrinsic social-cognitive difficulties). However, a small number of studies show that mindfulness/ACT can effectively address mental health difficulties for autistic adults. In this paper we will describe a multiple baseline single-case design evaluation of an ACT for insomnia group program for autistic adults. We will outline the components & adaptations of a group program that combines sleep hygiene principles with Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, and present participant-reported (insomnia and mental health) and objective outcomes (actigraphy), along with the feedback on program acceptability.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss the unit of analysis in defining and solving a problem and discuss the roles of self-prompting and self-probing within specified relational repertoires to solve problems involving spatial orientation. 2. Compare the relative strengths of direct contingency management and ACT strategies for improving athletic performance in young adults with autism. 3. Discuss sleep hygiene principles taught alongside ACT to promote healthy bedtime habits in adults with autism.

 

71. Defusion, Distraction, Cognitive Restructuring, Formal or Informal Mindfulness? A Data-Based Path Through the Jungle
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Relational Frame Theory, ACT component analyses
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q119

Chair: Thomas Szabo, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Florida Institute of Technology
Discussant: Nic Hooper, University of the West of England

As contextual behavior science (CBS) matures, integration of methods developed in other disciplines becomes possible. Deciding which among several competing or overlapping methods to use with a client can be daunting. Gordon Paul's question,“What treatment, by whom, is most effective for this individual, with that specific problem, under which set of circumstances, and how does it come about?” informs the CBS research papers included in this symposium. In the first paper, Lavelle, Dunne, Mulcahy, & McHugh will present research comparing chatbox-delivered defusion and cognitive restructuring interventions for negative self-referential thoughts. Next, Szabo, Tinnerman, and Haskins will present research comparing defusion and distraction as preventative measures to inoculate against human depression. Finally, Hope-Bell, Hooper, and Thompson will share findings related to a metaphor-based intervention to improve mindfulness without formal contemplative practices. Following the presentations, Dr. Nic Hooper will offer comments and generate discussion topics.

• Chatbot-delivered cognitive defusion verses cognitive restructuring for negative self-referential thoughts
Joseph Lavelle, University College Dublin
Neil Dunne, University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, University College Dublin
Hugh Edward Mulcahy, MD, FRCPI, University College Dublin

Negative self-referential thoughts are posited to be involved in a range of psychological disorders ranging from depression and anxiety to psychosis. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) and Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) are approaches that target negative thoughts via processes of restructuring and defusion respectively. Research has lent support to computerized CBT and ACT while chatbot-delivered CBT has shown preliminary effectiveness in reducing depression and anxiety. The present research aims to compare two brief chatbot interventions which delivered cognitive restructuring and defusion interventions respectively. It was hypothesized that a defusion chatbot would lead to reduced cognitive fusion and thought believability relative to cognitive restructuring and a non-active control. Participants were randomized into one of three conditions (defusion, restructuring, control), engaged for five days and completed thought and mood measures pre- and post-intervention. Differences between groups on measures of: cognitive fusion; thought believability, negativity, discomfort, willingness; psychological flexibility; and mood will be discussed. Despite brevity of interventions, the present study lends support to the use of brief defusion-based chatbot interventions (and chatbots generally) as mental health interventions.

• A Comparison of Pre-teaching Methods in a Learned Helplessness Analogue of Human Depression
Thomas Szabo, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Florida Institute of Technology
Natalie Tinnerman, BCBA, Florida Institute of Technology
Miranda Haskins, Florida Institute of Technology

Thought distraction is a common approach for avoiding unwanted psychological events. Recent research suggests that such strategies may be counterproductive due to the resurgence of suppressed content in similar contexts. An alternative behavior analytic tactic is defusion, in which the literal functions of self-defeating thoughts are undermined and transformed. We pre-taught five participants to use either distraction or defusion strategies when thinking themselves incapable of a task. We then exposed them to repeated trials of unsolvable anagram problems that switched to being solvable without signal. In four out of five participants, defusion led to successful outcomes and distraction to giving up. Results suggest that pre-training in defusion techniques can help individuals to distance themselves from self-defeating thoughts long enough to contact delayed reinforcement.

• Increasing Mindfulness without Formal Mindfulness Practice
Josh Hope-Bell, University of the West of England
Nic Hooper, University of the West of England

Given poor adherence to formal mindfulness practice, this research study sought to determine if it is possible to increase levels of mindfulness without formal mindfulness practice. Specifically, it was hypothesized that metaphors stemming from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) may be helpful in this regard. 115 participants, over a six-day period, were randomly allocated to receive brief metaphor-based interventions, brief mindfulness-based interventions or no intervention. Prior to, immediately following and one-week post-intervention, all participants were required to complete a measure of mindfulness. Results indicated significant increases in mindfulness for the metaphor and mindfulness conditions at post-intervention and at one-week follow-up, relative to the no-intervention control condition. This suggests that there are ways to increase mindfulness which do not involve formal mindfulness practice. The wider implications of these findings are discussed.

Educational Objectives:
1. Participants will describe the uses of chatbox-delivered defusion and cognitive restructuring interventions. 2. Participants will critique the relative strengths and weaknesses of defusion versus distraction as prevention against depression. 3. Participants will describe situations in which to use informal versus formal mindfulness practices.

 

75. When Life is Lame: Navigating Adolescent Mental Health
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Literature review, Original data, Case presentation
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, adolescents, self-harm, protocol
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Ashley Braezeale, Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Discussant: Louise Hayes, Ph.D., The University of Melbourne & Orygen Youth Mental Health

Adolescent mental health has become a rising concern. In fact, 10-20% of adolescents are affected by mental health concerns and suicide is the third leading cause of death among children aged 15-19 years (World Health Organization, 2018). The primary aim of this symposium is to educate attendees on the prevalent presenting problems in adolescents and a novel approach to behavioral treatment. The presenter will discuss the relationship between components of psychological flexibility, family accommodation, and self-harm behaviors in adolescents with severe OCD. The second presenter will discuss a new measure of gender role conflict and its relationship with suicide ideation, self-esteem, and depression. The final presentation will introduce a multi-session Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) protocol that utilizes a singular metaphoric theme (Life is a Show) to guide the adolescent client through all ACT processes in treatment. The symposium will conclude with remarks on the shared concepts in all presentations and the importance of continued work in adolescent mental health.

• Self-Harm and Depression in Adolescents with Severe OCD: Relationships with Family Accommodation and Psychological Inflexibility
Lisa Coyne, Ph.D., Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital
Rebecca Michel, Harvard Medical School/McLean Hospital
John L. McKenna, The New England Center for OCD and Anxiety
Evelyn Gould, Ph.D., McLean Hospital, Harvard University

Recent work has suggested that adolescents with OCD and anxiety are six times more likely to experience depression than younger children, and that 1 in 2 met criteria for a co-occurring mood disorder (Peris, Rozenman, Bergman, Chang, O’Neill & Piacentini, 2017). Our study examined the relationship between depression, suicidal ideation and self-harm behaviors, family accommodation, and contextual behavioral variables; namely, experiential avoidance, cognitive fusion, and valuing behavior, in adolescents with severe obsessive compulsive disorder. Our sample comprised 128 adolescents (Age M = 15.24; SD = 1.76) with severe OCD (M = 29.7; SD = 4.61). We expected to find a positive correlation between depression, self-harm, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms. We also expected that engagement in self-harm behaviors would be associated with higher psychological inflexibility and family accommodation. Strengths and limitations of the current study are discussed, as well as directions for future research.

• Adolescent Suicide Ideation, Depression and Self-Esteem: Relationships to a New Measure of Gender Role Conflict
Cormac Ó Beaglaoich, Ph.D., National Institution for Science and Education (NISE) and University of Limerick
Jessica McCutcheon, Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan
Paul Conway, Ph.D., National Institution for Science and Education (NISE) and University of Limerick
Joan Hanafin, Ph.D., National Institution for Science and Education (NISE) and University of Limerick
Todd G. Morrison, Ph.D., University of Saskatchewan

Among 15-24 year olds in Ireland, completed suicide was responsible for 4.1 times more male deaths than female deaths in 2014 (WHO, 2017). Few international research studies have investigated the relationship between masculinity (as measured by the Gender Role Conflict [GRC]) and suicide ideation, and none within an adolescent Irish context. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to investigate the relationships between a new measure of GRC developed specifically for use with Irish adolescents (I-GRCS-A; O’Beaglaoich, Kiss, Ní Bheaglaoich & Morrison, 2016), and depression, self-esteem, and negative/protective suicide ideation. A sample of 176 secondary school boys (M = 16.9, SD = 0.94) took part in the study. Regression analyses and tests of mediation revealed that depression significantly mediated the relationship between GRC and negative suicide ideation, whilst self-esteem and depression significantly mediated the relationship between GRC and positive suicide ideation. Limitations of the current study are outlined and directions for future research are discussed.

• 3...2...1...ACTion!: A Unified Metaphor Approach to Treatment with Adolescents
Mindy Chadwell, Ph.D., Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Ashley Breazeale, Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center
Emmie Hebert, Munroe-Meyer Institute, University of Nebraska Medical Center

The prevalence of anxiety and depression among the US adolescent population has increased in recent years (Mojtabai & Olson, 2016). Adolescents experiencing symptoms of anxiety or depression often have difficulties with low mood, psychological inflexibility, withdrawal from valued activities, and/or heightened autonomic arousal, among many other symptoms that impair functioning. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a treatment approach aimed at increasing psychological flexibility, increasing contact with the present moment, and increasing engagement in valued activities (Hayes, Strosahl, & Wilson, 2012). While adaptations to ACT have been made to respond to the unique developmental needs of adolescents, there are currently no adolescent-focused ACT approaches that operate from the use of a single metaphor; nor are there protocols that incorporate caregiver involvement. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the 3…2…1 ACTion! protocol, a unified metaphor for use with adolescents presenting in clinic with symptoms of anxiety and depression; as well as to present case study data describing the therapeutic impact of the protocol in relation to increasing psychological flexibility and engagement with valued activities.

• “My Schema is Shouting”: A Contextual Approach to Integrating Schema Therapy and PTSD Treatment
Peter Grau, M.S., Marquette University; Rogers Memorial Hospital
Chad Wetterneck, Ph.D., Rogers Memorial Hospital

Early childhood trauma results in increased risk of PTSD and poorer treatment outcomes from time-limited, evidence-based treatments (Harding, Burns, & Jackson, 2012; Price, 2007). One way these experiences can be understood is through the self-as-context congruent lens of the early maladaptive schema model, which has recently been explored within a CBS framework. In schema theory, early unmet core needs lead to the development of maladaptive schemas (e.g., abandonment, shame/defectiveness), which have been linked to high levels of PTSD symptom severity (Dutra et al., 2008), self-criticism (Thimm, 2017), and interpersonal struggles (Karatzias, 2016). Data from an ACT-informed exposure-based partial hospitalization program (n = 277) was examined for relationships between early maladaptive schemas, PTSD symptom severity, self-compassion, interpersonal functioning, and valued living with moderate to strong correlations between schema severity and the other variables. Longitudinal analyses will be conducted on relationships between schema change scores, symptom reduction, and quality of life. We will discuss ways to increase awareness of schemas and use self-as-context and defusion to disentangle patients from schema-based language systems and movement towards current values.

Educational Objectives:
1. Participants will be able to describe the relationship between self-harm, depression, family accommodation, and psychological flexibility in adolescents with severe OCD. 2. Participants will be able to describe a psychometric measure of gender role conflict and discuss how gender role conflict is related to depression and anxiety. 3. Participants will be able to discuss the unified metaphor for the 3…2…1 ACTion protocol and visually analyze case study data of the therapeutic effects of treatment.

 

76. How to Cry in Contextualism: Exploring Different Contextual Factors of and Interventions for Emotion Regulation
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data
Categories: Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Performance-enhancing interventions, Emotion Regulation, Exercise, Substance Use Disorder, Video Games
Target Audience: Beginner
Location: Q217

Chair: Rebecca Copell, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Discussant: Rhonda Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University School of Medicine

Emotions are an essential part of what it means to be human. While emotions are internal events, the regulating of emotional responses often takes the form of overt behavior that can have maladaptive effects and even pathological implications. It is suggested the difficulties in regulating emotions are central to most if not all psychological disorders. Research in this area needs to then consider not only contextual factors that affect emotion regulation but also interventions to improve emotion regulation, in both clinical and non-clinical settings. This symposium includes three presentations exploring these areas of research. The first presentation will look at how acute emotion regulation is affected by mindfulness and video game interventions as compared to a control game. The second presentation will focus how exercise affects emotion regulation. The final presentation will explore the unique struggles people with substance use disorders have with regulating emotions, especially in terms of depression. A general discussion will follow.

• Relation of Experiential Avoidance, Depression Symptoms, and Emotional Reactivity to a Distressing Laboratory Task in the Context of Inpatient Substance Use Patients
Emily A. Kalantar, University of South Dakota
Rachel C. Bock, University of South Dakota
Lucas D. Baker, University of South Dakota
Christopher R. Berghoff, University of South Dakota
Kim L. Gratz, University of Toledo
Matthew T. Tull, University of Toledo

Individuals with substance use or mood disorders experience emotion regulation difficulties (e.g., Chen et al., 2018; McFarland & Klein, 2009), which may be a source of mutual maintenance for these diagnostic categories. Yet, little extant research has identified individual-level variables that influence such relations in short-term contexts. Experiential avoidance (EA) may be one such factor. The present study aimed to clarify the relations of EA, emotional reactivity, and depression symptoms with a sample of inpatient SUD patients (N=221; Male=141; Mage=35.71; Range=18-61). Participants completed a multi-part distressing laboratory task and ratings of negative emotional responses (anxiety, frustration, and irritation; Lejuez et al., 2002). Multilevel modeling (Preacher, Curran, & Bauer, 2006) indicated significant within-person depression symptom by EA interactions on mean emotion, t=2.87, p=.005, and linear reactivity, t=-2.80, p=.006, across all trials. High EA was associated with elevated mean negative emotion only for individuals who reported elevated depression symptoms. Alternatively, high EA was related to elevated emotional reactivity only for individuals who reported low depression. Theoretical and clinical implications will be discussed.

• Examining the Effect of Acute Aerobic Exercise on Emotion Regulation and Attempts to Control Negative Affect
Madison K. Knox, B.S., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Caitlin T. Daigle, B.S., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Christopher R. Berghoff, Ph.D, University of South Dakota
Randy L. Aldret, Ed.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Greggory R. Davis, Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
David M. Bellar, Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Michael J. McDermott, Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Although physical exercise is associated with reductions in negative mood states, the precise mechanisms of this relation remain unclear. Recent studies indicate that exercise may improve psychological well-being through alterations in emotion regulation yet findings remain preliminary with limitations in the assessment of emotional and physiological responding. Thus, this study utilized a randomized cross-over design in which participants completed a 30-minute aerobic exercise intervention (Exercise) or a 30-minute rest control activity (Rest) followed by a computerized behavioral measurement of emotion regulation (PASAT-C). Results of a 2 (Exercise vs. Rest) × 3 (T1 vs. T2 vs. T3) repeated measures ANOVA controlling for relevant covariates demonstrated a significant condition × time interaction, F(2, 12) = 5.57, p = .004, ηp2 = 0.40, demonstrating that acute aerobic exercise may affect psychological well-being by protecting against declines in ER associated with stress. Results from behavioral distress tolerance task (PASAT-C) and measures of attempts to control negative affect will also be reported.

• Playing with Emotions: The Effects of Video Games and Mindfulness on Acute Emotion Regulation
Jonah McManus, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Emily K. Sandoz, Ph.D., University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Patrick Rappold, University of Louisiana at Lafayette
Madison Gamble, University of Louisiana at Lafayette

Emotion regulation involves any attempt at changing, starting, or stopping covert verbal behavior, and associated emotions. Some experts suggest that difficulties in regulating emotions is central to most, if not all, psychological disorders. For this reason, increasing adaptive emotion regulation is a common therapeutic goal. However, therapeutic goals extend past the therapy context. For example, video game play and mindful breathing are commonly reported as simple approaches anyone can do to manage intense emotions and responses thereto. The current study examined the impact of two brief interventions, video games and mindful breathing, on acute emotion regulation measured via a distress tolerance task and self-reported emotional states as compared to a waiting control. Results showed differing effects of each intervention on emotion regulation and divergent results as measured by the self-report measures versus the distress tolerance task. Steps for future research and limitations as well as implications for assessment will be discussed.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe how different interventions affect emotion regulation. 2. Discuss different models of emotion regulation. 3. Design future studies to further explore emotion regulation.

