Phenomenological characteristics, social problems, and the economic impact associated with chronic skin picking

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APA Citation: 

Flessner, D. A., & Woods, D. W. (2006). Phenomenological characteristics, social problems, and the economic impact associated with chronic skin picking. Behavior Modification, 30, 944-963.

Publication Topic: 
Other Third-Wave Therapies: Empirical
Publication Type: 
Article
Language: 
English
Keyword(s): 
skin picking; social impairment; phenomenology; experiential avoidance
Abstract: 

In this study, the authors collected data on the demographic characteristics, phenomenology, and social and economic impact of skin picking. A total of 92 participants completed an anonymous, Internet-based survey through a link to the Trichotillomania Learning Center’s home page. Results indicated that skin pickers experienced social, occupational, and academic impairment, a number of medical or mental health concerns, and financial burdens, which they attributed to skin picking. Results also revealed moderate, statistically significant relationships between skin picking severity and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and experiential avoidance. Subsequent mediational analyses demonstrated that the relationship between skin picking severity and symptoms of anxiety and depression was partially mediated by experiential avoidance. Implications, conclusions, and future areas of research are discussed.

Comments: 
Found that the impact of skin picking on depression and anxiety was partially mediated by the AAQ in a non-referred sample of chronic skin pickers.
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