 

77. Randomized controlled trials of RNT-focused ACT protocols: Emotional disorders, clinical psychology trainees, and adolescents with interpersonal skills deficits.
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Educational settings, Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Relational Frame Theory, Emotional disorders, interpersonal problem solving skills, clinical psychology trainees
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q218

Chair: Daniela M. Salazar, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Discussant: Carmen Luciano, Ph.D., Universidad de Almería

Recent research on clinical RFT has identified repetitive negative thinking (RNT) as an especially counterproductive form of experiential avoidance because of its pervasiveness. RNT is usually the first response to aversive private events and some recent empirical analyses are showing that triggers of RNT are hierarchically related. This analysis has some clinical implications: (a) focusing the intervention on disrupting counterproductive patterns of RNT might be especially powerful and might produce rapid therapeutic gains; and (b) focusing therapeutic work on the triggers at the top of the hierarchy might promote greater generalization of the therapeutic outcomes due to how transformation of functions through hierarchical relations works. Some studies have been developed RNT-focused ACT protocols that have shown very promising outcomes. The current symposium will present new randomized controlled trials that have analyzed the effect of RNT-focused ACT protocols for emotional disorders, the difficulties found by clinical psychology trainess, and for adolescents with interpersonal skills deficits.

• Efficacy of a 2-session RNT-focused ACT protocol in emotional disorders: A randomized waitlist control trial
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Andrés Peña-Vargas, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Eduar S. Ramírez, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Juan C. Suárez-Falcón, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
María B. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Diana M. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Andrea Monroy-Cifuentes, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Ángela Henao, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

This parallel randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) focused on disrupting repetitive negative thinking (RNT) versus a waitlist control (WLC) in the treatment of adult emotional disorders. Forty-eight participants were allocated by means of simple randomization to a 2-session RNT-focused ACT intervention or the WLC. The primary outcomes were emotional symptoms as measured by the DASS-21. Process outcomes included ACT and RNT-related measures: general RNT, experiential avoidance, cognitive fusion, values, and generalized pliance. No blinding procedures were implemented. At the 1-month follow-up, linear mixed effects models showed that the intervention was efficacious in reducing emotional symptoms (d = 2.42, 95% CI [1.64, 3.19]), with 94.12% of participants in the RNT-focused ACT condition showing clinically significant change in the DASS-Total scores versus 9.09% in the WLC condition. The intervention effects were maintained at the 3-month follow-up. No adverse events were found. A very brief RNT-focused ACT intervention was highly effective in the treatment of emotional disorders.

• Acceptance and commitment training focused on repetitive negative thinking for clinical psychology trainees: A randomized controlled trial
Iduar Dereix-Calonge, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Marco A. Sierra, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Andrés Peña-Vargas, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Eduar S. Ramírez, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

This parallel randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect of Acceptance and Commitment Training (ACT) focused on disrupting repetitive negative thinking (RNT) versus a waitlist control (WLC) in clinical psychology trainees. Eighty-five trainees agreed to participate and were allocated by means of simple randomization to a group, 6-session RNT-focused ACT intervention or the WLC. The ACT training was based on an online program for emotional disorders. At posttreatment, repeated measures ANOVA showed that the training was efficacious in reducing emotional symptoms (d = 0.75), depression (d = 0.79), the frequency of behaviors obstructing valued living (d = 0.51), RNT focused on clinical practice (d = 0.89), and general RNT (d = 0.62). Larger effect sizes were obtained by participants showing high levels of emotional symptoms (d = 0.75 to 2.52), with 73.33% of participants obtaining a reliable change in emotional symptoms, and 66.67% a clinically significant change versus 7.14% for both indicators in the WLC condition. An easy-to-implement RNT-focused ACT training is effective in reducing emotional symptoms and promoting valued living in clinical psychology trainees.

• Improving interpersonal skills in adolescents with acceptance and commitment training: A randomized waitlist control trial
Koryn Bernal, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
María B. García-Martín, Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz
Francisco Ruiz, Ph.D., Fundación Universitaria Konrad Lorenz

This parallel randomized controlled trial evaluated the effect acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) versus a waitlist control (WLC) in improving interpersonal skills in adolescents and reducing emotional symptoms. Participants with a low level of emotional intelligence were invited to participate in the study. Forty-two adolescents (11-17 years) agreed to participate. At pretreatment, the sample showed low levels of interpersonal skills, behavioral adaptation, and valued living; and high levels of repetitive negative thinking, psychological inflexibility, and emotional symptoms. Participants were allocated by means of simple randomization to the intervention condition or the waitlist control condition. The intervention was a 3-session, group-based adaptation of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) focused on repetitive negative thinking (RNT). At posttreatment, repeated measures ANOVA showed that the intervention was efficacious in increasing overall interpersonal skills (d = 2.92), values progress (d = 1.38), and reducing emotional symptoms (d = 1.08). No adverse events were found. A brief RNT-focused ACT intervention was highly efficacious in improving interpersonal skills and reducing emotional symptoms in adolescents.

Educational Objectives:
1. List three clinical applications of an RFT analysis of repetitive negative thinking. 2. Discuss the potential of RNT-focused ACT protocols. 3. Describe the efficacy of RNT-focused ACT protocols in different settings.

 

78. Application and treatment efficacy of Compassion Focused Therapy: research findings among different populations
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Literature review, Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Behavioral medicine, Compassion Focused Therapy
Target Audience: Intermediate
Location: Q220

Chair: Chia-Ying Chou, Ph.D., Private Practice
Discussant: Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., The Center for CFT, NYC

Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) is an evidence-based psychotherapy that draws upon our evolved capacity for compassion to facilitate the alleviation of human suffering, including but not limited to that associated with mental health challenges. Growing evidence has supported effectiveness of the therapy in treating symptoms of complex mental health disorders, e.g., Posttraumatic Stress Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, and Eating Disorders, and improving a range of important psychological capacities, such as distress tolerance and openness to receiving compassion. This symposium will present two studies that applied CFT to underserved and less well-studied populations, i.e., individuals with Hoarding Disorder and sex offenders. The presenters will share how CFT was applied to treating the clinical challenges faced by the two populations, and the efficacy of the therapy. Finally, the third study of the symposium will illuminate mechanisms that are important to better treatment outcome of CFT based on self-report and biological evidence gathered from a healthy adult sample. The discussion will focus on the clinical implications of these research findings.

• Treating Hoarding Disorder with Compassion Focused Therapy
Chia-Ying Chou, Ph.D., Reservoir Psychotherapy, Research, and Training
Janice Tsoh, Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco
Martha Shumway, Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco
Lauren Smith, MSc., University of California, San Francisco
Joanne Chan, Psy.D., Private practice
Kevin Delucchi, Ph.D., University of California, San Francisco
Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., The Center for CFT, NYC
Paul Gilbert, Ph.D., OBE, Centre for Compassion Research and Training; University of Derby

Hoarding disorder (HD) was recognized as a psychiatric disorder in 2013. The study aimed to provide an initial evaluation on the potential of Compassion Focused Therapy (CFT) as an intervention for HD. Both CFT and another round of the current standard of treatment, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) were investigated as follow-up treatment options for individuals who had completed CBT but still significantly symptomatic. Forty eligible individuals (20 in each treatment) were enrolled in either group. Treatment feasibility and acceptability were assessed. To explore treatment effectiveness, HD symptom severity, HD-related dysfunctions and their underlying mechanisms were assessed pre- and post-treatment for both treatments. Results showed that CFT yielded 72% retention rate and excellent satisfaction ratings. After receiving CFT, 77% of the treatment completers had HD symptom severity dropped below the cutoff point for clinically significant HD, and 62% achieved clinically significant reduction in symptom severity. These findings were discussed in comparison to those regarding receiving CBT again as a follow-up treatment option. Overall, the findings suggest promising potential of CFT as a treatment for HD.

• The Impact of Compassion Training and Compassion Practice on Psychological Symptoms and Spirituality for Individuals on Public Sex Offender Registries
Theresa M. Robertson, Ph.D., LCPC, Loyola University Maryland

The aim of this research was to examine the efficacy of an 8-week compassion-focused therapy (CFT) group intervention for increasing levels of compassion and spirituality, and decreasing levels of shame, stress, depression, anxiety, and hopelessness among 30 adult men on a public sex offender registry in a major metropolitan area. This research also sought to determine if the amount of between-session compassion practice would predict greater improvements in treatment outcome measures. Participants self-selected and were randomly assigned to one of six 8-week CFT groups. Repeated measures MANOVA revealed significant improvements for participants in self-compassion, spirituality, shame and stress. After controlling for personality, the results of multiple regression analyses indicated that greater levels of self-compassion significantly predicted lower levels of shame, depression, and hopelessness. Finally, greater engagement in between-session compassion practice was found to predict higher levels of self-compassion and lower levels of shame, stress, and depression. The results suggest that CFT may have the potential to positively impact criminogenic factors, including prosocial behavior of those convicted of sexually offending.

• The psychological and physiological effects of a brief compassion focused intervention and the importance of embodying the compassionate self
Marcela Matos, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Cristiana Duarte, Ph.D., University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Joana Duarte, Ph.D., Royal Holloway University of London
José Pinto-Gouveia, Ph.D., MD, University of Coimbra - CINEICC (Center for Research in Neuropsychology and Cognitive and Behavioral Interventions), Portugal
Nicola Petrocchi, Ph.D., John Cabot University
Paul Gilbert, Ph.D., OBE, Centre for Compassion Research and Training; University of Derby

This paper examines the impact of a two-week Compassionate Mind Training (CMT) intervention on emotional, self-evaluative and psychopathology measures and on heart-rate variability (HRV), and explores how participants experienced the compassion practices, and the impact of the quality of practice on the effectiveness of the intervention. Participants (general population and college students) were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: CMT (n=56) and Wait-List Control (n=37). At post-intervention the experimental group significantly increased compassion for the self and openness to the compassion from others, safe and relaxed positive affect, and HRV; and showed reductions in shame, self-criticism and fears of compassion. Results also show that more than how often participants practiced the exercises, it is their perception of helpfulness of the compassion practices and their ability to embody of the compassionate self in everyday life and in moments of difficulty that are associated with increases in compassion for the self, for others and from others, positive affect and compassionate goals, and decreases in self-criticism, fears of compassion and stress, at post-intervention.

Educational Objectives:
1. Attendees will be able to identify compassion-based techniques that are effective in treating individuals with Hoarding Disorder and describe how to apply them. 2. Attendees will select a minimum of two empirically-based rationales for considering the benefits of compassion-based therapeutic approaches for treating individuals convicted of sexual offenses. 3. Attendees will describe which practice qualities in a compassion-focused intervention should be strengthened to improve its effectiveness.

 

88. Expanding our understanding: A Relational Frame Theory Perspective of Implicit Responding and its Measurement
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Original data,
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Educational settings, Bias Intervention, Implicit testing, IRAP, Children, Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST), Sexual Orientation
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q217

Chair: Lynn Farrell, Ph.D., Queen’s University, Belfast

Research examining implicit responding using RFT-based measures continues to enhance our understanding of this process and offer new questions. This collection of papers presents an interesting snapshot of the variety of work being carried out in the domain of implicit relational responding as these measures and our understanding of them continues to be refined. The included papers utilize the IRAP (Papers 1-4) and the FAST (Papers 4 & 5). Paper 1 examines the malleability of implicit gender-STEM bias and has implications for the measurement of implicit responding across time and contexts. Paper 2 extends findings in the domain of fear and avoidance using a verbal rehearsal task, with results having implications for the concept of defusion. Paper 3 assesses psychological flexibility among children while comparing two IRAP presentation formats. Paper 4 extends previous research in the area of implicit sexual responses with a focus on examining both relative and individual implicit biases. Paper 5 closes by discussing the assessment of attitudes towards abortion using the FAST which may offer advantages over other measures of implicit responding.

• Examining the malleability of implicit gender-STEM bias among adults using the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure
Lynn Farrell, Ph.D., Queen’s University, Belfast
Niki Nearchou, Ph.D., University College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., University College Dublin

Implicit gender bias is a barrier to women’s progression in Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) fields. The current study assessed whether implicit gender-STEM bias was influenced by a brief bias intervention. Gender-STEM bias was assessed at two time points post-intervention, both at the explicit level (via rating scales) and the implicit level (via the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure; IRAP). Participants (N = 210; 58.1% women) completed one of four conditions: (i) perspective-taking; (ii) exposure to counter-stereotypical exemplars; (iii) psychoeducation; or (iv) control. The IRAP offered greater detail regarding which relations were influenced by the interventions (e.g. Men- and/or Women-STEM relations). Results indicated that implicit gender-STEM bias is malleable, at least in the short term. The interventions strengthened a positive implicit relation between women and STEM. Psychoeducation appeared most effective. Results from session 2 presented a more complex picture of implicit bias change, as the control group exhibited an unexpected pattern of results. The implications of these findings are discussed in relation to gender-STEM bias and measuring the malleability of implicit bias.

• The Impact of an ACT Based Fear-Related Verbal Rehearsal Task on a Behavior-Behavior Relation and its Implications for the Experimental Analysis of Defusion.
Aileen Leech, Ghent University
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

The current research sought to replicate and extend the findings reported by Leech and Barnes-Holmes (2017) by examining the impact of a Fear-Related verbal rehearsal task on performance on two Implicit Relational Assessment Procedures (IRAPs), approach behaviour towards a spider (a BAT), and the relationship between the two measures. Participants were assigned to one of three conditions; control, accept-fear or reduce-fear. Participants were exposed to two IRAPs one targeting fear (Fear-IRAP) and the other targeting avoidance (Avoidance-IRAP), self-report measures, and a BAT. Consistent with Leech and Barnes-Holmes (2017), there were no significant differences between the three conditions for performances on the IRAPs and BAT. However, correlations between performances on the IRAPs and the BAT were concentrated almost exclusively in the control condition. When considered in the context of the results reported previously, the differential pattern of correlations observed here suggest that the verbal rehearsal task impacted upon a behavior-behavior relation that may be directly relevant to the concept of defusion in the ACT literature.

• Using the IRAP to measure psychological flexibility with children. Comparing natural language statements with a typical sample-target presentation format.
Gloria Torres-Fernandez, M.Sc., University of Jaen
Monica Hernandez-Lopez, Ph.D., University of Jaen
Miguel Rodríguez Valverde, Ph.D., University of Jaén

Few studies have used the IRAP with children (Rabelo et al., 2014; Scanlon et al., 2014). This study is part of a series exploring the use of the IRAP for the assessment of psychological flexibility with children. Specifically, it compares two IRAP presentation formats (typical sample-target vs. natural language statements) as Kavanagh et al. (2016) explored with adults. Seventy-two primary school students (9-10 years old) underwent the IRAP individually. The task assessed the strength of verbal relations among each of two samples (“I have to get rid of” and “I am willing to have”) and different emotional targets (joy, calmness, happiness, sadness, anxiety, and anger). Half of the participants were presented with the labels and targets composing a natural language statement (e.g. I have to get rid of anxiety), while the other half were presented with the samples and targets separate, without lexical links (e.g. get rid – anxiety). There were no significant differences between both experimental conditions. More detailed analyses found that only younger participants completed the IRAP faster in the typical sample-target condition.

• Measuring Implicit Sexual Response Biases to Nude Male and Female Pictures in Androphilic and Gynephilic Women using the IRAP and the FAST
Claudio Silva, M.Sc., Federal University of Minas Gerais
Renato Bortoloti, Ph.D., Federal Universtity of Minas Gerais

Timmins, Barnes-Holmes & Cullen (2016) demonstrated that an Implicit Association Test predicted the sexual orientation of gynephilic and androphilic men in terms of their attraction biases towards pictures of nude males and females. Relative bias scores were obtained, with no information on the separate response biases to each target gender. The present study sought to extend this research by assessing both relative and individual implicit biases using the IRAP.and the FAST (Function Acquisition Speed Test). An explicit measure screened for men with androphilic (n=33) or gynephilic (n=25) orientations on the dimensions of sexual attraction, sexual behaviour, sexual fantasies, hetero/gay lifestyle, and self-identification. The IRAP revealed a non-orthogonal pattern of biases across the two groups and had an excellent ability to predict sexual orientation with areas under the curves of 0,8313 for the relative bias score and 0,7532 and 0,8557 for the bias scores for the male and female pictures, respectively.

• Developing an “implicit” Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST) for indexing strength of attitudes towards abortion.
Isabella Lalor, BSc, Maynooth University
Bryan Roche, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Maynooth
Andrew Crabbe, Maynooth University
Jamie Cummins, Ghent University

The current research was designed to validate a newly developed Function Acquisition Speed Test (FAST; O’Reilly et al., 2012) designed to measure attitudes to abortion among the general population and to retrospectively predict real world behavior in relation to voting for or against the availability of abortion services, in a national referendum. A sample of participants from the general population were exposed to an Implicit Association Test, a FAST procedure, an explicit attitudes to abortion questionnaire and a demographic survey. This procedure allowed for a comparison of FAST and IAT outcomes, inter-correlations between the explicit and implicit measures, as well as the predictive validity of the implicit measures of referendum voting behaviour. Results showed that the FAST performed favorably compared to the IAT in predicting self-reported attitudes and referendum voting behavior. This paper will involve an outline of the basic processes underlying the newly developed FAST method and illustrate how it may offer advantages over existing implicit test methods.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the use of the IRAP and the FAST for the examination of implicit relational responding. 2. Discuss the malleability and measurement of implicit responding across contexts. 3. Compare and contrast measures of implicit responding from an RFT perspective.

 

89. ACT Interventions for Eating and Weight-Related Concerns
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Behavioral medicine, Weight Management, Disordered Eating, Obesity, Type 1 Diabetes
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q218

Chair: Jennifer L. Barney, M.S., Utah State University
Discussant: David Gillanders, Psy.D., University of Edinburgh

Problematic eating behaviors and weight concerns are notoriously difficult to treat. Further, those who experience initial behavioral change or weight loss gains during treatment often struggle to maintain these gains long-term. This symposium presents recent data from clinical trials examining the efficacy of ACT-based interventions to address these difficulties within multiple clinical populations. Each intervention utilizes novel interventions and differential treatment modalities (e.g. skills workshop; self-help; phone coaching; mobile health). Theory, intervention and modality efficacy, lessons learned, and recommendations for future research and applied work based on the outcomes of these studies will be discussed.

• Increasing access to obesity management services: Results from a pilot study of a telephone coaching program using Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for post-bariatric surgery patients
Dayna Lee-Baggley, Ph.D., Nova Scotia Health Authority, Dalhousie University
Tiffany Shepherd Ph.D.
Nicole Vincent, Ph.D.
Sulaye Thakrar, Ph.D.

Obesity is a well-established risk factor for multiple serious health problems and decreased quality of life. Access to services remains a key barrier in addressing obesity throughout Canada. Bariatric surgery is a well-established intervention for obesity, however studies show that a substantial proportion of patients will regain weight after surgery. Patients can minimize this weight gain by continuing to engage in weight-related health behaviors (e.g., portion monitoring, regular physical activity) in the long term. The current pilot study examines an 8-week ACT-based, telephone coaching intervention aimed at improving weight-related health behaviors for post-bariatric surgery patients. The authors will present techniques, clinical examples, and research data from the study. Pre- and post-data on psychological indicators (e.g., mindfulness), behavioral indicators (e.g., physical activity), and health indicators (e.g., weight, quality of life) will be presented. In addition, weekly changes in key psychological processes (e.g., self-compassion) will be examined. Implications for access to obesity management services and long term behavior change will be discussed.

• Evaluating an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy self-help book for weight self-stigma: Results from a randomized trial
Michael E. Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University
Sarah Potts, Ph.D., Utah State University
Jennifer Krafft, M.S., Utah State University

Overweight individuals experience chronic stigma, which is particularly harmful when internalized (i.e., weight self-stigma). ACT has been found to reduce weight self-stigma and improve diet, physical activity, and weight outcomes, but primarily through in-person interventions. The Diet Trap (Lillis, Dahl & Weineland, 2014) is an ACT self-help book targeting weight self-stigma, which can increase access for those who would benefit. The current randomized controlled trial sought to evaluate The Diet Trap and determine whether supplemental phone coaching is needed to be effective. 55 overweight/obese adults reporting high weight self-stigma were randomized to ACT guided self-help with phone coaching, ACT without coaching, or a waitlist. Preliminary results indicate both ACT conditions improved weight self-stigma and psychological inflexibility relative to waitlist. Only the ACT phone coaching condition improved dietary and physical activity behaviors relative to waitlist. No differences were found between the two ACT conditions. Final results will be presented and challenges and opportunities for delivering ACT self-help for weight self-stigma will be discussed.

• iACT: A Mobile Health Intervention to Address Maladaptive Eating and Weight Control among Adults with Type 1 Diabetes
Rhonda M. Merwin, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center
Ashley A. Moskovich, Ph.D., Duke University Medical Center

Maladaptive eating and weight control are common among young women with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and increases the risk of early and severe diabetes-related medical complications and premature death. Conventional treatments for eating disorders are far less effective for individuals with T1D, highlighting the need for innovative treatments. We developed a novel ACT-based intervention combining individual sessions and a tailored mobile app for individuals with T1D (iACT), based on momentary assessment of target behaviors in T1D patients’ natural environment and qualitative research. Results from our pilot study indicate significant improvements in diabetes self-management and glycemic control. HbA1c levels also decreased with a significant decrease for participants with HbA1c>8. Participants reported greater acceptance of distressing thoughts/feelings about diabetes, and acceptance correlated with end-of-treatment HbA1c. Although not directly targeted, diabetes distress also significantly decreased pre-to-post treatment. This paper will provide an overview of this novel treatment, findings, and implications.

• Using novel behavioral interventions to improve long-term weight loss: A randomized trial comparing acceptance and commitment therapy and self-regulation for weight loss treatment seeking adults with overweight and obesity
Jason Lillis, Ph.D., Brown University Medical School
Rena R. Wing, Ph.D., Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, The Miriam Hospital/Brown Medical School

This randomized controlled trial compared an ACT workshop (ACT), a Self-Regulation workshop (SR), and a no-workshop control (Control) for weight loss treatment seeking adults who lost ≥5% of their body weight after completing a 3-month weight loss intervention (N=102). All three groups utilized a self-monitoring system that enabled participants to report key behaviors each week and receive weekly email messages for the 3 months following the workshop intervention. Retention at study end (24 months) was 80% for both the ACT and SR conditions, and 58% for Control. Participant acceptability ratings were generally positive, with slightly higher ratings on ACT as compared to SR. At 24 months, participants in the ACT condition lost significantly more weight when compared to the no-workshop control (-7.18% vs -1.15%; F=4.92; p=.033 ; d=.73). Additionally at 24 months, a greater percentage of ACT participants achieved ≥10% weight loss when compared to both the SR and Control groups (χ2=9.99, p=.007). Limitations, implications, and future directions will be discussed.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the theory and development of ACT interventions for addressing eating- and weight-concerns. 2. Assess outcomes data from multiple trials implementing novel ACT-based interventions for treating eating- and weight-concerns within various populations. 3. Discuss challenges and future directions for research and implementation of ACT interventions for eating- and weight-related concerns.

 

90. Parental Burnout - Guided Web-based ACT as a Solution
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Literature review, Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Performance-enhancing interventions, Parents
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q220

Chair: Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Discussant: Juho Strömmer, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Parents whose children have chronic conditions face an increased risk of worries and stress in everyday life, which can lead to burnout (Anclair et al., 2009; Miodrag & Hodapp, 2010). Web-based interventions can provide one solution for delivering psychological support for parents, who often have challenges in finding time to access face-to-face services. This symposium presents and compares the results of two randomized studies conducted in Sweden and Finland, and discusses the mechanisms of change and factors influencing engagement in the interventions. The three talks also explore implications for delivering guided web-based support for parents.

• Web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy intervention on wellbeing of parents whose children have chronic conditions: Effectiveness and mechanisms of change
Essi Sairanen, Ph.D., Karlstad University
Raimo Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Kirsikka Kaipainen, Tampere University
Fredrik Carlstedt, M.D., The County Council of Värmland, Research Unit in Primary Health Care
Malin Anclair, Ph.D., Karlstad University
Arto Hiltunen, Ph.D., Karlstad University

Web-based interventions offer a solution for delivering psychological support for parents of children with a chronic condition. We investigated the outcomes of a web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT)-based intervention for parents of children with a chronic disease or functional disability. Psychological flexibility processes were investigated as mechanisms of change in the intervention. Participants (N=74) with burnout symptoms were randomly assigned to a web-based ACT intervention or a waiting list control condition. Symptoms of burnout (SMBQ), depression, anxiety and stress (DASS) as well as ACT-related processes of psychological flexibility (AAQ), cognitive fusion (CFQ) and mindfulness (FFMQ) were measured before and after the intervention period and at the four months follow-up measurement. The ACT web-intervention lasted 10 weeks and was guided by students of psychology. The ACT web-intervention produced significant improvements in burnout and depressive symptoms. Improvements were also observed in mindfulness skills of observing, describing, acting with awareness and non-reactivity as well as in cognitive defusion. Improvements in cognitive defusion and mindfulness skills mediated changes in psychological symptoms.

• Guided web-based ACT for parental burnout: An effectiveness study
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Inka Pakkala, Ph.D., GeroCenter Foundation for Aging Research & Development
Juho Strömmer, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä
Kirsikka Kaipainen, Ph.D., Tampere University
Raimo Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Internet-delivered interventions are one way to reach out to exhausted parents of children with chronic conditions or functional disability. Based on the experiences and results of a study conducted in Sweden, we developed a similar web-based ACT intervention for Finnish parents of children with chronic conditions or functional disabilities. Results and experiences from the Swedish and Finnish studies will be compared. Participants (N=40) were recruited on parent associations’ Facebook groups and randomly assigned to guided web-based ACT condition and a control condition receiving psychoeducation. The web-based ACT condition received a 10-week web intervention including three remote meetings with a psychologist through the telemedicine application Doxy.me. Symptoms of burnout (SMBQ), depression (PHQ), health-related quality of life (RAND-36), parent experience of child illness (PECI), parent psychological flexibility (PPF), and mindfulness (FFMQ) were measured before and after the intervention and at 4-month follow-up. In this paper we will discuss the results and experiences of the Finnish study.

• Understanding engagement in web-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy interventions for parental burnout: Usage, dose-response and user experiences
Kirsikka Kaipainen, Ph.D., Tampere University
Essi Sairanen, Ph.D., Karlstad University
Päivi Lappalainen, Ph.D., University of Jyväskylä

Web-based acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) interventions have shown their capacity to improve mental health and well-being (Brown et al., 2016). Engagement in technology-aided interventions is considered to be linked to intervention outcomes (Mattila et al., 2016; Short et al., 2018). Engagement can be defined as a composite of various measures such as usage time, task completion, interaction activity and user experience. We investigated how engagement influences outcomes in guided web-based acceptance and commitment therapy interventions for parents whose children have chronic conditions. We present findings from two studies: the first study was conducted in Sweden in 2017 (10-week intervention; N=36; median usage time 2:37 hours), and the second in Finland in spring 2019. Results related to the dose-response relationship between usage and the changes in psychological measures will be discussed. User experience findings of the two interventions will be compared to illustrate design choices that may have an influence on the engagement.

Educational Objectives:
1. Explain the mechanisms of change in a web-based ACT for parental burnout. 2. Discuss similarities and differences in guided web-based interventions for parental burnout in different countries. 3. Describe how user engagement in web-based interventions is connected to intervention effects, and apply this knowledge in intervention design.

Saturday, 29 June

100. Education and rehabilitative applications of SMART training
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, Performance-enhancing interventions, Educational settings, SMART training, Children, Educational settings, Alzheimer's disease, Cognitive rehabilitation
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: QG13

Chair: Bryan Roche, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Maynooth
Discussant: Ian Stewart, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway

SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training) is an RFT web-based multiple exemplar training that has been demonstrated effective in raising cognitive skills and improve educational outcomes. The symposium offers the opportunity to know about the latest researches in the field. The first paper will present two of the largest stratified (by ability) active-controlled studies to date in which the utility of SMART training for improving matrix reasoning and examination performance was tested. The second presentation will present data on the effects of a SMART intervention on intellectual ability and measures of everyday attention in children aged attending school in the UAE. A newly-developed SMART:Remedial program, which aims to target more basic relational responding skills in individuals with developmental or intellectual difficulties, will be presented in the third paper. In the last one data of SMART as an add-on, non-pharmacological intervention to cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) to increase cognitive skills in Alzheimer’s patients will be presented and seem to suggest that the training might slow down cognitive decline and improve general cognitive functioning in AD subjects.

• Two active-controlled trials to test the utility of relational operant training for enhancing children’s non-verbal IQ and subsequent educational outcomes.
Shane McLoughlin, University of Chester
Ian Tyndall, University of Chichester
Antonina Pereira, University of Chichester
Teresa Mulhern, University of Chester

Meta-analyses of randomized controlled trials suggest that cognitive training does not work. Behavior-analytic interventions are typically excluded from these meta-analyses due to their small samples. SMART is one form of gamified behavior-analytic training that has shown promise as a way to raise cognitive ability and improve educational outcomes. We will present two of the largest stratified (by ability) active-controlled studies to date in which we test the utility of SMART training for improving matrix reasoning and examination performance. The first study (N = 70; ages 12-14; active control = computer coding) was conducted in an Irish secondary school. The second (N = 39; ages 7-9; active control = online chess) was conducted in an Irish primary school. In each study, SMART successfully raised matrix reasoning ability. Analyzed together (N = 119; 1-β = .998), we found an overall increase in matrix reasoning of 7.18 non-verbal IQ points (ƞp2 = .17) with a low training dosage. Our results suggest that SMART may be used to raise cognitive ability and improve educational outcomes on a larger scale.

• A Relational Frame Skills Training Intervention to Increase IQ and Selective Attentional Abilities in 11-12 Year Old Children
Bryan Roche, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Maynooth
Ian Grey, Zayed University
Anna Dillion, Zayed University
Justin Thomas, Zayed University
Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D., Maynooth University, Ireland and Smithsfield Clinic (private practice)
Dylan Colbert, Maynooth University

The current study investigated the effects of a SMART (Strengthening Mental Abilities through Relational Training) intervention on intellectual ability and measures of everyday attention. Sixteen children aged between 11 and 12 years attending school in the UAE received approximately 1-5 hours of training per week in derived relational responding skills via a computerized on-line programme (SMART) over 13 weeks. Attentional abilities and intelligence were tested at baseline and follow-up using the Test of Everyday Attention-2 and the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence, respectively. Ten further children matched for age and baseline intellectual ability served as waiting controls. Results showed significant gains on IQ for the experimental participants only, whereas all participants showed significant gains on attentional skills, which was not related to the condition. Implications for future work and applications are discussed.

• The SMART:R system: A pilot analysis of a remedial relational skills training programme designed to increase intellectual performance
Dylan Colbert, Maynooth University
Sarah Cassidy, Ph.D., Maynooth University, Ireland and Smithsfield Clinic
Bryan Roche, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Maynooth

The SMART system (Strengthening Mental Abilities with Relational Training) has shown considerable efficacy in increasing intellectual performance. However, individuals with developmental or intellectual difficulties may not be able to access the benefits provided by this program, due to a high prerequisite relational skill fluency level. The current paper represents the first analysis of a newly-developed SMART:Remedial program, which aims to target more basic relational responding skills. A sample of Irish primary school children currently attending additional educational support (n = 22) was divided into two ability-matched groups, with experimental participants receiving bi-weekly SMART:R training sessions over a 16-week period while control participants received no additional intervention. Results indicated that SMART:R exerted a significant impact on WASI Full-Scale, Verbal and Performance IQ, as well as on a measure of relational skill. The current findings provide further support for the effectiveness of relational skills training in increasing intellectual performance, as well as providing preliminary validation of a first-build SMART:R intervention program.

• SMART aging: Improving cognitive skills in Alzheimer’s patient undergoing AChI treatment
Giovambattista Presti, Ph.D., MD, Kore University, Enna
Salvatore Torregrossa, Alzheimer and Dementia Unit – Neurodegenerative Disorders O.U., A.S.P. 2
Edoardo Cumbo, Alzheimer and Dementia Unit – Neurodegenerative Disorders O.U., A.S.P. 2
Daniela Stornaiuolo, Kore University, Enna
Annalisa Oppo, Sigmund Freud University, Milan
Bryan Roche, Ph.D., National University of Ireland Maynooth

Twenty-six patients with a diagnosis of mild-to-moderate Alzheimer’s disease (AD) were enrolled in a prospective, randomized, parallel-group trial to evaluate the efficacy of SMART training (RFT) as an add-on non-pharmacological intervention to cholinesterase inhibitors (ChEIs) to increase cognitive skills. Participants in the AChI+RFT group (n=13; 5 male and 8 female, mean age 78yrs) were exposed to a mean of 35-38 out of the 70 training sessions of SMART. Control group (n=13; 6 male and 7 female, mean age 77.38yrs) received only drug treatment. MODA (Milan Overall Dementia Assessment), Coloured Progressive (CPM) and attentive matrices assessed cognitive functioning. Patients treated with RFT (n=13) scored significantly better (p>0.05 vs baseline; p>0.05 vs ChEIs) on MODA, CPM and attentive matrices at the end of training. After 9 months FU a decay of the RFT group on MODA was present. These data seem to suggest that an RFT-based training might slow down cognitive decline in AD subjects treated with ChEI, and that number of training sessions and duration of the training could be critical factors for future studies.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe latest applications of SMART training in educational and rehabilitative contexts. 2. Discuss its utility with a number of populations such as non-English speakers, individuals with developmental difficulties and Alzheimer’s patients. 3. Assess the effectiveness of SMART training on a larger scale.

 

106. Increases in quality of life using novel third-wave treatment for cancer for sufferers and informal carers
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Cancer patients, caregivers
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate,
Location: Q158

Chair: Silvia Golita, Babes-Bolyai University
Discussant: Andreas Larsson, Ph.D., Stockholm University

The number of new cancer incidents are on the increase globally and cancer is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide (WHO, 2019). With advancement in cancer screening and treatment people are living longer with 50% now surviving 10 years or more (Cancer Research UK, 2019). Due to the threat of mortality, significant treatment burden and morbidity people diagnosed with cancer and their carers live with physical and psychosocial problems that may compromise their quality of life (Torre et al, 2016). Third-wave therapies or contextual approaches such as ACT, CFT and Mindfulness-based therapy may be of particular pertinence by offering an intervention model that may be better suited to the individualistic nature of cancer adjustment than second wave therapies (Hulbert-Williams & Storey, 2014). The current symposium brings together existing knowledge of third-wave treatment and people affected by cancer in under researched areas including young people with cancer, informal carers and web-based interventions.

• ACT with Mindfulness and Compassion course: A pilot for young adults diagnosed with cancer
Sari Harenwall, The Maggie Keswick Jencks Cancer Caring Centres Trust; Bradford District Care NHS Foundation Trust
Danielle Wilson, Newcastle Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust
Alice Bentley, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Trust
Karen Verrill, The Maggie Keswick Jencks Cancer Caring Centres Trust
Lesley Howells, The Maggie Keswick Jencks Cancer Caring Centres Trust

Young adults (YA) diagnosed with cancer experience elevated risk of Distress, Depression and Anxiety (DDA: Lang et al., 2015). The combined trend of increased incidents of cancer in 15-24 year olds and increased survival rates (Cancer Research UK, 2019) calls for effective and accessible treatment to be available. The study piloted an 8-week ACT with Mindfulness and Compassion (ACTMC) group intervention for YA (18-31, m= 22.6) with cancer (n=9). The primary aim was to explore acceptability and feasibility with the secondary aim of measuring effectiveness in reducing distress and increase quality of life (QoL). Session ratings (mean ranging from 7.04-8.33 on 4 0-10 point likert-scales) and high attendance (m = 6 Std=0) indicated acceptability and feasibility. Secondary outcomes showed reduction in anxiety, depression and distress and an increase in psychological flexibility and QoL immediately after the course and maintained at 3 months follow-up. The pilot shows promise for ACTMC group interventions with valuable lessons learned to inform the design of randomized controlled trials as the necessary next stage.

• Compassionate Mind Training for informal caregivers of cancer patients: A pilot study
Elsa Olterman, M.S., Stockholm Health Care Services
Andreas Larsson, Ph.D., Stockholm University

Informal caregivers of cancer patients often experience increased anxiety and depressive symptoms and decreased QOL (Stenberg, et al. 2014). Existing interventions designed to alleviate these symptoms for informal caregivers show inconsistent and generally small to moderate effects which leaves room for extending research (Frambes et al, 2018). Compassionate Mind Training (CMT) is promising in decreasing depressive symptoms, self-criticism and shame (Matos et al., 2017). This pilot study aims to investigate the feasibility and acceptability of a four-week CMT course for young informal caregivers of cancer patients. Six Swedish individuals aged 25-33 (x̅ = 29, sd = 2.7) participated. On a group level the depressive symptoms decreased (r = -0.58) and QOL increased (r = -0.64) with better effect than what has been shown with existing interventions. The majority of the participants also arrived at a reliable clinical significant change and comments from participants reflected the study`s feasibility and acceptability. Even when considering the limited number of participants and the pilot study-format, the results indicate CMT as a promising intervention for informal caregivers of cancer patients.

• A Guided Internet-based Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Intervention for Romanian Women Diagnosed with non-metastatic breast cancer: Study protocol for a randomized controlled trial
Silvia Golita. Ph.D Cand, Babes-Bolyai University
Adriana Baban, Ph.D., Babes-Bolyai University

The first two years post-diagnosis are most negatively impacted by psychosocial and physical problems for non-metastatic breast cancer patients. The ACT model is proven beneficial for this population, further research needing to test a web-based version, which is more (cost)-effective and easily accessible. This intervention aims to improve quality of life and enhance involvement in meaningful activities. Acceptability, effectiveness, and mechanism of change will be assessed. 160 women recruited online and offline will be randomized to the intervention or to expressive writing as control condition. The intervention is delivered in 8-10 weeks via a counsellor guided online platform containing eight ACT-consistent modules. Data collection will occur at baseline, week 3 and 5, post-intervention along with qualitative and usage data and at 10 weeks follow-up. Primary outcomes: quality of life, life satisfaction. Secondary outcomes: emotional functioning, self-efficacy. Process outcomes: psychological flexibility, thought suppression, values based-living. Mediation and growth curve analysis and an ITT approach will be applied. This RCT will assess the first web-based ACT intervention for breast cancer patients against an active control group.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe and discuss challenges in setting up group based interventions for young adults living with persistent health problems. 2. Describe the potential benefits of Compassionate Mind Training for the psychological difficulties informal caregivers of cancer patients can experience. 3. Develop design and decision-making skill necessary in the process of building a web-based ACT intervention for a specific population.

 

107. From human to robot therapists: How the functions of ‘therapists’ have evolved in the context of ACT for cigarette smoking cessation: Washington State, USA Chapter Sponsored
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Therapist Process
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q217

Chair: Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center & University of Washington
Discussant: Michael Levin, Ph.D., Utah State University

Consumer technologies can serve functions similar to human therapists. Smartphone apps, conversational agents ("chatbots"), and avatars with human-like nonverbal behaviors are providing people support, empathy, goal setting, and skill building right in the palm of their hands. Are we being replaced by robots? If not, what is our function as therapists? Can brain imaging studies give us answers? We will present original data on a full spectrum of “therapists” providing ACT interventions for health behavior change: human delivered intervention (Dr. Megan Kelly), smartphone app delivered intervention (Dr. Robert Whelan), chatbot conversational agent delivered intervention (Dr. Jonathan Bricker), and an avatar delivered intervention (Dr. Noreen Watson). We will focus on: How these different notions of “therapist” activate ACT processes, stimulate regions of the brain, and impact treatment outcome; How patients experience these different notions of therapist, in terms of receptivity, engagement, and satisfaction. Our broader goal is to develop a more flexible relationship to the concept of therapist, appreciating that flexibility as it applies to the world’s most preventable cause of premature death: cigarette smoking.

• Acceptability and Preliminary Efficacy of an In-Person Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Post-traumatic Stress Disorder and Tobacco Addiction
Megan M. Kelly, Ph.D, Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital; University of Massachusetts Medical School
Kendra Pugh, M.A., Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital; University of Massachusetts Medical School
Steven D. Shirk, Ph.D., Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital; University of Massachusetts Medical School

Veterans with PTSD smoke at rates 2-3 times higher than the general population. However, few treatments specifically target emotional obstacles to smoking cessation for veterans with PTSD. The present study evaluated the acceptability and preliminary efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for PTSD and Tobacco Addiction (ACT-PT), which helps veterans with PTSD overcome emotional challenges to quitting smoking. U.S. Veterans with PTSD were randomized to either nine face-to-face individual counseling sessions of ACT-PT (n=16) or the American Lung Association’s Freedom from Smoking Program (FFS; n=20). For veterans in the ACT-PT condition, 26% quit smoking at the end of treatment vs. 0% in FFS. For treatment completers, 50% in ACT-PT vs. 0% in FFS quit smoking at the end of treatment. Veterans were significantly more likely to reduce their smoking in ACT-PT vs. FFS. Veterans reported high satisfaction scores for ACT-PT and liking the one-on-one format. Veterans reported that the mindfulness exercises of ACT-PT were the most helpful treatment component. Overall, ACT-PT appears to be a promising and well-received smoking cessation treatment for veterans with PTSD.

• A longitudinal analysis of neural changes associated with SmartQuit App usage
Nigel Vahey, Ph.D., Trinity College Dublin
Louise McHugh, Ph.D., School of Psychology, University College Dublin
Robert Whelan, Ph.D., Trinity College Dublin

One of the most popular contemporary reformulations of the smoker-therapist relationship is in terms of smartphone applications, which coach smokers in various techniques related to successfully managing tobacco cravings. SmartQuit was designed to automate techniques from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) that have already proven successful at promoting smoking-cessation. Forty participants were recruited into a longitudinal study. Brain activity during assays of response inhibition and reward processing, measured using electroencephalography, were recorded immediately prior to smoking cessation. Contingent on bio-verified abstinence, participants repeated the assessment at one week and one month. Machine learning was used to identify the neural, behavioral, clinical and demographic variables associated with SmartQuit usage and smoking cessation. These data provide a first test of how brain activity associate with SmartQuit usage relates to bio-verified duration of smoking-cessation.

• "Hi, its Ellen. Are you free to chat?": First randomized trial of a conversational agent chatbot for cigarette smoking cessation
Jonathan Bricker, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center & University of Washington
Kristin E. Mull, M.S., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center
Brie Sullivan, Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center

Computer-driven text messaging interventions are a prominent therapeutic technology. However, text messaging has modest treatment outcomes, driven largely by low user engagement. Fortunately, a new technology provides a potentially game-changing solution. Machine learning, natural language processing, and cloud computing are together creating conversational agents (CAs), which are digital coaches designed to form social-emotional connections with users. CAs are supportive, empathic, reflectively listen, personalize responses, and offer skills training appropriately timed to user needs. To date, there are only 5 trials of CAs for any behavior change--and none for smoking cessation. Through an iterative user-centered design process and a 14-day diary study of 8 users, we developed a CA for smoking cessation, called “QuitBot,” and then tested it in a randomized controlled trial (N = 300), comparing it to the US National Cancer Institute's SmokefreeTXT text messaging intervention with 3-month follow-up (93% data retention). We will present comparative results on participants’ (1) engagement and satisfaction, (2) therapeutic alliance, and (3) quit smoking rates. We will discuss implications for the contextual behavior science of therapeutic relationships.

• Why unicorns don’t make good therapists: Design of an avatar-led, ACT-based digital smoking cessation intervention targeted for sexual and gender minority young adults
Noreen Watson, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center
Maria Karelka, Ph.D., University of Cyprus
Megan Kelly, Ph.D., Edith Nourse Rogers Memorial Veterans Hospital
Melissa Gasser, B.A., University of Washington
Edit Serfozo, M.P.H., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center
Jaimee Heffner, Ph.D., Fred Hutch Cancer Research Center

In the US, sexual and gender minority (SGM) young adults (YAs) have a smoking prevalence twice as high as non-SGM YAs and are a population that experiences tobacco-related health disparities. In 2018, we began adapting an existing, avatar-led, web-based program based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy that previous research suggests is effective for YAs at all stages of readiness to quit smoking to meet the unique needs of SGM YAs. Employing a user-centered design framework of literature reviews, review of existing programs, and 2 rounds of user feedback (n=7), we identified what unique needs this intervention should address (e.g., mental health, e-cigarettes, stigma), prioritized changes to the original intervention (e.g., importance of an inspiring, relatable avatar to guide the program), and have finalized the program’s content in preparation for an upcoming single-arm pilot trial. In this presentation, we will detail the identified needs of this population and how we adapted the existing ACT exercises and engagement features of the program to address these needs, with particular focus on the program’s avatar guide.

Educational Objectives:
1. Develop a more flexible relationship to the concept of therapist. 2. Describe how different notions of “therapist” activate ACT processes, stimulate regions of the brain, and impact smoking cessation treatment outcome. 3. Explain how patients experience these different notions of therapist, in terms of receptivity, engagement, and satisfaction.

 

109. "Does it really work?" New approaches to guiding and evaluating interventions in organizations and groups
Symposium (10:35-12:05)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Case presentation,
Categories: Organizational behavior management, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Performance-enhancing interventions, measurement, prosocial, workgroups, organizations
Target Audience: Intermediate,
Location: Q220

Chair: Amanda Hagenbeek-Gels, M.S., AMHG Advies
Discussant: Andrew Gloster, Ph.D., University of Basel

During recent years, there's been an increased focus on ways to improve the efficacy and well-being of workgroups within organizations. Methods based on contextual behavior science, most notably the Prosocial initiative, are gaining momentum although further empirical support is needed to understand the impact. To support the development of evaluations it's important to create measures that allow systematic adaptation and assessment of the effectiveness of interventions. We will briefly present the components of the Prosocial initiative, and describe two approaches to measurement within this context. The third presentation features psychometric data and examples of practical application of a newly developed measure focused on social interactions in workgroups, based on the Nurturing Environments framework (Biglan, Flay, Embry, & Sandler, 2012).

• Overview of the Prosocial Core Design Principles for Groups and Suggestions for Operationalizing to Enhance and Further Develop Behavioral Measures.
Julia Fiebig, Ph.D., ABA Global Initiatives, LLC, Ball State University
Rebecca A. Watson, ABA Global Initiatives, LLC, RSU 13
Brittany T. Mazur, Private Consultant

Behavior science offers tools that can help groups identify values and pinpoint which behaviors are most critical to gain optimal team outcomes. Values are seen as conduits that inform an individual’s behavior (Ciarrochi, Fisher, & Lane, 2011) and are the result of an individual’s history of responding and reinforcement (Skinner, 1971). To connect values to behavior the Prosocial process involves using the Acceptance and Commitment Training Matrix (Polk, Schoendorff, Webster, & Olaz, 2016) and eight Core Design Principles (CDPs) for group interaction (Wilson, Ostrom, & Cox, 2013) to help groups clarify common purpose, build flexibility, and cultivate collaborative relationships for group wellbeing and improved performance of the team. In this talk, we will provide an overview of the CDPs and share data showing impact of the Prosocial process on team performance and engagement across multiple educational, public service organizations. Additionally, we will share practical suggestions for operationalizing each CDP, making these principles observable and measurable within and across groups to facilitate flexible and healthy group dynamics that aim to positively impact cooperation, performance, and well-being.

• Prosocial: Evolving a community approach to measurement & practice.
Ian MacDonald, Ph.D., University of Binghamton
Paul Atkins, Ph.D., Institute for Positive Psychology and Education, Australian Catholic University

The Prosocial process involves a set of tools and ideas for improving collaboration within and between groups. While the initiative is informed by modern evolutionary theory, and rests on evidence from Ostrom's Nobel Prize winning research and the field of CBS, many aspects of the process await empirical testing as a package. Consequently, this talk has two inter-related aims. First, we introduce some of the specific tools we’re developing to assist the growing community of Prosocial facilitators and trainers to measure the effectiveness of their work. Second, and looking to the future of Prosocial, we discuss potential opportunities and challenges associated with a community-directed, co-evolutionary process of measurement and research unfolding over our distributed network of researchers, practitioners, tools and methods.

• Measuring Nurturance in Work Environments - an instructive assessment for improving social work environments.
Magnus Johansson, M.S., Oslo Metropolitan University
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., Oregon Research Institute

The Nurturing Environments Observation Form (NEOF) was created based on the Nurturing Environments framework (Biglan, Flay, Embry, & Sandler, 2012) as a free to use questionnaire meant to provide clear targets of change to improve the social work environment in a group or organization. The NEOF contains behavioral items connected to the four domains of Nurturing Environments - toxic social conditions, prosocial behavior, limiting problems, and psychological flexibility. By collecting data on both frequency of behaviors and desirability, group level analysis results in both prescriptive targets of change and targets derived from discrepancies between frequency and desirability. Psychometric data and strategies for analyzing and presenting NEOF data for group development will be presented.

Educational Objectives:
1. Participants will list and describe the 8 Core Design Principles of cooperative groups and discuss examples of response classes of behavior related to each principle and suggestions for measurement. 2. Participants will use data from the Nurturing Environments Observation Form to inform interventions to improve the social work environment of workgroups. 3. Participants will discuss the challenges and opportunities of creating a measurement system to be used by a community of researchers.

 

114. Strengthening the foundations: Advances in basic RFT research
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Didactic presentation
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Educational settings, Functional contextual neuroscience and pharmacology, Functional contextual approaches in related disciplines, Relational Frame Theory, Artificial intelligence, Children, skill assessment, RFT, remedial education
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: The Studio

Chair: Sabrina Norwood, M.S., Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester

The expansion of RFT into various applied domains has highlighted the importance of continuing to examine and increase our understanding of psychological phenomenon through basic RFT research. This symposium brings together a collection of papers which contribute to this endeavor, showcasing the variety to be found in terms of both topic and approach. Paper 1 examines repertoires of arbitrarily applicable relational responding (AARR) among typically-developing children and children with Autism Spectrum Disorder, with an additional focus on contextual conditions. Paper 2 combines AARR with Artificial Intelligence, demonstrating an Artificial General Intelligence system problem-solving using relational frames. Paper 3 expands research on the transfer of conditioned fear using a more current recommended psychophysiological measure – eye-blink startle. Paper 4 utilizes transformation of stimulus functions to understand the euphemism treadmill effect, with implications for stigma reduction. Paper 5 highlights the importance of Randomized-Control Trials in basic research, enhancing our understanding of metaphors and the impact of additional contextual cues. Paper 6 finishes by examining how pliance plays a mediatory role in the relationship between perfectionism cognitions and self-esteem.

• Assessing Derived Relations in Typically-developing Children and Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder: the role of assessment context and relational complexity across broad relational repertoire.
Krystyna Pomorska Ph.D., University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Paweł Ostaszewski, University of Social Sciences and Humanities
Yvonne Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

The research aimed at exploring the core repertoires of arbitrarily applicable relational responding in typical and atypical development. Across two studies, we assessed repertoires of co-ordination, distinction, comparison, opposition, and deictic relations in typically-developing children aged 6-8 years and in children with ASD aged 6-10 years. The other aim was to systematically investigate the contextual conditions under which the two samples of children could or could not demonstrate the target relational responses (i.e., by testing the relations in more or less naturalistic contexts). Another aim was to investigate the functional distinctions between mutually entailed and combinatorially entailed relational responding, as this functional distinction has received limited empirical scrutiny, but may be important in terms of targeting relational responding skills for remedial purposes. The results of both studies suggest that relational repertoires do not develop uniformly from non-arbitrary to arbitrary or from simple to complex relations. Furthermore, the context in which these repertoires are assessed appears to be important but differently for typically and atypically developing children.

• Arbitrarily applicable relational responding in an artificial general intelligence framework
Robert Johansson, Ph.D., Stockholm University and Linköping University
Jonas Ramnerö, Stockholm University
Arne Jönsson, Linköping University

During the last few years we have seen an enormous progress in the field of artificial intelligence. However, not much work has been done in studying whether machines can do AARR. It is clear that AARR is a domain-independent process, potentially occuring at many levels, and seems to be involved in many cognitive functions. Hence, it seems like a promising approach to consider AI models that aim to build general-purpose intelligent systems that could perform in a wide range of domains. A subfield in AI, Artificial General Intelligence (AGI) is a small but active field of research where these questions are explored. One example of an AGI system is NARS (Non-Axiomatic Reasoning System; Wang, 2013). In NARS, its various cognitive functions are uniformly carried out by a central reasoning-learning process following a “non-axiomatic” logic (Wang, 2013). In the talk, we will provide examples of how forms of AARR can be specified in NARS. Using this, we will show how NARS solves various problems that require repeated applications of different relational frames.

• Experimental analysis of the transfer of conditioned fear with multiple physiological measures.
Miguel Rodríguez Valverde, Ph.D., University of Jaén
Sergio Jordan-del-Jesus, B.A., University of Jaen
Monica Hernandez-Lopez, Ph.D., University of Jaen

Although research on the transfer of aversively conditioned respondent functions is key to understanding human fear and anxiety, there is limited empirical evidence. The few published studies are based on skin conductance responses (SCRs) as the measure of fear. However, current recommendations in psychophysiology research point to fear-potentiated blink startle as a more adequate measure. Forty-one participants underwent an MTS procedure for the formation of two five-member equivalence classes. Two elements from each class were used in a differential aversive conditioning procedure (CS+1: B1; CS+2: C1; CS-1: B2; CS-2) with electric shock as the UCS. Transfer tests were presented with the remaining class elements. Acoustic eye-blink startle (EMG activity of orbicularis oculi) was the main dependent variable (SCRs and heart rate were recorded too). Results show a transfer effect at the group level with the startle measure, with a significant main effect for stimulus class [F(1,40)= 5.696; p= ; η2= .449], but no significant main effect for trial nor any significant interaction (both Fs< 1). Similar results were obtained with SCRs.

• Examining the euphemism treadmill effect using transformation of stimulus functions
Sabrina Norwood, M.S., Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, Ph.D., Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Nicholas J Hulbert-Williams, Ph.D., Centre for Contextual Behavioural Science, University of Chester
Michelle Mattison, Ph.D., University of Chester

A common approach to stigma reduction is the enforcing of politically correct language. Opponents of this argue that terms which were once deemed politically correct, over time, lose their correctness and have to be replaced by a new word. This concept is often referred to as the euphemism treadmill effect (Pinker, 1994). Such an effect would be in keeping with RFT, yet the existence of such an effect is largely ignored in stigma-reduction policies. This study aims to examine this effect experimentally using two different methods. Both experiments will involve participants learning coordination relations between gay people and an arbitrary group name. The first experiment attempts to achieve this using a match-to-sample procedure. The second experiment will use a vignette, in order to achieve a degree of ecological validity. A stigma questionnaire will be employed to demonstrate transformation of stimulus function. ANOVA will be applied to data on approximately 400 participants. The euphemism treadmill effect, if confirmed, would have strong implications for future approaches to stigma reduction.

• Appetitive augmental functions and common physical properties in metaphor effect: An extended replication
Rosina Pendrous, University of Chester
Lee Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester
Kevin D. Hochard, University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

Understanding metaphors, according to Relational Frame Theory (RFT), rests on our ability to derive relations based on relevant contextual cues. Experimental work has demonstrated that including additional cues within perseverance metaphors which specify common physical properties (CPPs; e.g. “very cold”) encourages verbal generalisation to the cold pressor task, increasing pain tolerance (Sierra et al., 2016). When the metaphor also specified appetitive augmental functions (AAFs), pain tolerance increased further. We aimed to directly replicate and extend these findings. A stratified double-blind randomized-controlled (RCT) experiment obtained baseline measures (including analogical reasoning) and demographics. Participants (N=89) were allocated to a prerecorded audio-delivered metaphor exercise containing either: (i) CPPs, (ii) AAFs, (iii) both CPPs and AAFs, or (iv) neither (control). Participants completed the cold pressor task before and after the metaphor exercise. There were no significant main effects of time on pain tolerance nor significant interactions between time and condition. The original findings were not replicated; pain tolerance did not increase in any condition. These results highlight the importance of using RCT designs in basic and applied RFT research.

• The Mediator Role of Pliance in the Relationship Between Perfectionism, Cognitions, and Self-esteem
Engin Büyüköksüz, Okan University
Işıl Tekin, Ph.D., İstanbul Medeniyet University
Asiye Büşra Şirin Ayva, School Counselor

The aim of this study is to search the mediator role of plıance in the relationship between perfectionism cognitions and self esteem. participants of this study are undergraduate students (n=200: 61 males; 139 females). Measuring instruments of this study are perfectionism cognitions inventory (Flett, Hewitt, Whelan, & Martin, 2007), Rosenberg self-esteem scale (RSE) (Rosenberg, 1965), and generalized pliance questionnaire (Ruiz, Suárez-Falcón, Barbero-Rubio, & Flórez). As a result of this study, it is seen that pliance plays a partial mediatory role between perfectionism cognitions and self esteem.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe current advances in basic RFT research across domains. 2. Assess relational repertoires across populations and contexts. 3. Demonstrate the variety of empirical approaches currently being used and adapted by RFT researchers.

 

121. Using ACT to better understand and intervene in Gastrointestinal (GI) disorders: ACT for Health SIG Sponsored
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data
Categories: Behavioral medicine, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Gastrointestinal disorders
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Nuno Ferreira, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Discussant: Maria Karekla, Ph.D., University of Cyprus

It has been well established that psychological factors and brain-gut dysregulation play a critical role in the development and maintenance of GI disorders, and there is a recognized need for psychologists to intervene in GI practice settings (ROME foundation, 2018). In this symposium, we present 3 papers that address the usefulness of the ACT model in describing, predicting and intervening in GI disorders. The first paper will address the influence of psychological flexibility in psychosocial processes in Irritable Bowel Syndrome; the second paper will highlight the longitudinal impact of cognitive fusion on the evolution of Inflammatory Bowel Disease outcomes (symptoms, physical and mental health); and the third paper will present preliminary results of a randomized control trial comparing an ACT based intervention with psycho education for Body Image Dissatisfaction in Inflammatory Bowel Disease. The theoretical and clinical implications of the results will be discussed.

• Moderating effect of Psychological flexibility in the relation between Symptom Severity and Quality of Life in Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS)
Nuno Ferreira, University of Nicosia, Cyprus
Hester Bowers, University of Edinburgh
David Gillanders, Psy.D., University of Edinburgh

Objective: The present study will present and test a theoretically driven model (Ferreira et al., 2011) of how visceral anxiety, behavioural response, symptom severity, quality of life and psychological flexibility interact to determine how people cope and respond in IBS. Methods: A model of moderated serial mediation was tested using a sample of 166 gastrointestinal outpatients attending a tertiary care Gastrointestinal Motility disorders clinic. Results: Visceral anxiety and behavioural response were found to serially mediate the relationship between symptom severity and quality of life (p<.001). A significant interaction was also found for psychological flexibility as a moderator at the level of the indirect effect (-.0091, 95%CI = .-.0163 to .0019). The strength of the mediatory effect appears to be linearly related psychological flexibility. Conclusions: The results suggest multiple psychosocial variables interact to shape IBS experience and outcomes. This study provides a clearer picture on the variability of Quality of Life across patients that present with similar Symptom Severity. The theoretical and clinical implications of these findings are discussed in the light of a biopsychosocial approach

• The longitudinal influence of cognitive fusion on the evolution of physical and psychological health in inflammatory bowel disease
Inês A. Trindade, Ph.D., CINEICC, University of Coimbra, Portugal
Cláudia Ferreira, CINEICC, University of Coimbra, Portugal
José Pinto-Gouveia, CINEICC, University of Coimbra, Portugal

Aims: To explore the longitudinal impact (18 months) of cognitive fusion on the evolution of IBD symptomatology, physical health, and psychological health in a sample of IBD patients. Method: 116 adult IBD patients completed self-report measures (IBD symptoms checklist, CFQ-7, WHOQOL-bref) in three different times equally spaced 9 months apart. Latent growth analyses were performed to examine the trajectory of the variables. Results: IBD symptomatology and cognitive fusion significantly influenced the baseline levels of psychological health (bsympt = -0.29; βcf = 0.62) and physical health (bsympt = -0.59; βcf = -0.28) but only cognitive fusion presented a significant effect on the evolution of these outcomes (all p<.001). Cognitive fusion influenced the growth trajectory of psychological health (β = 0.30, p = 0.007) and physical health (β = 0.26, p = 0.024), predicting change in these variables. Discussion: These findings inform that IBD care may benefit from comprising psychological interventions focusing on defusion and acceptance, such as those based on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy. Further implications for research and clinical practice are discussed.

• Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) compared with psychoeducation for Body Image dissatisfaction in adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Lisa Murphy, University College Dublin, Ireland
Louise McHugh, University College Dublin, Ireland
Barbara Dooley, University College Dublin, Ireland
Hugh Mulcahy, St. Vincents University Hospital

Background and Objective: Many adults with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) describe considerable psychosocial disability, including body image dissatisfaction (BID). (Jedel, Hood & Keshavarzian, 2015). Formal IBD patient education has been found to empower patients, improve quality of life, have a positive effect on coping, physical appearance and body image. In addition, findings from ACT interventions that target BID suggest that psycholological flexibility may facilitate a reduction in BID. Method: This study is a randomized controlled trial of a one day ACT workshop intervention (n=40) compared to a one day psychoeducational intervention (n=40) for adults with a diagnosis of an IBD. Participants will complete a series of baseline questionnaires assessing demographic, socioeconomic and clinical details. Psychological questionnaires including the Body Image Scale will also be completed at baseline and post treatment. Results: Baseline demographic questionnaires will be analysed. In addition, psychological questionnaires including the Body Image Scale will be analysed at baseline and post treatment. Conclusion: This study will demonstrate the potential benefits of an ACT workshop intervention compared to a psycho-educational intervention in targeting BID.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the state of current research regarding ACT in GI disorders. 2. Discuss the mechanisms of action of ACT in GI disorders. 3. Analyze the potential of ACT as an intervention for GI disorders.

 

122. Exciting new Contextual Behavioral Science measures and a cautionary note
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data,
Categories: Psychometrics, Methodology and statistics, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Performance-enhancing interventions, Behavioral medicine, Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Professional Development, Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Relational Frame Theory, Psychometrics, Mechanisms in ACT, General clinical application of ACT, FAP, Process-Based Therapy, Scale development and validation, Emotions, Internal Experiences, Measurement, Psychometrics, Applied Practice, CBS
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q217

Measuring behavior is of critical importance to behavioral scientists. The first five papers in the current symposium showcase exciting new measures of different processes in the area of Contextual Behavioral Science. Data will be presented on the brief item response theory analysis of the AAQ-II brief form, the MindFlex Assessment System, the ACT-Fidelity measure (ACT-FM), FAP assessment via the FIAT-Q-SF and the Felt Experiences from Everyday Living (FEEL) scale. The symposium will conclude with a cautionary note on the limitations of self-report measurement and the threat that can pose to research findings.

• An Item Response Theory analysis of the AAQ-II & validation of a brief form
Lee Hulbert-Williams, Ph.D., University of Chester
Kevin Hochard, Ph.D., University of Chester
Nick Hulbert-Williams, University of Chester

The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (AAQ-II; Bond et al. 2011) is the most widely used measure of psychological flexibility. Whilst there is evidence of its reliability and validity, some psychometric questions remain. By combining Item Response Theory (IRT) and other approaches, we developed an ultra-brief version and further tested the scale’s psychometric properties. Combining data from seven heterogenous samples, including general population, cancer patients/survivors, and people recovering or suffering from anorexia or sleep paralysis to create a large dataset (N=2174, Nfemale=1734, ages 16 to 96), we ran IRT analysis, tests of unidimensionality, and a variety of item-reduction techniques. A

• Developing a More Nuanced Understanding of Mechanisms of Change in ACT: Clarifying Specific Dimensions of Psychological Flexibility Linked to ACT Treatment Effects with the MindFlex Assessment System
Ronald D. Rogge, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Jenna Macri, University of Rochester
Katherine J. Saint, M.A., The Chicago School of Professional Psychology
Brooke Dubler, Ph.D., University of Rochester
Jaci L Rolffs, M.A., University of Rochester

Studies have examined psychological flexibility as a potential mechanism to explain the robust and consistent improvements in functioning seen with ACT. Most of those studies have used scales like the AAQ-II in their mediation analyses, treating flexibility as a single dimension. This study sought to extend that work by examining 12 distinct dimensions of flexibility and inflexibility as possible mechanisms of change in ACT. We collected baseline and 2-month follow-up data using the MindFlex Assessment System from 37 clients receiving some form of ACT. The MindFlex Assessment System is an online assessment tool for therapists to establish baseline functioning and track meaningful change in treatment on seven outcome dimensions (depressive symptoms, generalized anxiety, life satisfaction, vitality, autonomy, competency, & relatedness) and on 12 dimensions of flexibility and inflexibility (using the MPFI). Specific dimensions of flexibility emerged as uniquely predictive of outcomes. For example, increases in acceptance and decreases in fusion were particularly strongly linked to drops in depressive symptoms. The talk will blend these quantitative findings with specific case-study examples to highlight their clinical relevance.

• The Acceptance and Commitment Therapy Fidelity Measure (ACT-FM): Results of an Online Delphi Study and Field Testing
Lucy O'Neill, University of Leeds
Gary Latchford, Ph.D., Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds and Leeds Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust
Lance McCracken, Uppsala University
Christopher D. Graham, Ph.D., Queen's University Belfast

We aimed to develop a new trans-diagnostic measure of therapist fidelity to Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT). Study 1 used Delphi methodology to design the measure. We recruited 13 experienced ACT clinicians from across countries and specialities, approximately half of whom were ACBS peer reviewed trainers. There were three iterative rounds of online questionnaires. After considering a preliminary draft of the measure - in the first two rounds - participants rated the utility of items, the manual and structure of the measure, and generated new items for consideration. In the third round participants provided final suggestions on an emergent draft of The ACT Fidelity Measure (ACT-FM). Study 1 resulted in a measure with 24-items divided among ACT-consistent and inconsistent domains against the three-part model of psychological flexibility (“Tri-flex”).Study 2 comprised an investigation of the usability and preliminary psychometric properties of the ACT-FM. A group of ACT clinicians used the ACT-FM to rate a videoed ACT therapy session. The inter-rater reliability was moderate to excellent. Based on clinician feedback, the measure was expanded to 25 items.

• New data and new questions: Examining the FIAT-Q-SF and understanding FAP assessment in a process-based era
Cory Stanton, M.S., University of Nevada, Reno
Jonathan Singer, M.A., University of Nevada, Reno
Brandon Sanford, M.S., University of Nevada, Reno
William C. Follette, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno

One of the challenges of doing Functional Analytic Psychotherapy (FAP) is understanding the unit of analysis. As the “protocols for syndromes” era fades in clinical science, opportunities abound for process-oriented therapies such as FAP. How to best conceptualize processes in FAP remains an area of investigation and discussion. The FIAT-Q-SF (Darrow, Callaghan, Bonow, & Follette, 2014) is a measure of interpersonal difficulties that represents an extension of the broader FIAT system of assessment (Callaghan, 2006). As an example of how assessment issues can be framed, data will be presented from two time points (n = 636 baseline, 569 follow-up) with undergraduate students that include the FIAT-Q-SF as part of a wider assessment battery. Factor structure, reliability, and predictive validity will be reviewed. Preliminary analyses indicate that while the sum score is an effective predictor, the factor structure appears to differ from the original publication. Interpreting these findings will be discussed in an era of process-based therapy and idiographic assessment, while also considering how network analysis and experience sampling methods hold promise for future research.

• Hidden invalidity among self-report measures poses a threat to research findings
Ian Hussey, Ph.D., Ghent University
Sean Hughes, Ph.D., Ghent University

CBS goes beyond previous waves of behaviourism by paying particular consideration to language and cognition. This has required a greater reliance on self-report measures: 99% of papers published in JCBS employ self-reports (Newsome et al., 2018). Their use necessitates their validity, and thus the appropriate assessment of this. Elsewhere, Flake, Pek, and Hehman (2017) demonstrated that metrics of structural validity are severely underreported in social and personality psychology. We applied their recommendations for the comprehensive assessment of structural validity to a uniquely varied dataset (N > 150,000) to investigate the structural validity of widely used measures in social and personality psychology (k = 15). Comprehensive assessment of internal consistency, immediate and delayed test-retest reliability, factor structure, and measurement invariance for median age and gender revealed that only 60% demonstrated good validity. Furthermore, the less commonly a test is reported in the literature, the more likely it was to be failed. Results are equally relevant to measures in clinical psychology and CBS: widespread hidden invalidity in the measures we use poses a threat to research findings.

• Using felt experiences as guides for living a purpose-oriented life: Psychometric properties of the Felt Experiences from Everyday Living (FEEL) scale
Jonathan R. Dowling, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London
Frank W. Bond, Ph.D., Goldsmiths, University of London

Recent theoretical and empirical developments in the contextual behavioural sciences have highlighted the functional role that emotions have in enabling individuals to live lives that matter to them. Based upon widely discussed, contextual-based conceptualisations of emotions over the past century, this paper presents a novel measure of emotions, Felt Experiences from Everyday Living (FEEL) (Bond, & Dowling, 2019), that conceptualises these felt experiences, in part, as indicators that reflect the extent to which a person is relating to their current circumstances, as the person they wish to be both now-and-in-the-future. We present results from a series of mixed-methods studies that provide robust findings for the factor structure of the FEEL scale. We also discuss findings from several large-scale studies that suggest its usefulness in predicting a wide-range of outcomes, from quality of life and feelings of hope, to performance-based pay and promotion decisions. Discussion focuses on how these findings relate to wider developments in RFT and CBS, more generally.

Educational Objectives:
1. Get to grips with the theoretical and practical challenges presented by applying standardised measures to ACT, FAP and Mindfulness. 2. Describe what is meant by hidden invalidity. 3. List methods and strategies to avoid or overcome the issues with standardized measurement as a behavioral scientist.

 

123. Maximizing the functional impact of defusion, mindfulness, and self-compassion processes: Implications for the timing, use, and delivery of ACT interventions
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Relational Frame Theory, Component studies
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q218

Chair: Timothy R. Ritzert, Ph.D., Longwood University
Discussant: Dennis Tirch, Ph.D., The Center for CFT, NYC

Myriad laboratory-based studies have evaluated ACT components in isolation, generally indicating that individual interventions derived from the psychological flexibility model produce outcomes predicted by theory (Levin, Hildebrandt, Lillis, & Hayes, 2012). However, few studies have used overt behavioral outcomes and more work is needed to understand for whom and under what conditions individual therapy components work best. The papers in this symposium will present studies addressing these important issues, with the aim testing important theory-driven predictions about individual intervention components. The first paper presents a study investigating the impact of a defusion intervention on a laboratory analogue of valued behavior that involves approaching a feared stimulus in the service of a valued outcome. The second paper evaluates the conditions under which a mindfulness exercise works best by manipulating the rationale for the exercise and exploring how the rationale impacts behavior during a subsequent CO2-enriched air challenge task. The final paper uses an RFT framework to explore how language used during self-compassion exercises impacts an individual’s subjective response to these interventions.

• Defusion in Action: Results From a Study Evaluating the Impact of an ACT Defusion Intervention on Valued Living in the Context of Anxiety and Fear
Timothy R. Ritzert, Ph.D., Longwood University
Leonie Verstraete, Longwood University
Myonni Alexander, Longwood University
Kathryn Bates, Longwood University
Marcella Johnson Boone, Longwood University
Emily Randall, Longwood University

This study is evaluating the impact of a defusion intervention on a laboratory analogue of valued behavior in the context of anxiety. Undergraduates with elevated spider fear who endorse the value of helping others are being randomized to one of three conditions: defusion, distraction, or inactive control. Defusion and distraction protocols are targeting thoughts about spiders. Following intervention, participants complete a spider behavioral approach task (BAT) featuring several steps, each of which brings participants closer to a spider. Participants are informed that for each completed step, the researchers will donate money toward meals for people struggling with hunger. Participants are told that by approaching fear, they can live this value. Although data collection is ongoing, a preliminarily analysis using ordinal logistic regression indicates that participants (N = 18) the defusion condition (Wald = 8.01, p = .005) are more likely to complete a greater number of BAT steps, relative to control. Data suggest defusion might facilitate valued action in the presence of anxious distress.

• Context of Meditation: Manipulating the Rationale Given for Mindfulness Meditation
Eric D. Tifft, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Emily Padula, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
Glenn Philips, B.A., University at Albany, SUNY
John P. Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany, SUNY

The psychological benefits of mindfulness are well documented (Eberth & Sedlmeier, 2012). Western society appears to be amid a mindfulness zeitgeist. Numerous publications, podcasts, and smartphone apps promote mindfulness meditation and its benefits. By focusing on psychological outcomes such as helping with anxiety-related problems, applications of mindfulness meditation run the risk of deviating from traditional intentions of increasing psychological acceptance. In some contexts, mindfulness meditation might be packaged as a method of controlling experience, rather than fostering an open, nonjudgmental posture. In a recent study, we found that among those who meditate, 59% reported using it to control unwanted thoughts and emotions and 41% reported practicing meditation with the traditional intention. The difference in intention raises a question: Does how one uses meditation impact important behavioral outcomes? This paper will present results from an experiment manipulating the rationale given for a mindfulness exercise, comparing a traditional acceptance-based rationale with a control-based rationale, testing the prediction that one’s intention during meditation affects subjective and psychophysiological experience during and after a subsequent anxiogenic CO2-enriched air challenge task.

• When Self-Compassion Interventions Backfires: The Role of Oppositional Frames
Shannon B. Underwood, B.S., University at Albany
John P. Forsyth, Ph.D., University at Albany

Professionals are increasingly utilizing loving-kindness and compassion meditations to cultivate self-compassion in their clients. However, the initial introduction of the loving-kindness meditation might be challenging with certain clients (Galante, Galante, Bekkers, & Gallacher, 2014). It has been suggested that future research should identify strategies to more effectively introduce loving-kindness meditation to clients (Boellinghaus, Jones, & Hutton, 2014). Relational frame theory could provide a framework to assess, understand, and address resistance to self-compassion prior to intervention. The phrases used in these meditations (e.g. may I be safe) could possibly evoke frames of opposition in clients (e.g. I am often in danger). In the present study, participant responses to a measure were coded to detect potential frames of opposition in response to widely used phrases in loving-kindness and compassion meditations. The present study aims to explore the role of language in self-compassion interventions and identify phrases that might be more difficult than others for clients to utilize during intervention. Results will be presented in the context of developing strategies to effectively deliver loving-kindness mediation.

Educational Objectives:
1. Use behavioral and physiological assessments to evaluate ACT components. 2. Describe strategies for introducing and delivering mindfulness and self-compassion interventions. 3. Evaluate defusion and mindfulness-based intervention components.

 

124. Can We Capture AARRing in non-English Speaking Participants (Japanese and Chinese)?- Modified IRAP, FAST and Developing a New Measure: the Kanji Maze Technique (KMT): Japan Chapter Sponsored
Symposium (13:20-14:50)
Components: Original data,
Categories: Relational Frame Theory, AARRing, IRAP, FAST
Target Audience: Intermediate,
Location: Q220

Chair: Shinji Tani, Ph.D., College of Comprephensive Psychology, Ritsumeikan University
Discussant: Ian Stewart, Ph.D., National University of Ireland, Galway

This symposium presents the results of measuring AARRing for non-English speaking participants by using the IRAP, FAST, and Kanji Maze Test (KMT). The KMT was developed to capture AARRs in Japanese’s participants. The symposium will comprise three papers. The first presenter (Zhang) will show the effect of mastering the clinical conversation on altruism IRAP responses in Japanese and Chinese. The findings from the altruism IRAP data show that mastering the clinical conversation is useful to promote altruistic cognition. The second presenter (Natsumi) presents on a study that investigates the effect of defusion on mental illness stigma with FAST and SC-IAT. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the FAST in Japan. The third presenter (Yuki) reports on a study looking at the effect of defusion on depressive rumination with the KMT. The data from the KMT suggest that defusion is an effective coping strategy for depressive rumination.

• The Effects of Improving Sensibility to Altruistic Behavior on Altruistic Relational Responding
Zhang Pin, Graduate school of Science for Human Service, Ritsumeikan University
Shinji Tani Ph.D., College of Comprephensive Psychology, Ritsumeikan University

The purpose of the study is to introduce the relational framework response related to altruistic behavior and changes in the AAQ by improving sensitivity towards altruistic behavior, and to verify the effectiveness of mastering the clinical conversation. A 2(Japanese or Chinese) x 2(clinical conversation group or control group) × 2(PRE or POST) design was used to show the impact of the interventions on the IRAP effect and AAQ. The results showed that the Chinese intervention group experienced no changes in bias against altruistic behavior unlike the Japanese intervention group. This study also recognized differences between the D-Score and the AAQ as observed in an ANCOVA. In the Japanese clinical conversation group, the D scores of "i" and "altruism", POST were significantly higher than PRE, whereas for the Chinese clinical conversation group, PRE are significantly higher than POST responses. The present study suggested that improving sensitivity can effectively promote the establishment of a new relational network, and improve psychological flexibility.

• Is It Possible to Use FAST in Non-English Countries?: An Example of Cultural Adaptation
Natsumi Tsuda, M.A., Doshisha University
Asako Okuyama, Doshisha University
Shoki Sonoda, Doshisha University
Kokoro Makino, Doshisha University
Ayaka Nishii, Doshisha University
Takashi Muto Ph.D., Doshisha University

In this presentation, the use of the Functional Acquisition Speed Test (FAST) to measure implicit stigma towards mental illness in Japan is discussed. The FAST is based on Relational Frame Theory, and is used to measure participants history of relational framing. This presentation covers three topics: 1) How to translate the FAST from English to Japanese and the selection of stimuli 2) Assessing the FAST data as a measurement of the intervention. The experiment followed a 3(Time: Pre, Post, FU)×3(Group: Defusion, Thought suppression, Control) design, and participants comprised ten undergraduate students in each group. There was no main effect of group and no influence of practice effect in FAST data either. 3) Comparison of FAST data and the Single Category-Implicit Association Test (SC-IAT) data. The findings suggested that the two implicit measures measured different stigma.

• The Effect of Defusion on Depressive Rumination in Japan: The Investigation of a New Measure; the Kanji Maze Technique (KMT)
Yuki Shigemoto Ph.D., Kyotobunkyo University
Takashi Muto Ph.D., Doshisha University

The purpose of this presentation is to show the effect of defusion on depressive rumination using the Kanji Maze Technique KMT. Törneke (2014) states that depressive rumination is the result of relational framing. Therefore, defusion may be an effective coping strategy for depressive rumination. However, to date this has not been examined. Shigemoto and Muto (2018) developed the KMT as a measure which determines depressive rumination and its relation to behavioral inflexibility. Therefore, this study investigated the effect of defusion by the KMT. Participants were assigned to a defusion (female 15 and male 9) or control group (female 19 and male 5). The effect of defusion was measured by the CFQ-28, Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Ruminative Response Scale (RRS) and the KMT. All data were analyzed pre- and post- with two groups repeated measures ANOVA. Believability at post intervention was significantly decreased compared with pre intervention within the defusion group. Post intervention believability was significantly less for the defusion group than the control group. Depressive rumination measured by the KMT decreased from pre- to post. The conclusion is that defusion beneficially effects depressive rumination after intervention.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the modification of AARRing measures for non-native English speakers. 2. Design the measure of AARRing according to their language. 3. Discuss the effect of MCC on altruistic cognition, and defusion on mental illness stigma and depressive rumination.

 

128. Adapting Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for people with intellectual/learning disabilities and their parents and carers
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Original data, Didactic presentation, Case presentation
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Intellectual/learning disabilities
Target Audience: Beginner
Location: The Studio

Chair: Freddy Jackson Brown, AWP NHS Trust, Bristol, UK
Discussant: Giovanni Miselli, Ph.D., BCBA, Instituto Ospedaliero Fondazione Sospiro Onlus (CR) Italy

People with intellectual/learning disabilities are at increased risk of experiencing difficulties with psychological wellbeing and behaviour that challenges. This symposium examines how ACT can be adapted to continue to be effective in supporting the needs of people with intellectual/learning disabilities. The first paper, presented by Mark Oliver, presents data on the development and initial properties of a psychometric measure of psychometric flexibility for people with intellectual disabilities. The second paper, presented by Natalie Bailey, focuses on the development of deictic functioning in a young person with autism and the impact this had on his social functioning and levels of behaviours that challenge. The third paper, presented by Steve Noone, used participatory methods to develop a group based ACT intervention to support parental wellbeing. Data indicating improved wellbeing and reductions in behaviour that challenges are presented. The fourth paper, presented by Gina Skourti, presents the outcomes of an ACT based group intervention for carers of young people with an intellectual/learning disability. Psychological acceptance and goal-based outcome measures alongside a thematic analysis were employed.

• The development and initial psychometric properties of the Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PFQ-ID)
Mark Oliver, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Matthew Selman, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Megan Thomson, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Rebecca Long, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Nikki Forshaw, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust
Samuel Brice, Northumberland Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust

Introduction The lack of accessible process measures may be a barrier to wider clinical and research interest in ACT for people with intellectual disabilities (aka mental retardation). This paper presents the initial development of the Psychological Flexibility Questionnaire for People with Intellectual Disabilities (PFQ-ID). Methods Initial questionnaire development and focus group work led to the PFQ-ID. It was piloted alongside two established measures (AAQ-II and the Cognitive Fusion Questionnaire) across some staff resilience workshops. More detailed analysis of the psychometric qualities of the measure took place with data from an online survey of typically developing adults (n=100). Results The focus group data revealed that people with ID preferred the PFQ-ID over the mainstream measures, which they found difficult to understand and aversive. Initial psychometric testing has revealed encouraging psychometric data when compared with the established measures. Implications The PFQ-ID represents the only known adapted and accessible measure for the processes targeted for change in ACT. If adapted by the field, clinicians and researchers could use this to evidence ACT interventions for people with intellectual disabilities.

• Case study: A deictics intervention to support development of perspective taking and empathy in a child with ASC
Natalie Bailey, Avon & Wiltshire Partnership NHS Trust, Bristol, UK
Freddy Jackson Brown, Avon & Wiltshire Partnership NHS Trust, Bristol, UK

Introduction Individuals with a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Condition (ASC) typically have difficulties taking the perspective of others, which is a central skill in empathy development. This paper presents a deictics intervention delivered to a young person with ASC and the effects on their empathy skills, frequency of physical aggression and unprompted apologies. Methods Weekly multiple exemplar training of three sets of deictic stimuli I-YOU, HERE-THERE and NOW THEN was completed over 6 months. Results An increase in deictic perspective taking skills correlated with an increase in empathy scores and an increase in unprompted apologies following physical aggression. Data illustrated that the frequency of incidents of physical aggression significantly decreased over time, with a noticeable decrease following a period of increased unprompted apologies. Implications Deictic perspective taking skills can be learned and generalised to everyday situations to support the social communication and functioning of individuals with a diagnosis of ASC.

• Development of Group ACT Based Intervention for Parents using participatory research methodology
Steve Noone, Northumbria University
Tina Cooke, Hope University

Introduction Research shows parents of adult sons and daughters with intellectual disability face high levels of stress yet receive little support to promote well-being. Although parent training has been identified as effective, many families remain suspicious of being patronised. This study describes the development of a group based intervention (FabPos), in collaboration with families, to identify indicators of success. Methods Three consecutive groups of 8 parents, received five, two hour sessions. Each iteration was altered based on feedback from previous groups, obtained from personal and focus group interviews. Themes were identified through qualitative analysis. Results Parents contributed to content and process of workshops. Significant indicators of success were: identification of new value based activities, increased quality interaction with other family members and tangible improvements in health and well-being. Implications Collateral benefits were the reduction in aggressive behaviour of a number of adult children and reduction in psychiatric medication. Further research is under way to develop technology to aid continued connectivity of group participants and to train wider range of workshop facilitators.

• Using acceptance-based interventions to promote the well-being of caregivers of young people with intellectual and developmental disabilities
Gina Skourti, Central and North West London (CNWL) NHS Trust
Lisa Brosh, Central and North West London (CNWL) NHS Trust

Introduction Caregivers are known to experience stress and other emotional difficulties when supporting a child who displays challenging behaviour. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) based workshops are run to support wellbeing. Methods Participants were carers of children with intellectual and developmental disabilities accessing specialist services in the UK. The workshops involved two 4-hour group sessions on consecutive weeks. One follow up individual appointment 4–6 weeks following the group took place, to evaluate progress and conduct a semi-structured interview. Results To assess the outcomes of our intervention, we used a general measure of psychological acceptance and a goal-based outcome. Thematic analysis was used as a means to gain insight of participants' experiences. The analysis suggests that carers found the workshops useful, and mindfulness interventions may positively affect their psychological flexibility. Implications This intervention appears to promote carers’ well-being and may also establish a flexible behavioural repertoire. Emotional support for caregivers might be considered within the Positive Behaviour Support (PBS) framework, and we are developing the integration of ACT based strategies with our work with families.

Educational Objectives:
1. Demonstrate how ACT can be adapted for people with intellectual/learning disabilities. Utilize examples of effective ACT based interventions with a case study with a child and groups for parents and carers of people with intellectual/learning disabilities. 2. Demonstrate Core ACT skills in a user friendly and clinically accessible way by describing clinical processes with child and prepare how to deliver ACT in groups with parents and carers. 3. Explain how to measure psychological flexibility with a new psychometric measure developed for people with intellectual/learning disabilities.

 

130. Who's on first? Choosing Your Target, Terminology, and Training in High Performance Applications
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data, Case presentation
Categories: Performance-enhancing interventions, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Sport, Military, Mindfulness
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate
Location: Q119

Chair: Emily Leeming Ph.D., United States Army
Discussant: Fabián O. Olaz Ph.D., Universidad Nacional de Córdoba

Psychological flexibility based interventions continue to show support across the spectrum of human performance. Within high performing populations the growth of these interventions is occurring rapidly. In this symposium we discuss the effects of mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions as compared to psychological skills training (PST) in a randomized control trial for competitive athletes. Additionally, the following two papers will discuss clinical approaches to enhancing the effectiveness of interventions with athletic teams and within tactical athlete demographics.

• Mind the gap: common and unique effects of mindfulness / acceptance-based interventions and psychological skills training in competitive athletes
Daniel Birrer, Swiss Federal Institute of Sport Magglingen
Stephan Horvath, Swiss Federal Institute of Sport Magglingen
Philipp Röthlin, Swiss Federal Institute of Sport Magglingen

Recent evaluations of the application of mindfulness-based interventions in sport revealed that they might be remarkably impactful (Bühlmayer, Birrer, Röthlin, Faude, & Donath, 2017). Nevertheless, RCTs comparing mindfulness / acceptance-based interventions (MAI) with traditional psychological skills training (PST) are sparse. 95 competitive athletes (Mage = 24.4) were randomly assigned either to a PST (n=32), MAI (n=32) or waiting control group (n=31). Both intervention programs consisted of four 90 minutes group workshops, which took place over a period of one month (Röthlin & Birrer, 2019). As expected the MAI group increased significantly their meta-cognitive awareness and their acceptance and decreased their experiential avoidance / psychological inflexibility, whereas the PST group significantly increased the use of self-talk. Both intervention groups significantly increased their use of relaxation and activation techniques and emotional control in comparison to the waiting control group. Furthermore, athletes participating in the MAI increased significantly their subjective functional athletic behavior as measured by an ambulatory assessment during competition. We conclude that different mechanisms of action are involved in the programs.

• Play Smarter Not Harder: Targeting Systemic Elements of Athletic Environment for Broader Impact
Patrick Smith, University of Nevada, Reno
Emily Leeming Ph.D., United States Army

The majority of current research in applying ACT, RFT, and/or Mindfulness is done at the level of the individual athlete. These investigations are gathering evidence of significant improvement in sport performance and reduced prevalence of clinical outcomes. Moving beyond the level of the athlete can magnify those improvements. Behavior occurs in context. Targeting systematic interventions across the athletes' training environments may not only bolster outcomes for the athlete, but influence secondary and tertiary effects on those in the athlete’s sphere of influence. Theory stands to support that creating social environments supporting psychological flexibility will improve the psychological flexibility of those operating inside those environments. Such work may maximize and support sustained effects of individual intervention too. This symposium will review the state of research, present a network map of contact points influencing athletes that may be leveraged for improvement, and provide research implications of those different contact points and the network as a whole.

• Meeting in the Middle: Using Culturally Relevant Language to Implement Behavioral Principles with Tactical Athletes
Emily Leeming, Ph.D., United States Army
Patrick Smith, University of Nevada, Reno

Technical terms within science are intended to create a specific and objective way to communicate specialized concepts. Yet in applied arenas these technical terms may limit the effectiveness of clinicians serving their clients. As it relates to psychological flexibility many middle level terms have been developed and used to describe principles and processes in understandable ways to nonscientific audiences. Yet not all nonscientific audiences are the same, the necessary middle level terms used within the United States Military are no exception. This symposium will discuss how common place and technical military language can be used as bridging terms between soldiers and psychologists in a brief ACT and behavioral education-based intervention protocol for students preparing for Jumpmaster (Airborne Parachute Safety Operations) qualification training.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss the effects of mindfulness and acceptance-based interventions as compared to psychological skills training (PST) in a randomized control trial for competitive athletes. 2. Discuss clinical approaches to enhancing the effectiveness of interventions with athletic teams and within tactical athlete demographics. 3. Assess and compare possible mechanisms of action inherent in traditional psychological skills training and mindfulness /acceptance-based interventions within competitive athletes.

 

134. Cutting edge research on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Mindfulness with Children, Adolescents and Parents
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Literature review, Original data, Case presentation,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Educational settings, Clinical Interventions and Interests, Performance-enhancing interventions, Behavioral medicine, Educational settings, Supervision, Training and Dissemination, Autism and Anxiety, ACT; Psychological flexibility; Youth; Inpatient care; Adolescent depression; Adolescent anxiety; Mediation, Children and Family, Mindfulness, partial hospital program, mood disorders
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q158

Chair: Kate J. Zelic, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic

Contextual Behavioral Science research with children and adolescents is growing. The current symposium comprises six papers presenting research data on different unique aspects of child and adolescent research. The first paper looks at the using ACT interventions to tact private events in youth diagnosed with autism and anxiety. The second paper looks at ACT for antisocial youth. The third paper looks at the effects of ACT on children and adolescents classroom behavior. The forth paper will report on the impact of mindfulness on sleep in youth with mood disorders. The fifth papers investigates the impact of mindfulness with children diagnosed with autism of different cognitive capacities and the session concludes with a paper on the effectiveness of mindfulness and ACT strategies to help support parents of children with medical/psychological diagnoses.

• Using Functional Contextual Interventions for Private Events When Private Events are Extra Hard to Name: A Pilot Study of ACT interventions in Youth with Autism and Anxiety
Rebecca Hambin, Ph.D., University of Texas Medical Branch
Barbara Calvert, Ph.D., University of Texas Medical Branch
Olga Berkout, Ph.D., Texas A& University Corpus Christi

Despite promising initial results and calls by experts for more research on ACT interventions for individuals with disabilities (Harper et al. 2013; Eilers and Hayes, 2015; Hoffman, Contreras, Clay, & Twohig, 2016), very little empirical evidence exists on the application of ACT interventions in youth with autism and developmental disabilities. Additionally, while both ACT and exposure therapy are know interventions for anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorders (OCD) in general, traditional exposure therapies are less efficacious when delivered to children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) relative to typically developing children (Storch et al., 2016). Thus, although an estimated 90% of individuals with ASD struggle with impairing anxiety, existing treatments are insufficient for addressing the unique needs of this growing population. This presentation will describe a pilot study examining the application of an ACT in a small (N=7) group of youth diagnosed with ASD and impairing anxiety and their parents. Methods and rational for creating the treatment model for youth and parents, description of implementation, and initial data on outcomes will be presented.

• A Quasi-Experimental, Multicenter Study of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy for Antisocial Youth in Residential Care
Fredrik Livheim, M.S., Karolinska Institutet
Anders Tengström, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet
Gerhard Andersson, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet
JoAnne Dahl, Ph.D., University of Uppsala
Caroline Björck, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet
Ingvar Rosendahl, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet

Background: Treatment of youth in residential care is a challenging task for most providers because comorbid problems are common and general psychosocial functioning is low. Objective: The purpose of this study was to test a brief, transdiagnostic, ACT group intervention for youth in residential care. Method: With a quasi-experimental design, 69 youth received Treatment-as-Usual (TAU), and 91 youth received TAU with an additional 12 hours of ACT in a group setting (TAU+ACT). Both short- and long-term follow-up was conducted. We hypothesized that psychological flexibility (PF) would mediate outcome. Findings: ITT analyses showed statistically significant improvements in the primary outcome variables of anxiety and depression in TAU+ACT youth after the end of treatment. Regarding secondary outcomes, the TAU+ACT group showed several improvements. Psychological flexibility mediated the decrease in the primary outcome of decreased anxiety. Conclusions: ACT in group format may be of help in promoting various positive outcomes for youth in residential care. Increasing psychological flexibility is a promising process variable that can be targeted to increase the effectiveness of interventions for this population.

• Mindfulness and Sleep in Youth with Mood Disorders in an Integrated Family-Based Partial Hospitalization Program
Kate J. Zelic, Ph.D., Mayo Clinic
Jarrod M. Leffler, Ph.D., ABPP, Mayo Clinic

Background: Meta-analytic reviews of mindfulness-based interventions in youth have demonstrated small positive average treatment effects in studies involving controlled and pre-post designs (Zenner et al., 2014; Zoogman et al., 2015). The current study involved participants admitted to Mayo Clinic’s Child and Adolescent Integrated Mood Program (CAIMP), a two-week family-based partial hospitalization program for youth with mood disorders that integrates components of evidence-based treatments. We aimed to provide preliminary data on 1) implementing a mindfulness-based intervention in CAIMP and 2) examining the relationship between mindfulness and sleep indices. Method: Participants included 31 youth who were primarily Caucasian (80.60%), female (71.00%), adolescents (M=14.06, SD=2.21). Youth completed self-report measures of mindfulness and sleep. Results: Correlational data revealed positive associations between youth mindfulness and multiple sleep indices. Paired samples t-tests showed significant change in multiple sleep indices from pre-treatment to post-treatment. Discussion: Findings revealed that youth with mood disorders with a greater propensity towards mindfulness had higher ratings of sleep, and there were also significant improvements in sleep indices from pre-treatment to post-treatment.

• Exploring the Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Children and Adolescents’ Classroom Behaviors
Emily Dzugan, M.S., BCBA, Saint Louis University
Victoria Hutchinson, M.S., BCBA, Saint Louis University
Alyssa N. Wilson, Ph.D., BCBA-D, Saint Louis University

The purpose of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of implementing tailored Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) interventions based off of Dixon’s (2014) curriuculum with three school aged students who displayed challenging behaviors in the classroom. A nonconcurrent multiple baseline with withdrawal design was used to compare the effects of ACT and control sessions during classroom observations. ACT sessions were tailored to the student’s interest and current need, while control sessions included unrelated therapeutic activities. Following all treatment sessions, students were observed by a secondary research team member, during 10-30min observations. All direct observation sessions were conducted using a 30-sec combined partial and whole interval recording schedule, tracking vocal disruption, physical aggression, classroom disruption, and on-task behavior. Following individualized ACT treatment, participants’ behaviors improved compared to baseline and control conditions. Standard Mean Difference (SDM) analyses indicated moderate to large effects across all conditions. Implications for school-based treatment programs and collaborative transdisciplinary intervention strategies will be discussed.

• Mindfulness and children with autism across different cognitive levels
Rachel Lam, M.S., BCBA, Aspiration & Discoveries
James C. K. Porter, C. Psych., BCBA, New Beginning Wellness

Attention, self-regulation and on-task behaviour are crucial skills to a child’s learning success and it has raised various concerns which led to numerous research in the past. Many mindfulness studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of mindfulness-based intervention in increasing students’ on-task behaviours. However, these studies mostly targeted special needs children with relatively higher cognitive ability (IQ score of 70-75 or above) and excluded children with Autism with IQ under 70-75. Therefore, we are examining through a 9 weeks modified mindfulness based on MYmind plus additional behaviour analytical strategies implemented with group of 7 children with ASD: (1) Whether there is a correlation between cognitive function and the child’s ability in implementing mindfulness strategies on two levels, a) early level (IQ score below 70) and b) advance level (IQ score above 70). (2) Whether there are significant differences on participates’ (a) executive function and self-regulation, (b) problem behaviours, (c) and attention prior to and after mindfulness training across cognitive levels. (3) Ability in following mindfulness program across cognitive levels.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the effects of ACT and mindfulness interventions with different child and adolescent populations. 2. Apply and combine behavior analytic based strategies with ACT and mindfulness interventions. 3. Describe youth and parent acceptability of ACT and mindfulness interventions in different settings.

 

136. Interbehaviorism, and the psychological event: implications for investigating complex patterns of relational responding.
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data
Categories: Interbehaviorism, Interbehaviorism, RFT, IRAP
Target Audience: Beginner, Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q218

Chair: Mitch Fryling, Ph.D., California State University, Los Angeles
Discussant: Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

This symposium will provide an outline of the work of JR Kantor, and detail the application of this work to analyses of complex behaviors. The first paper provides an introduction to Kantor’s thinking, and to the tenets of interbehavioral psychology. The second paper will present a formulation of complex behavior from the interbehavioral perspective. The final paper will present analyses of individual patterns of behavior in the IRAP that draw on the Kantorian construction of the psychological event. This symposium seeks to highlight the benefit of interbehavioral thinking for those working under the umbrella of ACBS. Specifically, awareness of system building, assumptions, constructs and events can benefit researchers working on RFT as they grapple with complex behavioral interactions.

• Interbehaviorism and Contextual Behavioral Science
Mitch Fryling, Ph.D., California State University, Los Angeles

Kantor’s work has a number of implications for contextual behavioral science. In general, Kantor’s work calls attention to what science is and is not, and to the importance of developing an authentic philosophy of science. Other implications include the explicit articulation of philosophical assumptions at all levels, a careful appreciation of the distinction between constructs and events, the role of research in science, and the analysis of science as a cultural institution. Kantor’s system of psychology is also distinctive. For example, the subject-matter of psychology is constructed as a psychological event, and a system building procedure is proposed whereby sciences continuously evaluate their validity, significance, and comprehensiveness. Kantor also outlines a number of discipline specific assumptions in Interbehavioral Psychology, and describes the role of various subsystems within the larger system of psychology. The aim of this paper is to provide a broad overview of Kantor’s philosophy of science and system of psychology, and to highlight implications for work in contextual behavioral science throughout.

• Complex Behavior in Interbehavioral Perspective
Linda J. Parrott Hayes, University of Nevada, Reno

When a unit psychological event is construed as a coordination of responding and stimulating, understanding a complex response requires consideration of the complex stimulational circumstances participating in the event. Complexity is a matter of multiple conditions having to do with the response factor, the stimulus factor, or both. For example, responding may be subtle, stimulating may arise from verbally attributed properties, and both may be substitutional. Understanding psychological events, particularly when these sorts of complications are present, requires consideration of the settings in which they are occurring. In doing so, it becomes obvious that the setting is neither stable nor impotent. It is rather a continuously evolving field of many factors integrated with the continuously evolving relation of responding and stimulating constituting the event focus. In short, the setting is an aspect of a unit psychological event such that different setting factors constitute a different unit. The aim of this paper is to see how this perspective, namely that of interbehavioral psychology, may be of service in attempts to understand complex human behavior.

• Predicting-and-Influencing Patterns of Arbitrarily Applicable Relational Responding in Individual Performances in the Implicit Relational Assessment Procedure
Martin Finn, MSc, Ghent University
Dermot Barnes-Holmes, Ph.D., Ghent University

An emerging model of differential arbitrarily applicable relational responding effects (the DAARRE model, pronounced “Dare”; Finn, Barnes-Holmes, & McEnteggart, 2018) has focused on coherence among the Cfunc, Crel, and RCI properties of the stimuli presented in each block of trials within the IRAP. A sequence of IRAP studies tested the DAARRE model at the individual participant level. Patterns of D-IRAP effects were brought under experimental control by focusing on the Cfunc and Crel properties of the label and target stimuli. First, labels and targets with pre-experimentally established functions were employed. Next, the functions of the label and targets were established within the experiment by means of matching-to-sample, and Training IRAP procedures. The results from these studies suggest that the relative dominance of Cfunc and Crel control over patterns of relational responding can be manipulated. This relatively precise experimental manipulation of patterns of derived relational responding may have important implications for basic RFT research, and for its relationship to the analysis of natural language in more applied settings.

Educational Objectives:
1. Discuss how an understanding of the interbehavioral construct of the psychological event can contribute to RFT research. 2. Describe the DAARRE model. 3. Analyze and interpret patterns of IRAP effects.

 

137. Complex relationships: Courage in the Context of Trauma and Intimacy
Symposium (15:10-16:40)
Components: Conceptual analysis, Original data,
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Theoretical and philosophical foundations, Interpersonal functioning and trauma
Target Audience: Beginner,
Location: Q220

Chair: Victoria Follette, Florida Institute of Technology
Discussant: William C. Follette, Ph.D., University of Nevada, Reno

This symposium brings together three areas of research that are woven together by both theory and populations. While the field has focused on a range of psychological difficulties, there is often less focus on the range of interpersonal difficulties. The first paper addresses issues with sexual intimacy issues faced by women surviving sexual assault as a child or adult. Understanding the role that avoidance plays in impacting the ability to function sexually has not been addressed in the empirical literature. In a different but related vein, the second paper addresses interpersonal targets from FAP in explaining treatment outcomes for trauma survivors. The third paper examines issues with intimacy that are related to trauma and depression. Together these papers contextualize issues that go beyond basic symptomology and examine the impact of relationship variables on clinical problems. New empirical research presented will be discussed in terms of theoretical and clinical implications. Moving away from single target treatments and including clinically relevant behaviors in our treatment programs will help in the evolution of one-size-fits-all treatment packages.

• Sexual functioning: the role of experiential avoidance and trauma in predicting sexual satisfaction
Victoria Follette Ph.D., Florida Institute of Technology
Kerri Guadagni, Florida Institute of Technology

There is a large body of empirical literature demonstrating the negative impacts of sexual victimization on psychological functioning. Research has also shown the relationship of experiential avoidance in mediating negative outcomes. The clinical literature on victimization frequently discusses negative outcomes in the areas of intimate relationships and sexual functioning. However, the empirical literature in this area is extremely limited. Using the online Amazon Mechanical Turk platform, we recruited 280 women over the age of 18 to participate in the study. Several types of victimization were assessed including child sexual abuse, adolescent abuse, and adult assault. Findings indicate that victimization, particularly revictimazation, is associated with increased trauma symptoms, experiential avoidance, and lower sexual satisfaction and functioning, Clinical implications for working with women who are survivors of sexual trauma will be discussed. Specifically, when is a focus on PTSD not necessary or sufficient in trauma therapy?

• Awareness, courage, and responding in an Exposure-based PTSD Program: Integrating Interpersonal Flexibility into Trauma Treatment
Peter P. Grau, M.S., Marquette University

The impact of interpersonal functioning on PTSD treatment outcomes has been demonstrated consistently in the literature (De Jongh et al., 2016), especially for patients with a chronic trauma history (Cloitre, 2005). Recently, machine learning approaches have shown that change in interpersonal targets from FAP (i.e., Awareness, Courage, and Responding [ACR]) predict up to 20% of the variance in PTSD treatment outcomes (Wetterneck, Grau, & Singh, 2018). While these results are encouraging, additional research is needed to further examine the factor analytic structure of the ACR and relationship to relevant outcome variables (e.g., self-compassion, shame, and quality of life). This study explores both the psychometric properties and predictive power of the ACR in an ACT-informed, exposure-based partial hospitalization program (PHP). Initial results (n = 132) show change in awareness of self is a significant predictor of PTSD symptom severity and self-compassion, while change in interpersonal courage is the strongest scale predictor of discharge PTSD symptom severity, self-compassion, trauma-related shame, and quality of life. Factor analytic findings and implications for treatment will be discussed.

• The role of disruptions in the interpersonal model of intimacy in the development and maintenance of maladaptive behaviors
Daniel Maitland, Texas A&M University

Loneliness has long been implicated as a risk factor for issues of mental and physical health (Leigh-Hunt, 2017). However, there is evidence that the detrimental impact attributed to loneliness may be due to low levels of subjective feelings of social connection rather than objective social isolation (Ge et al., 2017). While the process of developing feelings of connection (social intimacy) is relatively well understood (Reis & Shaver, 1988) and the evidence of the therapeutic benefits of increasing intimacy via contextual behavioral interventions such as FAP are emerging (Maitland et al., 2016), the exact nature of deficits in intimacy in maladaptive behaviors are not well understood. The current study presents data from large data sets collected at a medium sized university assessing the role of deficits in intimacy on complex grieving, trauma related symptoms, and depression. Discussion will focus on where in the intimacy process disruptions occur, how these deficits function to develop and maintain maladaptive behavior, and on the ramifications of these findings on treatment.

Educational Objectives:
1. Describe the interpersonal model of intimacy and articulate how disruptions to that process maintains maladaptive behaviors. 2. Demonstrate the role of experiential avoidance in the sexual satisfaction of women with a history of sexual victimization. 3. Explain the prediction of the impact of awareness, courage, and responding in a trauma affected population outcomes.

Sunday, 30 June

145. Addressing common difficulties in ACT-based group treatment: Research and clinical innovations.
Symposium (9:00-10:15)
Components: Original data
Categories: Clinical Interventions and Interests, Prevention and Community-Based Interventions, Educational settings, mindfulness; adults; ACT; group interventions
Target Audience: Intermediate, Advanced
Location: Q119

Chair: Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych., St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton/McMaster University

Despite demonstrated effectiveness for treating physical, psychological, and social issues, challenges remain in delivering ACT-based group protocols (e.g., differential responsiveness, skill generalization, unsystematic intake to group programs, uneven access to care, medium-low effect sizes). We identified common difficulties across diverse settings, populations, and countries and will present models and results regarding novel use of the underlying processes of CBS. The first presentation will describe results from an intervention emphasizing values and committed action to facilitate self-care among healthcare trainees struggling to cope with professional demands. The second will describe a triage algorithm for the assessment, intake, and modularization of pain rehabilitation programs based on CPAQ-8 and their way to accept (or not) their pain, the outcomes for the patient, the benefits for the clinic. The third will provide evidence supporting modified ACT interventions for psychiatric outpatients with cognitive impairment that facilitate their participation and improve outcomes. Finally, ways to overcome practical challenges in adapting ACT to a broad, group-based setting and satisfaction, utility, and understandability of the ACT-based group intervention will be presented.

• I Know I Should But…”: A Randomized Control Trial Using Values to Promote Health Care Trainee’s Self-Care Behavior
Jorden Cummings, Ph.D., R.D.Psych., University of Saskatchewan
Jessica Campoli, University of Saskatchewan

Trainees in professional health care programs report stress levels that exceed the general population. Despite an ethical responsibility to engage in self-care, professional knowledge of the importance of self-care, and awareness of what such practices often entail, trainees report barriers to engaging in self-care. They also report feeling ill-equipped to cope with the demands of their programs. We present results from a wait-list randomized control trial evaluating Value-Based Self-Care (VBSC), an ACT-informed intervention emphasizing values and committed action. Participants were from a variety of health disciplines (e.g., medicine, nursing, psychology) who completed a 6-week group intervention. We provide an overview of the intervention and present results from our pilot. Pre-to post-treatment results showed a significant impact on frequency of self-care utilization, stress, and anxiety. Participants reported being highly satisfied with the intervention. Given that self-care practices established early in one’s training can influence an entire career and the number of lives health care professionals touch over the course of their careers, our results have substantial implications for participants as well as their future patients.

• Process-based tailored group interventions: how to create groups with shared behavioral flexibility patterns and shared therapeutic needs
Graciela Rovner, Ph.D., Karolinska Institutet & ACT Institutet Sweden

ACT programs for chronic health conditions (such as pain) yield effect sizes medium to low showing the differential responsiveness among participants. Grouping patients by their pain acceptance (with 8 questions) offers a clear understanding of their behavioral flexibility, as well as their rehab-needs in terms of processes, in turn guiding the modularization of the rehab-program. Based in our research (Rovner, 2014; Rovner, Vowles, Gerdle, & Gillanders, 2015) we’ve developed ACTiveRehab, the clinical implementation that supports a novel logistic in the intake and allocation of patients in groups guiding decision making and how to tailor a stepped care for group settings. We will present comparisons between the before and after implementation of the ACTiveRehab model in terms of not only clinical outcomes, but also how other patients considered ‘difficult’ were no longer rejected from the programs and explain why.

• Evaluating the effectiveness for a modified intervention group for neuropsychiatric illness and cognitive impairment
Elena Ballantyne, Psy.D., C.Psych., St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton/McMaster University
Jorden Cummings, Ph.D, R.D.Psych., University of Saskatchewan
Megan English, Ph.D., R.Psych., Eastern Health, Health Sciences Centre

The purpose of this non-randomized pre-post study was to examine potential benefits of a modified ACT intervention for individuals (n=26) with psychiatric/neurological illness who, due to neurocognitive difficulties, could not otherwise benefit from traditional group-based psychotherapy. A prior pilot study examining feasibility informed the current study which assessed whether adaptations (e.g., memory aids, shorter exercises, between-session support) facilitated learning/use of strategies, skill generalization, emotional awareness, and reduction of executive dysfunction/inattention. Pre-group cognitive screens and pre-post questionnaires were completed to assess executive functioning and ACT-based skills. Process of change using weekly measures of acceptance and mood variables were administered. Groups met for 10 weeks with two booster sessions after group completion. The primary outcome was participants' level of self-reported mindfulness with respect to 5 dimensions: observing, describing, act with awareness, non-judgment, and non-reactivity. Emotional dysregulation, executive functioning, valued living, mood, and acceptance were examined. Results from qualitative analysis of between session telephone support and quantitative process measures will be presented. Discussion will include clinical issues and strategies for adapting ACT for this population.

• Patient Satisfaction and Understanding of Components of the Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) Model: Challenges in Adapting ACT to Group-Based Care
Theresa A. Morgan, Ph.D., Rhode Island Hospital, Department of Psychiatry
Brian Pilecki, Ph.D., Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University
Catherine D'Avanzato, Ph.D., Lifespan Physican Group
Sarah Zimage, M.A., Lifespan Physican Group
Rawya Aljabari, Ph.D., Lifespan Physican Group
Olga Obraztova, Ph.D., Lifespan Physican Group
Douglas Long, Ph.D., Lifespan Physican Group
Savannah McSheffrey, Rhode Island Hospital Partial Hospital Program

Existing ACT research emphasizes patient outcomes including symptom change, improved functioning, and process change in the short- and long-term. In contrast few studies report on patient experiences with the ACT model. Patient satisfaction is positively associated with improved outcomes (Shipley et al., 2000), correlates with quality of care (Trujols et al., 2014), and is integral to program evaluation and development (Glorimar, 2014). The current study reports over 17,000 patient-rated surveys on satisfaction, utility, and understandability of ACT-based treatment groups in a partial-hospital setting (Morgan et al., 2014). Group topics included: mindfulness, values, committed action,